AuthorTopic: 🦠 Killer Superbugs!  (Read 25110 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: 🦠 Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #210 on: March 26, 2020, 06:06:34 PM »
Everyone is going to get this "oh my god we are all going to die" flu. The only questions
1) kill rate? ~3-5% it looks like
2) immunity yes or no? Obviously, most people are not immune, otherwise it wouldn't nspread so rapidly
3) mutations will we get this every year just like "all is well" flu? Hard to say at this point
4) will this help the blue gang or the red gang of killers?  It won't help any gang.  Dead People aren't very helpful

It's not the Flu.

RE
:emthup:
:emthup: :emthup:
It's not the "China Flu," not the "Wuhan flu," it's not even the Mushroom Dick flu.

The other questions have been answered. I will amplify.

1) Death rate worldwide as of this evening is 4.5% (dividing deaths by total cases. US death rate is 1.4%, but it is still early days and we have ten days to go full Italy, let the buzzards land, and fire up the crematoria.

2) Immunity? None. Think smallpox blankets, and humankind are the Indians.

Covid-19's R0 (R-nought) factor is estimated at 2.2, meaning each infected person infects 2+ others. Ebola's is 1.34-2. Smallpox's was 3.5-6 when it was eradicated, but there was substantial herd immunity. In populations without  such immunity, it cut like a hot knife through butter. And now little residual herd immunity exists since vaccination has ceased. So in X years, we'll get to do smallpox again.
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Offline RE

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🦠 PM Boris Johnson tests positive for coronavirus
« Reply #211 on: March 27, 2020, 05:23:19 AM »
The Brit Trumpofsky-Lite gets HIT!   :icon_sunny:

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UgoBardi

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What Can Collapsologists Learn From the Coronavirus Disaster?
« Reply #212 on: March 28, 2020, 01:25:03 AM »


youtube-Logo-2gc2reddit-logoPublished by Ugo Bardi



Guest Article by Herbert Krill



Follow us on Twitter @doomstead666

Friend us on Facebook



Published originally on Cassandra's Legacy on March 27, 2020



 



——————  This time, it is for real!  ——————–






Coming this Sunday to a Laptop Near You



A Doomstead Diner Double Feature






 



Discuss this article at the Medicine & Health Table inside the Diner



 



What Can Collapsologists Learn From the Coronavirus Disaster?





 


Guest post by Herbert Krill


March 23, 2020


 


 


These are interesting times for collapsologists and for anyone interested in collapse. For many years, we all studied the past, historic collapses like the Fall of Ancient Rome, and speculated about future collapses. We studied Joseph Tainter, Jared Diamond, read the Blogs of Dmitry Orlov and James Howard Kunstler, re-read "The Limits to Growth" and "Overshoot", enjoyed "The Long Descent" and so on … But now, something that could end in collapse is really here. There is a very fast decline of things as we speak, a "cliff" just as Seneca and Ugo Bardi and others have described.


Is the Coronavirus disaster our collapse? Is that "it"?


 


It might not "the Big One". But it's a big, fat Black Swan. And big enough to learn a lot from it.  Like one learns from a quake, even if it's not the Big One.


 


What is it that we have learned so far?


 


 


All the big systems need redundancy


 


Next time we will have to be better prepared. All this "slowdown", this trying to "flatten the curve" that's happening now (and disturbing the economy and the people themselves, although there are also positive sides to it, see below) could have been mitigated if a better health infrastructure would have been in place. The thing is, you have to build redundancy into the system, some overcapacity.


 


If you have capacity, then you don't have to slow down things so much. Think of fire-fighting. Fires are quick, they need to be attacked quickly. You have to have overcapacity. Fire engines sitting around idly, seemingly uselessly, until the call comes. Firefighters being bored, playing cards (or, rather, playing their smartphones). But no-one will say, "We don't need so many of them if they don't actually work." At some point, they will be needed, in a flash.


 


And that goes for the health care system as well. There should have been many more hospital beds available (even if empty most of the time), more respirators, protective suits, and so forth. If you don't have that infrastructure, you will have to build it quickly, like you do in a war.  It was funny to see those pictures of dozens of caterpillars digging the foundations of emergency hospitals in China, but a week later, those hospitals were actually ready. America did that sort of thing in World War II, regular factories were converted into producing arms, planes, ships, at an incredible rate. But for that to happen you need leadership. There was a Franklin D. Roosevelt then, not a Trump.


 


And the rest of the infrastructure?


 


For collapsologists, it will be interesting to see how the rest of the infrastructure holds together. Here in California, the Internet works (thank God), electricity flows, the mailperson makes his or her rounds, and amazon deliveries are still happening, albeit a bit delayed already. Even though there are lines in front of the supermarkets (people spaced two meters apart), there are not real food shortages. But will it stay that way?


 


The other day, I was reassured by reading an article in the L.A. Times about electricity distribution in  California. "Say what you will about the utility industry – they’re pretty good about contingency planning," Stephen Berberich, president of the California Independent System Operator, which manages the electric grid for most of the state, was quoted. The big electric grids, though sometimes weak, are systems that have always planned for disaster. They might be more vulnerable by a computer virus than a biological one.


 


But still, things can get stressed way too much. What if an earthquake decides to strike us right now? For example, a major rupture of the Hayward Fault, running through Oakland and Berkeley, about 10 km from where I live, is way overdue. Kamala Harris, California senator and recently a presidential candidate, worried aloud about this. It's not just a fantasy. Just a couple of days ago, there was a mid-size earthquake outside Zagreb. People running out on the street and congregating, instead of staying inside, as per official Coronavirus mitigation strategy.


 


A cure worse than the disease?


 


Isn't the current cure what's causing the "slow collapse"? That's probably what President Trump and his people think. They don't want the economy fall to pieces. "The U.S. was not built to be shut down," he said today.  He wants to get things running soon again. But what's more important, the economy or the people? Or are they one and the same?


 


It's a big, bold and perhaps desperate experiment, all this shutting down of everything, of "non-essential businesses", of more activities day by day, including most transportation and especially flying. There is certainly a danger that the whole economic edifice, or house of cards, depending on your point of view, could yet fall down. So interesting to watch this in real time! But just let's not be caught underneath the rubble.


 


Gail Tverberg (students of collapsology will know her) wrote recently on her blog: "Human beings cannot stop eating and breathing for a month. They cannot have sleep apnea for an hour at a time, and function afterward. Economies cannot stop functioning for a month and afterward resume operations at their previous level. Too many people will have lost their jobs; too many businesses will have failed in the meantime."


 


There is already talk of "cascading effects" in the mainstream press. And today, on Bloomberg, the word "domino effect": "Real estate investor Tom Barrack said the U.S. commercial-mortgage market is on the brink of collapse and predicted a domino effect of catastrophic economic consequences if …". This is classical collapsology.


 


The psychological impact


 


You cannot tell people just to stay at home, not to do anything, for a long time. It's bad for their mental health. Many will become slightly unhinged. The "Guardian" just had an article about domestic violence increasing, in China in February and now in the U.S. as well: "A domestic violence hotline in Portland, Oregon, says calls doubled last week." And "The New Yorker" came out with this story: "How Loneliness from Coronavirus Isolation Takes Its Toll".


 


The "shelter in place" policy actually exacerbates the gulf between the haves and the have-nots. You were lucky if you had booked a suite with a balcony on the "Diamond Princess" cruise ship when you had to wait out fourteen days of quarantine, instead of an interior room without any windows at all. The same goes for small apartments in a crowded city.


 


Stay-at-home and creative types like writers can cope with this, but most people are dependent on going out, having a drink at a bar, going to the movies, be part of a crowd. It's bad for the average guy, for the working classes, to be cooped up like that.


 


Positive sides, unintended


 


If you are not too stressed out, it's a time for reflection. Cherishing nature, family, or even thinking of death, it's good for you. Strangely enough, most churches are closed, as well. It will be a most unusual Easter this year.


 


Less greenhouse gases getting released, the air becomes clean again, for example in China. Time slows down, becomes available again. It's a period of deceleration. And by and by it starts to resemble a "World Made by Hand", the title of a novel by James Howard Kunstler, in which the post-collapse world was not a bad one indeed.


 


And despite of the new etiquette of "social distancing" (a brand-new expression, only ten days old or so) there is more face-to-face friendliness. And people are more in touch with each other via telephone, email, Facebook and such.


 


Just a dress rehearsal?


 


It's a big moment in history and therefore exciting. There is a "global feeling". Awaiting the coming days, weeks, and months. I communicate with my friends in Austria, Germany, and the Czech Republic as much as I can. Everyone does this now. When will we see each other again? We are united in isolation. And it's a global unity against an unseen, common enemy.


 


But perhaps this is just a fire drill, a dress rehearsal. The real thing, a much worse pandemic, might come later. A more contagious, and/or more deadly virus could emerge. Peter Daszak, a well-known "disease ecologist", thinks the current crisis will prove to be manageable, noting that the mortality rate of Covid-19 isn’t as great as SARS and the spread isn’t rampant. "I’m not hiding in my bunker right now," he told the "Wall Street Journal" at the beginning of the month. "We’re going to get hit by a much bigger one sometime in the next 10 years." Really?


 


 


So we collapsologists may get our "Big One" after all. We may even die from it.


Up to now, we were more or less theoreticians. Now it gets far more real. We were Cassandras, collapse aficionados, we kind of enjoyed our post-apocalyptic visions.


 


But who would have thought that we would really experience something like this?


Now we should stop speculating and start analyzing this event, the Coronavirus Crisis of 2020 or whatever it will be called. Create a framework, set rules, detect mechanisms, make Collapsology a real science.


 


 


Herbert Krill is an Austrian documentary filmmaker currently working in the San Francisco Bay Area. In 2012, he directed "American Collapse", a 45-minute documentary for the German-language Public TV network 3SAT.


 



 



 



 



 



 




« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 02:33:06 AM by RE »

Offline RE

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So how many days until the ship is full to capacity?  What's the Over-Under on this?  ???

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Offline Eddie

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Re: 🦠 Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #214 on: March 28, 2020, 10:21:02 AM »
One week, maybe two.
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Re: 🦠 What Can Collapsologists Learn From the Coronavirus Disaster?
« Reply #215 on: March 28, 2020, 10:59:49 AM »

youtube-Logo-2gc2reddit-logoPublished by Ugo Bardi

Guest Article by Herbert Krill

Follow us on Twitter @doomstead666 Friend us on Facebook

Published originally on Cassandra's Legacy on March 27, 2020

覧覧覧 This time, it is for real! 覧覧覧

Coming this Sunday to a Laptop Near You

A Doomstead Diner Double Feature

Discuss this article at the Medicine & Health Table inside the Diner

What Can Collapsologists Learn From the Coronavirus Disaster?

Guest post by Herbert Krill
March 23, 2020
These are interesting times for collapsologists and for anyone interested in collapse. For many years, we all studied the past, historic collapses like the Fall of Ancient Rome, and speculated about future collapses. We studied Joseph Tainter, Jared Diamond, read the Blogs of Dmitry Orlov and James Howard Kunstler, re-read "The Limits to Growth" and "Overshoot", enjoyed "The Long Descent" and so on But now, something that could end in collapse is really here. There is a very fast decline of things as we speak, a "cliff" just as Seneca and Ugo Bardi and others have described.
Is the Coronavirus disaster our collapse? Is that "it"?
It might not "the Big One". But it's a big, fat Black Swan. And big enough to learn a lot from it. Like one learns from a quake, even if it's not the Big One.
What is it that we have learned so far?
All the big systems need redundancy
Next time we will have to be better prepared. All this "slowdown", this trying to "flatten the curve" that's happening now (and disturbing the economy and the people themselves, although there are also positive sides to it, see below) could have been mitigated if a better health infrastructure would have been in place. The thing is, you have to build redundancy into the system, some overcapacity.
If you have capacity, then you don't have to slow down things so much. Think of fire-fighting. Fires are quick, they need to be attacked quickly. You have to have overcapacity. Fire engines sitting around idly, seemingly uselessly, until the call comes. Firefighters being bored, playing cards (or, rather, playing their smartphones). But no-one will say, "We don't need so many of them if they don't actually work." At some point, they will be needed, in a flash.
And that goes for the health care system as well. There should have been many more hospital beds available (even if empty most of the time), more respirators, protective suits, and so forth. If you don't have that infrastructure, you will have to build it quickly, like you do in a war. It was funny to see those pictures of dozens of caterpillars digging the foundations of emergency hospitals in China, but a week later, those hospitals were actually ready. America did that sort of thing in World War II, regular factories were converted into producing arms, planes, ships, at an incredible rate. But for that to happen you need leadership. There was a Franklin D. Roosevelt then, not a Trump.
And the rest of the infrastructure?
For collapsologists, it will be interesting to see how the rest of the infrastructure holds together. Here in California, the Internet works (thank God), electricity flows, the mailperson makes his or her rounds, and amazon deliveries are still happening, albeit a bit delayed already. Even though there are lines in front of the supermarkets (people spaced two meters apart), there are not real food shortages. But will it stay that way?
The other day, I was reassured by reading an article in the L.A. Times about electricity distribution in California. "Say what you will about the utility industry they池e pretty good about contingency planning," Stephen Berberich, president of the California Independent System Operator, which manages the electric grid for most of the state, was quoted. The big electric grids, though sometimes weak, are systems that have always planned for disaster. They might be more vulnerable by a computer virus than a biological one.
But still, things can get stressed way too much. What if an earthquake decides to strike us right now? For example, a major rupture of the Hayward Fault, running through Oakland and Berkeley, about 10 km from where I live, is way overdue. Kamala Harris, California senator and recently a presidential candidate, worried aloud about this. It's not just a fantasy. Just a couple of days ago, there was a mid-size earthquake outside Zagreb. People running out on the street and congregating, instead of staying inside, as per official Coronavirus mitigation strategy.
A cure worse than the disease?
Isn't the current cure what's causing the "slow collapse"? That's probably what President Trump and his people think. They don't want the economy fall to pieces. "The U.S. was not built to be shut down," he said today. He wants to get things running soon again. But what's more important, the economy or the people? Or are they one and the same?
It's a big, bold and perhaps desperate experiment, all this shutting down of everything, of "non-essential businesses", of more activities day by day, including most transportation and especially flying. There is certainly a danger that the whole economic edifice, or house of cards, depending on your point of view, could yet fall down. So interesting to watch this in real time! But just let's not be caught underneath the rubble.
Gail Tverberg (students of collapsology will know her) wrote recently on her blog: "Human beings cannot stop eating and breathing for a month. They cannot have sleep apnea for an hour at a time, and function afterward. Economies cannot stop functioning for a month and afterward resume operations at their previous level. Too many people will have lost their jobs; too many businesses will have failed in the meantime."
There is already talk of "cascading effects" in the mainstream press. And today, on Bloomberg, the word "domino effect": "Real estate investor Tom Barrack said the U.S. commercial-mortgage market is on the brink of collapse and predicted a domino effect of catastrophic economic consequences if ". This is classical collapsology.
The psychological impact
You cannot tell people just to stay at home, not to do anything, for a long time. It's bad for their mental health. Many will become slightly unhinged. The "Guardian" just had an article about domestic violence increasing, in China in February and now in the U.S. as well: "A domestic violence hotline in Portland, Oregon, says calls doubled last week." And "The New Yorker" came out with this story: "How Loneliness from Coronavirus Isolation Takes Its Toll".
The "shelter in place" policy actually exacerbates the gulf between the haves and the have-nots. You were lucky if you had booked a suite with a balcony on the "Diamond Princess" cruise ship when you had to wait out fourteen days of quarantine, instead of an interior room without any windows at all. The same goes for small apartments in a crowded city.
Stay-at-home and creative types like writers can cope with this, but most people are dependent on going out, having a drink at a bar, going to the movies, be part of a crowd. It's bad for the average guy, for the working classes, to be cooped up like that.
Positive sides, unintended
If you are not too stressed out, it's a time for reflection. Cherishing nature, family, or even thinking of death, it's good for you. Strangely enough, most churches are closed, as well. It will be a most unusual Easter this year.
Less greenhouse gases getting released, the air becomes clean again, for example in China. Time slows down, becomes available again. It's a period of deceleration. And by and by it starts to resemble a "World Made by Hand", the title of a novel by James Howard Kunstler, in which the post-collapse world was not a bad one indeed.
And despite of the new etiquette of "social distancing" (a brand-new expression, only ten days old or so) there is more face-to-face friendliness. And people are more in touch with each other via telephone, email, Facebook and such.
Just a dress rehearsal?
It's a big moment in history and therefore exciting. There is a "global feeling". Awaiting the coming days, weeks, and months. I communicate with my friends in Austria, Germany, and the Czech Republic as much as I can. Everyone does this now. When will we see each other again? We are united in isolation. And it's a global unity against an unseen, common enemy.
But perhaps this is just a fire drill, a dress rehearsal. The real thing, a much worse pandemic, might come later. A more contagious, and/or more deadly virus could emerge. Peter Daszak, a well-known "disease ecologist", thinks the current crisis will prove to be manageable, noting that the mortality rate of Covid-19 isn稚 as great as SARS and the spread isn稚 rampant. "I知 not hiding in my bunker right now," he told the "Wall Street Journal" at the beginning of the month. "We池e going to get hit by a much bigger one sometime in the next 10 years." Really?
So we collapsologists may get our "Big One" after all. We may even die from it.
Up to now, we were more or less theoreticians. Now it gets far more real. We were Cassandras, collapse aficionados, we kind of enjoyed our post-apocalyptic visions.
But who would have thought that we would really experience something like this?
Now we should stop speculating and start analyzing this event, the Coronavirus Crisis of 2020 or whatever it will be called. Create a framework, set rules, detect mechanisms, make Collapsology a real science.
Herbert Krill is an Austrian documentary filmmaker currently working in the San Francisco Bay Area. In 2012, he directed "American Collapse", a 45-minute documentary for the German-language Public TV network 3SAT.



This is a pretty good synopsis of the big picture,, JRM.

We knew for years that "global pandemic" was on the list for potential Black Swan events......it just wasn't the one I thought was MOST likely......but turns out, it is a big deal....and not specifically because of a mass die-off. The whole idea that this is a true mass die-off......does NOT quite hold water, from what I see. But the economic impact of the lockdown is going to eclipse the 2008 crash...and make the subsequent publicly financed bailouts look small.

I'm not trying to be cold hearted. I care about the deaths...I read that in NYC somebody is dying of COVID every 17 minutes today,,,and the numbers keep rising.

But the conservatives, lying pieces of shit that they are, have a point about the economic fallout.

We've managed the whole epidemic very poorly by not ramping up testing in January. We are 4 months behind in terms of dealing with this.....it's going to have major impacts....things...institutions, markets...ARE going to fail.

Nobody has a clue exactly how bad it might be, at this point. All I can say is that we're probably okay generally speaking in most places int he US....for a few more weeks,,,,that's about it.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2020, 04:39:42 AM by Surly1 »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

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Re: 🦠 Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #216 on: March 28, 2020, 11:03:17 AM »
One week, maybe two.

I concur.

RE
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🦠 Zaandam cruise ship stranded at sea with two coronavirus cases
« Reply #217 on: March 28, 2020, 06:07:39 PM »
Maybe they can pull the Hospital Ship up alongside!   :icon_sunny:

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🦠 Sudden spike in new Tokyo virus cases brings dire warning for Japan
« Reply #218 on: March 29, 2020, 02:30:06 AM »
As if Radioactive Sushi, Tsunamis, Typhoons and Volcanic Eruptions were nnot enough!

Tokyo could excedn NY Shity or Los Angeles!

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/coronavirus-in-japan-could-spike-as-tokyo-cases-jump-today-2020-03-26/

Sudden spike in new Tokyo virus cases brings dire warning for Japan

By Lucy Craft

March 26, 2020 / 9:52 AM / CBS News

Tokyo The Japanese capital registered 47 new coronavirus cases Thursday, its biggest single-day rise, as the metropolis of 13.9 million people prepares for a weekend indoors. The worrying jump in infections prompted Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike to hold a video conference with her counterparts in neighboring prefectures, asking them to help the greater Tokyo region to isolate itself.

Six prefectures responded quickly, asking citizens to avoid all nonessential trips into the capital, or even to stay home altogether. The region is home to about 40 million people about a third of Japan's total population.

Japan Battles Against The Coronavirus Outbreak

People, some wearing face masks, walk through a park as they enjoy cherry blossom season on March 26, 2020 in Tokyo, Japan. Carl Court/Getty

Disease experts are concerned not just about Japan's rising case numbers, but their inability to trace the routes of infection. Tokyo, said Koike, "is now at a critical juncture."
Coronavirus: The Race To Respond

    Coronavirus updates: Millions of jobless seek help as 1,000 die in U.S.
    Pregnant women face birth alone during coronavirus
    Coronavirus relief bill moves to the House for Friday vote
    American expats fear coronavirus could leave them in limbo

More in Coronavirus: The Race To Respond

Compared to Manhattan, Milan or other big cities grappling with tens of thousands of cases, Japan's total of 2,000-plus infections about a third of them from the outbreak on the Diamond Princess cruise ship might seem insignificant. But the spiraling stats are so troubling an expert government panel released its most dire analysis ever today, saying it is "highly likely" Japan will see "rampant" infections.

That assessment triggered the formation of a central task force to direct the coronavirus fight. It also paved the way for Prime Minister Abe to declare a state of national emergency, though officials said that extreme move wasn't warranted yet. A state of emergency would enable officials to order residents to stay inside, expropriate private land for medical care, and take other extreme measures.

Governor Koike's request that one of the world's most populous cities spend the weekend indoors unleashed a frenzy of shopping so panicky the Agriculture Ministry was forced to ask the public to stop hoarding and offer reassurances that food remains plentiful. The country also has several months' worth of rice and wheat stockpiled.
Coronavirus: Responses around the world
Coronavirus: Responses around the world 53 photos

While Japanese workplaces are remarkably inflexible, the crisis has pushed at least larger companies to get serious about teleworking. About 70% of firms belonging to Japan's chamber of commerce, the Keidanren, said they have or plan to introduce working from home because of the coronavirus outbreak.

Japan has so far escaped the massive disruption to daily life seen in the U.S. and other countries. While sumo is now played to jarringly empty arenas, and residents have been asked to refrain from their beloved custom of picnicking during cherry blossom season, citizens have been free to shop, stroll to day spas and movies, and go out to eat albeit with more face mask use and hand-sanitizing than usual.
Japan Battles Against The Coronavirus Outbreak
Commuters make their way to work on March 26, 2020 in Tokyo, Japan. Getty

Theories as to why Japan's outbreak has been more muted than elsewhere vary. Some say a cultural avoidance of physical contact hugging, kissing and handshaking are rare here and an obsessive use of face masks year-round, along with a general high level of personal hygiene, may have helped keep the virus at bay. The less charitable theory is that Japan kept its numbers down by not going all-in on testing, as South Korea and other countries have done.

Whatever the reason, one thing is clear: If this weekend's voluntary measures are ineffective, residents here are bracing for the lockdowns that have become familiar in harder-hit regions of the world.

First published on March 26, 2020 / 9:52 AM
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🦠 Florida coronavirus cases pass 4000: state border checkpoints begin,...
« Reply #219 on: March 29, 2020, 03:28:14 AM »
As if Hurricanes & Rising Sea Levels were not enough...  ::)

RE

Florida coronavirus cases pass 4000: state border checkpoints begin, vacation rentals halted
James Call
USA TODAY NETWORK-Florida Capital Bureau


Florida governor plans checkpoints to screen Louisianians, suspend vacation rentals as cases pass 4,000

When the number of coronavirus deaths reached 54 in Florida on Saturday, Gov. Ron DeSantis told the state's surgeon general, Dr. Scott Rivkees, to get on the phone and send a public health alert to every Florida resident.

The message Rivkees texted Saturday afternoon was a repeat of the advisory he issued Wednesday, that people 65 and older, and those with underlying medical conditions, should stay home and avoid crowds, and everyone should practice "social distancing."

By Saturday evening, the number of coronavirus cases in Florida stood at 4,038, more than a fivefold increase from a week ago, when the state reported 706 infections. The death count creeped up to 56.

The virus has been particularly fatal for those over the age of 65, with that group making up 89% of statewide deaths. Another 35% were between the ages of 55 and 74, while people younger made up 4% of the fatalities and those over 85 were 19% of deaths.

撤rotect yourself. Now is not the time to go outside. Don稚 get involved in any big crowds, use this time to protect yourself, DeSantis said in a briefing live-streamed from his conference room in the Capitol.

DeSantis and public health officials are in a race to control the spread of the virus before it overwhelms the ability of hospitals and health care professionals to deliver care.

On Friday, he issued an executive order expanding a previous directive that airline travelers from the New York City area self-quarantine for 14 days to include people from Louisiana who enter the state on Interstate 10.

The order would not apply to commercial transportation.

New Orleans is experiencing a coronavirus surge of more than 1,000 infections linked to the Mardi Gras celebration in February, sending Louisiana's total number of cases past 3,300 as of Saturday. DeSantis wants to intercept any Louisiana travelers from 都eeding the virus in Florida.

It's about a three-hour drive from New Orleans to Pensacola, Florida, and panhandle officials had expressed concerns to him about travelers fleeing the Bayou State and carrying the virus into Florida.

鏑ook, we池e either trying to fight this virus or we are not, DeSantis said of his plan that includes a checkpoint on Interstate 10 at the Alabama line and National Guard members greeting travelers from the New York City area at airports.

展e致e done what we could with New York City and we池e also doing the same with the New Orleans hot spot, DeSantis said.
Bourbon Street is empty on March 16 as Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards orders bars, gyms and casinos to close until April 13th due to the spread of the coronavirus.

His executive orders defined the greater New York City area and Louisiana as areas with substantial community spread. Individuals traveling from those regions must "self-declare" they came from a hot spot and agree to quarantine themselves for 14 days upon arrival in Florida. A violation could mean a 60-day jail sentence and fines of up to $500.

Signs were erected along I-10 to direct eastbound drivers to a checkpoint where they were notified about the requirement. DeSantis said he was also looking at establishing one on I-95 to catch New York travelers.

But while the Georgia Public Health Department has called Albany, 88 miles north of Tallahassee, a region with "sustained community spread of the coronavirus, DeSantis shrugged about establishing a checkpoint on I-75. And his office did not respond to questions about U.S. 319. Both thoroughfares connect north Florida to Albany.
A streetcar conductor wears a mask on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans on Saturday, amid an outbreak of the new coronavirus.

滴aving the 10 and 95 (checkpoints) is good and I think that provides the protection, DeSantis said when asked about other routes into the state.

The governor also called on local airport authorities and airlines to help identify travelers from hotspots. The National Guard and public health officials are stationed at major airports and DeSantis called on local airport authorities to help to screen arrivals at smaller airports like Tallahassee's for contact with hot zones.

的 think it is in everybody痴 interest that we deal with the spread we have now, try to blunt it, flatten the curve, but we don稚 allow importing new infections, DeSantis said.

On Friday, he said the state would suspend vacation rentals for two weeks, telling visitors, "If you're in one now, finish and go home."
Gov. Ron DeSantis holds a press conference to address the latest updates on how COVID-19 is impacting Florida and what steps his team is taking to prevent the spread of the virus, Friday, March 20, 2020.

Despite a growing support among lawmakers to do so, DeSantis has refused to issue a statewide lockdown limiting residents' movements like 22 other states have done in some fashion. Instead, he has preferred to let local governments decide. At least 10 counties have imposed some form of restriction, closing non-essential businesses and advising residents to stay home.

Local restrictions are tight in South Florida with orders in place in Broward and Miami-Dade counties, which report nearly half of the state痴 infections.

Hillsborough and Pinellas counties have also issued directives as have Orange and Osceola counties in Central Florida. Some communities, including Leon County, have also imposed curfews, and many have threatened to enforce with arrests or fines as high as $500.

James Call is a member of the USA TODAY NETWORK-Florida Capital Bureau. He can be reached at jcall@tallahassee.com and follow him on Twitter @CallTallahassee.

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🦠 More than 9,000 coronavirus deaths in Italy, overtakes China in cases
« Reply #220 on: March 29, 2020, 09:41:44 AM »
I gotta do a follow-up chat with Ugo this month.  Over 300 Views/Listens/Downloads to the Broadcast with Ugo, George Mobus, K-Dog & me so far.  :icon_sunny:

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TEOTWAWKI ARRIVES!
« Reply #221 on: March 29, 2020, 10:55:35 PM »


youtube-Logo-4gc2reddit-logoOff the keyboard, microphone & camera of RE



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Published on The Doomstead Diner  March 29, 2020






 



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Available Streaming over the web or by mp3 Download on Diner Soundcloud






Discuss this Video & Article at the Medicine & Health Table inside the Diner



 



No intro article yet.  I am neck deep in video editing.  Maybe later today  For now, you just gotta watch the vid.


« Last Edit: March 29, 2020, 11:22:30 PM by RE »
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🦠 Spain tightens lockdown as coronavirus death toll spikes
« Reply #222 on: March 30, 2020, 02:30:42 AM »
https://www.politico.com/news/2020/03/28/spain-tightens-lockdown-as-coronavirus-death-toll-spikes-152888

Europe
Spain tightens lockdown as coronavirus death toll spikes

Only essential workplaces to remain open, PM S疣chez says.

Emergency workers wearing full protective suits carry an elderly COVID-19 patient to an ambulance in Sabadell, near Barcelona, Spain. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

By CRISTINA GALLARDO

03/28/2020 03:41 PM EDT


All non-essential workplaces in Spain will close for two weeks to try to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Prime Minister Pedro S疣chez said Saturday after the country痴 death toll climbed to nearly 5,700.

Speaking at a press conference, S疣chez said the measure will come into force Monday and last until April 9. Workers will receive their usual wages but will have to make up lost hours at a later date, he said. The goal is to reduce travel to levels registered during the weekends, he added.

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S疣chez had faced pressure to tighten the country's lockdown from regional leaders, including from his own Socialist party, anxious to slow the spread of the virus across the country from Madrid, officials said.

S疣chez announced the move on the day that Spain痴 death toll climbed to 5,690 as of 11.30 a.m., up by 832 since Friday morning. A total of 72,248 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed, with 4,575 people receiving treatment in intensive care units, and 12,285 recovering.

典hese are very tough, sad, bitter days. But they are decisive because they are the ones in which we have to measure ourselves. And then we will have an entire life to remember that in the difficult times, resisting, united, Spain made the grade, he said.
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🦠 Health officials paint stark image of coronavirus' impact on the U.S.
« Reply #223 on: March 30, 2020, 04:16:11 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/NXgYqk1VNLs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/NXgYqk1VNLs</a>
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🦠 In Pictures: New York, the coronavirus epicentre in the US
« Reply #224 on: March 31, 2020, 05:31:51 PM »
https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/pictures-york-coronavirus-epicentre-200331072157721.html


In Pictures: New York, the coronavirus epicentre in the US


Field hospital in Central Park and US Navy ship Comfort in Hudson River give wartime feel to city's coronavirus crisis.

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In Pictures: New York, the coronavirus epicentre in the US

  • 14 hours ago
US Navy hospital ship Comfort passes the Statue of Liberty as it enters New York Harbor. The ship arrived with 1,000 beds to relieve pressure on overwhelmed hospitals. [Mike Segar/Reuters]
US Navy hospital ship Comfort passes the Statue of Liberty as it enters New York Harbor. The ship arrived with 1,000 beds to relieve pressure on overwhelmed hospitals. Mike Segar/Reuters

The mounting death toll from the virus outbreak in the United States had it poised on Tuesday to overtake China's grim toll of 3,300 deaths.

The US has the most confirmed cases in the world, a number that is likely to soar when tests for the virus become more widespread.

More:

In New York City, Governor Andrew Cuomo and health officials warned on Monday that the crisis unfolding there is just a preview of what other US communities could soon face.

New York State's death toll climbed by more than 250 people in a day on Monday to more than 1,200, most of them in the city.

Hospitals in New York City have been overrun with patients suffering from COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the virus. Officials have appealed for volunteer healthcare workers.

People in New York and New Jersey lined both sides of the Hudson River to cheer the US Navy hospital ship, Comfort, a converted oil tanker painted white with giant red crosses, as it sailed past the Statue of Liberty accompanied by support ships and helicopters.

To ease the pressure in New York, construction of a 68-bed field hospital began on Sunday in Manhattan's Central Park. The white tents being set up evoked a wartime feel in an island of green typically used by New Yorkers to exercise, picnic and enjoy the first signs of spring.

The makeshift facility, provided by the Mount Sinai Health System and non-profit organisation Samaritan's Purse, is expected to begin accepting patients on Tuesday, New York Major Bill de Blasio said.

The Broadway theatre district has emptied. So far 930 members of the New York Police Department have tested positive for the disease. [Jeenah Moon/Reuters]
Most Americans remain under state or local government orders to stay at home to slow the spread of the virus. [Jeenah Moon/Reuters]
People wait in line to be tested for the coronavirus outside Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens. [Jeenah Moon/Reuters]
A healthcare worker sits on a bench near Central Park, Manhattan. [Jeenah Moon/Reuters]
A man wearing a facial mask walks across 5th Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. Americans are now being asked to prepare for at least another 30 days of severe economic and social disruption. [Mary Altaffer/AP Photo]
People line up to receive free meals from the Bowery Mission soup kitchen and shelter. The shelter typically serves 250 meals each day, but recently at least 400 people have been showing up for food daily, as more people deal with the economic impacts of the coronavirus-related shutdown of all non-essential businesses. [Justin Lane/EPA]
Field tents are erected as a makeshift hospital in the East Meadow of Central Park by the disaster relief organisation, Samaritan's Purse. New York City is the epicentre of the coronavirus in the US. [Peter Foley/EPA]
Two bodies on hospital trolleys are prepared for storage in a mobile morgue, put in place due to a lack of space at the Brooklyn Hospital Center. [Justin Lane/EPA]
Medical professionals and hospital employees transfer a body into temporary storage in a mobile morgue at the Brooklyn Hospital Center. Most of the state’s deaths have occurred in the past 10 days. [Justin Lane/EPA]
A doctor stands with a stack of gloves and masks donated by the Chinese community outside the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens, New York. [Justin Lane/EPA]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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