AuthorTopic: 🦠 Killer Superbugs!  (Read 42081 times)

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🦠 Latin America coronavirus death toll hits 200,000: Live updates
« Reply #600 on: August 02, 2020, 01:42:09 AM »
Shouldn't that be "Dead Updates"?  ???   :icon_scratch:

RE

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/08/south-africa-coronavirus-cases-surpass-500000-live-updates-200801231108440.html

Latin America coronavirus death toll hits 200,000: Live updates

Most of COVID-19 fatalities in South America recorded in Brazil, Mexico; Australia's Victoria declares state disaster.
by Ted Regencia & Umut Uras
an hour ago


    The death toll in Latin America from the novel coronavirus has surpassed 200,000, a Reuters tally showed, after Peru reported another 191 deaths from the pandemic early on Sunday.

    South Africa has surpassed 500,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, representing more than 50 percent of all reported coronavirus infections in Africa's 54 countries. It also reported more than 8,000 deaths.

    Thousands of demonstrators have gathered in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv to demand the resignation of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for his handling of the coronavirus emergency, and the alleged corruption in his government.

    More than 17.79 million people around the world have been diagnosed with the new coronavirus. Almost 10.5 million patients have recovered and more than 684,000 have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Here are the latest updates:
Sunday, August 2
07:50 - Russia's coronavirus cases surpass 850,000

Russia reported 5,427 new cases of the novel coronavirus, bringing its nationwide tally to 850,870, the fourth largest caseload in the world.

Russia's coronavirus taskforce said 70 people had died over the last 24 hours, pushing the official death toll in the country of around 145 million people to 14,128.
07:20 GMT - Tokyo confirms 292 new coronavirus cases on Sunday - NHK

Tokyo confirmed 292 new coronavirus infections, after cases rose by more than 400 in the past two days, public broadcaster NHK said.

Governor Koike Yuriko said on Friday Tokyo could declare a state of emergency if the coronavirus situation in the Japanese capital deteriorates further, as debate deepened over how to respond to record increases in new infections.
Coronavirus - Japan
Passengers wearing protective face masks pass through the automated entranceway at a station in Tokyo [Reuters]
07:00 GMT - Mexico registers record 9,556 new daily cases

Mexico's health ministry reported a record 9,556 new confirmed cases of coronavirus and 784 additional fatalities, bringing the total in the country to 434,193 cases and 47,472 deaths.

The government has said the real number of infected people is likely significantly higher than the confirmed cases.
06:25 GMT - Philippines to update COVID-19 strategy

The Philippines' health department vowed to update its game plan against COVID-19 within a week and sought to beef up the healthcare workforce in the capital Manila, where medical frontliners are calling for reviving strict lockdowns.

The Southeast Asian country on Saturday reported 4,963 additional coronavirus infections, the largest single-day jump on record, bringing its total confirmed cases to 98,232, while its death toll had climbed to 2,039.

It has the second-highest number of coronavirus infections and COVID-19 deaths in the region, behind Indonesia.

In the largest call yet from medical experts to contain the virus, 80 groups representing 80,000 doctors and a million nurses, on Saturday said the Philippines was losing the fight against the disease and warned of a collapse of the healthcare system from soaring infections without tighter controls.
06:00 GMT - India's cases cross 1.75 million

India’s coronavirus caseload crosses 1.75 million with another spike of 54,735 in the past 24 hours.

The new cases are down from 57,118 on Saturday. The Health Ministry on Sunday also reported 853 deaths for a total of 37,364.

The month of July alone has accounted for more than 1.1 million cases in India.Health Minister Harsh Vardhan said the case fatality rate was progressively reducing and currently stands at 2.18 percent, one of the lowest globally.
Outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Ahmedabad
A healthcare worker wearing protective gear takes a swab sample from a man in Ahmedabad, India [Reuters]
05:30 GMT - Australia's Victoria imposes curfew to contain COVID-19

A state of disaster was declared in Australia's Victoria, with the local government implementing a night curfew as part of its harshest movement restrictions to date to contain the coronavirus.

State Premier Daniel Andrews said that the new restrictions, to be in place for six weeks until mid-September, will allow only one person per household to go shopping once a day. Melbournians will not be able to go further than five kilometres (3 miles) from home.

Hello, this is Umut Uras in Doha taking over from my colleague Ted Regencia.
04:52 GMT - Australia's Victoria declares state disaster over coronavirus

Australia's state of Victoria has declared a state of disaster on Sunday, and announced a lockdown following a surge in the number of coronavirus cases.

A curfew has been issued in the city of Melbourne beginning at 8pm on Sunday night.

Residents of Melbourne are also ordered not to travel beyond five kilometres (3.1 miles) from their residence.
04:33 GMT - Tokyo reports record 472 new cases

Tokyo reported a record 472 new cases of the coronavirus, NHK reported on Sunday.

The daily tally in the Japanese capital topped 400 for the second day in a row as of the end of Saturday. That puts the total number of infections in Tokyo more than 13,000.

Tokyo officials say the increase may be due to outings during the 4-day holiday last month.

Nationwide, more than 1,500 new infections were reported as of the end of Saturday.

The latest Johns Hopkins University tally on Sunday showed a total of 37,780 cases and just over 1,000 deaths.
04:03 GMT - Austrian foreign office staff tests positive of coronavirus

Authorities have announced that an employee at the Austrian chancellery has tested positive for the coronavirus, but did not work directly with Chancellor Sebastian Kurz, according to AP news agency.

The Austria Press Agency reported the chancellery says people who were in contact with the employee have tested negative and the office's work was not affected by the support worker's infection. Kurz is tested regularly for the virus.

Austria's handling of the pandemic has generally been viewed as relatively successful. The country recently toughened rules on wearing masks after an increase in new infections.

Austria has 718 confirmed deaths, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.
03:47 GMT - South Korea reports 22 new importted cases, eight local infections

South Korea reported 30 new cases of the coronavirus on Sunday, with 22 of them imported cases and eight local cases, marking the second day in a row that local infections have increased by a single-digit figure, according to Yonhap news agency.

The new cases raised South Korea's total cases of COVID-19 to 14,366, while the nation's death toll remained at 301, according to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC).

The number of new cases has been in the 30s since Friday when South Korea reported 36 new virus cases. The number fell to 31 on Saturday.
03:25 GMT - France starts testing passengers from 16 countries at airports, ports

Travelers entering France from 16 countries where the coronavirus is circulating widely must have virus tests upon arrival at French airports and ports, AP news agency reported.

French Prime Minister Jean Castex announced last month the tests would be required starting on Saturday for the arriving passengers, unless they present proof of a negative test within 72 hours of their departure.

Those who test positive in France must quarantine for 14 days.

France is not permitting general travel to and from the 16 countries, which include the hotspots of the United States and Brazil.
02:49 GMT - Manila's Catholic leader orders shutdown of church activities, mass gatherings
Quiapo ChurchThe Philippines has reported over 98,000 cases and more than 2,000 deaths as of Saturday [File: Aaron Favila/AP]

The head of Manila's Catholic church has ordered the suspension of all public activities and other mass gatherings for the next ten days, as part of the effort to help curb the spread of the coronavirus in the Philippine capital.

"As a response to the call of our medical people, all the churches and shrines in the Archdiocese of Manila will revert to the period of ECQ protocols," Bishop Broderick Pabillo, the head of the Archdiocese of Manila said, in reference to the previous strict lockdown procedures imposed in Manila.

"We will not hold public religious activities from August 3 to 14 but we continue our online activities," he added in the statement issued late on Saturday. Pabillo had earlier tested positive of the virus.

The Philippines' more than 100 million population is predominantly Catholic. The head of the Manila church is seen as the most influential figure in the Catholic hierarchy in the country.

The Philippines has reported over 98,000 cases and over 2,000 deaths as of Saturday.
02:37 GMT - Brazil reports 45,392 new coronavirus cases, 1,088 deaths in last 24 hours

Brazil has recorded 45,392 additional confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus as well as 1,088 deaths from the disease caused by the virus in the past 24 hours, Reuters reported quoting the country's health ministry.

Brazil has registered more than 2.7 million cases of the virus since the pandemic began, while the official death toll has risen to 93,563, according to ministry data.
02:05 GMT - Australia's Victoria sees more than 650 new coronavirus cases

Australia's state of Victoria reported more than 650 infections of the new coronavirus on Sunday, up from 397 cases the previous day, Reuters news reported city ABC News television.

Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews is to announce the official number of cases later on Sunday, together with a set of new measures to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus.
01:40 GMT - Mainland China reports 49 new coronavirus cases, including 30 in Xinjiang

China has reported 49 cases of the new coronavirus in the mainland as of the end of August 1, up from 45 cases a day earlier, Reuters news agency reported on Sunday quoting the health commission.

Of the new infections, 30 were in the far western region of Xinjiang, three were in the northeastern province of Liaoning, and the remaining 16 were imported cases, according to a statement by the National Health Commission.

China reported 20 new asymptomatic cases, down from 23 a day earlier. As of the end of Saturday, mainland China had 84,385 confirmed coronavirus cases, the health authority said. The COVID-19 death toll remained at 4,634.
01:30 GMT - Italy's daily COVID-19 infections dip under 300

Italy's daily coronavirus infections has dipped under 300 cases for the first time in three days, after a recent flurry of clusters throughout the nation raised concern among health experts, according to AP news agency.

The Health Ministry says Italy registered 295 cases in the last 24 hours, raising the total to 247,832.

The ministry’s weekly report says there were 123 clusters of infection throughout Italy in the previous seven days.

Meanwhile, Health Minister Roberto Speranza ordered the railways to resume leaving empty seats so passengers can be at least one meter (3 ½ feet) apart during summer travel.

With five more deaths, the total confirmed deaths in Italy reached more than 35,000 as of the end of Saturday.
01:04 GMT - Mexico reports new record of more than 9,500 coronavirus cases
Coronavirus - Mexico
With over 47,000 confirmed deaths, Mexico is already the third country in the world with the most deaths due to the coronavirus pandemic [Jorge Núñez/EPA]

Mexico has racked up a record number of new confirmed coronavirus infections, registering more than 9,000 daily cases for the first time and passing the previous peak for the second day running, Reuters news agency reported on Sunday quoting official data.

Mexico's health ministry reported 9,556 new cases of coronavirus on Saturday, surging past the record of 8,458 set on Friday. The ministry also logged 784 additional fatalities, bringing the total tally in the country to 434,193 cases and 47,472 deaths.

The new record in cases came a day after Mexico overtook Britain as the country with the third-highest number of deaths caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Mexico has struggled to contain the virus, and has since late May been trying to restart the economy, which in the April-June period contracted by more than 17 percent quarter-on-quarter.
00:47 GMT - High-ranking US Congress member tests positive of coronavirus

Congressman Raul Grijalva, a high-ranking member of the US Congress from the state of Arizona has announced that he has the coronavirus.

The Democrat says he tested positive for the coronavirus days after he sat close to another member, Texas Rep Louie Gohmert, who announced a positive test this week.

The 72-year-old Grivalva is at least the 11th member of Congress known to have tested positive for the virus.

Gohmert, a Republican, has questioned the use of masks and often walked around the Capitol without one.
00:30 GMT - Greece confirms 110 new coronavirus cases

Greek authorities say there were 110 new confirmed coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours, the fourth-highest daily figure and highest since April, according to AP news agency.

Authorities say 23 of the cases concerned employees at a meat processing factory in the northern city of Kavala. Tests on all 140 employees are still ongoing. Another 10 cases involved people who attended a wedding in the northern city of Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest.

Only nine of the cases involved incoming travelers.

Greece has 4,587 total confirmed cases and 206 deaths, with no deaths reported as if the end of Saturday.
00:05 GMT - Vietnam reports four new COVID-19 cases; two are imported
Coronavirus - Vietnam
Vietnam has registered a total of 590 cases and at least three confirmed deaths [Luong Thai Linh/EPA]

Vietnam's health ministry has reported four new coronavirus cases, including two locally transmitted and two imported cases, according to Reuters News Agency.

The Southeast Asian country has registered a total of 590 cases, of which 144 infections are linked to the recent outbreak in the coastal city of Danang. Vietnam has recorded three deaths, the health ministry said in a statement.
00:01 GMT - Thousands demand Netanyahu resignation as Israel PM

Thousands of demonstrators have gathered outside the official residence of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and thronged the streets of central Jerusalem, as weeks of protests against the Israeli leader appeared to be gaining steam.

The demonstration in central Jerusalem, along with smaller gatherings in Tel Aviv, near Netanyahu's beach house in central Israel and at dozens of busy intersections nationwide, was one of the largest turnouts in weeks of protests.

Israeli media estimated at least 10,000 people demonstrated near the official residence in central Jerusalem.

Late on Saturday, thousands marched through the streets in a noisy but orderly rally. Demonstrators hoisted Israeli flags and blew loud horns as they marched. Many held posters that said "Crime Minister" and "Bibi Go Home" or accused Netanyahu of being out of touch with the public.

For months, thousands of Israelis have taken to the streets, calling for Netanyahu to resign, protesting his handling of the country's coronavirus crisis and saying he should not remain in office while on trial for corruption charges. Though Netanyahu has tried to play down the protests, the twice-a-week gatherings show no signs of slowing.

_________________________________________________________________

Hello and welcome to Al Jazeera's continuing coverage of the coronavirus pandemic. I'm Ted Regencia in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

For all the key coronavirus-related developments from yesterday, August 1st, click here.

Philippines to update COVID-19 strategy as healthcare workers seek "timeout"
MANILA, Aug 2 (Reuters) - The Philippines' health department vowed on Sunday to update its game plan against COVID-19 within a week and sought to beef up the healthcare workforce in the capital Manila, where medical frontliners are calling for reviving strict lockdowns.

The Southeast Asian country on Saturday reported 4,963 additional coronavirus infections, the largest single-day jump on record, bringing its total confirmed cases to 98,232, while its death toll had climbed to 2,039.

It has the second-highest number of coronavirus infections and COVID-19 deaths in the region, behind Indonesia.

In the largest call yet from medical experts to contain the virus, 80 groups representing 80,000 doctors and a million nurses, on Saturday said the Philippines was losing the fight against the disease and warned of a collapse of the healthcare system from soaring infections without tighter controls.
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No notification yet AFAIK about delaying Skule Opening up here yet.

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🦠 As COVID-19 pandemic tightens grip on U.S., Trump ratchets up the cruelty
« Reply #602 on: August 04, 2020, 05:30:19 AM »
https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2020-08-03/pandemic-trump-cruelty-covid19-coronavirus

Column: As COVID-19 pandemic tightens grip on U.S., Trump ratchets up the cruelty

President Trump took a day off from creating more pain for American workers by going golfing on Saturday.
(AP)

By Michael HiltzikBusiness Columnist
Aug. 3, 2020
12 PM
UPDATED12 PM

Let’s dispense with the myth that the Trump administration has no strategy related to the coronavirus pandemic.

In his statements and the actions of federal agencies under his control, as well as the positions held by his Republican congressional caucus, the strategy is clear: Use the pandemic to make America a crueler place.

In only the last few weeks, Trump and the Republicans have:

— Raised additional obstacles for families applying for food stamps;

— Made it easier for businesses to fire workers who speak out against discrimination;

— Undermined the U.S. Postal Service, increasing the isolation of Americans for whom the mail is a lifeline to the outside world, and of course posing a possible issue with mail-in ballots in the coming election;

— Blocked the extension of the $600 increase in pandemic unemployment benefits, which expired last week, for nearly 30 million workers.

    In some cases people are overpaid and we want to make sure there are the right incentives.

Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin, a multimillionaire, frets about the working class

That’s just a sampling of concrete actions. Trump’s dereliction of duty as leader of the federal government goes much further.

He has exploited the pandemic to divide the American public by turning state and local efforts to stem the contagion into partisan purity tests.

His pronouncements about such fundamental policies as mask-wearing and social distancing have been consistently contradictory. When the facts contradict Trump’s claims, he lies about them or attacks the truth-tellers, even when they’re members of his own team.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), left, and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas).

Business

Column: In GOP plan, you can’t sue your employers for giving you COVID — but they can sue you

July 29, 2020

He continues to push hydroxychloroquine as a “miracle” treatment for COVID-19, despite incontrovertible evidence from random controlled trials, the gold standard in medical research, that it doesn’t work and may even be hazardous for some patients.

Trump praised as “very impressive” a spectacularly unhinged and data-free public appearance by Stella Immanuel, a Houston doctor who called the drug a “cure” and maintains on her website that “serious gynecological problems, Marital distress, miscarriages, impotence, untold hardship, financial failure and general failure” are caused by “evil spiritual marriages” and “demon sperm.”

Following Trump’s lead, the GOP faithful seem to have taken a thoroughly defeatist attitude toward the pandemic. A Republican corporate CEO (now retired) with whom I’ve long conducted a cordial exchange of differing opinions wrote me in mid-July to say he doesn’t “condemn the President as I don’t believe anyone would have handled the situation materially better.”

This is, of course, absurd. Most European and Asian countries, including some that exist at the global poverty line, have handled the pandemic “materially better” than the U.S.; indeed, only Brazil, which is led by a Trump sycophant, has handled it worse.

Even within the U.S., the variation among individual states is wide. Florida has had an average of 40 new daily cases and 0.93 daily death per 100,000 residents over the last seven days; New York has had 3 cases and 0.05 death per 100,000 residents.

New York was the poster child for the ravages of COVID-19 in March and April, when the disease was much more of a mystery, but it learned from its mistakes. Florida, the statistics indicate, hasn’t bothered to learn from New York’s mistakes and seems determined to make the same ones on its own.

Consistent messaging and policy initiatives from the White House almost certainly would have helped communicate to the rest of the country the lessons learned by the early-hit states. But Trump and his team didn’t create any. Its advisories on reopening schools have been confused and inconsistent but also doctrinaire and impractical.
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“The rule should be that kids go back to school this fall,” Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said in mid-July. “And where there are little flare-ups or hot spots, that can be dealt with on a school by school or a case by case basis.”

DeVos backed up her useless observation with a threat to withhold federal funds from schools remaining physically closed, though she couldn’t cite any authority for withholding federal funds from any schools, much less any ideas for how school districts could deal with “little flare-ups or hot-spots.”
Former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney filled out an NCAA bracket that ranks in the top 1% of more than 11 million in the ESPN Tournament Challenge.

Business

Column: GOP slips an attack on Social Security into its coronavirus relief bill

July 28, 2020

In October 2018, more than two years into the Trump era, Adam Serwer of the Atlantic defined the Trumpian politico ethos. “The cruelty is the point,” he wrote.
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Since then, the data points Serwer plotted have only metastasized. Whether the cruelty is truly the point as he concluded, it’s certainly true that some of the administration’s policies can’t be explained any other way.

Some don’t even make sense when measured against their own goals; for example, even Republicans fear that Trump’s attacks on mail voting and his efforts to undermine faith in the election will discourage their own voters.

Let’s take a look at the most recent examples.

The Republican-fostered logjam on extending the $600 weekly unemployment benefit is the move with the most dire consequences for the largest number of Americans — 30 million unemployed and their families.
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Much of the news reporting on this holdup has laid it upon “Congress.” That’s not right. The Democratic-controlled House called for extending the $600 weekly benefit through next January via a measure it passed in May. The Republican-controlled Senate never took it up.

As the July 31 expiration date for the benefit approached, the Senate and White House finally entered negotiations, opening with a proposal to cut the benefit to $200.

As we’ve reported, the GOP’s working hypothesis is that the $600 benefit, by exceeding the pre-layoff income of some workers, encourages them to stay home instead of returning to work. As we’ve also reported, there’s absolutely no evidence that this has happened, outside a few limited cases.

Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin nevertheless hauled out the argument during an appearance Sunday on ABC News. He had nothing of substance to add to the discussion.
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks to his office after leaving the Senate floor on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Business

Column: The GOP war on unemployment aid is bad for workers and disastrous for the economy

July 24, 2020

“In some cases people are overpaid and we want to make sure there are the right incentives,” he said. ABC’s Martha Raddatz immediately challenged his implication that the benefit constitutes an “incentive” not to work, citing an analysis by 10 scholars at Yale finding “no evidence that the enhanced jobless benefits... reduced employment.” That confirms other research finding no employment reduction.

Mnuchin tried to counter Raddatz’s challenge by citing a University of Chicago paper that purportedly countered the Yale findings. No sale: Peter Ganong, the Chicago paper’s lead author, promptly responded via Twitter that his paper did not say what Mnuchin seemed to claim. The Chicago paper can be found here.

What is known, however, is that ending the unemployment benefits boost will depress the economy substantially, leading to an economy smaller by 2% and 1.7 million fewer jobs by the end of this year, according to economist Ernie Tedeschi of Evercore ISI.
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Given that a crippled economy can’t be good for Trump’s reelection chances or the GOP, if cruelty isn’t the point of a cut in unemployment benefits, what is the point?

Meanwhile, Trump-controlled government agencies have been acting to make life harder for working Americans as well as those struggling with pandemic furloughs and layoffs.

The Department of Agriculture, for instance, relieved families on food stamps — the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP — of the chore of regularly re-certifying their eligibility for the benefit. Normally they would have to assemble financial documents such as pay stubs and utility bills and present them to a government employee in person.

USDA suspended that procedure, purportedly for the duration of the crisis. But the agency has refused to extend the forbearance past the end of this month despite requests from Maryland and the District of Columbia, according to the Washington Post.
Heidi French, of the Two Rivers Post Office, delivers mail Monday in Two Rivers, Wis. By Wednesday, the Postal Service had suspended mail delivery in a wide swath of the Midwest.

Business

Column: The Postal Service is America’s most popular government agency. Why does Trump hate it?

Jan. 9, 2020
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That merely means another obstacle placed before families facing challenges putting food on the table, at the very moment when those challenges are becoming intensified.

Then there’s the National Labor Relations Board, which under Trump has been rolling back workplace protections instituted under the Obama administration.

In a July 21 ruling, the Trump-appointed NLRB majority gutted a standard affording protection to workers protesting allegedly discriminatory management actions, even when the workers’ language was extreme.

The ruling removes that protection. The specific case involved a Black worker at a General Motors plant in Kansas City, Kan., who was repeatedly suspended for protesting what he said were racially discriminatory policies by responding to managers in what they said was the tone of “a slave speaking to a master.”
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The majority said that the board had no legal authority “to referee what abusive conduct is severe enough for an employer to lawfully discipline.” But the ruling gives employers considerably more latitude to discipline complainants.

“Employees who are fighting back against racism will be fired if an employer thinks a word is not genteel enough,” American Federation of Teachers union President Randi Weingarten told Bloomberg. “It’s a way of thwarting speech, and it’s a way of thwarting activism.”

Trump’s most far-reaching attack on American norms of daily life may involve the U.S. Postal Service, which Trump has been attacking virtually since the start of his term.

Until now, he has failed to chip away at the service, but that seems to have changed with his appointment of a political contributor named Louis DeJoy as postmaster general.
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DeJoy ended overtime for postal workers, all but ensuring that some mail will fail to be delivered on time. “We may see mail left behind or mail on the workroom floor or docks,” according to an internal memo distributed to all workers.

The degradation of mail service makes no sense, especially as volumes are expected to rise as mail balloting begins. This may have a purpose beyond mere cruelty, to be sure: Trump asserts without evidence that mail balloting is vulnerable to fraud, so efforts to complicate the process or slow it down will feed into his claim.

He seems to believe the mail balloting favors Democrats, also without evidence, so that may be another motivation behind DeJoy’s abandonment of postal efficiency.

The record wouldn’t be complete without noting Trump’s assault on the Affordable Care Act, including his support of a federal lawsuit filed by Texas and other red states aimed at getting the ACA declared unconstitutional. Trump promised two weeks ago that he would have a replacement healthcare reform act ready to sign within two weeks — that is, Monday.
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No more PAHHHTYING IN HOLLYWOOD?  ???

What will Kim Kardashian do?   :icon_scratch:

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🦠 Fauci: 'tens of millions' of vaccine doses by early '21
« Reply #604 on: August 09, 2020, 03:45:01 AM »
A BILLION doses available by next year!  Right...  ::)

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🦠 Brazil passes 100,000 Covid-19 deaths, as cases top 3 million
« Reply #605 on: August 09, 2020, 05:06:51 AM »
Bolsonaro could give a shit.  They're mostly from the Favelas.

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https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/08/world/brazil-covid-19-deaths-intl/index.html

Brazil passes 100,000 Covid-19 deaths, as cases top 3 million

By Rodrigo Pedroso, Fernanda Wenzel and Thaize Oliveira, CNN

Updated 6:49 PM ET, Sat August 8, 2020

Brazil's death toll from the coronavirus pandemic has topped 100,000.

Sao Paulo (CNN)Brazil surpassed 100,000 deaths from Covid-19 on Saturday as cases exceeded 3 million, according to the latest numbers by the country's Health Ministry.
The fatalities milestone comes less than five months after Brazil recorded its first Covid-19-related death.
The ministry said 100,477 people have lost their lives and 3,012,412 have been infected. In the last 24 hours, 905 people have died from Covid-19.
The day was marked by manifestations of solidarity with the victims' families and critics of the federal government. Many Twitter users marked their messages with the hashtag #100thousanddeaths. In Rio de Janeiro, the NGO Rio of Peace placed a hundred crosses in the sand and showed a poster asking: "Why are we the second in number of deaths?"
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After the US, Brazil is now the second country in the world to reach the bleak milestone, attributed by critics to the country's haphazard response to the outbreak, personified in President Jair Bolsonaro's leadership.
Bolsonaro has downplayed the coronavirus crisis for months, deriding it as a "little flu" and refusing to wear a mask in public even when it was encouraged by his own health ministers and ordered by a judge.
As cases began to grow in March, and state governors began to act to contain the spread, Bolsonaro argued that the economy could not be sacrificed for the sake of public health.
He criticized unpopular quarantine and shelter-in-place measures, hugging supporters at rallies without a face mask, while encouraging people to continue work and boosting the unproven drug chloroquine as a cure.
The US sent Brazil millions of hydroxychloroquine doses. Months later, they&#39;re still in storage
The US sent Brazil millions of hydroxychloroquine doses. Months later, they're still in storage
Bolsonaro has clashed with his health ministers, losing two in a span of a month, and choosing a military general with no background in medicine or public health to take over the role.
Bolsonaro tested positive for the virus in July as cases were skyrocketing in the country, and the healthcare system in several states became stretched to the limit.
On Thursday, Bolsonaro said on Facebook Live: "The number [of Covid-19 deaths] is reaching 100,000. We are going to get on with life and look for a way to get away from this problem", said
Getting on with life, however, has not been easy for Daniel Gustavo Veloso, a 34-year-old businessman who lost his father to Covid-19.
A volunteer disinfects a rooftop inside Santa Marta favela, in Rio de Janeiro on August 1.
A volunteer disinfects a rooftop inside Santa Marta favela, in Rio de Janeiro on August 1.
"You don't know how painful it is to arrive at the hospital and see your father inside a black garbage bag, with just the face out of it," Veloso told CNN.
Veloso's father, Victor Manuel Veloso Mendez, lived in Caxias do Sul, a city in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul State, one of the current epicenters of the coronavirus in Brazil. Despite being elderly and suffering from high blood pressure and diabetes, Victor didn't want to use a mask.
Brazil&#39;s top court backs special protection for indigenous communities, but won&#39;t set timeline for exit of outsiders
Brazil's top court backs special protection for indigenous communities, but won't set timeline for exit of outsiders
According to Veloso, Victor was a fervent Bolsonaro follower. "He used to say things like 'the virus won't attack me, it doesn't exist, it is something created by the media, by the communists, God will help me, it is just a little flu,'" Veloso said..
When his father realized the seriousness of the disease, it was too late. "When he arrived at the medical unit his oxygenation was already very low," Veloso said. "He called my mother crying desperately and begging 'don't leave me alone, don't let me die.' It was the last contact we had with him."
Victor was intubated and died nine days later, on June 19, at the age of 64.
The psychology of the pandemic is important in Brazil. According to Gisele Gus Manfro, a psychiatrist and professor of the psychiatry in Porto Alegre, the way the deaths are presented -- as numbers without a face -- and the sensation of powerlessness against the virus are generating a "trivialization of barbarism" in the country.
"The unknown is very scary, and at the first moment, people react to that with many symptoms like stress, anxiety, and depression. But after a certain moment it seems to happen a kind of denial ... maybe to defend themselves from a feeling of impotence," she said.
A Federal District employee disinfects a public school as a measure against the spread of the coronavirus in Brasilia, on August 5, 2020.
A Federal District employee disinfects a public school as a measure against the spread of the coronavirus in Brasilia, on August 5, 2020.
Disinformation has also played a part.
Alexandre Cunha, an infectious disease specialist at Brasilia University Hospital, in the country's capital, said, "Disinformation has been very bad for us doctors. Every day we have to deal with a relative questioning the treatment or a patient asking for drugs that do not have been scientifically proven like hydroxychloroquine."
"[It] feels like people got used to the idea that they can't escape from Covid-19. The country still has to deal with a high number of deaths and people seem numb about it," Cunha said.
Fires are raging in the Amazon, despite a Brazil government ban. The destruction could be worse than last summer
Fires are raging in the Amazon, despite a Brazil government ban. The destruction could be worse than last summer
Brazilians have used the internet to create a network of affection and support. The Support Network Host Group Covid-19, for example, has 8,000 psychologists and psychiatrists who provide free virtual care on loss and absence.
And the website Inumeráveis, created to honor Covid-19 victims with individual tributes, is based on the premise that "there are those who do not like to be numbered; people deserve to exist in prose." All the posts are prepared by volunteer journalists who use a questionnaire answered by friends and family at the time of registration.

Gabriela Veiga, who works as a social media specialist for Inumeráveis, notes that the absence of a proper goodbye ritual, imposed by the pandemic, makes it even more important to talk about the ones who lost their lives.
"To talk about their loved ones in a celebratory way, remembering funny moments with that person, for example, helps to improve the mourning process," she told CNN.

Rodrigo Pedroso reported from Sao Paulo, Fernanda Wenzel from Porto Alegre and Thaize Oliveira from Rio de Janeiro. Radina Gigova contributed to this report.
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🦠 US Tops 5 Million Coronavirus Cases
« Reply #606 on: August 09, 2020, 09:18:40 AM »
EZ Rider gets EZ COVID!

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/5ATilC3SAwE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/5ATilC3SAwE</a>
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Who here thinks this will work?

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🦠 Dr. Sanjay Gupta shares his concerns on Russia Covid-19 vaccine
« Reply #608 on: August 12, 2020, 05:58:13 AM »
Even if it works, it will take quite some time to roll out 100M doses.

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Re: 🦠 Killer Superbugs!
« Reply #609 on: August 12, 2020, 08:50:56 AM »
I trust the Russian vaccine far more than the Bill Gates vaccine.

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🦠 New Outbreak In New Zealand Leads To New Rules And Supermarket Runsn
« Reply #610 on: August 13, 2020, 06:47:44 AM »
So much for the "COVID Free" country!

RE

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/08/12/901745392/new-outbreak-in-new-zealand-leads-to-new-rules-and-supermarket-runs

New Outbreak In New Zealand Leads To New Rules And Supermarket Runs

August 12, 20202:10 PM ET
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)

People line up outside a supermarket in a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand, on Wednesday before a three-day lockdown goes into effect. Four new COVID-19 cases were diagnosed in Auckland, and an additional four probable cases have been identified.   Fiona Goodall/Getty Images

After more than 100 days without any community spread of COVID-19, New Zealand moved to an elevated alert level Wednesday with news of four new cases and another four probable ones.

The country had returned to normal life, but the mystery of the new outbreak's source has led to increased restrictions and concern in the island nation.

The first four cases are members of the same family in the city of Auckland. The new probable cases — based on symptoms but still awaiting test results — are linked to the cases in the Auckland family.

"Two are work colleagues and two are another related household that one of the cases had stayed at in the preceding week," Dr. Ashley Bloomfield, New Zealand's director-general of health, said of the probable cases in a media conference Wednesday.
New Zealand On Alert After 4 Cases Of COVID-19 Emerge From Unknown Source
Coronavirus Live Updates
New Zealand On Alert After 4 Cases Of COVID-19 Emerge From Unknown Source

At noon Wednesday, New Zealand began a three-day period at alert level two, with Auckland at the higher level three. The country had been at level one since June 9 when life had largely returned to normal.

Under the tighter level three restrictions, most businesses and schools in Auckland are closed, and bars and restaurants may only offer takeout. Elsewhere in the country, level two measures mean people can still go to work and school but are urged to take safety precautions, including social distancing and the wearing of masks.

Despite requests not to engage in panic buying and assurances that grocery stores would remain open for contactless pickup and delivery during the three-day period, Aucklanders formed long lines at supermarkets before the measures went into effect.
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Testing centers for the coronavirus throughout the city also saw long lines. Bloomfield said 6,000 to 7,000 people were being tested in Auckland as well as in the cities of Christchurch, Wellington and Rotorua. Special testing sites are available to those identified as close or casual contacts of the Auckland cluster.

The new probable cases announced Wednesday include three adults and one teenager. "They're probables because there's a clear epidemiological link [to the other four cases] and they're symptomatic," Bloomfield said. All four are in isolation, and contact tracing is underway as they await test results.

Bloomfield said four members of the family in the Auckland COVID-19 cluster had traveled in recent days to Rotorua, a city known for its geothermal features and Maori culture, where they visited tourist attractions and eateries. Two members of the family subsequently tested positive for the virus, raising the possibility they could have spread it to Rotorua.

The government is conducting genome testing to identify the strain of the virus in the new cluster.

More than 200 contacts of the new cases had been identified, mostly at two workplaces where the individuals who tested positive are employed. One is Americold, a cool storage facility in Auckland. That facility has been swabbed for the virus to investigate the possibility that the virus could have arrived in New Zealand via refrigerated freight.

Bloomfield ordered employees and contractors at Americold and a finance company called Finance Now, as well as their family members, to isolate at home and not go to work until they are contacted by contact tracers and given further direction. Because Auckland is under level three alert, people at those workplaces would be staying home anyway.
In New Zealand, Life Was Ordinary Again With No Virus Spread, But It Didn't Last
Coronavirus Live Updates
In New Zealand, Life Was Ordinary Again With No Virus Spread, But It Didn't Last

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced two additional regulations on Wednesday.

First, it's now mandatory for any business or service to display prominently a QR code for the country's NZ Covid Tracer smartphone app at all entry points. That will enable Kiwis to use the app to scan the QR code and log the businesses they visit, making it easy for contact tracers to notify people of any possible exposures.

"The ability to contact trace is one of the key tools we have to find new cases and get them in isolation to avoid future lockdowns," Ardern said. "Using the app is a big investment in keeping our businesses and economy open." The prime minister said that more than 100,000 people had downloaded the app the previous night.

Second, people flying out of Auckland must now wear face coverings. The only people traveling by plane from Auckland, she noted, are those who don't live there and need to return home.

During this time, Auckland residents are asked but not required to wear face masks. The government has released 5 million additional masks from the national stockpile. Ardern said the government is working with social service agencies to distribute 3 million masks to those who might struggle to afford or have access to them.

The new outbreak raises the possibility of postponing New Zealand's upcoming election, scheduled for Sept. 19. Parliament was to be dissolved on Wednesday, but Ardern delayed that until at least Monday in case the body needs to meet in short order. Under New Zealand law, the election could be postponed about two months, The Associated Press reported.
Some Countries Have Brought New Cases Down To Nearly Zero. How Did They Do It?
Goats and Soda
Some Countries Have Brought New Cases Down To Nearly Zero. How Did They Do It?

New Zealand now has 26 active cases. None of the patients require hospital-level care. Excepting the four cases and the four suspected in the Auckland cluster, the rest of the nation's cases are in people arriving in the country; they were all put immediately into managed isolation facilities or quarantine. Every person arriving in New Zealand is required to be isolated from others in the country for a minimum of 14 days.

To illustrate the importance of taking the risk of spread seriously, Ardern pointed on Wednesday to neighboring Australia, which had more than 300 new cases the previous day and more than 650 people hospitalized.

"Our response to the virus so far has worked. It opened our economy and our communities and gave New Zealanders freedoms that we cherished and we all want to get back there as soon as we can," Ardern said. "We know how to beat this, but we also know we don't need to look far to see what it can mean if we don't get on top of it."
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🦠 COVID-19 hotspots and warning for 3 major cities
« Reply #611 on: August 14, 2020, 07:37:25 AM »
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Color me not surprised.   ::)

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https://www.thedailybeast.com/usps-warns-46-states-and-dc-that-some-mail-in-ballots-likely-wont-be-delivered-in-time

USPS Warns 46 States That Some Mail-In Ballots Likely Won’t Be Delivered in Time

THIS IS... NOT GOOD
Rachel Olding

Breaking News Editor
Published Aug. 14, 2020 3:21PM ET

Scott Olson/Getty

The U.S. Postal Service has written to election officials in 46 states and D.C., warning that it can’t guarantee that every mail-in ballot will be delivered in time to be counted in the high-stakes November election. Despite President Trump’s efforts to block federal aid for USPS and prevent mass mail-in voting, many states are expecting an avalanche of mail ballots amid the coronavirus pandemic. Six states and D.C. received warnings that ballots could be delayed for a small group of voters, according to The Washington Post, which obtained the USPS letters through a records request. But USPS told 40 states— including battleground states of Florida, Michigan, and Pennsylvania—that their state deadlines for ballots were “incongruous” with USPS mail delivery timelines.

For example, Pennsylvania lets voters request a mail ballot up until Oct. 27, but USPS said voters need to have mailed their completed ballot by that same date, raising the risk that voters who apply in the last week of the application period will be disenfranchised. As a result, some states are trying to move their deadlines. Pennsylvania has asked the state Supreme Court to allow mail ballots to be counted if they’re received up to three days after the Nov. 3 election, as long as there’s proof they were mailed before Nov. 3. However, similar rules in New York resulted in many ballots not being counted in a recently disputed congressional primary, in some cases because they lacked dated postmarks.
Read it at The Washington Post
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Trump Orders TikTok Owner to Sell U.S. Assets

SECURITY RISK
Rachel Olding

Breaking News Editor
Published Aug. 14, 2020 9:09PM ET

In an order issued late Friday, President Trump said ByteDance, the Chinese owner of video app TikTok, must sell its U.S. assets. ByteDance acquired the U.S. app Musical.ly in 2017 and merged it with its own TikTok application to create the wildly popular video app. “There is credible evidence that leads me to believe that ByteDance... might take action that threatens to impair the national security of the United States,” said Trump’s order, which came after a probe by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S., a government body that reviews acquisitions of U.S. businesses by foreigners. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement that the probe was “exhaustive” and came to the unanimous conclusion that ByteDance’s U.S. assets must be sold “to protect U.S. users from exploitation of their personal data.”
Read it at Bloomberg
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Dr. Fauci: Tucker Carlson ‘Triggers Some of the Crazies’

‘REALLY RIDICULOUS’
Allison Quinn

News Editor
Published Aug. 14, 2020 7:16PM ET

Dr. Anthony Fauci took a jab at Tucker Carlson on Thursday, saying the Fox News host’s frequent attacks on him have led to actual threats. Asked by The Washington Post’s Geoff Edgers in an Instagram Live interview if he was familiar with Carlson, Fauci joked, “He’s the guy that really loves me, right?” The Fox host has repeatedly railed against Fauci, calling him a “chief buffoon” and suggesting Americans should not be listening to the infectious diseases expert’s health advice amid the coronavirus pandemic. “I’m not concerned about what he says,” Fauci told Edgers. “It’s a little bit—I think you could say that when he does that, it triggers some of the crazies in society to start threatening me, actually threatening, which actually happens... I mean, who would have thought when I was in medical school doing things to save people’s lives, I’d have to be going around with a security detail? That’s really ridiculous.”
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🦠 Coronavirus pandemic leading to depression and drinking, CDC says
« Reply #614 on: August 15, 2020, 06:58:58 AM »
I was drinking before Coronavirus ever evolved!  lol.  I've never been depressed though, at least in the clinical sense of the word.  I did find the Surly-Eddie Napalm contest pretty depressing though.

RE

https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/511904-coronavirus-pandemic-leading-to-depression-and-drinking-cdc-says
 
Coronavirus pandemic leading to depression and drinking, CDC says

© Getty Images

Americans are struggling to cope with the coronavirus pandemic after months of harsh lockdowns, widespread disease and economic suffering that has fallen disproportionately on the young, minorities and those who are most vulnerable to financial shocks.

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds the number of Americans reporting adverse mental health or behavioral changes — like drinking or drug use — on a perilous rise in recent months.

About a quarter of Americans reported symptoms of an anxiety disorder, three times higher than what a similar survey found a year ago. Those reporting depression has quadrupled, to nearly a quarter.

About 13 percent of Americans said they were drinking or using drugs more because of the stress of the pandemic. And almost 11 percent said they had seriously considered suicide in the last month, including more than a quarter of those between 18 and 24 years old.

In total, 41 percent of Americans said they were suffering from one or more symptoms of serious mental health problems. The CDC said treating those conditions was an essential part of the response to the pandemic.

“Markedly elevated prevalences of reported adverse mental and behavioral health conditions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic highlight the broad impact of the pandemic and the need to prevent and treat these conditions,” the authors wrote. “Addressing mental health disparities and preparing support systems to mitigate mental health consequences as the pandemic evolves will continue to be needed urgently.”

The CDC survey found younger people, Hispanics and African Americans are more likely to suffer from mental health conditions caused by the pandemic in addition to essential workers and unpaid caregivers for adults. Most at risk are those who are already undergoing treatment for a previously diagnosed mental health condition.

    Overnight Health Care: Obama leans into Trump criticism on...
    CDC: Children and teens are eating more fast food

More than 21 percent of essential workers had considered suicide in the last month, and a quarter of those workers said they were using substances more now than they had before the pandemic.

About one in five Americans say they know someone who has tested positive for the coronavirus, while 8 percent say they know one of the approximately 160,000 people who have died in the United States.

The CDC survey included responses from 5,412 American adults between June 24-30.
Tags Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mental health Coronavirus Pandemic essential workers Depression Anxiety Suicide drug use
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