AuthorTopic: Machinery for a post collapse world  (Read 20981 times)

Online Nearingsfault

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #30 on: April 09, 2017, 02:36:55 PM »
No you would take possession of the scrap yard manufacture in place only moving finished goods...
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #31 on: April 09, 2017, 02:37:06 PM »
Do you honestly believe that these people or their descendants would not adapt to dwindling supplies of sheet metal?

Of course they would.  They would use STONE AGE TECHNOLOGY.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/uZGFTmK6Yk4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/uZGFTmK6Yk4</a>

The point I am making is the scavenging paradigm for metal working is a short lived skill set overall.

Beat the rush and learn Stone Age skills today!  :icon_sunny:

RE
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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #32 on: April 09, 2017, 02:39:51 PM »
No you would take possession of the scrap yard manufacture in place only moving finished goods...

Scrap yards generally do not have good sources of potable water near them.  So instead of shipping the metal out, you have to ship the water in. Not to mention the food to feed the guys working in the scrap yard and living there who don't have time to do farming.

RE
« Last Edit: April 09, 2017, 02:41:26 PM by RE »
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Online Nearingsfault

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #33 on: April 09, 2017, 03:32:25 PM »
Do you honestly believe that these people or their descendants would not adapt to dwindling supplies of sheet metal?

Of course they would.  They would use STONE AGE TECHNOLOGY.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/uZGFTmK6Yk4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/uZGFTmK6Yk4</a>

The point I am making is the scavenging paradigm for metal working is a short lived skill set overall.

Beat the rush and learn Stone Age skills today!  :icon_sunny:

RE
Your vision for the future is nothing if not consistent.  I quite like those videos.  I would like to see him use the same machine he spends so much time building week after week to see how much of a stash he could amass.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #34 on: April 09, 2017, 03:39:33 PM »

Your vision for the future is nothing if not consistent.  I quite like those videos.  I would like to see him use the same machine he spends so much time building week after week to see how much of a stash he could amass.

I try to stay consistent, and you can go all the way back to 2008 and my monetary theory posts all are internally consistent.  I didn't arrive at the primitive end game so quickly, for the first couple of years I was in the Amish 1750 Tech camp.

This fellow is fucking amazing.  Go to his channel.  His cabin building one is quite incredible.  Makes all the tiles for the roof himself, puts in a heating system too!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAL3JXZSzSm8AlZyD3nQdBA

RE
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #35 on: April 09, 2017, 03:51:34 PM »
Cool channel RE.
Thanks for posting.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Online Nearingsfault

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2017, 06:39:07 PM »
Darcy practicing her fossil fuel free gardening. Get em young and hopefully it will stick.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2017, 07:05:08 PM »
Beautiful. Careful, or the next time you look up she'll be grown. It happens so fast.

I remember my parents more or less made me work in the garden, which was large and fruitful, but full of weeds most of the time. We lived in our own house on my grandfather's farm. When he passed away, my father sold the old man's house and it was moved away, and my Dad tore down his old barn, moved the heirloom family corn crib to another spot on the farm, and built a new barn around it.

Where my grandfather's cow lot had been we planted the biggest garden we ever had, probably 2 acres. Two generations of composted manure gave us the finest harvest. I would like to have another garden or two like that, while it's still possible. I have a sort of practice garden now, and I've built it but my daughters, who are grown, tend to it more than I do. We do now have tomatoes. Getting  hot here. About 90F today and supremely muggy. It's been a cool spring actually. Sorry to see it go.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online Nearingsfault

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #38 on: May 26, 2017, 08:26:44 PM »
I'm very lucky I had close contact with my Mother's parents for my childhood years.  My grandfather was probably the last generation of subsistence farmer. Raised 9 kids,  Grew vegetables and livestock for food,  cash crops, a small dairy operation, hogs on the extra milk, logged in the winter, fixed and or built his own equipment til it was worn to the knub.  He was mostly retired and doing it for fun by my time but his garden was magical to me.  Somehow most of his children never took to the life and did nothing to pass it on.  I sometimes feel cheated out of my history... hopefully I will be more successful with my kids.
Best regards, David B
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Online Nearingsfault

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #39 on: July 14, 2017, 08:39:46 PM »
One of the best parts of my new life as a solar tech is all the older systems I get to see out there still chugging along. There is also lots of gear put aside for something better. Every now and then I get to take some home.  Today was such a day.  I came across a Trace U2512SB it is a 25 year old inverter still putting out power.  It's charger has failed which is why it was put out to pasture.  But I hooked it up to a battery and poof runs like a charm  I'll probably put it away as a backup or as a construction inverter.  Great tech rock solid and fixable...
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 08:54:56 PM by David B. »
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline K-Dog

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #40 on: July 14, 2017, 09:17:08 PM »
Way to go!  Can one have too many inverters?  I think not!
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Online Nearingsfault

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #41 on: July 15, 2017, 07:28:57 AM »
It's actually quite cool. It's such an early model trace was not even doing printed circuits yet.  The components are soddered onto blank board and wired. A friend rebuilds them.  I'm thinking of sending it off and having the charger fixed.  That destroys the whole "free" part though. 
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline K-Dog

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Re: Machinery for a post collapse world
« Reply #42 on: July 15, 2017, 08:56:37 AM »
Chargers are not that complicated and someone who is good with electronic repair would be able to fix it.  Why send it off?

The circuit board situation is interesting.  Making a flat board that can handle high currents is problematic.  I have seen many power supply supply sections where heavy wire has bee tack soldered to circuit boards to increase current carrying capacity.  I have seen many old power supply sections where boards have been toasted brown or black because the currents they carry have slow cooked the boards.  Elivated temperature and time will carbonize organic substances and a board may not show decomposition for several years but over time the damage can become bad enough that black areas can become conductive causing circuits to fail.  Concerning your board, it may be that there was time enough to design a board but not time enough to design a good one, and while wire straps can be ugly they work.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline Petty Tyrant

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Re: Amazing level of skill
« Reply #43 on: July 15, 2017, 01:22:55 PM »
If you have ever tried to do sheet metal work you should understand how incredibly talented these men are. A gasifier friend sent me the link.  These skills used to be much more present in our part of the world.  It's good to see they still live on somewhere.
https://youtu.be/YNXQKCrpkJE

Thats crazy mad skill, reminds me of another one i saw where a barefoot indian was fabricating panels for cars.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2017, 01:26:07 PM by Uncle Bob »
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Online Nearingsfault

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Cold climate greenhouse growing
« Reply #44 on: August 20, 2017, 08:37:54 AM »
And this is why hoophouse are so useful in my climate.  We've been eating Cucumbers for 6 weeks now.  My first outdoor one are starting to ripen but will peak before the inside ones are done.  The picture.... well that's just a proud papa happy his girls are playing in the dirt and eating something off a vine.
Cheers
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

 

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