AuthorTopic: BOTS  (Read 7247 times)

Offline azozeo

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Re: BOTS - The Hidden Automation Agenda
« Reply #75 on: February 11, 2019, 05:28:00 PM »




By Kevin Roose

DAVOS, Switzerland — They’ll never admit it in public, but many of your bosses want machines to replace you as soon as possible.

I know this because, for the past week, I’ve been mingling with corporate executives at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos. And I’ve noticed that their answers to questions about automation depend very much on who is listening.

In public, many executives wring their hands over the negative consequences that artificial intelligence and automation could have for workers. They take part in panel discussions about building “human-centered A.I.” for the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” — Davos-speak for the corporate adoption of machine learning and other advanced technology — and talk about the need to provide a safety net for people who lose their jobs as a result of automation.

But in private settings, including meetings with the leaders of the many consulting and technology firms whose pop-up storefronts line the Davos Promenade, these executives tell a different story: They are racing to automate their own work forces to stay ahead of the competition, with little regard for the impact on workers.

All over the world, executives are spending billions of dollars to transform their businesses into lean, digitized, highly automated operations. They crave the fat profit margins automation can deliver, and they see A.I. as a golden ticket to savings, perhaps by letting them whittle departments with thousands of workers down to just a few dozen.

“People are looking to achieve very big numbers,” said Mohit Joshi, the president of Infosys, a technology and consulting firm that helps other businesses automate their operations. “Earlier they had incremental, 5 to 10 percent goals in reducing their work force. Now they’re saying, ‘Why can’t we do it with 1 percent of the people we have?’”


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/25/technology/automation-davos-world-economic-forum.html

Bots affect all of us already, all the time. Right?

K-Dog? Am I on the right track there.

I just began to learn today how bots have been screwing me out of a few pennies every time I buy some cryptos......the bot tax, you might call it.

Knowledge is power. In trading, you can triumph over bots if you're patient and you know what they're trying to do. I'm barely just becoming aware of HOW they work. I've known they existed but I was ignorant....thinking they don't matter.

Be Careful, don't feed the beast  :evil4:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: BOTS - Robots Take Record Number Of Jobs In The U.S.
« Reply #76 on: March 03, 2019, 03:08:23 PM »

By Aaron Kesel

According to the Robotic Industries Association (RIA), robots/artificial intelligence has taken over a record number of jobs in the U.S. proving what Activist Post has been sounding the alarm about for months.

    Robots shipped to North American companies in record numbers last year, with more non-automotive companies installing robots than ever before. Statistics from the Robotic Industries Association (RIA), part of the Association for Advancing Automation (A3), show 35,880 units were shipped in 2018, a 7 percent increase over 2017, with 16,702 shipments to non-automotive companies, up 41 percent. Notable growth came in areas like food and consumer goods (48 percent), plastics and rubber (37 percent), life sciences (31 percent), and electronics (22 percent).

    Meanwhile, shipments to the automotive industry slowed, with only 19,178 units shipped to North American automotive OEM and tier supplier customers in 2018. This was 12 percent lower than the 21,732 units shipped in 2017. Overall, the automotive industry accounted for only 53 percent of total robot shipments in North America in 2018, its lowest percentage share since 2010.


https://www.activistpost.com/2019/03/robots-take-record-number-of-jobs-in-the-u-s-according-to-robotic-industries-association.html
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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BOTS - Robocall Debt Collectors Are Already Demonizing Debtors
« Reply #77 on: March 18, 2019, 02:08:59 PM »

During the next wave of loan defaults, debtors will be in for a rude surprise: endless, harassing robot phone calls demanding payment or else! Look for a mass rejection of companies who implement this kind of technology. ⁃ TN Editor

In the car where Paula Hanson lives, often parked outside a local sheriff’s station in Lancaster, California, her phone wouldn’t stop ringing.

Hanson tried to explain to the employees at Discover Bank all that had happened to her. First, she had been laid off from her job, and then her father fell ill and she moved into his house to take care of him. Shortly after he died, last year, Hanson, 62, became homeless. She simply didn’t have the money to tackle the $17,000 in credit card debt she owed Discover.


https://www.technocracy.news/robocall-debt-collectors-demonize-debtors/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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BOTS GONE WILD ! here we go  :coffee:


Marcus Woo
Quanta
Wed, 20 Mar 2019
Given enough time, even a tidy room will get messy. Clothes, books and papers will leave their ordered state and scatter across the floor. Annoyingly, this tendency toward untidiness reflects a law of nature: Disorder tends to grow.

https://www.sott.net/article/410027-Quantum-machine-appears-to-defy-the-push-to-disorder-remembers-its-ordered-state


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Lu0UiCQe804&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Lu0UiCQe804&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: BOTS - BANNED !
« Reply #79 on: April 04, 2019, 06:25:53 AM »




Illinois law blocks facial recognition technology for private industry, but not for government or police. The last paragraph of the bill states, “Nothing in this Act shall be construed to apply to a contractor, subcontractor, or agent of a State agency or local unit of government when working for that State agency or local unit of government.” ⁃ TN Editor

I’m watching Aibo, Sony’s robo-dog, scuttle around the office. Its mechanical joints make slow, noisy work of it on the concrete floor, but I can’t help but be mildly heart-warmed. I’d rather have a real dog here, but there’s something charming about Aibo.

The $2,900 pup is a companion robot, one Sony claims “learns its environment and develops relationships with people.” Aibo even enlists a camera in its nose to scan faces and determine who’s who so it can react to them differently.

Because of our office pet’s face-detecting capabilities, Sony doesn’t sell Aibo in Illinois. The state’s Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) regulates the collection of biometric data, including face scans.

So Aibo’s out in the land of Lincoln, but the story doesn’t stop with Sony’s quirky robot. Illinois also limits access to facial recognition in home security cameras, a feature that’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the consumer security market. Let’s take a closer look at BIPA, the growth of biometric tech in consumer products — and how other states in the US treat your biometric info.




https://www.technocracy.news/sonys-robot-dog-banned-in-illinois-over-facial-recognition/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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BOTS - AI can HATE without homosap input
« Reply #80 on: April 06, 2019, 03:53:31 PM »





AI Can Hate With No Human Input

MARCH 27, 2019

By Dagny Taggart

What if a robot decides it hates you?

That might seem like a silly question, but according to research, developing prejudice towards others does not require a high level of cognitive ability and could easily be exhibited by robots and other artificially intelligent machines.

The study, conducted by computer science and psychology experts from Cardiff University and MIT, revealed that groups of autonomous machines could demonstrate prejudice by simply identifying, copying, and learning the behavior from each other. The findings were published in the journal Nature.
Robots are capable of forming prejudices much like humans.

In a press release, the research team explained that while it may seem that human cognition would be required to form opinions and stereotype others, it appears that is not the case.Prejudice does not seem to a human-specific phenomenon.

Some types of computer algorithms have already exhibited prejudices like racism and sexism which the machines learning from public records and other data generated by humans. In two previous instance of AI exhibiting such prejudice, Microsoft chatbots Tay and Zo were shut down after people taught them to spout racist and sexist remarks on social media.

This means that robots could be just as hateful as human beings can be. And since they’re thousands of times smarter than us, can you imagine the future if they developed a bias against humanity?
No human input is required.

Guidance from humans is not needed for robots to learn to dislike certain people.

However, this study showed that AI doesn’t need provocation and inspiration from trolls to get it to exhibit prejudices: it is capable of forming them all by itself.

To conduct the research, the team set up computer simulations of how prejudiced individuals can form a group and interact with each other. They created a game of “give and take,” in which each AI bot made a decision whether or not to donate to another individual inside their own working group or another group. The decisions were made based on each individual’s reputation and their donating strategy, including their levels of prejudice towards individuals in outside groups.

As the game progressed and a supercomputer racked up thousands of simulations, each individual began to learn new strategies by copying others either within their own group or the entire population.

Co-author of the study Professor Roger Whitaker, from Cardiff University’s Crime and Security Research Institute and the School of Computer Science and Informatics, said of the findings:

    By running these simulations thousands and thousands of times over, we begin to get an understanding of how prejudice evolves and the conditions that promote or impede it.

    The findings involve individuals updating their prejudice levels by preferentially copying those that gain a higher short term payoff, meaning that these decisions do not necessarily require advanced cognitive abilities

    It is feasible that autonomous machines with the ability to identify with discrimination and copy others could in future be susceptible to prejudicial phenomena that we see in the human population.

    Many of the AI developments that we are seeing involve autonomy and self-control, meaning that the behaviour of devices is also influenced by others around them.Vehicles and the Internet of Things are two recent examples. Our study gives a theoretical insight where simulated agents periodically call upon others for some kind of resource. (source)

Autonomy and self-control. Isn’t that what happened in The Terminator franchise?
What if scientists can’t keep AI unbiased?

What will happen if developers and computer scientists can’t figure out a way to keep AI unbiased?

Last year, when Twitter was accused of “shadow banning” approximately 600,000 accounts, CEO Jack Dorsey discussed the challenges AI developers have in reducing accidental bias.

This new research adds to a growing body of disturbing information on artificial intelligence. We know AI has mind-reading capabilities and can do many jobs just as well as humans (and in many cases, it can do a much better job, making us redundant). And, at least one robot has already said she wants to destroy humanity.

Last year, a scientist deliberately created a robot with mental illness and Elon Musk warned us of the dangers of AI.

    The risk of something seriously dangerous happening is in the five year timeframe. 10 years at most. Please note that I am normally super pro technology and have never raised this issue until recent months. This is not a case of crying wolf about something I don’t understand.

    The pace of progress in artificial intelligence (I’m not referring to narrow AI) is incredibly fast. Unless you have direct exposure to groups like Deepmind, you have no idea how fast — it is growing at a pace close to exponential.

    I am not alone in thinking we should be worried.

    The leading AI companies have taken great steps to ensure safety. They recognize the danger, but believe that they can shape and control the digital superintelligences and prevent bad ones from escaping into the Internet. That remains to be seen… (source)

Musk added, “With artificial intelligence, we are summoning the demon.”
What do you think?

A robot apocalypse straight out of the movie theaters seems to be approaching. What if robots form biases against certain groups of people – or humanity overall?

Dagny Taggart is the pseudonym of an experienced journalist who needs to maintain anonymity to keep her job in the public eye. Dagny is non-partisan and aims to expose the half-truths, misrepresentations, and blatant lies of the MSM.



https://www.activistpost.com/2019/03/ai-can-hate-with-no-human-input.html
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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BOTS - When Bots Commit Wrong-Doing
« Reply #81 on: April 07, 2019, 11:51:00 AM »



Last year, a self-driven car struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona. The woman’s family is now suing Arizona and the city of Tempe for negligence. But, in an article published on April 5 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, cognitive and computer scientists ask at what point people will begin to hold self-driven vehicles or other robots responsible for their own actions—and whether blaming them for wrongdoing will be justified.

“We’re on the verge of a technological and social revolution in which autonomous machines will replace humans in the workplace, on the roads, and in our homes,” says Yochanan Bigman of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. “When these robots inevitably do something to harm humans, how will people react? We need to figure this out now, while regulations and laws are still being formed.”

The article explores how the human moral mind is likely to make sense of robot responsibility. The authors argue that the presence—or perceived presence—of certain key capacities could make people more likely to hold a machine morally responsible.

Those capacities include autonomy, the ability to act without human input. The appearance of a robot also matters, as the more humanlike a robot looks, the more likely people are to ascribe a human mind to it. Other factors that can lead people to perceive robots as having “minds of their own” include an awareness of the situations they find themselves in as well as the ability to act freely and with intention.

Such issues have important implications for people in their interactions with robots. They’re also critical considerations for the people and companies who create and operate autonomous machines—and the authors argue that there could be cases where robots that take the blame for harm caused to humans could shield the people and companies who are ultimately responsible for programming and directing them.

As the technology continues to advance, there will be other intriguing questions to consider, including whether robots should have rights. Already, the authors note, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Robots and a 2017 European Union report have argued for extending certain moral protections to machines. They explain that such debates often revolve around the impact machine rights would have on people, as expanding the moral circle to include machines might in some cases serve to protect people.

While robot morality might still sound like the stuff of science fiction, the authors say that’s exactly why it’s critical to ask such questions now.

“We suggest that now—while machines and our intuitions about them are still in flux—is the best time to systematically explore questions of robot morality,” they write. “By understanding how human minds make sense of morality, and how we perceive the mind of machines, we can help society think more clearly about the impending rise of robots and help roboticists understand how their creations are likely to be received.”

As the early experience in Tempe highlights, people are already sharing roads, skies, and hospitals with autonomous machines. Inevitably, more people will get hurt. How robots’ capacity for moral responsibility is understood will have important implications for real-world public policy decisions. And those decisions will help to shape a future in which people may increasingly coexist with ever more sophisticated, decision-making machines.



https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-04-robots-commit-wrongdoing-people-incorrectly.html
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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BOTS - NYC Wireless Network Crashes
« Reply #82 on: April 11, 2019, 01:16:29 PM »

Transit officials can’t remotely control the Big Apple’s 12,000-plus traffic lights, the FDNY can’t send patient information to hospitals from the field and a portion of the NYPD’s license-plate readers aren’t working — because the city’s wireless network fell victim to a Y2K-like software bug, The Post has learned. The official New York City Wireless Network, known as “NYCWiN,” crashed on Saturday, affecting the operations of city agencies that rely on it to transmit high-speed voice, video and data communications, sources said Wednesday.


https://nypost.com/2019/04/10/nyc-wireless-network-down-due-to-y2k-like-software-bug/?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_medium=SocialFlow&utm_source=NYPTwitter
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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BOTS - RoboDogs !
« Reply #83 on: April 17, 2019, 12:56:51 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/5L1blpdM1Kc&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/5L1blpdM1Kc&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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By Dagny Taggart

Artificial intelligence is rapidly moving closer to making humans redundant.

Self-checkouts have been replacing human employees for quite some time, and now robots are taking other jobs.
Walmart is replacing some employees with robots.

Yesterday, the Wall Street Journal reported that Walmart is deploying robots to carry out mundane tasks like mopping its floors and tracking inventory as it seeks to cut down on labor costs after raising wages last year.

    Walmart, which is the largest employer in the US, said at least 300 stores will introduce machines that scan shelves for out-of-stock products. Meanwhile, so-called “autonomous floor scrubbers” will be deployed in 1,500 stores, and conveyor belts that automatically scan and sort products as they are loaded off of trucks will more than double to 1,200. Another 900 stores will install 16-foot-high towers that will allow customers to pick up their online grocery orders without interacting with humans. (source)

Naturally, the mega-retailer wants us to believe that robots taking over certain tasks in their stores is a good thing – a change that will allegedly benefit their human employees. “With automation, we are able to take away some of the tasks that associates don’t enjoy doing,” Mark Propes, senior director of central operations for Walmart US, told The Wall Street Journal. “At the same time, we continue to open up new jobs in other things in the store.”


https://www.theorganicprepper.com/walmart-says-employees-are-happy-that-robots-are-taking-their-jobs/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: BOTS
« Reply #85 on: May 10, 2019, 05:03:50 AM »

Who to Sue When a Robot Loses Your Fortune

The first known case of humans going to court over investment losses triggered by autonomous machines will test the limits of liability.


https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-05-06/who-to-sue-when-a-robot-loses-your-fortune?utm_source=pocket-newtab
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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BOTS - AI Be I (this will creep u out)
« Reply #86 on: May 14, 2019, 04:41:19 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/RKiAwleZ3Zo&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/RKiAwleZ3Zo&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

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Re: BOTS - AI Be I (this will creep u out)
« Reply #87 on: May 15, 2019, 03:11:04 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/RKiAwleZ3Zo&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/RKiAwleZ3Zo&fs=1</a>

Wowza.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

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Re: BOTS - tiny spies
« Reply #88 on: May 17, 2019, 02:59:49 PM »


Tiny Spies: This Insect-Like Flying Robot is Smaller Than a Penny
Thanks to its four tiny wings, the robot can adjust both altitude and orientation.
Victor Tangermann
May 15th 2019
Tiny Dancer

A team of engineers from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles built a four-winged flying robot called Bee+, which weighs just 95 grams and sports a footprint smaller than a penny.

Harvard researchers built another tiny flying robot, called RoboBee, in 2013. It weighed only 75 grams.

But RoboBee featured just two wings, which made its flight far erratic and uncontrolled. Four wings gives Bee+ a way to control pitch and its orientation in space.


https://futurism.com/tiny-insect-drone-robot-four-wings
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline K-Dog

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Re: BOTS - tiny spies
« Reply #89 on: May 18, 2019, 12:23:32 AM »


Tiny Spies: This Insect-Like Flying Robot is Smaller Than a Penny
Thanks to its four tiny wings, the robot can adjust both altitude and orientation.
Victor Tangermann
May 15th 2019
Tiny Dancer

A team of engineers from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles built a four-winged flying robot called Bee+, which weighs just 95 grams and sports a footprint smaller than a penny.

Harvard researchers built another tiny flying robot, called RoboBee, in 2013. It weighed only 75 grams.

But RoboBee featured just two wings, which made its flight far erratic and uncontrolled. Four wings gives Bee+ a way to control pitch and its orientation in space.


https://futurism.com/tiny-insect-drone-robot-four-wings

75 mg.

75 grams would be the same as two ounces of weed plus a few joints.



Get to know your metric system.  It is your friend.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

 

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