AuthorTopic: The on-going DNC Hack saga  (Read 1493 times)

Offline Palloy

  • Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3754
    • View Profile
    • https://palloy.wordpress.com
The on-going DNC Hack saga
« on: January 06, 2017, 02:25:50 AM »
The intriguing thing is that although the MSM haven't asked Obama ANY difficult questions, effectively silencing the critics, they can't not cover Trump after January 20th.  Everything he says and tweets will be reported and analysed.  No doubt everything on "fake news sites" will be examined by Trump's people, and if reasonable, co-opted to help Trump's cause. 

Trump might even get Snowden on MSM TV to explain how NSA certainly knows about the traffic at DNC, GMail, Wikileaks, and some Russian sites (but not necessarily who runs them).  He could tear this Democratic Party smear to shreds, and use the CIA blunder to do a major reset of operations.

https://www.rt.com/usa/372796-trump-fbi-dnc-hacking/
‘What is going on?’ Trump wonders why FBI never requested access to the DNC’s ‘hacked servers’
6 Jan, 2017

Amid an avalanche of self-replicating reports of “Russian hacking”, Donald Trump has questioned how the task of checking whether the DNC’s servers were indeed breached was outsourced by the FBI to a third party.

“The Democratic National Committee would not allow the FBI to study or see its computers info after it was supposedly hacked by Russia,” President-elect tweeted after the DNC reportedly confirmed that the bureau failed to send their own staff to check the servers.

“So how and why are they so sure about hacking if they never even requested an examination of the computer servers? What is going on?,” the next US president asked.

Trump’s concerns were voiced the same day the Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, defended the US intelligence assessment that Russian agents interfered in the US election.

Clapper stopped short of declaring the DNC server hacking an “act of war,” as he told the Senate Armed Services Committee that Russia had stepped up its cyber espionage operations.

Commenting on Clapper’s testimony, John McAfee, the founder of McAfee antivirus software, told RT that Clapper engaged in the “most deceptive propaganda” that was ever delivered to the American public. McAfee added, “our intelligence community is so ignorant and naive that they should all be replaced.”

While a redacted intelligence report on the alleged Russian spying activity will be released to the public next week, a joint “informational purposes only” report by the FBI and Homeland Security was released last week. The widely- publicized glitzy titled ‘GRIZZLY STEPPE – Russian Malicious Cyber Activity’ report, was used by President Obama as the basis to expel Russian diplomats and for Clapper to defend his allegations of Russian meddling.

But at the time when the hacking scandal is gaining hysteric proportions in the US, the DNC’s deputy communications director revealed that the US intelligence community never bothered to check or conduct forensic analysis on the DNC server which was allegedly hacked by the Russians.

“The DNC had several meetings with representatives of the FBI’s Cyber Division and its Washington (DC) Field Office, the Department of Justice’s National Security Division, and US Attorney’s Offices, and it responded to a variety of requests for cooperation, but the FBI never requested access to the DNC’s computer servers,” Eric Walker, the DNC’s deputy communications director, told BuzzFeed News in an email.

Instead, the FBI outsourced the computer forensics analysis to IT security company CrowdStrike which first pointed the finger at Moscow in May.

“CrowdStrike is pretty good. There’s no reason to believe that anything that they have concluded is not accurate,” one intelligence official told BuzzFeed, insisting that the company was “confident” Russia was behind the hacks.

“Beginning at the time the intrusion was discovered by the DNC, the DNC cooperated fully with the FBI and its investigation, providing access to all of the information uncovered by CrowdStrike — without any limits,” Walker added.

Three cyber security firms questioned by BuzzFeed confirmed it would be “par for the course” for the FBI to conduct their own forensic research into the alleged hacks, but this time for some reason, that task was outsourced.

The US president-elect also criticized the US intelligence agencies assessment of the DNC information security fiasco. Trump has joined a large, growing chorus of security experts which have questioned the lack of factual intelligence in the 13-page report designed to point finger at Moscow.

McAfee explained to RT that the 29 December report is based on four so-called pillars: a Russian language was found in the malware allegedly used to hack DNC server, a Russian keyboard was used to penetrate US systems, the malicious code was compiled at a time that corresponded with business hours in Moscow and the IP addresses were Russian.

“If the CIA wanted to hack Russia, the things you would not do is: you would not include the English language in your software…you would certainly remove the date and time stamp from the program…and number four, you would absolutely not have an IP address that points to you,” the security specialist explained, speaking metaphorically.

“And here is why it cannot possibly be an organized nation-state: because the hack on the DNC used a piece of malware a year and a half old and there have been many updates since then,” McAfee said. “This was done by an independent one person kid that downloaded the software… Please, this is not an organized hack and certainly not a nation-state that did this.”

Robert M. Lee, the CEO and Founder of the critical infrastructure cybersecurity company Dragos, produced a large detailed critique of the initial Grizzly Steppe report. In particular, security specialist questions the list on page 4 of the report which has a table titled 'Reported Russian Military and Civilian Intelligence Services (RIS)'.

“The list of reported RIS names includes relevant and specific names such as campaign names, more general and often unrelated malware family names, and extremely broad and non-descriptive classification of capabilities,” Lee explained after examining the 13-page report.

“It was a mixing of data types that didn’t meet any objective in the report and only added confusion as to whether the DHS/FBI knows what they are doing or if they are instead just telling teams in the government 'contribute anything you have that has been affiliated with Russian activity,” he added in his in-depth explanation.

William Binney, an NSA security expert for 36 years, also questioned the US intelligence community’s rhetoric.

“With respect to the alleged interference by Russia and WikiLeaks in the US election, it is a major mystery why US intelligence feels it must rely on ‘circumstantial evidence,’ when it has NSA’s vacuum cleaner sucking up hard evidence galore,” Binney said in Thursday's op-edge in the Baltimore Sun. “What we know of NSA's capabilities shows that the email disclosures were from leaking, not hacking.”
The State is a body of armed men

Offline Palloy

  • Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3754
    • View Profile
    • https://palloy.wordpress.com
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2017, 12:26:37 AM »
https://www.dni.gov/files/documents/ICA_2017_01.pdf
Background to “Assessing Russian Activities and Intentions in Recent US Elections"

The latest report contains more pages but no facts.  Yawn.
The State is a body of armed men

Offline Palloy2

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 6097
    • View Profile
    • Palloy's Blog
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2017, 12:04:07 AM »
Hotels usually provide wifi internet access for their guests, and I suppose, people hanging around in their public areas.  So anyone with a smartphone set up to be a proxy relay could sit in the lobby and proxy messages from hackers thru the wifi connection and onto the internet, and the attack would look like it was coming from the hotel.  Consequently any claim that a hack came from some hacking group at a hotel is entirely without evidence unless the hotel agrees to open its wifi logs, and China would NEVER do that.  Pathetic.

https://www.rt.com/news/372952-china-hacking-groundless-smear/
‘Groundless smear attempt’: China rejects hacking claims, urges US to explain own spying
8 Jan, 2017

Beijing has challenged Washington to explain its own global spying activities following US media reports alleging that China is using two Chinese hotels as spy centres, describing the reports as a “groundless” smear attempt.

On Wednesday, The Washington Times published an article where it alleged that the 4PLA, a unit attached to the Chinese Defence Ministry, used the Jintang and Seasons hotels in the capital Beijing to conduct espionage.

The publication cited an open-source intelligence dossier produced by the Army’s Asian Studies Detachment, as the source of its report. The document does not explain why and how the hotels were allegedly used by the Chinese for hacking.

On Friday the Ministry of National Defense vigorously denied that any hotels in the Haidian District of Beijing served as a base for any cyber-espionage operations.

“The Chinese military has never supported any hacking activities, and the Chinese government has always been firmly opposed to and cracking down on relevant criminal activities in accordance with law, including network attacks," China's Defence Ministry said.

“Relevant accusation is totally groundless and a bad act of smearing China,” the statement added, calling on Washington to stop making “groundless accusation against China.”

Instead of blaming China for spying, Beijing challenged Washington to “give a clear explanation on the Prism Gate incident, ” not just to China, but to the entire international community.

First revealed through the Edward Snowden leaks in 2013, PRISM is a code name of the NSA surveillance program used to gain access to the private communications of users of nine popular Internet services, including Verizon, Apple, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and Facebook.

The system grants NSA access to email, chat logs, VoIP traffic, files transfers, and other social networking data from companies. PRISM is just one of the numerous US spying tools and techniques exposed by Snowden.
"The State is a body of armed men."

Offline Palloy2

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 6097
    • View Profile
    • Palloy's Blog
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2017, 06:19:10 AM »
RT poking fun at the expertise of CIA/FBI/NSA, and reveling in how influential they are in the US.

https://www.rt.com/op-edge/372942-rt-us-intelligence-reveal/
How RT became the star of CIA, FBI & NSA's anticlimactic ‘big reveal’
Bryan MacDonald
Bryan MacDonald is an Irish journalist, who is based in Russia
7 Jan, 2017

The eagerly awaited Director Of National Intelligence’s (DNI) report “Assessing Russian Activities and Intentions in Recent US Elections” didn’t need such a long winded title. They could have just called it: “We Really Don’t Like RT.”

Almost every major western news outlet splashed this story. But it was probably the New York Times' report which was the most amusing. America’s “paper of record” hailed the DNI’s homework as “damning and surprisingly detailed.” Then a few paragraphs later admitted the analysis contained no actual evidence.

Thus, in a few column inches, the Gray Lady went from describing the DNI’s release as something conclusive to conceding how it was all conjecture. “The declassified report contained no information about how the agencies had collected their data or had come to their conclusions,” the reporter, one David E. Sanger, told us. He then reached further into his bag of tricks to warn how it is “bound to be attacked by skeptics.”

Yes, those skeptics. Aren’t they awful? Like, imagine not accepting an intelligence document at face value? Especially when it warns that a nuclear armed military superpower is interfering in the American democratic process, but then offers not a smidgen of proof for its assertions. Not to mention how it appears to have been put together by a group of people with barely a clue about Russia.

For instance, RT progams such as “Breaking The Set” and “The Truthseeker” are mentioned in a submission supposed to be about how RT supposedly cost Hillary Clinton the US Presidential Election. But both of these programmes went off air around two years ago.

And, back then, Clinton wasn’t even the Democratic Party candidate for the 2016 contest. Furthermore, it's deeply odd how this seems to be part of super old report with a tiny disclaimer in that regard.

    Official DNI report on Russia says my show Breaking the Set, that ended 2 yrs ago, helped cost Hillary the election https://t.co/LyNZIaDxQmpic.twitter.com/Ha0rWNlSwV
    — Abby Martin (@AbbyMartin) January 6, 2017

The stream of obsolete information continues. Readers could be led to believe that the head of RT’s Arabic Service is Aydar Aganin and the London bureau is headed by Darya Pushkova. The problem is neither of these individuals currently work at RT, nor have done for a long time. And the focus on the latter is presumably because she's defined as "the daughter of Aleksey Pushkov, the current chair of the Duma Russian Foreign Affairs Committee."

But even if she were employed at RT, what would be unusual about it anyway? After all, many journalists have family members who've been involved in politics at one time or another. For instance, CNN host Christiane Amanpour’s husband James Rubin was an advisor to Hillary Clinton, and served as a US Assistant Secretary of State under her husband, Bill.
Plumbing the depths

So how bad is this report? You’d have to say on a scale of 1-10, it’d be eleven. The core message appears to be that having a point of view which is out of sync with the liberal popular media is considered a hostile act by US spooks. And it’s specifically the liberal press’ worldview they are defending here. Now, it’s up to you to judge whether this support, from state actors, is justified or not.

The DNI’s submission is ostensibly the work of highly qualified intelligence experts, but everything you learn about RT comes from publicly available interviews and Tweets posted by this channel’s own people. Yet, we are supposed to believe how the best Russia brains of three agencies – the CIA, FBI and NSA – laboured to produce this stuff? That said, the latter doesn’t appear to be fully on board, offering “moderate” confidence, in contrast to the other’s “high confidence.”

Approximately a third of the document centers on RT. And it appears that we should swallow how RT succeeded where the combined might of CNN, NBC, CBS, The Washington Post and the New York Times and others failed in influencing the US election. Not to mention the reality where 500 US media outlets endorsed Clinton and only 25 President-elect Donald Trump. It’s time to scream: “stop the lights!”

Meanwhile, the “background info” on RT offered here appears to have been compiled on the basis of poorly translated decade old articles and long-obsolete stats. As a result, the only current stuff, actually relevant to the 2016 election, comes down to “Russia hacked US election because RT criticized Clinton.” The absurdity of the claim is evidently lost on the authors.

Fragile facts

The mistakes are myriad. Audience figures are out of date. And the general feel is of some kind of amateurish compilation from a think tank. In fact, you could argue that many lobby firms' anti-Russia reports have been more polished than this offering. But they are chancers, with faux academic sounding titles, and the DNI is supposed to boast the finest minds of US intelligence.

    ‘They’re kidding, right?’ Social media unimpressed by intel report on #Russia ‘#hackinghttps://t.co/fGRz6c2qCnpic.twitter.com/4WbUa10aQE
    — RT (@RT_com) January 7, 2017

Of course, it could also be argued that it's the inevitable result of how funding for Russian studies was choked in the US after the Soviet collapse. And many have argued this point. Because it’s abundantly clear that all three agencies urgently need to hire better experts for their Russian desks. For example, people who’ve spent a bit of time in the country and can point to a rudimentary grasp of the language.

More outdated facts follow. When it comes to YouTube views, the report cites a figure of 800 million for RT. However, it’s five times higher, at four billion, and counting. Indeed, the English language channel alone can be proud of over 1.5 billion hits at present.

The point needs to be laboured because it exposes how shoddy this submission is. The compilers plainly couldn’t have been bothered to engage an intern to update their figures before publication. And it speaks volumes. So too when a Kommersant article, dated 07/04/2012 is explained as the fourth of July, as opposed to the seventh of April. Because you’d imagine Russia focused spies would be able to understand the European dating style, wouldn’t you?

Then there’s how the ‘investigators’ refer to Dmitry Kiselev and Vladimir Zhironovsky as somehow influential here. They allege the former’s TV show was biased towards Trump’s candidacy. But it’s a domestic programme, in Russian, aimed at people who live in Russia and can’t vote in US elections. Likewise, Zhirinovsky’s presence is bizarre (he’s described as a ‘Kremlin proxy’) because he’s an ageing clown. And, as it happens, his remark about “drinking champagne’ in the event of a Trump victory is rather mild given his track record. We are talking about a man who once predicted that George Bush’s soldiers would be “torn to pieces” if they invaded Iraq. So Nostradamus, he ain’t. And his clout with Putin is probably somewhere between slim and none.

The DNI’s report is beyond bad. And it’s scary to think how outgoing President Obama has stirred up a nasty diplomatic battle with Russia based on intelligence so devoid of insight and quality. There is nothing here which suggests the authors have any special savvy or insight. In fact, you could argue how a group of students would've assembled something of similar substance by simply reading back issues of The New York Times.

But the biggest takeaway is that it’s clear how the calibre of Russia expertise in America is mediocre, if not spookily sparse. And while this report might be fodder for amusement, the actual policy implications are nothing short of dangerous.
"The State is a body of armed men."

Offline Palloy2

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 6097
    • View Profile
    • Palloy's Blog
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2017, 04:36:16 PM »
Now Guccifer 2 chimes in, saying he did it, and he's not Russian.

https://guccifer2.wordpress.com/2017/01/12/fake-evidence/
Here I am Again, My Friends!
Written by guccifer2
January 12, 2017   

I really hope you’ve missed me a lot. Though I see they didn’t let you forget my name. The U.S. intelligence agencies have published several reports of late claiming I have ties with Russia.

I’d like to make it clear enough that these accusations are unfounded. I have totally no relation to the Russian government. I’d like to tell you once again I was acting in accordance with my personal political views and beliefs.

The technical evidence contained in the reports doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. This is a crude fake.

Any IT professional can see that a malware sample mentioned in the Joint Analysis Report was taken from the web and was commonly available. A lot of hackers use it. I think it was inserted in the report to make it look a bit more plausible.

I already explained at The Future of Cyber Security Europe conference that took place in London in last September, I had used a different way to breach into the DNC network. I found a vulnerability in the NGP VAN software installed in the DNC system.

It’s obvious that the intelligence agencies are deliberately falsifying evidence. In my opinion, they’re playing into the hands of the Democrats who are trying to blame foreign actors for their failure.

The Obama administration has a week left in office and I believe we’ll see some more fakes during this period.

I guess you have a lot of questions for me. So, feel free to send them via DM.
"The State is a body of armed men."

Offline K-Dog

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3169
    • View Profile
    • K-Dog
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2017, 07:49:55 PM »
What if our own intelligence agencies leaked the mails.  Then since somebody had to do it and it was not them, they are using Russia as a scapegoat.  They have the power and they can cover their own ass.  It true they risked nothing.  They wanted Trump.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2017, 08:04:53 PM »
Hotels usually provide wifi internet access for their guests, and I suppose, people hanging around in their public areas.  So anyone with a smartphone set up to be a proxy relay could sit in the lobby and proxy messages from hackers thru the wifi connection and onto the internet, and the attack would look like it was coming from the hotel.  Consequently any claim that a hack came from some hacking group at a hotel is entirely without evidence unless the hotel agrees to open its wifi logs, and China would NEVER do that.  Pathetic.


Periodically while on the road, I will park outside a hotel or a Starbucks or some other establishment that offers free wifi and sign on through their network.  I never even go inside the place, so there are no security camera photos of me, and I did not Register in the hotel.  The ONLY way I could be identified would be through my computer itself, but disguising the identity of your computer is quite EZ, even if you are not a Code Jockey.

Long as free WiFi is available and you do not need to give up info to sign on, you can remain Anon this way.  But you can't buy anything or ever use a credit card or debit card or sign up for any service that asks for a cell phone number or anything else tied to an account with your real identity.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline jdwheeler42

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3332
    • View Profile
    • Going Upslope
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2017, 09:02:24 PM »
But you can't buy anything or ever use a credit card or debit card or sign up for any service that asks for a cell phone number or anything else tied to an account with your real identity.
Of course, as long as cash is available, you can get prepaid debit cards, and buy prepaid cell phones with cash.

Besides anonymity, there is the security of knowing that you can never lose more than what you have already spent.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2017, 09:39:00 PM »
But you can't buy anything or ever use a credit card or debit card or sign up for any service that asks for a cell phone number or anything else tied to an account with your real identity.
Of course, as long as cash is available, you can get prepaid debit cards, and buy prepaid cell phones with cash.

Besides anonymity, there is the security of knowing that you can never lose more than what you have already spent.

I tried this method.  Most websites won't accept Pre Paid debit cards purchased with cash. They don't work without an ID attached.  Besides that, obviously you need to give them an address to deliver the products to.

RE
« Last Edit: January 12, 2017, 09:41:23 PM by RE »
Save As Many As You Can

Offline jdwheeler42

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3332
    • View Profile
    • Going Upslope
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2017, 05:16:09 AM »
But you can't buy anything or ever use a credit card or debit card or sign up for any service that asks for a cell phone number or anything else tied to an account with your real identity.
Of course, as long as cash is available, you can get prepaid debit cards, and buy prepaid cell phones with cash.

Besides anonymity, there is the security of knowing that you can never lose more than what you have already spent.
I tried this method.  Most websites won't accept Pre Paid debit cards purchased with cash. They don't work without an ID attached.  Besides that, obviously you need to give them an address to deliver the products to.
It's been a while since I used this method, I guess they upped their security.  And I used it on stuff that was delivered digitally, so no address was needed -- but with no physical product involved, I was concerned it would have been my word against theirs on what I actually got, so I really liked the security of my liability being limited to what I prepaid.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Re: The on-going DNC Hack saga
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2017, 06:40:17 AM »
But you can't buy anything or ever use a credit card or debit card or sign up for any service that asks for a cell phone number or anything else tied to an account with your real identity.
Of course, as long as cash is available, you can get prepaid debit cards, and buy prepaid cell phones with cash.

Besides anonymity, there is the security of knowing that you can never lose more than what you have already spent.
I tried this method.  Most websites won't accept Pre Paid debit cards purchased with cash. They don't work without an ID attached.  Besides that, obviously you need to give them an address to deliver the products to.
It's been a while since I used this method, I guess they upped their security.  And I used it on stuff that was delivered digitally, so no address was needed -- but with no physical product involved, I was concerned it would have been my word against theirs on what I actually got, so I really liked the security of my liability being limited to what I prepaid.

Da Goobermint and banks don't like anyone Anonymous on the net, for obvious reasons.  The IRS wants to know all your purchases, to see if you're reporting all your income.   They're afraid of Hackers.  Money Laundering. etc etc etc.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
0 Replies
673 Views
Last post April 26, 2016, 02:47:18 PM
by Palloy
1 Replies
336 Views
Last post May 10, 2017, 12:18:04 PM
by RE
5 Replies
1025 Views
Last post December 07, 2017, 04:55:04 PM
by RE