AuthorTopic: Trauma (psychological)  (Read 4675 times)

Offline JRM

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Trauma (psychological)
« on: February 16, 2017, 08:30:11 AM »
Howard Garner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences certainly has its limitations, but I think it's more true than false, in general.

I've been reading about current trauma theory lately, and I'm more and more convinced that it explains much more than we would previously have ever guessed.  It does come down, basically, to biology.  But then it trails off into culture, I think.  We have assembled cultures which are very unconsciously ensuring that most everyone will have a large dose of unresolved trauma.  We have so many filters and blinders on, collectively, around this that it boggles the mind.  (!)

On a personal note, I now know (or, rather, strongly suspect) that the "learning disabilities" I supposedly had as a kid (and I was a bright kid, anyway) were 99% as a  result of a string of unresolved traumas, both acute and relational/developmental.  (I tend to agree with John Holt on "learning disabilities" often being "teaching disabilities" instead.)

If we don't doom ourselves as a species, we will come to understand how vitally crucial knowledge of trauma is to all things human.  And we will then create a culture that is basically safe for humans, so that our potentials will not be so badly damaged.

The problem here is defining exactly what a trauma is, and then why some people are more resilient to traumas than others are. (good example of the use of than rather than then  :icon_sunny:)

Some people go through war zones in childhood or even as an adult and come out OK.  Others end up with PTSD.  Some people have their parents divorce in childhood and it messes them up, others come out OK.  What is trauma and why are some more resilient to it than others are? ???   :icon_scratch:

RE


I'm relatively new to any sort of in depth study of trauma.  But I found this video to be a very helpful introductory overview.  I now have five or six books on the topic, which I'm intending to study for my work (I teach mindfulness meditation, and meditation teachers need to know about this sort of thing because sometimes we have folks get trauma-triggered in our meditation halls.  We need to know how to help them with that).

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/q6M1FumqeyM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/q6M1FumqeyM</a>


My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline RE

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2017, 08:53:48 AM »
This thread should be on the Psychology board,not the Kitchen Sink.  I will move it.

RE
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Offline JRM

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2017, 09:11:20 AM »
I almost posted it in Doom Psychology, because it has the word "psychology" in it.  But it also has "doom" in it, and my topic at hand has nothing (directly) to do with doom.
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline RE

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2017, 09:28:48 AM »
I almost posted it in Doom Psychology, because it has the word "psychology" in it.  But it also has "doom" in it, and my topic at hand has nothing (directly) to do with doom.

All Psychology subjects go on this board.  The Forum in general is a Doom forum (this IS the "Doomstead Diner" after all  ::) ), I titled it this way accordingly but it is general for all psychology topics.

RE
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Offline JRM

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2017, 09:35:31 AM »
RE, you asked about why some folks are more resilient than others, such that they don't get stuck in traumatization and its symptoms and consequences.  That's a good question!  And I don't yet know enough about trauma and psychological resiliency to answer that question well.  I can say what I suspect, at the moment.

I suspect that most people (in our culture) are probably almost always in State 1 or higher in the video, and rarely visit State 0 (zero) in the video, or if they visit it is only briefly.  So there is chronic stress, and this results in lowered cognitive functioning, and probably especially in those areas of their lives which have emotional charge of a sort which is related to this chronic stress.

Being chronically stuck in trough 1 (in the video) is not regarded by the maker of the video as a trauma symptom, per se.  But I'd guess that no one would ever get chronically stuck in that trough if it were not for the presence of unresolved trauma in their bodyminds.

In short, I'd say that those folks who are able to frequently visit state 0 (zero) on the chart will probably be the more resilient folks. Longer visits are probably better than very short ones, too.  But I'd hazard to guess that those who have the least frequent visits to the zero state are holding unresolved trauma, which trauma itself is the very reason they tend not to rise up out of the trough in the direction of zero.

Stress messes with our cognitive functions, which is probably the tie in with many so-called "learning disabilities".  We think much more clearly, and learn better, when relaxed.
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline RE

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2017, 10:04:41 AM »
RE, you asked about why some folks are more resilient than others, such that they don't get stuck in traumatization and its symptoms and consequences.  That's a good question!  And I don't yet know enough about trauma and psychological resiliency to answer that question well.  I can say what I suspect, at the moment.

I suspect that most people (in our culture) are probably almost always in State 1 or higher in the video, and rarely visit State 0 (zero) in the video, or if they visit it is only briefly.  So there is chronic stress, and this results in lowered cognitive functioning, and probably especially in those areas of their lives which have emotional charge of a sort which is related to this chronic stress.

Being chronically stuck in trough 1 (in the video) is not regarded by the maker of the video as a trauma symptom, per se.  But I'd guess that no one would ever get chronically stuck in that trough if it were not for the presence of unresolved trauma in their bodyminds.

In short, I'd say that those folks who are able to frequently visit state 0 (zero) on the chart will probably be the more resilient folks. Longer visits are probably better than very short ones, too.  But I'd hazard to guess that those who have the least frequent visits to the zero state are holding unresolved trauma, which trauma itself is the very reason they tend not to rise up out of the trough in the direction of zero.

Stress messes with our cognitive functions, which is probably the tie in with many so-called "learning disabilities".  We think much more clearly, and learn better, when relaxed.

33 minutes is a pretty long vid to watch.  Can you synopsize these States of 0 & 1 so Diners who do not watch the whole video have a concept of them?

To me, it's a question of compartmentalization.  Some people can compartmentalize and shunt off things which disturb their Wa better than others.  It's another form of intelligence in a way.  If you can't compartmentalize, then trauma tends to affect all aspects of your cognitive functioning. I'm real good at compartmentalization, that's why I can tolerate people like MKing for so long.  I don't let it affect the other areas of my brain, I put it in a box and when I need to analyze it I go into that box, but most of the time it is not part of my consciousness.  It's irrelevant to me.  Same with shit that happened to me in childhood.  I compartmentalize it off and only consider it when necessary.  So it mostly does not bother me or affect my thinking that much.

RE
« Last Edit: February 16, 2017, 10:14:28 AM by RE »
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Offline JRM

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2017, 10:33:46 AM »
As it seems to me at the moment, there are two basic kinds of traumatization which people suffer from, which two kinds have much in common.  And yet they are distinct. That is, they also have much which is not in common between them.

One could be called "acute trauma," which are related to singular events or episodes -- such as a car accident, a house fire, a fall, an accident, maybe a violent attack.  The other basic kind is often called relational or developmental trauma, which has a much more interpersonal aspect which relates to our human need for connection and belonging.  Various kinds and degrees of childhood neglect and abuse are involved here, and the damage done is related to what psychologists call "attachment".  The field which seeks to understand all of this is called Interpersonal Neurobiology.

Since attachment is deeply related to survival (especially in infancy and childhood), people tend to experience attachment difficulties as traumatic.

Here's some intro stuff on Interpersonal Neurobiology.:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/JeGBhVm13mc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/JeGBhVm13mc</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/j2osh2wYuqs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/j2osh2wYuqs</a>
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2017, 10:37:36 AM »
Interesting topic, but I don't have much time to participate. I'll get back to this thread.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline JRM

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2017, 10:44:22 AM »
33 minutes is a pretty long vid to watch.  Can you synopsize these States of 0 & 1 so Diners who do not watch the whole video have a concept of them?

The video is so excellent -- concise, to the point, with graphics -- that I'd rather not attempt to explain it even more concisely. Therefore, I recommend that anyone not wanting to watch the whole video should watch about the first half. That should be enough to grasp my point about the zero point in relation to the first trough (1) on the graph. 

To me, it's a question of compartmentalization.  Some people can compartmentalize and shunt off things which disturb their Wa better than others.  It's another form of intelligence in a way.  If you can't compartmentalize, then trauma tends to affect all aspects of your cognitive functioning. I'm real good at compartmentalization, that's why I can tolerate people like MKing for so long.  I don't let it affect the other areas of my brain, I put it in a box and when I need to analyze it I go into that box, but most of the time it is not part of my consciousness.  It's irrelevant to me.  Same with shit that happened to me in childhood.  I compartmentalize it off and only consider it when necessary.  So it mostly does not bother me or affect my thinking that much.

RE

Such compartmentalization is a coping strategy, or even a "survival strategy," and as such it can be a useful adaptive strategy.  But like most adaptive strategies we adopted while young to cope, it has its downside, and may even have highly problematic unintended consequences.   It's up to you to decide if it works for you and whether you'd like to explore other options.
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2017, 10:55:53 AM »
I once took a week long workshop on healing trauma. It's the first long workshop in Skydancing Tantra as taught by Margot Anand and others, what they call LET 1. They borrow a lot from the work of Jack Painter, who is someone I'd bet JRM knows about. And Wilhelm Reich, whose work has fallen out of favor in mainstream psychoanalysis. Western medicine always throws out the baby with the bathwater.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postural_Integration

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Reich


This morning I was actually trying to write a fiction story describing what generally goes by the name of "first chakra work", for men, specifically. That kind of healing practice is completely lacking in our culture. So much so that most people can't even understand what it's all about, and erroneously think it's some kind of weird sexual trip.

That's what happens when you worship God and forget to give the Goddess her due. Abrahamic religions have a problem that way.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2017, 10:59:34 AM »

Such compartmentalization is a coping strategy, or even a "survival strategy," and as such it can be a useful adaptive strategy.  But like most adaptive strategies we adopted while young to cope, it has its downside, and may even have highly problematic unintended consequences.   It's up to you to decide if it works for you and whether you'd like to explore other options.

Well, I can only speak from my own experience on this, but for me it has worked pretty well for 60 years, so I think it is a good strategy.

RE
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Offline JRM

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2017, 11:02:03 AM »
I once took a week long workshop on healing trauma. It's the first long workshop in Skydancing Tantra as taught by Margot Anand and others, what they call LET 1. They borrow a lot from the work of Jack Painter, who is someone I'd bet JRM knows about. And Wilhelm Reich, whose work has fallen out of favor in mainstream psychoanalysis. Western medicine always throws out the baby with the bathwater.

Actually, the name Jack Painter isn't ringing any bells. Thanks for bringing it up, though. I'll check him out.


This morning I was actually trying to write a fiction story describing what generally goes by the name of "first chakra work", for men, specifically. That kind of healing practice is completely lacking in our culture. So much so that most people can't even understand what it's all about, and erroneously think it's some kind of weird sexual trip.

That's what happens when you worship God and forget to give the Goddess her due. Abrahamic religions have a problem that way.

I'd love to hear much more about this "first chakra work" and your thoughts about it, Eddie.
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline JRM

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2017, 11:07:13 AM »
Eddie, while the name Jack Painter was not lodged in my memory, his Pelvic-Heart Integration was something I bumped into on the internet a little. I know very little about it, however.  I do have some strong hunch that most of us aren't well integrated in that way, for sure!
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #13 on: February 16, 2017, 11:26:48 AM »
I once took a week long workshop on healing trauma. It's the first long workshop in Skydancing Tantra as taught by Margot Anand and others, what they call LET 1. They borrow a lot from the work of Jack Painter, who is someone I'd bet JRM knows about. And Wilhelm Reich, whose work has fallen out of favor in mainstream psychoanalysis. Western medicine always throws out the baby with the bathwater.

Actually, the name Jack Painter isn't ringing any bells. Thanks for bringing it up, though. I'll check him out.


This morning I was actually trying to write a fiction story describing what generally goes by the name of "first chakra work", for men, specifically. That kind of healing practice is completely lacking in our culture. So much so that most people can't even understand what it's all about, and erroneously think it's some kind of weird sexual trip.

That's what happens when you worship God and forget to give the Goddess her due. Abrahamic religions have a problem that way.

I'd love to hear much more about this "first chakra work" and your thoughts about it, Eddie.

Probably not a good topic for the forum. A little too esoteric for most doomers. Reich and then (much later) Painter, though, were the ones who came up with the idea that people suffer pain from what is generally called "somatic holding" which is the memory of old trauma that hasn't been fully processed.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline JRM

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Re: Trauma (psychological)
« Reply #14 on: February 16, 2017, 11:37:45 AM »
Probably not a good topic for the forum. A little too esoteric for most doomers. Reich and then (much later) Painter, though, were the ones who came up with the idea that people suffer pain from what is generally called "somatic holding" which is the memory of old trauma that hasn't been fully processed.

I know a little more about Reich than Painter. I'll have to look into him some more.

Esoteric or not, could you say more about "first chakra work"? ... and how the Skydancing Tantra do that?  Or link to something on that? (I didn't fine much.)
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

 

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