AuthorTopic: Killer Superbugs!  (Read 3365 times)

Offline RE

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207 million eggs in nine states recalled over salmonella fears
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2018, 10:16:16 PM »
That's a lot of eggs!  :o

How do you "recall" eggs?  ???   :icon_scratch:  By now I would expect most of them have been eaten.

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/15/business/egg-recall-salmonella.html

207 million eggs in nine states recalled over salmonella fears
Posted 7:55 PM, April 15, 2018, by CNN Wire, Updated at 07:56PM, April 15, 2018

A farm in Indiana is recalling more than 200 million eggs sold in nine states over salmonella fears.

Rose Acre Farms voluntarily recalled 206,749,248 eggs due to potential contamination with Salmonella Braenderup, the Food and Drug Administration said in a statement.

At least 22 illnesses have been reported so far, the FDA said Friday.

The eggs were sold through retail stores and restaurants. They reached consumers in Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.

“Consumers with these eggs shouldn’t eat them,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb tweeted. “Throw them away or return them to place of purchase for credit or refund.”

Related Story
FDA orders recall of salmonella-tainted herbal supplement

Brands affected include Country Daybreak, Coburn Farms, Crystal Farms, Sunshine Farms and Glenview, with some eggs sold at Food Lion stores.

Salmonella causes serious and sometimes fatal infections, especially in young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems. It is generally contracted from contaminated poultry, meat, eggs and water, and affects the intestinal tract.

Chickens can pass the bacteria to eggs because the eggs leave hens through the same passageway as feces. Alternatively, bacteria in the hen’s ovary or oviduct can get to the egg before the shell forms around it, according to the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

Symptoms include fever, nausea, diarrhea and abdominal pain.

In 2010, a salmonella outbreak sickened hundreds and led to the recall of half a billion eggs.
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Offline RE

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🐛 Ticking Meatmares
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2018, 03:06:05 AM »
https://grist.org/article/lone-star-ticks-are-a-carnivores-nightmare-and-theyre-just-waking-up/

 Ticking Meatmares

Lone star ticks hunt in packs and spread an allergy to beef and pork. Thanks to climate change, they're spreading.

By Zoya Teirstein   on May 1, 2018


When Peter Coughlin was in his sophomore year at James Madison University in northern Virginia, he was besieged by a strange and unsettling illness. At random times throughout the night, Coughlin would wake up with hives, full body chills, and raging fevers. These episodes always ended up with him in the bathroom, throwing up until his stomach was empty.

After keeping a food journal for nearly a year, Coughlin realized his symptoms occurred after eating meat, primarily pork. “I essentially spent a week proving my point,” Coughlin says. “I’d eat a bunch of red meat, and go through a series of pretty severe reactions.”

When he finally went to the hospital in 2016, the doctor tested him for all the usual allergies and was flummoxed by the lack of results. She gave him a strong antihistamine and an EpiPen and sent him home.

Frustrated by the lack of answers, Coughlin started researching. He found similarities between his symptoms and documented cases of something called alpha-gal allergy. A major study on the allergic reaction had been done right across the Blue Ridge Mountains at the University of Virginia.

Suddenly, his hiking trips in that very mountain range came into focus: “I kept pulling ticks off of me,” he says. According to the research, those little brown bugs, marked by a telltale white spot, were to blame for his meat allergy. Coughlin was bit by lone star ticks.

Alpha-gal isn’t your typical hayfever-like allergy. It’s a severe, delayed-reaction immune response, which means it hits hours after someone who suffers from the allergy eats meat. People with alpha-gal describe their episodes as terrifying experiences that can land you in the emergency room and change the way you live your life.

“I was disheartened,” Coughlin says. “I’m a big eater.”
CDC

Even a decade ago, only small populations of lone star ticks were found in the northeastern U.S. As climate change shifts temperatures and humidity levels across the country, many types of ticks, which thrive in warm, humid weather, are able to expand their ranges. The EPA even uses Lyme disease, which is transmitted by blacklegged ticks, as an indicator to track where the country is warming. The spread of lone stars has been linked to climate change, and now, the ticks have made it all the way up through Maine, imparting severe red meat allergies on unsuspecting carnivores — and offering a window into our changing world and its effect on human health.

As lone stars expand into new communities this summer, the ticks are poised to catch people off guard. And just like Coughlin, these little fellows are big eaters.

As you read this, millions of tiny, black-and-brown-legged creatures are beginning to reawaken after laying dormant underneath layers of last year’s leaf cover.

Ticks are only second to mosquitoes as vectors for human disease. This week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a report showing illnesses from ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes are on the rise. Disease cases in the U.S. more than tripled between 2004 and 2016, and the report found that we’re ill-equipped to tackle the growing problem.

Large swaths of the eastern U.S. are already dealing with an epidemic of Lyme disease, an illness that can rob you of your short-term memory, your motor functions, and, very rarely, even your life.

And every so often, it seems, the ticks that rouse themselves from the leaf litter are armed with unexpected and mysterious pathogens, like the resurfaced Powassan virus or Pacific Coast tick fever. The CDC report says seven new tick-borne infections have been recorded since 2004. The organization hasn’t recognized alpha-gal allergies yet.

“It’s scary,” says Graham Hickling, the director of the University of Tennessee’s Center for Wildlife Health. “Pretty much every year, we’re finding something new.”

A combination of factors has allowed lone stars to conquer territories far outside their known range.

Climate change is among them. It’s likely affecting the viability rates for the thousands of eggs that a single lone star can lay at a time. “When we start getting these warm seasons, high rainfall kind of years, that probably means that those 2,000 baby ticks do a lot better,” Hickling says.

That’s not the only way climate change is aiding survival rates. Many ticks go dormant during the winter, when consecutive below-freezing days and nights turn them into sesame-sized popsicles. But as warming keeps taking days out of the region’s cold season, ticks are able to stay active for longer.

Hickling says a benign climate is helpful for ticks and what they carry: “There are more opportunities for those viruses to start infecting us.”

Holly Gaff, a tick-borne disease expert at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, also points to one of the tick’s favorite hosts, the white-tailed deer. Deer can travel several miles in the days or even weeks it takes for lone stars feed on them, eventually dropping the ticks a long way from where they first picked them up. Reforestation efforts in the eastern U.S. that began in the 20th century, coupled with a slump in hunting, have led to an explosion in white-tail deer populations. The growth of suburbs means there are plenty of people pressed up against these wooded areas.
Raymond Gehman/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

Gaff calls this combination of factors — higher deer populations, people living next to fragmented forests, a friendlier climate — the “perfect storm” for lone star–tick proliferation. “When you have nature in balance you get some ticks, but not like this,” Gaff says.

Already, at least 600 known cases of alpha-gal have occured north of the Mason-Dixon line, according to University of North Carolina allergist Scott Commins, one of the researchers who discovered the connection between ticks and alpha-gal. But that’s probably only a fraction of the incidences. It’s a difficult pathology to diagnose, and doctors aren’t required to report alpha-gal to the CDC.

Compared to blacklegged ticks, lone stars are much more aggressive. Blacklegged ticks behave in relatively predictable ways — they hang out in leafy undergrowth, arms and legs outstretched in case a hapless animal or human passes by. According to Ellen Stromdahl, a researcher with the United States Army Public Health Center, blackleggeds are relatively small and weak.

Lone stars, on the other hand, hunt in packs and travel at surprising speeds, emerging from the leaf litter like a swarm of thirsty, galloping lentils.

“If you sit in the middle of the woods breathing out CO2, you’ll get a fan club of lone stars pretty quickly,” Hickling says.

On top of lone stars’ rapacious mentality, Old Dominion’s Gaff says that after conducting a series of experiments, the bugs “seem to be invincible.”

She’s tried freezing them — but they came crawling out of the freezer after seven days on ice. Next, she tried drowning them, figuring that sea-level rise on Virginia’s coast could end up doing humanity a favor by drowning out tick populations. Her team submerged lone stars in salt, fresh, and brackish water. Every single tick lasted for at least 30 days in each condition — the last lone star died after 74 days.

It only takes one bite from a lone star tick for an unsuspecting victim to develop a meat allergy that can last months, years, or even an entire lifetime.

Here’s how scientists think it goes down: Alpha-gal is a sugar molecule found in nearly all mammals, except humans and a few other primates. A lone star carrying alpha-gal (or an alpha-gal-like substance) bites a person and spreads it to their blood through the tick’s saliva. Then, the molecule essentially rewires the body’s immune system, prompting it to produce an overload of alpha-gal antibodies. When that person goes in for a cheeseburger, their body has a life-threatening reaction to the sugar in the meat.

As recently as a few years ago, the link between lone stars and this allergic reaction was controversial. In 2011, a team of University of Virginia allergists presented its hypothesis in front a group of tick experts. The scientists’ reaction was dismissive.

“We thought, ‘These guys are full of stuffing,’” Gaff recalls.

That team was led by Thomas Platts-Mills, who initially made the connection between lone stars and alpha-gal. Platts-Mills applied insights from his study of patients who were taking the cancer drug cetuximab. Some patients were allergic to the drug, which contains alpha-gal. The team looked into what could be causing the reaction and discovered the link between lone stars and alpha-gal antibodies.

As more people started turning up in emergency rooms with sudden and inexplicable reactions to meat, other researchers began coming around to the idea that a sesame-sized insect could, in fact, instill a lifelong aversion to red meat in full-sized human beings. While the CDC has a comprehensive map of Lyme disease cases in the U.S., state health departments aren’t required to report incidents of alpha-gal as they are with Lyme. Platts-Mills is now working on mapping cases of the allergy.
Lone star ticks. Ben McCanna/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

One such case took place in Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. John Beckett, a self-professed meat lover, was besieged by a pack of lone stars when he was cleaning out underbrush from an old car lot in 2014. Two weeks later, he was chowing down on hamburgers with some friends at a dock party on the lake when he started breaking out in hives.

Over time, Beckett figured out that he felt sick every time he ate red meat.

The hives weren’t enough to make him stop, though. It wasn’t until he wound up in the emergency room — after eating a cowboy rib eye from one of his favorite restaurants — that he decided to kick red meat out of his diet once and for all.

“The hives had closed my airways,” Beckett says. “I thought I was going to die that night.”

When he finally went to an allergist and got his blood tested, his doctor told him the levels of alpha-gal antibodies in Beckett’s system were the highest he had ever seen. “You gave me bragging rights,” Beckett remembers his doctor telling him.

That was four years ago. Beckett stopped eating meat, and the amount of alpha-gal antibodies in his blood declined only slightly.

Mark Vandewalker, an allergist who’s been treating patients in Missouri since 1990, has noticed an uptick in patients exhibiting anaphylaxis, or a systemic allergic reaction, to meat. He sees patients come in with hives, swelling, itching, and, occasionally, some respiratory difficulties.

“Initially, I didn’t even believe that the condition was real,” Vandewalker says. “But now, having seen so many cases of my own, I think that it’s impossible to deny that this is a very unusual, but a very real, form of food-induced anaphylaxis.”

The vast majority of food-related anaphylaxis occurs within minutes after eating, but alpha-gal is one of the rare allergies that doesn’t work that way.

“What’s odd is that it’s happening in the middle of the night,” Vandewalker explains. “These episodes have occurred three, four, five, even up to eight hours after eating.”

That makes it harder to diagnose, which is why patients with alpha-gal are often sent home from medical facilities without answers.

On a trip to visit his family in Leesburg, Virginia, last year, Peter Coughlin was bitten by a blacklegged tick. He contracted Lyme disease, which required him to go on a regimen of antibiotics.

A few months later, he reunited with a bunch of his high school friends, and the group decided to go out to eat. It had been two years since his alpha-gal symptoms began popping up, and Coughlin explains he was ready to jeopardize his health in the name of grilled steak.

“I just said, ‘Fuck it,’” he recalls. “I filled my pocket with Benadryl and went to Korean barbecue.”

This time Coughlin didn’t have an allergic reaction. The Benadryl he had brought stayed in his pocket.

According to Vandewalker, the Missouri physician, alpha-gal can eventually retreat to the point where eating red meat again is possible. Doctors and researchers don’t know, however, how long the antibodies will linger patient to patient — remember, John Beckett’s levels were still high four years after he was bit — and they don’t know how to counteract it besides telling patients to lay off the red meat.

Though alpha-gal remains somewhat mysterious, there is some good news about the ticks that carry it. While in some areas up to 50 percent of blacklegged ticks carry some kind of infectious disease — Lyme, Babesia, Anaplasmosis — the rate of transmissible illnesses found in lone stars (like Rocky Mountain Fever) is much lower, around 10 to 20 percent. What’s more, a recent study published by the Army Public Health Center indicates that lone stars can’t carry Lyme disease at all. Stromdahl, the Army entomologist, surveyed 54 studies from 35 different research groups involving 52,000 ticks and found that a chemical in lone star saliva kills Borrelia – the bacteria that causes Lyme.
Lisa Zins

“You never want to say never with ticks or insects and what they can carry,” she says. “But we presented a lot of evidence that they don’t.”

But the reality is that we’re living in a warming world, and one of the consequences of that is a tick expansion. And while a group of scientists is working on a vaccine for alpha-gal, others are devising ways to attack the issue at its root — by eliminating the ticks from highly populated areas.

Gaff at Old Dominion conducts studies using a robot called a tickbot, which moves around dragging a rag soaked with permethrin (a common treatment for lice that also kills ticks). The bot, which has a little piece of dry ice embedded in its center, breathes out CO2 and attracts ticks to the toxic rag.

Richard Ostfeld, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Upstate, New York, is conducting tick experiments on entire neighborhoods, which he calls “tick towns.” Twenty-four communities volunteered for the experiment, and some are outfitted with a naturally occurring fungus that sucks the life force out of ticks. Others have little contraptions called “bait boxes” that dab rodents with a small dose of Frontline, the flea and tick medicine for cats and dogs. According to Ostfeld, these preventive measures are “probably our best hope at clobbering ticks.”

Tickbots and tick towns aren’t much comfort to people already living with Lyme or alpha-gal, but they’re our best shot at keeping people who are still unaffected safe. For the alpha-gal allergic among us, the spread of lone stars means the end of traditions that once seemed reassuringly permanent — like eating hamburgers at a dock party on the Lake of Ozarks. Those get-togethers aren’t what they once were for John Beckett. But he’s playing the long game.

“I’m trying my best not to get bitten a second time,” he says, adding he reckons his blood levels will have evened out in a few decades. “By the time I’m 80 I might be able to eat meat again.”
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Offline RE

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🔬 Trump & The Big Bad Bugs
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2018, 12:30:57 AM »
https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/07/17/trump-the-big-bad-bugs/

July 17, 2018
Trump & The Big Bad Bugs
by Conn Hallinan


Photo by Cat Branchman | CC BY 2.0

When people contemplate potential disasters ignited by the Trump administration’s foreign policy, places like the South China Sea, Central Asia, or the Korean Peninsula come first to mind. Certainly a dustup with Beijing, Teheran or Pyongyang is a scary thing to contemplate. But the thing that should also keep people up at night is Washington’s approach to international health organizations and the President’s stubborn refusal to address climate change.

Bad bugs are coming, and they are stronger and nastier than they have ever been. A few—like malaria and yellow fever—are ancient nemeses, but they’re increasingly immune to standard drugs and widening their reach behind a warming climate. Others—like Ebola, SARS, MERS and Zika—are new, exotic and fearsome. And antibiotic resistant bacteria threaten to turn the clock back to pre-penicillin days, when a cut could be a death sentence.

Trump’s disdain for international agencies and treaties, plus cuts in public health programs, and a relaxation of regulations on the use of antibiotics in animal husbandry could create a worldwide medical catastrophe.

The President recently asked Congress to cut over $15 billion from health care, especially in the area of overseas response. On the very day that the World Health Organization (WHO) declared an emergency over the latest Ebola outbreak, National Security Advisor John Bolton eliminated the National Security Agency’s program for epidemic prevention.

 As Laurie Garrett—winner of the Pulitzer Prize for her writings on health care—notes, Bolton’s move “leaves the United States with no clear line of authority for responding to any outbreak of disease, whether naturally arising or as an act of bioterrorism,” adding “the U.S. government is increasingly withdrawing from global health efforts.”

The cost of that retreat may be dear.

The 2014-16 Ebola epidemic killed 11,300 people in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, and infected health workers brought it back to Europe and the U.S.. While the disease was eventually corralled, it continues to flare up.

WHO found that the key to stopping Ebola’s spread is an immediate response that combines vaccination with isolation and hospitalization, a strategy that stopped a 2018 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in its tracks. But the Trump budget cuts all Ebola spending and reduces emergency funds for the State Department. A post-epidemic analysis found that an extra 300 hospital beds would have stopped the disease’s spread in 2014.

Diseases like Ebola get media attention, in part because Ebola kills more than 80 percent of its victims in a particularly grotesque manner: death by massive hemorrhaging.

But the more familiar diseases like malaria do the most damage. The malaria plasmodium infects 216 million people a year and kills 450,000, many of them children. And after decades of retreat, the disease is roaring back with varieties that are increasingly hard to treat. One by one, the barriers that once kept the disease at bay have fallen. Having overcome chloroquine, and then fansidar, now malaria has begun to breach the latest cure, artenisinin.

Public health experts predict that if the drug-resistant malaria strain ever reaches Africa, its impact will be catastrophic.

Yellow fever, once a major killer but largely tamed by mosquito control and vaccinations, is also making a comeback. Dengue, or “break-bone fever, which infects 400 million worldwide and kills over 25,000 people a year, has spread from nine countries in 1970 to over 100 today.

The fact that diseases overcome defenses is nothing new. Natural selection will generally find a way to outflank whatever chemicals humans come up with to defend themselves. Penicillin was discovered in 1939, and by 1941 doctor discovered Staphylococcus bacteria that were immune to the drug.

But bad policies and bad pathogens go hand in hand. The Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accords will certainly accelerate climate change in a way that encourages the spread of disease. Earlier Springs and later Falls mean longer life spans for disease vectors like ticks and mosquitoes, which translates into greater infection rates. Researchers in Scandinavia and Massachusetts suspect that an increase in Lyme’s disease is due to climate change, and malaria is moving up the Andes as the higher altitudes warm.

Other diseases, like chagis—which kills 50,000 people a year—is already moving north as its vector, the assassin bug, migrates out of its base in Latin America. Diseases like West Nile is now part of the standard disease loads of Europe and the U.S.

Again, pathogen mobility is hardly new. Malaria, yellow fever, measles and small pox were all introduced to the New World by travelers, conquerors and African slaves. But disease is even less a local phenomenon today than it was in the 15th century. As Dr. Don Francis, who played a key role in identifying the HIV virus and was on the first medical team to confront Ebola, points out how disease spreads: “Just sit in an airport and watch all the costumes walk by.”

Trump is famously resistant to science. He doesn’t yet have a White House science advisor and is relying, instead, on Michael Kratsios, a 31-year old political science major who studied Hellenic Greece. Kratsios was the former chief of staff of California billionaire Peter Thiel, founder of PayPal, who advocates rolling back Food and Drug Administration regulations.

Those regulations cover the use of antibiotics in animal husbandry. Chickens, cattle and pigs account for 70 percent of the antibiotics used in the U.S. The animals are not ill, just packed into pens and cages that would sicken them if they were not juiced with Bambermycin, Salinomycin or Bacitracin. Antibiotics also increase the animals’ weight.

But animals jammed into rarely cleaned cages and pens are the perfect Petri dish for generating drug resistant germs. According to the Environmental Working Group, nearly 80 percent of U.S. supermarket meat is infected with antibiotic resistant germs. Studies of meats in the U.S. show that up to 70 percent are laced with germs immune to antibiotics.

When the European Union banned non-therapeutic antibiotics on animals, drug resistant germ levels declined dramatically.

Eventually those pathogens move from animal pens to hospitals and gyms and airports. What you do in an Iowa pig farm does not stay in Iowa.

The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that 23,000 Americans die each year from drug resistant germs, and a British study predicted that, unless something is done about the crisis, antibiotic resistant bacteria could kill 10 million people a year by 2050. The WHO says “superbugs” pose one of the most serous threats that humanity faces, and the medical magazine Lancet called drug resistant pathogens “The biggest global health threat in the 21st Century.”.

The White House’s hostility to the Obama administration’s Affordable  Care Act could also have major consequences, not only for Americans, but the world. In 1918, a mild Spanish flu mutated—probably in Kansas—into a fearsome virus that killed between 50 and 100 million people worldwide. 

The 1918-19 pandemic almost certainly started in the digestive tracts of Chinese pigs, then passed to birds, and from birds to people. Those Chinese pigs are still out there, and lethal varieties of bird flu are currently circulating in China and Southeast Asia. So far, most can only be passed by direct contact with infected animals, but sooner or later there will be a mutation that will make a virus far more communicable. A deadly worldwide pandemic is a “when,” not an “if.”

And when that pandemic hits, Americans will find that there are not enough hospital beds—so-called “surge capacity” is non-existent—or robust public health programs to cope with it.  China has also cut back on public health care programs and, as a result, was initially unable to deal with the 2003 SARS crisis that sickened 8,000 people and killed 800.

Europeans, with their national health services, are better prepared, but even their public health systems have been hollowed out by years of austerity-driven economic policies. But there is a worldwide shortage of medical workers, particularly nurses.

In his “Second Coming,” the Irish writer William Butler Yeats seems to have foreseen the future: “Some rough beast, its time come round at last, Slouches toward Bethlehem, waiting to be born.”

The beasts are out there, and they will be born. The Trump administration’s denial of climate change, hostility to international institutions, and laissez faire approach to governance at home will make those beasts far more dangerous than they have to be.
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Offline Karpatok

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2018, 03:34:23 PM »
   
   Why is the United States responsible for the health of the rest of the world? Let Bill fucking Gates take care of Africa! Let China take care of China and South East Asia. Let fucking George Soros spend his ill gotten gains on health care for Muslim migrants that he wants to make Europe pay for. Get my point yet?

Offline Karpatok

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2018, 04:51:23 PM »
   
   Why is the United States responsible for the health of the rest of the world? Let Bill fucking Gates take care of Africa! Let China take care of China and South East Asia. Let fucking George Soros spend his ill gotten gains on health care for Muslim migrants that he wants to make Europe pay for. Get my point yet?
.
             Probably a die off of the weak, the unable to function, the irresponsible, the careless, the too old to function independently would be a good thing and reduce the load. It is going to be a Mathews Island sort of situation anyway. If everything is stripped totally to make everyone equal. But I guarantee that when the resources become very depleted nobody is going to care that much to save the unfit or even to breed more people. These organisms will undoubtedly have the last say and be around to evolve into a whole new world. And Trump doesn't have a damn thing to do with it. Wash your hands, eat properly, stay away from stupid crowds, don't take stupid drugs and use needles on yourself or even more perverse things. Might give you a little more time. And stay out of the hospital where MRSA thrives. And if you want more nurses don't call them stupid and bimbos!

Offline RE

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2018, 04:54:40 PM »
   
   Why is the United States responsible for the health of the rest of the world? Let Bill fucking Gates take care of Africa! Let China take care of China and South East Asia. Let fucking George Soros spend his ill gotten gains on health care for Muslim migrants that he wants to make Europe pay for. Get my point yet?

Bll Gtes should spend his money first on improving HC and Medicare, Funding Single Payer, and slashing bloated salaries for Doctors, Dentists, Nurses Social Workers and Physical Therapists, and firing all Insurance Conpany and Medical Administrators.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2018, 05:30:00 PM »
What fuckin' salary?

I don't get no stinkin' salary. I dream of a salary. People on salary get a pension and paid vacation. I work or I don't make a dime. I get what's left after every vendor and employee and my spendthrift Uncle Sam take theirs off the top.

Bill Gates is a corporate greedhead with too much money. What did he really do? He wrote DOS, and then used his money to bankrupt his competition.

How did he get to be in charge of saving the planet? Fine job he did with the Seed Vaulttm.



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Offline Surly1

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2018, 05:31:13 PM »
   
   Why is the United States responsible for the health of the rest of the world? Let Bill fucking Gates take care of Africa! Let China take care of China and South East Asia. Let fucking George Soros spend his ill gotten gains on health care for Muslim migrants that he wants to make Europe pay for. Get my point yet?

Bll Gtes should spend his money first on improving HC and Medicare, Funding Single Payer, and slashing bloated salaries for Doctors, Dentists, Nurses Social Workers and Physical Therapists, and firing all Insurance Conpany and Medical Administrators.

RE

Of all you list, you mention the health care professionals. You really want your Doctor, Dentist, Nurse,  Social Worker and Physical Therapist providing services based on the lowest acceptable bid?

You don't like what the health care system has become and neither do I. Blame Nixon and Henry Fucking Kaiser.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #23 on: July 18, 2018, 08:25:16 PM »
You really want your Doctor, Dentist, Nurse,  Social Worker and Physical Therapist providing services based on the lowest acceptable bid?

No, I want it paid as a Goobermint Job in a fixed payer sociaized medical system.  Top of the scale for full 4 year accredted post-graduate study with 10 yera experience.  Pubic record of success and failure rate in their treatment plans.

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Offline RE

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2018, 08:27:25 PM »
What fuckin' salary?

I don't get no stinkin' salary. I dream of a salary. People on salary get a pension and paid vacation. I work or I don't make a dime. I get what's left after every vendor and employee and my spendthrift Uncle Sam take theirs off the top.

No Privately run medial offices.  100% Socialized, all medical personnel employees of the state like Teachers.

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Offline Eddie

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More Warm Water Equals More Vibrio Deaths
« Reply #25 on: July 20, 2018, 05:14:07 AM »
While viruses tend to get all the press, bacterial infections continue to kill people. Warming brackish and salt water is the ideal medium for bacteria like Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Every week this time of year I read about some fisherman or crabber who dies from an infected cut or scratch.

The problem isn't that they don't respond to antibiotics. The problem is that these infections are so fast spreading and aggressive, that by the time you know you're sick, you're past the point of no return.


WASHINGTON — A Virginia man is dead after getting infected by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a strain of flesh-eating bacteria found in bodies of water in the area.

WVEC-TV in Norfolk was the first to report the death, citing a friend of the victim who was exposed to the Vibrio bacteria a few years ago.

This is the first Vibrio-related death reported in Virginia this year, though 23 people in the state have gotten ill through exposure to the bacteria, according to The Washington Post.

The Virginia Department of Health hasn’t said exactly where the man contracted the bacteria, but a representative told The Washington Post it happened in the health department’s eastern region, which includes Virginia’s Northern Neck and tidewater areas that feed into the lower Chesapeake Bay.

The bacterial infection is contracted when a cut or open wound makes contact with water where the bacteria is living.

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Vibrio is found in brackish or warm salt waters – which are commonly seen around the Chesapeake Bay, the coastal bays as well as rivers found in the Mid-Atlantic region.
Each year a few dozen cases of the Vibrio infections get reported, but the fatal strain that killed the Virginia man tends to be more rare in the region.

In 2016, a man cleaning crab pots in Ocean City’s Assawoman Bay also contracted the bacteria and died from infection.

Earlier this year, a man crabbing near the Delaware Bay in New Jersey also died after he was infected, according to The Washington Post.

https://wtop.com/virginia/2018/07/rare-strain-of-flesh-eating-bacteria-kills-virginia-man/
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #26 on: July 20, 2018, 06:21:08 AM »
Ho-lee shit. Awfully close to home...
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😷 DRC: New Ebola virus outbreak days after previous epidemic ends
« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2018, 04:09:14 AM »
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/08/drc-ebola-virus-outbreak-days-previous-epidemic-ends-180801170409109.html

DRC: New Ebola virus outbreak days after previous epidemic ends

Health ministry announces Ebola outbreak in DRC just days after previous emergence of the deadly virus is declared over.
15 hours ago


The average fatality rate among those infected with Ebola is about 50 percent, according to the World Health Organization [File: Sam Mednick/AP]

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The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has announced a new outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, just days after a recent emergence of the disease, which killed 33 people, was declared over.

Four cases of the virus were confirmed in northeastern North Kivu province, the DRC's health minister said in a statement on Wednesday, though there was no indication they were linked to the country's previous - and ninth - Ebola outbreak in northwestern Equateur Province.

"Although we did not expect to face a tenth epidemic so early, the detection of the virus is an indicator of the proper functioning of the surveillance system," Health Minister Oly Ilunga said.

Ebola is a virus-caused hemorrhagic fever that in extreme cases causes fatal bleeding from internal organs, the mouth, eyes or ears.



Four confirmed cases

North Kivu authorities alerted the health ministry on Saturday that 26 cases of hemorrhagic fever, including 20 deaths, had occurred in and around Mangina, a town about 30km west of the city of Beni and 100km from the DRC's border with Uganda.

Six samples were taken from hospitalised patients and sent to the National Institute of Biological Research in Kinshasa, the capital, for analysis. Four of the samples tested positive for the Ebola virus.

A team of 12 experts from the health ministry will arrive in Beni on Thursday to set up a response operation, the ministry said, and local travel restrictions were being implemented.
'A constant threat'

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), said in a tweet on Wednesday that health officials would continue to fight the "constant threat" of Ebola in the DRC.

The latest outbreak comes after DRC authorities declared a previous emergence of the disease - which has no proven cure - over on July 24.

WATCH
00:00

How can Ebola be contained?

The declaration brought the curtain down on an outbreak which began two months earlier in the remote northwestern area of Bikoro, about 2,000km from Mangina, on May 8 and culminated in 54 confirmed cases of Ebola, 33 of which proved fatal.

Health officials said a quick international response and the vaccination of more than 3,300 people were decisive factors in containing the virus.

The outbreak took place fewer than 12 months on from the DRC's previous Ebola scare, in May 2017, during which eight people were infected, four of whom died.

The average fatality rate among those infected with Ebola is about 50 percent, according to the WHO.

An epidemic of the virus killed about 11,300 people in West Africa as it surged through Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia between 2013 and 2016.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #28 on: August 02, 2018, 05:34:43 AM »
It's become endemic.
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Offline RE

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Re: Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #29 on: August 02, 2018, 08:28:20 AM »
It's become endemic.

Waiting for it to become Pandemic.

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