AuthorTopic: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 191210 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread/Heather Cox Richardson
« Reply #2295 on: November 25, 2019, 05:41:06 AM »
November 24, 2019 (Sunday)
As the news came fast and furious today, I could not help thinking of the famous quotation, “The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”
We had plenty of monsters today as old ideas began their death rattle and new ones began to peep.
There was lots more on the Ukraine scandal, as leaders formerly in control tried to stay that way. Ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, Devin Nunes (R-CA), who has been accused of trying to smear the Bidens and down play the Russian attack, was asked point-blank if he had been in Vienna with Shokin, the corrupt Ukrainian prosecutor that Biden helped to fire, as a participant alleged on Friday. Nunes’s answer was illuminating: he simply refused to answer, saying: “Everyone’s going to know the truth…. I can’t compete trying to debate this out with the public media when 90% of the media are totally corrupt.” He added: “We’ve got all the facts on our side.”
All the facts on his side, but he couldn’t tell us any of them, because… the media asked him about them? Remember, yesterday I said to watch what he does, not what he says. The same man who said the tale of his trip to meet Shokin was “demonstrably false” and that he was going to sue CNN for breaking the story is now not talking. We also learned today that Nunes did, in fact, go to Austria at exactly the time Giuliani’s associate Lev Parnas said he went, with a number of aides. The trip cost almost $57,000 of taxpayers’ money.
Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) was also toeing the Trump party line when he insisted on Fox News Sunday that we do not know that it was Russia that hacked the Democratic National Committee; it could have been Ukraine. We do know, of course. Our intelligence experts all say it was Russia. It is Russia’s leaders—and a number of Republican politicians– that are pushing the Ukraine story. Kennedy, remember, was one of the eight GOP leaders who spent last July 4 in Moscow. Even FNC’s Chris Wallace, who was conducting the interview, pushed back against Kennedy, and reiterated, once again, the story of Russian interference in the 2016 election.
The whole line of argument from Trump supporters has become so absurd that they clearly think of they are on the ropes. Today on the Fox News Channel, personality Jeanine Pirro dismissed ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland’s testimony against Trump by saying “that he, like many Deep State bureaucrats, is not a fan of the president.” Sondland is a hotel magnate with no diplomatic experience at all, who got his job by literally giving Trump a million dollars. The argument that he is a hostile bureaucrat sounds desperate.
This morning, we also learned that when the Ukraine scandal broke, the White House scrambled to construct a justification for the decision to withhold money from our ally. Another word for this kind of activity is cover-up, and in the end, a cover-up is what sank Richard Nixon. Also significant is that the story was leaked by three people in the White House, so Trump’s control over his people continues to erode.
Meanwhile, Jennifer Rubin in the Washington Post came out and said it: Republicans are guilty not only for violating their oath of office by supporting a criminal president, but also for broadcasting Russian propaganda. Remember that Jennifer Rubin is a conservative commentator.
We also learned that the House intelligence committee is reviewing audio and video tapes and photographs provided by Lev Parnas, the indicted associate of Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani. Parnas’s lawyer insists that Parnas is “non-partisan,” and wants to do “what is in the best interests of our nation.” Parnas is the same man who refused to honor a subpoena to testify in front of Congress, and his lawyer wrote an incredibly insulting letter to Congress in comic sans font. Their tone has changed in the last month.
It is likely that this change of tone reflects a power shift in Washington. We learned today that Trump is no longer using the Oval Office but instead is working from the private residence. The Politico story that broke the news suggests he is doing so because he fears spies and is more comfortable in the private residence, but this does not pass the smell test. Presidents generally work in the Oval Office unless they are ill. Either he is retreating out of fear of the impeachment proceedings, or the cognitive problems that we have all noticed are becoming severe enough that he is no longer comfortable being in public.
Finally, perhaps the biggest story today was the firing of Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer over the case of Edward Gallagher, a Navy seal accused of committing war crimes, and that story highlighted that Trump is both trying cement is power and is being challenged over it. Gallagher was acquitted of murder but convicted of posing with the body of a prisoner. For that, he was demoted. From the first, this case has bothered Trump. On Twitter, he accused the Navy of mistreating Gallagher, and he reinstated Gallagher’s rank. It is extraordinary for a president to get involved in an individual disciplinary cases, and Pentagon officials asked the president not to, because it would hurt military discipline and weaken our standing in the world. In the midst of this wrangling, Spencer announced publicly that Gallagher would have to go before a review board to see if he could stay in the elite Navy SEALs. This afternoon, Spencer announced that “I hereby acknowledge my termination as United States Secretary of the Navy.” The White House offered a complicated story about him being fired for being insubordinate, but it was clear from his carefully written resignation letter that he had been contemplating leaving over the Gallagher case for a while. Today’s date on the letter was clearly written later, by hand, and in a hurry. When he heard of the resignation, Gallagher’s lawyer told a reporter: “This case is bananas. You can quote me on that.”
And the letter is a doozy. Spencer says, “I cannot in good conscience obey an order that I believe violates the sacred oath I took in the presence of my family, my flag and my faith to support and defend the Constitution of United States.”
Guess who took the same oath.
Spencer called out Trump for violating his oath to defend the Constitution, but it is worth noting that right now it is Spencer, not Donald Trump, who is out of a job.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”
----
Also available at https://heathercoxrichardson.substack.com
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Trump Attacks Impeachment Inquiry and Accuses a Witness of Lying
« Reply #2296 on: November 25, 2019, 08:45:28 AM »

JDW is correct. Outside the cities, rural areas are brimming with such people uncontaminated by evidence. As long as the government delivers hard right judges and preserves white privilege and prerogatives, they are good.

And the people who love them are going to empty the graveyards to bring out the 2020 vote. Imagine a second Trump Term with a Repugnant Congress.

"Papa Doc Trump... President a Vie!"

So you also predict not only that El Trumpo will be reelected but that CONgress will go all Repugnant in both houses?

RE

Far too early to tell, but certain not beyond imagining. Depends on voter enthusiasm, voter turnout, the success of rebuke voter suppression tactics and whatever new electoral exotica Vlad's hackers throw into the mix. What I am saying is that anything is possible.

And a unified Trumpist government will lose no time in repealing the Twenty-Second amendment, which says a person can only be elected to be president two times for a total of eight years. Having the effect of providing permanent lifetime immunity to Trump for his many crimes.

There is nobody to oppose him.  The Democrats have lost the support of the people and nobody will trust any of their candidates.  The only hope is a third party and that is not going to happen.  We don't have enough Diners for a third party.
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Offline RE

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Re: Trump Attacks Impeachment Inquiry and Accuses a Witness of Lying
« Reply #2297 on: November 25, 2019, 08:57:55 AM »

JDW is correct. Outside the cities, rural areas are brimming with such people uncontaminated by evidence. As long as the government delivers hard right judges and preserves white privilege and prerogatives, they are good.

And the people who love them are going to empty the graveyards to bring out the 2020 vote. Imagine a second Trump Term with a Repugnant Congress.

"Papa Doc Trump... President a Vie!"

So you also predict not only that El Trumpo will be reelected but that CONgress will go all Repugnant in both houses?

RE

Far too early to tell, but certain not beyond imagining. Depends on voter enthusiasm, voter turnout, the success of rebuke voter suppression tactics and whatever new electoral exotica Vlad's hackers throw into the mix. What I am saying is that anything is possible.

And a unified Trumpist government will lose no time in repealing the Twenty-Second amendment, which says a person can only be elected to be president two times for a total of eight years. Having the effect of providing permanent lifetime immunity to Trump for his many crimes.

I doubt it, but in any event Collapse will finish off whatever Goobermint is left, whether Trumpsky is in charge or Mayor Petey or Lizzy, etc.

RE
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Offline RE

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Re: Trump Attacks Impeachment Inquiry and Accuses a Witness of Lying
« Reply #2298 on: November 25, 2019, 09:02:43 AM »
There is nobody to oppose him.  The Democrats have lost the support of the people and nobody will trust any of their candidates.  The only hope is a third party and that is not going to happen.  We don't have enough Diners for a third party.

According to Polls, just about any of the Top 5 Demodopes would beat Trumpofsky.

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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread/Heather Cox Richardson 11/26
« Reply #2299 on: November 26, 2019, 01:01:59 AM »
November 25, 2019
Nov 26
Public post


Today’s theme was the rule of law.

This question is playing out over Trump’s recent overruling of the Pentagon in the case of Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher. Gallagher was court-martialed for allegations of murdering a civilian and threatening his own squadron for reporting him, but was acquitted in a surprise twist after another SEAL admitted to murdering the wounded man in what he claimed was a mercy killing. Gallagher was, though, convicted of posing with the body, which is actually a really big deal in the military. For doing so, he was demoted, and the process started for a review that could have led to his expulsion from the Navy SEALs, an elite unit.

Personalities on the Fox News Channel made a big deal of Gallagher, who appeared often on the network, and of two other soldiers convicted or charged with murder of civilians, railing that they were heroes persecuted by an overly nice military justice system. Over the wishes and advice of his military advisors, Trump pardoned the two soldiers and overruled Gallagher’s demotion and upcoming review, permitting him to retire at full rank. The secretary of the Navy, Richard Spencer, had insisted that Gallagher’s review must go forward to protect the idea of process, and Trump ordered Defense Secretary Mark Esper to stop the review and then to fire Spencer, who released a letter saying “I hereby acknowledge my termination.”

The military has to work on a strict legal system to prevent ranking officers from enforcing justice according to their own whims. For Trump to short circuit that system by declaration led the Navy Secretary to issue this letter, citing the “deadly serious business” of maintaining “good order and discipline.” He wrote that “the rule of law is what sets us apart from our adversaries” and that “it has become apparent that in this respect, I no longer share the same understanding with the Commander in Chief who appointed me.” He went on: “I cannot in good conscience obey an order that I believe violates the sacred oath I took in the presence of my family, my flag and my faith to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

Trump has floated the idea of having the pardoned men and Gallagher at campaign rallies for the 2020 election.

The rule of law was also in the news today as U.S. District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson shot down the argument, made by White House lawyers, that White House officials enjoy “absolute immunity” from compelled congressional testimony. The White House is resisting a subpoena for testimony from former White House counsel Donald McGahn, but Judge Jackson ruled that “per the Constitution, no one is above the law.” The Department of Justice immediately appealed, but Judge Jackson’s forceful opinion might open the door for willing witnesses to come forward. House Intelligence Committee chair Adam Schiff said, “We would encourage witnesses to demonstrate the same courage and patriotism of public servants like Dr. Hill, Lt. Col. Vindman, Ambassador Taylor and others who have come forward to fulfill their duty.” We’ll see.

The Supreme Court also stopped the enforcement of a House subpoena requiring Trump’s accounting firm to turn over his taxes, which they need to investigate the payments to Stormy Daniels, whom he paid to keep quiet before the election about their sexual encounter. That payment might well be a violation of campaign laws, so the House wants to see Trump’s records about it. His lawyers have until December 5 to file a petition asking the Supreme Court to review the case. This is an administrative stay, so it is unclear if the Court will take up the issue. If it does, thanks to the two new Trump appointees on the Court who believe in a strong executive, it is unlikely to be as harsh on the president as the lower courts have been.

And that brings up the other way in which today was about the rule of law. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) boasted on Twitter that the Senate as confirmed more than 160 new federal judges since Trump took office-- that’s one out of every four—and they have more coming up. These people, who are overwhelmingly male and white, are generally extreme defenders of property and opponents of the administrative state that protects regular Americans. Today, in an opinion on the Supreme Court’s refusal to rehear a case called Gundy v. United States (its details don't matter much), Judge Brett Kavanaugh sided with Judge Neil Gorsuch-- Trump appointees both-- to say the Court should reexamine whether or not Congress can delegate authority to administrative agencies. They believe that the Constitution forbids such delegation. If that doctrine holds, it would destroy the administrative state and take our federal government back to that of the 1920s, before FDR’s New Deal regulated business, provided a basic social safety net, and promoted infrastructure.

McConnell’s boasting is an illuminating view into what is really going on in these battles. Are we all equal before the law, or does a minority get to stack the deck against the rest of us?

Ultimately, the fight over the rule of law is really a fight to preserve democracy.
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Offline RE

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread/Heather Cox Richardson 11/26
« Reply #2300 on: November 26, 2019, 03:56:12 AM »
Ultimately, the fight over the rule of law is really a fight to preserve democracy.

Rule of Law?  What law?  Who makes the Law?  Who can afford the best Lawyers?

What a joke.  ::)

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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread/Heather Cox Richardson 11/26
« Reply #2301 on: November 26, 2019, 09:27:43 AM »
Ultimately, the fight over the rule of law is really a fight to preserve democracy.

Rule of Law?  What law?  Who makes the Law?  Who can afford the best Lawyers?

What a joke.  ::)

RE

Yes, you are.
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread/Heather Cox Richardson 11/26
« Reply #2302 on: November 26, 2019, 09:36:47 AM »
Ultimately, the fight over the rule of law is really a fight to preserve democracy.

Rule of Law?  What law?  Who makes the Law?  Who can afford the best Lawyers?

What a joke.  ::)

RE

Yes, you are.

Can you clarify that?

RE
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Offline jdwheeler42

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Re: Trump Attacks Impeachment Inquiry and Accuses a Witness of Lying
« Reply #2303 on: November 26, 2019, 09:14:21 PM »
The Polls don't show that anybody BELIEVES Trumpofsky, just that most Repugnants still SUPPORT him.  The issue here is they just DON'T CARE that he is lying, or that he tried to bribe the Ukies.  To a Repugnant, having a Criminal Pathological Liar as POTUS is better than having...GOD FORBID... a SOCIALIST!  Oh, the HORROR!.  :o
You give too much credit.... there are plenty of people that believe Trump is an honest, upstanding citizen undergoing a smear campaign by the mainstream media.  I don't need polls, I know them first-hand.

Nice 2 C U JDW!  :icon_sunny:
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So, this "Smear Campaign" extends to the dozen or so people who Trump himself appointed and who testified?  They are ALL lying?
I know, it's hard to fathom, but yes, people do believe that.... part of it is that they are NOT watching the testimony themselves, they are relying on sound bites being spoon fed to them.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2019, 09:28:36 PM by jdwheeler42 »
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Offline azozeo

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Impeach the Government: Rogue Agencies Have Been Abusing Their Powers for Decade
« Reply #2304 on: December 03, 2019, 01:09:24 PM »


By all means, let’s talk about impeachment.

To allow the President or any rogue government agency or individual to disregard the rule of law whenever, wherever and however it chooses and operate “above the law” is exactly how a nation of sheep gives rise to a government of wolves.

To be clear: this is not about Donald Trump. Or at least it shouldn’t be just about Trump.

This is a condemnation of every government toady at every point along the political spectrum—right, left and center—who has conspired to expand the federal government’s powers at the expense of the citizenry.

For too long now, the American people have played politics with their principles and turned a blind eye to all manner of wrongdoing when it was politically expedient, allowing Congress, the White House and the Judiciary to wreak havoc with their freedoms and act in violation of the rule of law.

“We the people” are paying the price for it now.

We are paying the price every day that we allow the government to continue to wage its war on the American People, a war that is being fought on many fronts: with bullets and tasers, with surveillance cameras and license readers, with intimidation and propaganda, with court rulings and legislation, with the collusion of every bureaucrat who dances to the tune of corporate handouts while on the government’s payroll, and most effectively of all, with the complicity of the American people, who continue to allow themselves to be easily manipulated by their politics, distracted by their pastimes, and acclimated to a world in which government corruption is the norm.

Don’t keep falling for the Deep State’s ploys.


https://themindunleashed.com/2019/12/impeach-the-government-rogue-agencies.html
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Offline Surly1

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By all means, let’s talk about impeachment.

To allow the President or any rogue government agency or individual to disregard the rule of law whenever, wherever and however it chooses and operate “above the law” is exactly how a nation of sheep gives rise to a government of wolves.

To be clear: this is not about Donald Trump. Or at least it shouldn’t be just about Trump.

This is a condemnation of every government toady at every point along the political spectrum—right, left and center—who has conspired to expand the federal government’s powers at the expense of the citizenry.

For too long now, the American people have played politics with their principles and turned a blind eye to all manner of wrongdoing when it was politically expedient, allowing Congress, the White House and the Judiciary to wreak havoc with their freedoms and act in violation of the rule of law.

“We the people” are paying the price for it now.

We are paying the price every day that we allow the government to continue to wage its war on the American People, a war that is being fought on many fronts: with bullets and tasers, with surveillance cameras and license readers, with intimidation and propaganda, with court rulings and legislation, with the collusion of every bureaucrat who dances to the tune of corporate handouts while on the government’s payroll, and most effectively of all, with the complicity of the American people, who continue to allow themselves to be easily manipulated by their politics, distracted by their pastimes, and acclimated to a world in which government corruption is the norm.

Don’t keep falling for the Deep State’s ploys.

https://themindunleashed.com/2019/12/impeach-the-government-rogue-agencies.html

I read the article. It is just a variation of the theme of "both sides do it," and excoriates the "krup't duopoly" according to that same familiar tune whistled by false equivalencers everywhere. Executive power has been on the rise since Lincoln. We were all there for Poppy Bush, Ventriloquist Dummy Bush, and Obama, and we all waved our flags and ordered freedom fires when Congress rushed the long-prepared-in-advance PATRIOT Act into law post 9-11. And we've all looked the other way as Congress buried its required re-authorizations into appropriations acts.

That said, anyone whoo fails to recognize that the crimes of the Trump crime family are unique and quite a ting apart from anything we've seen in or lifetimes is either a hopeless ideologue or depositing laundered rubles into an account.

And pray tell, where does the "deep state" end and the civil service begin?
« Last Edit: December 03, 2019, 06:40:30 PM by Surly1 »
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Offline RE

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And pray tell, where does the "deep state" end and the civil service begin?

Somewhere between the CIA and the NSA.

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The Senate Trial should be a HOOT!  :icon_mrgreen:

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🤡 All but certain the House will impeach Trump
« Reply #2308 on: December 06, 2019, 03:35:10 AM »
Let the Games BEGIN1

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« Last Edit: December 06, 2019, 03:36:51 AM by RE »
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🤡 New House Judiciary Committee report defines impeachable offenses
« Reply #2309 on: December 08, 2019, 12:24:54 AM »
https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/12/7/21000471/impeachable-offenses-trump-house-judiciary-committee-hearings-report

New House Judiciary Committee report defines impeachable offenses

Ahead of the release of articles of impeachment, Democratic lawmakers explain what they believe the Constitution states are impeachable offenses.
By Katelyn Burns Dec 7, 2019, 5:40pm EST


House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerry Nadler (D-NY), left, speaks with ranking member, Doug Collins (R-GA) during a House Judiciary Committee Impeachment Inquiry hearing at the Longworth House Office Building on Wednesday December 04, 2019 in Washington, DC. Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee concluded the first week of its public hearings in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump by releasing a report summarizing its findings so far on Saturday.

The 52 page report, authored by staffers of the Democratic members of the committee, is a condensed version of the testimony of four legal experts who answered questions before the committee Wednesday. In their testimonies, those experts worked to explain what constitutes an impeachable offense according to the Constitution. The report also serves as a rebuttal to common Republican critiques of the impeachment inquiry thus far — largely by making the case a president does not need to commit a crime to be impeached, and by arguing the inquiry thus far has proceeded as legally defined.

The committee hoped to arrive at a concrete definition of impeachable offenses in order to provide a basis for the writing of articles of impeachment; those articles are traditionally authored by the Judiciary Committee, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi charged impeachment inquiry leaders with crafting those articles last week.

Article Two, Section 4 of the Constitution spells out impeachable offenses like this: “The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.”

Treason is defined very clearly in the Constitution. Bribery, high crimes, and misdemeanors are not, and have been the subject of debate among legal scholars, including during Wednesday’s hearing.

The report’s authors state that this continuing debate is the reason for the report’s existence; the impeachments of Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton used documents similar to this report to define when and why a president should be impeached. Those reports, the authors write, “no longer reflect the best available learning on questions relating to presidential impeachment,” and therefore, this report will form the foundation of the articles of impeachment to come.

For the purposes of this inquiry, the report defines treason, bribery, high crimes, and misdemeanors in turn.

The president is unlikely to face any accusations of treason in the articles of impeachment; mostly because the Constitution defines treason as giving “Aid and Comfort” to a country the US is at war with, as the report explains:

    Under Article III of the Constitution, “treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort.” In other words, a person commits treason if he uses armed force in an attempt to overthrow the government, or if he knowingly gives aid and comfort to nations (or organizations) with which the United States is in a state of declared or open war.

While an argument could be made Trump’s actions with respect to Ukraine benefitted Russia, a US adversary, the two nations are not at war, making treason not particularly relevant to the current inquiry.

Bribery, on the other hand, is something Democratic leaders have accused Trump of, arguing that trying to pressure Ukraine into launching an investigation into his rivals by withholding first a coveted White House meeting, and later, military aid constitutes bribery.

The report defines this offense as such:

    The essence of impeachable bribery is a government official’s exploitation of his or her public duties for personal gain. To the Framers, it was received wisdom that nothing can be “a greater Temptation to Officers [than] to abuse their Power by Bribery and Extortion.” To guard against that risk, the Framers authorized the impeachment of a President who offers, solicits, or accepts something of personal value to influence his own official actions. By rendering such “Bribery” impeachable, the Framers sought to ensure that the Nation could expel a leader who would sell out the interests of “We the People” to achieve his own personal gain.

House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Adam Schiff — who led the first phase of the impeachment inquiry — told NPR recently, “I don’t think there’s any question that the uncontested facts show this president solicited a bribe.” Other top Democrats, like Pelosi, have made similar statements, and reporting has suggested at least one article of impeachment will focus on bribery.

The final impeachable offenses — high crimes and misdemeanors — are perhaps the vaguest. And the report acknowledges it would “be an exercise in futility to attempt a list of every conceivable abuse constituting ‘high Crimes and Misdemeanors.’” Rather than doing so, it draws upon the writings of the Constitution’s authors, those of legal scholars, and the testimonies of Wednesday’s experts to broadly define those offenses as acts that involve abuse of power, betrayal of the nation, and outright corruption.

Obviously, those concepts, despite being more specific and familiar that the terms high crimes and misdemeanors, are also broad, and so the report works to define them as follows.

The report says:

    Abuse of power was no vague notion to the Framers and their contemporaries. It had a very particular meaning to them. Impeachable abuse of power can take two basic forms: (1) the exercise of official power in a way that, on its very face, grossly exceeds the President’s constitutional authority or violates legal limits on that authority; and (2) the exercise of official power to obtain an improper personal benefit, while ignoring or injuring the national interest. In other words, the President may commit an impeachable abuse of power in two different ways: by engaging in forbidden acts, or by engaging in potentially permissible acts but for forbidden reasons (e.g., with the corrupt motive of obtaining a personal political benefit).

Betrayal it describes as being:

    Where the President uses his foreign affairs power in ways that betray the national interest for his own benefit, or harm national security for equally corrupt reasons, he is subject to impeachment by the House. Any claims to the contrary would horrify the Framers. A President who perverts his role as chief diplomat to serve private rather than public ends has unquestionably engaged in “high Crimes and Misdemeanors”— especially if he invited, rather than opposed, foreign interference in our politics.

And corruption is described in detail, with examples of how foreign nationals and US citizens might tempt the president to misuse their power. Overall, the report states the Constitution’s authors were most concerned with two types of corruption:

    The Framers discussed the risk that Presidents would improperly conspire with foreign nations; they also discussed the risk that Presidents would place their interest in retaining power above the integrity of our elections. Both offenses, in their view, called for impeachment. That is doubly true where a President conspires with a foreign power to manipulate elections to his benefit—conduct that betrays American self-governance and joins the Framers’ worst nightmares into a single impeachable offense.

These concepts are likely to inform at least one other article of impeachment centered on abuse of power, arguing — to use the language of the report — that Trump engaged in the “exercise of official power to obtain an improper personal benefit, while ignoring or injuring the national interest.” House Democrats may also claim Trump used “his foreign affairs power in ways that betray the national interest for his own benefit” (or, engaged in betrayal) and that he did so in a way that qualifies as corrupt as described above.

Exactly when the articles of impeachment will be released is not yet clear. House lawmakers have until December 20 to vote on them — as of now, that is the final day of the 2019 legislative calendar. This would give lawmakers roughly two weeks to write and vote on articles. Democrats have signaled they are inclined to move quickly to end the House phase of impeachment, meaning the articles could appear as early as next week.
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