AuthorTopic: Machinery for a post collapse world  (Read 19384 times)

Offline Nearingsfault

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OK, I have come up with what I think should be an agreeable solution to going all-electric for your post-shtf day Electric Chainsaw needs.  :icon_sunny:

To start with, the chainsaw itself.  Getting the highest ratings with 4.8 out of 5 in the category of Professional quality electric chainsaws is the corded Makita 16" Electric Chain Saw (model UC4051A)



UC4051A
16" Electric Chain Saw
Buy LocalBuy Online

    INNOVATION : “Tool-less” blade and chain adjustment /replacement by simply turning a lever
    COMFORT : Rubberized grip handles and large trigger switch for comfortable use
    CONTROL : Large metal spike bumper for added convenience
    CONVENIENCE : Oil level visible through large window for easy sight check of bar lubricant
    INCLUDES : Chain, guide bar and chain cover

UC4051A

UC4051A UC4051A UC4051A UC4051A UC4051A UC4051A UC4051A UC4051A UC4051A UC4051A

About Model

The Makita 16" Electric Chain Saw (model UC4051A) is engineered for fast cutting, efficient operation and easy maintenance, without the hassle of gas. The UC4051A has a chain speed of 2,900 FPM for efficient cutting and trimming. The motor has a built-in current limiter which is engineered to protect the motor from burnout by reducing power when the saw is overloaded, and an electric chain brake for maximum productivity. Additional features include an automatic chain oiler for heavy continuous cutting, and a large oil reservoir with view window that allows the operator to easily check the oil level. For increased comfort, the chain saw has ergonomic rubberized grip handles, and a large trigger switch with soft start for smooth start-ups.

Features

    "Tool-less" blade and chain adjustments for convenient operation and easy maintenance
    Rubberized grip handles are ergonomically designed for comfort
    Large trigger switch with soft start for smooth start-ups
    Built-in current limiter helps protect motor from burnout by reducing power to motor when saw is overloaded
    Large oil reservoir with view window allows operator to check bar oil level
    Automatic chain oiler for heavy continuous cutting
    Electric chain brake for maximum productivity
    Zero emissions and reduced maintenance
    Soft start for smooth start-ups
    Current limiter helps protect motor from damage caused by heat



Coming in now on Amazon Smile at the bargain price of $235.99.  Don't forget to designate the Sustaining Universal Needs Foundation as your charity when you buy!  :icon_sunny:

To power your saw out in the field and pull your load of chopped up trees back to your doomstead, you use an Electric Sled Tow.


You can either buy one already assembled from Yvon Martel (probably pretty pricy) or DIY cannibalizing the treads off a junked snow machine  and dropping in a 5000W 48V Electric Motor to drive the thing.


Currently $525 from Monster Scooter Parts, but they run sales all the time of 10-15% off.

For batteries, 4 large size 100AH deep cycle marine batteries  front and rear on the sled for weight and balance.  Wire in series to run the 48V motor, switch to parallel to run your inverter.


Currently $260/ea on Amazon Smile.   Don't forget to designate the Sustaining Universal Needs Foundation as your charity when you buy!  :icon_sunny:

3000W Pure Sine Wave Inverter to run your corded power tools out in the field.


Currently $319 on Amazon Smile.   Don't forget to designate the Sustaining Universal Needs Foundation as your charity when you buy!  :icon_sunny:

You could add some Solar Panels to the top of the tractor to recharge the batts while out in the field.  Probably overkill though since you'll never cut enough wood in a day to run down 4 deep cycle 100AH batts.
I'm very weary of anything that brags about tool less chain adjustment. Stihl had it on a few models then it quietly went away. Generally I like makita tools although they have in recent years gone the route of 2 tier tools where there is a mass market cheaper version and a pro version available through dealer networks. Dewalt, milwaulkee, and Porter cable have also gone this route.The lithium snow sled is a fun looking toy. A cousin of mine used to skidoo with martel the guy who developed it.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #286 on: December 08, 2018, 10:20:48 PM »
I'm looking at a used set of tracks for my ATV. They are complex and prone to problems but when they work you feel like an all terrain god. Really pricey. A used set is 1500 over 3000 new...too much spent on toys this year probably. I'm not a fan of the utvs I find them too heavy to push out if tou get stuck and they don't float over snow as well as the atvs

If I am spending $12K on a new EV Polaris Ranger, what's another $3K for a set of treads?  Chump Change!

Seriously though, for my uses around here, a set of good Knobby Tires will work fine.

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Offline RE

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I'm very weary of anything that brags about tool less chain adjustment. Stihl had it on a few models then it quietly went away. Generally I like makita tools although they have in recent years gone the route of 2 tier tools where there is a mass market cheaper version and a pro version available through dealer networks. Dewalt, milwaulkee, and Porter cable have also gone this route.The lithium snow sled is a fun looking toy. A cousin of mine used to skidoo with martel the guy who developed it.

I still think the best way to go is to get treads off junked snow machines and build a DIY model.  Do the whole thing for less than $1K I'd bet.

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Offline RE

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #288 on: December 08, 2018, 10:39:05 PM »
How about this one?  Great price!  Bet I beat your price even with shipping (it's not available from Amazon Prime).



RE
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #289 on: December 09, 2018, 06:38:55 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6MlHxAzLXA

I cant help myself. I had to share. I just started my partII in the C5 gets wood, series. Its called...

C5 Gets Apocalyptic Wood From Faggots.

I'm Looking forward to seeing that title as the header at the Doomstead Diner

In it, we will bypass all this chainsaw talk. I am hoping to order a billhook in the next few days. They are all pricey and rare though. This is the only cheap version I have found
https://www.machetespecialists.com/product/imacasa-10-inch-coa-machete-blade/



Here is a teaser of some of what I will be writing about 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LizqU8OOVh0

I'm guessing you saw these already. They look like they're better, perhaps. Still within reason.

https://www.ebay.com/i/183530024518?chn=ps
I actually already have one of those.

I need something that works better in tight  brush (I recently did a 40 ft test plot of hedge laying to get a feel for the work load)

For anyone that does not know, a faggot is a bundle of sticks. Brits would know what faggot wood is.
I have one of the fiskars tools. Sort of a bill hook saw combined. A little light. I've been thinking of that Lee valley one... also grinding down a leaf spring from my neighbors scrap heap... good hard tool steel in leaf springs.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #290 on: December 09, 2018, 07:06:29 AM »
I have one of the fiskars tools. Sort of a bill hook saw combined. A little light. I've been thinking of that Lee valley one... also grinding down a leaf spring from my neighbors scrap heap... good hard tool steel in leaf springs.

I found what looks to be a pretty good one.  It's on it's way to C5 now.  He'll review it after it arrives, just after Christmas.  I'm not putting up pics of it though because I want it to be a surprise when he gets it.  :icon_sunny:

RE
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 12:10:03 PM by RE »
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Offline cernunnos5

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #291 on: December 09, 2018, 04:05:31 PM »
I have one of the fiskars tools. Sort of a bill hook saw combined. A little light. I've been thinking of that Lee valley one... also grinding down a leaf spring from my neighbors scrap heap... good hard tool steel in leaf springs.

I found what looks to be a pretty good one.  It's on it's way to C5 now.  He'll review it after it arrives, just after Christmas.  I'm not putting up pics of it though because I want it to be a surprise when he gets it.  :icon_sunny:

RE

OK,  NF,  get out of my brain, you evil mother... with your evil mind sucking machine. Who sent you.......  :coffee:

I too had been thinking of hitting the metal yard for a leaf  spring and grinding one out if I could'nt find anything. I'm curious to see how Re's tool will handle the job.

And I have no idea why anyone ever invented that tiny little Fiscars. Silly tool

By the way, that is a very cool mind sucking machine youve got there, Dr. Evil. Where can I buy one :o

Offline RE

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C5 Knife Abuse Test
« Reply #292 on: December 09, 2018, 05:18:29 PM »
I have one of the fiskars tools. Sort of a bill hook saw combined. A little light. I've been thinking of that Lee valley one... also grinding down a leaf spring from my neighbors scrap heap... good hard tool steel in leaf springs.

I found what looks to be a pretty good one.  It's on it's way to C5 now.  He'll review it after it arrives, just after Christmas.  I'm not putting up pics of it though because I want it to be a surprise when he gets it.  :icon_sunny:

RE

OK,  NF,  get out of my brain, you evil mother... with your evil mind sucking machine. Who sent you.......  :coffee:

I too had been thinking of hitting the metal yard for a leaf  spring and grinding one out if I could'nt find anything. I'm curious to see how Re's tool will handle the job.

And I have no idea why anyone ever invented that tiny little Fiscars. Silly tool

By the way, that is a very cool mind sucking machine youve got there, Dr. Evil. Where can I buy one :o

While you might make a serviceable billhook out of a leaf spring, it will never get as sharp or hold an edge as well as good high carbon stainless steel alloyed specifically for using to make knives.  If you wanted a REALLY good one, you would have to make it out of Damascus Steel.  That's what the Samurai used for their swords.

Then there is the thickness issue on the blade, you need different thickness blades for different purposes.  You don't grind a Fillet Knife out of the same blanks as a Chef's Knife, nor do you grind a Chef's Knife out of the same Blanks as a Hunting Knife.  These are all knives used for different purposes.  My Chef's Knife is not the same as my Hunting Knife, though both are as sharp as I can make these type of blades.  You really want sharp in a knife, use a Straight Razor blank or a Fillet Knife blank.

For the Billhook you want a knife with a decent amount of mass behind it, because of course KE=1/2mv2.  The kinetic energy delivered by the knife edge to the stalk to cut it is determined by the mass and how fast you swing the billhook.  The length of the blade has nothing to do with it as long as you are accurate.  Then doing a day's work, you have to depend on the blade staying sharp, because you don't want to have to sharpen it after every 20 cuts.  Once at the end of the day should be enough.

The blade I bought got very high marks, 4.5 out of 5 with 100 respondents of purchasers.  We'll see if it can stand up to the "C5 Knife Abuse Test". lol.

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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: C5 Knife Abuse Test
« Reply #293 on: December 09, 2018, 05:47:09 PM »
I have one of the fiskars tools. Sort of a bill hook saw combined. A little light. I've been thinking of that Lee valley one... also grinding down a leaf spring from my neighbors scrap heap... good hard tool steel in leaf springs.

I found what looks to be a pretty good one.  It's on it's way to C5 now.  He'll review it after it arrives, just after Christmas.  I'm not putting up pics of it though because I want it to be a surprise when he gets it.  :icon_sunny:

RE

OK,  NF,  get out of my brain, you evil mother... with your evil mind sucking machine. Who sent you.......  :coffee:

I too had been thinking of hitting the metal yard for a leaf  spring and grinding one out if I could'nt find anything. I'm curious to see how Re's tool will handle the job.

And I have no idea why anyone ever invented that tiny little Fiscars. Silly tool

By the way, that is a very cool mind sucking machine youve got there, Dr. Evil. Where can I buy one :o

While you might make a serviceable billhook out of a leaf spring, it will never get as sharp or hold an edge as well as good high carbon stainless steel alloyed specifically for using to make knives.  If you wanted a REALLY good one, you would have to make it out of Damascus Steel.  That's what the Samurai used for their swords.

Then there is the thickness issue on the blade, you need different thickness blades for different purposes.  You don't grind a Fillet Knife out of the same blanks as a Chef's Knife, nor do you grind a Chef's Knife out of the same Blanks as a Hunting Knife.  These are all knives used for different purposes.  My Chef's Knife is not the same as my Hunting Knife, though both are as sharp as I can make these type of blades.  You really want sharp in a knife, use a Straight Razor blank or a Fillet Knife blank.

For the Billhook you want a knife with a decent amount of mass behind it, because of course KE=1/2mv2.  The kinetic energy delivered by the knife edge to the stalk to cut it is determined by the mass and how fast you swing the billhook.  The length of the blade has nothing to do with it as long as you are accurate.  Then doing a day's work, you have to depend on the blade staying sharp, because you don't want to have to sharpen it after every 20 cuts.  Once at the end of the day should be enough.

The blade I bought got very high marks, 4.5 out of 5 with 100 respondents of purchasers.  We'll see if it can stand up to the "C5 Knife Abuse Test". lol.

RE
yes and no. Traditionally axes are a softer steel the can be easily sharpened with a file. I think bill hooks follow the same idea. The mind sucking... well that's probably because we've all read the same post apocalyptic fiction. The leaf spring is straight out of dies the fire when the bear killers get together.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: C5 Knife Abuse Test
« Reply #294 on: December 09, 2018, 06:02:20 PM »
I have one of the fiskars tools. Sort of a bill hook saw combined. A little light. I've been thinking of that Lee valley one... also grinding down a leaf spring from my neighbors scrap heap... good hard tool steel in leaf springs.

I found what looks to be a pretty good one.  It's on it's way to C5 now.  He'll review it after it arrives, just after Christmas.  I'm not putting up pics of it though because I want it to be a surprise when he gets it.  :icon_sunny:

RE

OK,  NF,  get out of my brain, you evil mother... with your evil mind sucking machine. Who sent you.......  :coffee:

I too had been thinking of hitting the metal yard for a leaf  spring and grinding one out if I could'nt find anything. I'm curious to see how Re's tool will handle the job.

And I have no idea why anyone ever invented that tiny little Fiscars. Silly tool

By the way, that is a very cool mind sucking machine youve got there, Dr. Evil. Where can I buy one :o

While you might make a serviceable billhook out of a leaf spring, it will never get as sharp or hold an edge as well as good high carbon stainless steel alloyed specifically for using to make knives.  If you wanted a REALLY good one, you would have to make it out of Damascus Steel.  That's what the Samurai used for their swords.

Then there is the thickness issue on the blade, you need different thickness blades for different purposes.  You don't grind a Fillet Knife out of the same blanks as a Chef's Knife, nor do you grind a Chef's Knife out of the same Blanks as a Hunting Knife.  These are all knives used for different purposes.  My Chef's Knife is not the same as my Hunting Knife, though both are as sharp as I can make these type of blades.  You really want sharp in a knife, use a Straight Razor blank or a Fillet Knife blank.

For the Billhook you want a knife with a decent amount of mass behind it, because of course KE=1/2mv2.  The kinetic energy delivered by the knife edge to the stalk to cut it is determined by the mass and how fast you swing the billhook.  The length of the blade has nothing to do with it as long as you are accurate.  Then doing a day's work, you have to depend on the blade staying sharp, because you don't want to have to sharpen it after every 20 cuts.  Once at the end of the day should be enough.

The blade I bought got very high marks, 4.5 out of 5 with 100 respondents of purchasers.  We'll see if it can stand up to the "C5 Knife Abuse Test". lol.

RE
yes and no. Traditionally axes are a softer steel the can be easily sharpened with a file. I think bill hooks follow the same idea. The mind sucking... well that's probably because we've all read the same post apocalyptic fiction. The leaf spring is straight out of dies the fire when the bear killers get together.

Axes are another category with another set of parameters,  they are a "chopping" knife exclusively.  There are two basic types of knives, Chopping Knives and Slicing Knives. In my world of cooking, you see the difference in a Butcher's Meat Cleaver vs a Turkey Carving Knife.  The Meat Cleaver is a Chopping Knife, the Carving Knife is a Slicing Knife.  You can't substitute one for the other, at least not and do a good job with it.

A Chef's Knife falls in the middle, for most purposes you can either Chop with it or Slice with it.  If you can only have one knife in the kitchen to work with, it's a Chef's Knife.  Just don't try to slice your Smoked Salmon with it or part out a Chicken.  You can't do as a good a job with it no matter how good you are with a knife.

The Billhook is like a Chef's Knife in that it performs both functions.  You use a Chopping Action, but then once the blade contacts the stalk because of the sickle shape it starts to slice as well.  So it has to be hard enough to withstand the chopping action but sharp enough to also slice.

In ALL case the old adage remains true. "Better to spend an hour sharpening the axe and an hour chopping the wood than 4 hours chopping the wood".

RE
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Offline cernunnos5

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Re: C5 Knife Abuse Test
« Reply #295 on: December 09, 2018, 07:51:51 PM »


  Then doing a day's work, you have to depend on the blade staying sharp, because you don't want to have to sharpen it after every 20 cuts.

RE
[/quote] The mind sucking... well that's probably because we've all read the same post apocalyptic fiction. The leaf spring is straight out of dies the fire when the bear killers get together.
[/quote]



In ALL case the old adage remains true. "Better to spend an hour sharpening the axe and an hour chopping the wood than 4 hours chopping the wood".

RE
[/quote]



Speaking of psychic mind sucking machines....

Yup. Strait out of Dies The Fire was my thinking too. Whoed of thunk, Dies the fire and World War Z would be the best survival manuals. The actual prepper fiction, not so much.

20 cuts and sharpen, had also been the exact number on my mind when considering the tool (just last night). I was thinking it may be like a scythe... and I would use the same stone. 20 cuts, Zick zick zick. 20 cuts Zick zick zick. The scythe blade isnt rasor sharp. The stone cuts in little nicks so it acts like a saw blade.

I am absolutely and embarrassingly terrible in my tool maintenance.

But it proves again why the corded angle grinder is my number four in the top five prepper items. Because you can make magical items like a billhook. NS, I figure you might have a stationary grinder and that would make the job far easier than my angle grinder. Love to see what you come up with. I'll try to get a photo of a couple of my choppers in the next C5 gets wood article

Re would love my one good kitchen knife. It was holy grail moment find in a random thrift store that I got for 25$. It just looked like an old knife but I noticed that inscibed it said Razor Steel. I knew I would be hauling this around for life as one of my most valuable possessions.  I have been negligent in sharpening it for a couple years and even after regular use, its still the sharpest knife in the house.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 07:58:29 PM by cernunnos5 »

Offline RE

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Re: C5 Knife Abuse Test
« Reply #296 on: December 09, 2018, 08:33:01 PM »
Re would love my one good kitchen knife. It was holy grail moment find in a random thrift store that I got for 25$. It just looked like an old knife but I noticed that inscibed it said Razor Steel. I knew I would be hauling this around for life as one of my most valuable possessions.  I have been negligent in sharpening it for a couple years and even after regular use, its still the sharpest knife in the house.

Far as my cooking knives are concerned, I'm obsessive about sharpening them.  No idea how sharp they would be after a couple of years not hitting the stone, because I usually can't help myself and sharpen them every couple of weeks or so whether they need it or not, which they usually don't. lol.

If you do make your own billhook out of a leaf spring, it would be interesting to see a direct comparison with the commercial blade in the field.

I have been thinking about it, and the curvature radius of the blade is dependent on the stroke you use and the location on the blade you make contact with the stalk.  That will be a bit different for different billhooks, and I think you need to get used to one and stick with it to perfect your stroke for that blade.

RE
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 01:04:55 AM by RE »
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Offline RE

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🔪 Knife Sharpening Dilemmas
« Reply #297 on: December 10, 2018, 07:45:19 AM »
OK, all this talk about knives has got me "Sharp Crazy".  I've been looking at sharpeners of various kinds to supplement my trusty Whetstone.  I haven't had an Electric since I was a kid and we had one we brought back from Brazil which was attached to an electric can opener on the other side, using the same motor.  It wasn't real high quality, but it did OK with the Knives we also brought back, which I used until I went off to Columbia.  Cripple that I am these days, an electric would make it easier to keep my knives Razor Sharp.  But which one to buy?  The Chef's Choice model seems to get the best reviews.  Diamond sharpening wheels, that's important.  It's a big step up from carbide grits.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/W4SitQ0cknc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/W4SitQ0cknc</a>

$130 from Amazon.  Pricy, but my knives are worth it!  :icon_sunny:

RE
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 07:47:29 AM by RE »
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Another fun day in the field
« Reply #298 on: December 12, 2018, 01:38:22 PM »
At this time of year our installations are done for the year. We get a lot of interesting calls though. This one was a malfunctioning AGS which turned out to be a genny low on oil and 1000 lbs of batteries frozen solid at a remote camp in a 100000 acre private forest. 20 kms by snowmobile trail. I had not ridden a snow mobile in over 20 years...
Photo 1 the drive up
Photo2 random trail crossing halfway point
Photo3 20km in the Bush by snow mobile; finally there
« Last Edit: December 12, 2018, 01:42:45 PM by Nearingsfault »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #299 on: December 12, 2018, 01:43:28 PM »
Are those snow machines "company cars"? 

55 degrees F here this morning. We're at the at that time of year when the work weekdays are nice.....and only weekends have bad weather.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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