AuthorTopic: Bucket List  (Read 1449 times)

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34788
    • View Profile
Bucket List
« on: March 12, 2017, 04:59:06 AM »


youtube-Logo-4gc2reddit-logoOff the keyboard of RE



Follow us on Twitter @doomstead666

Friend us on Facebook



Published on The Doomstead Diner on March 12, 2017



http://cdn.gdol.com/ap/p.php?a=pv&p=56790



Discuss this article at the Frosbite Falls Table inside the Diner



Seems like there is some new Anniversary or significant date arriving almost monthly these days.  We had the New Year's Recap of the events of 2016 to review, then the 5 Year Anniversary of the founding of the Doomstead Diner.  Upcoming in August is my 60th Birthday, which is a miraculous longevity for me given the way I lived my life and all the Close Encounters with the Grim Reaper I had along the way.  I never figured to make it past 50.  However, on all occasions to date, the Finger of God stepped in and kept me above ground level walking the Earth for another day to see another Sunrise.



This month marks another Anniversary, my second full year in Retirement. In fact it was on the Ides of March that I walked out the doors of a gymnastics school as a coach for the last time.



http://cdn.history.com/sites/2/2015/02/ask-history-what-are-the-ides-of-march-E.jpeg



Beware the Ides of March



I got to retire early because I became disabled after taking a fall at work and injuring my neck.  Resultant from that are physical issues too numerous to mention, which preclude things like hiking the Bush here in Alaska, circumnavigating the Globe in a Sailboat or even retiring on a Golf Course in Florida to play a round of golf every day. lol.  My retirement such as it is consists mainly of puttering around my digs and writing about Collapse here on the Diner.  So it's not exactly the retirement of my dreams from my youth, when I hoped to be retired by 50, buy a nice 36' or so yacht and sail the various playgrounds of yachties, from the Greek Islands to the Bahamas and the South Pacific.  I never got that dream, at least not long term.  I did have a few good sailing adventures of a couple of weeks at a time in my younger days though.



http://www.sailmiami.com/images/boats4sale/union_anchor.jpg Today, even if I did get the dream, it's not so dreamy anymore to be living the Yachty life.   You have the dangers of kidnapping by Pirates, as one German couple found out for the second time this year.  You have increasingly bad weather with rogue waves around that can take out a small boat in the blink of an eye.  The Greek Islands are not the place they were when I sailed them in the 1980s, now they are piled up with Syrian refugees.  South Pacific Islands are sinking under rising ocean waters and are battered regularly by Super Typhoons.  So maybe it's better I didn't get that dream after all, at least in terms of living a bit longer anyhow.



Besides that though, I don't really have much of a "Bucket List" of things I always wanted to do but never got a chance to do.  In terms of travel, I saw all of Europe, most of South America, the South Pacific Islands and Australia.  Never got to China or to Africa, but never really had the desire to see either of those places.  Today, I DEFINITELY would not want to travel to either one, in China you are lucky if the air is clean enough to breathe on a given day and in Africa your lucky not to contract Ebola or have your head lopped off with a machete.  Besides, are there any Lions or Elephants even left there to see on Safari?  I can watch a nice National Geographic documentary on You Tube from the 1970s and see Africa as it once was, I don't want to see it as it now is.  Besides it's fucking HOT in Africa, and I hate hot weather.



http://img.vietnamplus.vn/t660/Uploaded/izhsa/2017_01_01/China81250x650.jpg



Speaking of not wanting to see things as they now are, another place I don't want to go is back to NY Shity to see my old neighborhoods and haunting grounds.  My old neighborhood of Flushing, Queens isn't even recognizable in pictures I Google up.  The great clubs I frequented like CBGBs and Max's Kansas City are all long gone, and even if they still existed I wouldn't want to be an old guy wandering around a music den stuffed with 20-somethings these days with the type of music that is popular now.  Everybody pierced up and tatoos from head to toe is just repulsive.  OK, I am sounding like Jimmy Kunstler now so I'll get off this topic. LOL.



So besides Travel, what are other things retirees put on their Bucket Lists?  Great Adventures doing something EXCITING!  Well, first off I would need to be healthy and not a cripple to do these things, but once again assume I was healthy.



http://www.themissingyear.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Image42.jpg Do I want to jump out of an airplane with a parachute?  No, unless forced to do that because the plane is crashing, that is just a fucking stupid thing to do.  Do I want to climb Mt. Everest or K-2?  Another fucking stupid thing to do, they don't call it the DEATH ZONE up there for nothing you know.  Most of the lesser adventures like White Water Rafting or hunting for Bear I already did, so they are not on a Bucket List of things I never did but want to still do.



Bottom line here is I have no Bucket List at all, and I'm quite happy to be living peacefully in my digs, keyboarding Collapse on the Diner.  I have all the Food, Beer and Smokes I consume every day that I need, and the place is warm and cozy.  At least most of the time anyhow, except when the heat went out during the cold snap we had a couple of weeks ago anyhow. lol.  However, that was fixed inside a day by the maintenance man, and it never actually got below 49F in the digs, so I was in no danger of freezing to death at the time.  It was just a little uncomfortable.  I usually keep the heat down fairly low anyway, since I like it colder and it keeps my heating bill down too.  However, 49 and dropping is just a little too cold.  Low 60s is good for wandering around the digs in Flannel Pajamas or sweats, wearing some nice warm slippers.



http://www.buckandbuck.com/uploads/Product/product_486_file_large.jpg So even though being disabled is no fun, I don't feel like I missed out on anything because of it, but what I did get out of it was EARLY RETIREMENT! I am now at 2 years and still running without having to work, getting up each day to do mainly as I please, with the exception of having the continuing headache of litigating my SS-WC Case and making trips to the doctors as necessary.  Fortunately there seems to be no major life threatening problem at the moment, just the continuing annoyances.  My keyboard fingers still work fine though, and I think I have most of my marbles left so my prose comes out OK when I keyboard.  At least most of the feedback seems to indicate that anyhow in the blog commentariat, although I do get criticized for being nuts on the forum by a few people. lol.  So I am doing what I enjoy doing, I got no boss over me telling me what to do, I don't even have to get out of my Flannel Pajamas most days!  Only if I need to go on a Prep Run to pick up some Food or Beer do I need to get semi-decent in street clothes!



Getting to this point was not EZ though, for the first 7 months of this retirement I had no income and had to live off my savings, which fortunately I had enough of so I did not end up as a Homeless Cripple Freezing to Death on the Streets of Palmer, Alaska. More than half of the people in the FSoA could not have negotiated such a lengthy time with no income, most could not even make it for a month. So I was anxious and worried for this whole time, and anxious and worried is even worse than physical pain and disabiity, so that was not a great time in my retirement.  However, once my SS came through and then I won my WC Case and then got my Early Retirement Pension from the Union I worked for rolling in, my financial worries dissipated for the most part, although like with all people concerned about the financial end of collapse, that money is pretty ephemeral.  The money in the Credit Union Account could disappear any day the Credit Union or the whole financial system fails.  My Union Pension could disappear when the Pension Fund goes bankrupt.  My SS Bennies could disappear when SS goes tits up.  I do have enough food preps to keep going for a good year or so if/when all that occurs though, and at this point in my relatively long and crippled life, all I really want to live long enough to see is the collapse of the system that I was unhappy with for the entire time I walked the earth in this iteration in this corporeal host.  When the system goes down, I will go down with it, along with many others.  So it goes in a Civilization Collapse.



http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-FVu9hLGeY4M/UDI6Q_1zVZI/AAAAAAABmZc/me_YbLlaI1E/s1600/Old+Photos+of+Eskimo+(1).jpg The thing for me is, despite being a cripple now and not having the most dreamy of retirements, at least I GOT one, and now 2 years running!  As we move forward in collapse, retirement will be a thing of the past for all people, you will have to work in one sense or another until the day you die.  If it goes tribal and you are well respected as an Elder in the tribe, you may be supported by the tribe as a person who settles disputes and who advises on where to hunt, or where to plant crops etc, but that's still work, intellectual and social work.  If you are a useless hunk of old meat, one day you will wake up and the rest of the tribe has taken off on the move and left you behind.  Also as it spins down on the other end of the lifespan, many infants will be left exposed on moutaintops if the tribe cannot afford to support them or they are too deformed.  Or they will be dropped in a dumpster or garbage can. Dieoff of a Civilization is not a pretty thing to contemplate, but nevertheless these are things you need to grasp hold of if you are to be one of those few who can make it through the Zero Point.



I cherish my days of retirement, despite my disabilites.  I was lucky in when I was born and where I was born and to who I was born.  I walked the earth for near 60 years now, and got to see and do many things that most others who walked the earth never did.  Few if any who follow me will get to do all that either, and certainly not in the kind of world I was living in before it was totally consumed by industrial civilization.  If I had one wish that could have been granted, it would be to have been born 10-20 years earlier than I was, and been pushing 80 now instead of 60 and lived through the times Leonard Cohen did before he bought his ticket to the Great Beyond this year at 82.  I wish I was old enough to have been there in the Summer of Love in Haight-Ashbury.  I wish I had made it to Woodstock, but I was only 12 and my plans to run away from Summer Camp to go there were derailed.  I wish I had been on the bus with Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, I wish I had been there to hear Allen Ginsburg read his poetry in some seedy Greenwich Village bar.  Alas, I was born a bit too late for all of that, but I did get to experience a whole lot that came after it, so I am grateful for that.



https://cs3.livemaster.ru/zhurnalfoto/b/c/b/151105020859.jpeg



For the current generation of 20-somethings, these are the "good old days", assuming they live long enough to wistfully remember them.  As good old days go though, they are not so good for most of them stuck in dead end jobs as Starbucks Barristas or Fast Food workers or Checkout Clerks at Walmart.  They don't have health care insurance and they'll never get any time in retirement, crippled or not.  They will have a heck of an adventure in trying to stay alive though, and hopefully a few of them will manage to do that.



Now I will close this nostalgic post, because I need to change out of my Flannel Pajamas and go buy some beer on my mailbox money and craft a new letter to SS to try to find out WTF is going on with my case, and then Medicaid to see if I can get my damn ID card so I can find a new Primary Care Physician since my old one retired on Dec 31st and couldn't find a young doctor to take over his client list and practice.  This shit occupies my time in retirement, along with writing about the Collapse of Industrial Civilization on the Doomstead Diner.  Who could ask for a better retirement than that?


SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline luciddreams

  • Administrator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3307
    • View Profile
    • Epiphany Now
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2017, 08:55:07 AM »
I enjoyed this article RE.   :)  I especially like that pic of the Merry Pranksters. 

I watched the first episode of a series called Lilyhammer last night.  Then main character reminds me of you, you even sort of look like him. 

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/bfRgVbp9gSY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/bfRgVbp9gSY</a>

I'm gonna enjoy the hell out of this series.  Vegging out in front of the idiot screen is the greatest drug man ever came up with, and it's as Merikan as apple pie.   :D

At least we've got great entertainment to keep us distracted as tshtf... :icon_scratch:
« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 08:59:31 AM by luciddreams »

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16297
    • View Profile
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2017, 03:14:10 PM »
I don't care if I ever retire, and I certainly hope I can keep doing low impact work in the garden until I drop dead. My dad got sick when he was three years older than I am now, and had to stop his hobby farming and animal husbandry, so I don't take anything for granted.

I've never been a smoker, or even much of a drinker, having gone completely drug and alcohol free for nearly 20 years, from age 35 to 55, while I was raising my kids. I have handled a great many substances known to cause cancer, including herbicides like Agent Orange, which we used on the farm when I was a kid. You just never know. Once you're over 60, you're on bonus time in my book.

The only real bucket list items I still think about are:

Making a trip to BC to visit the central coast.

If I were single I'd probably move there. I am currently investigating a possible trip this next summer finally, after lobbying my SO for three years. It looks like climate change paradise (short term at least), and there aren't many people, just a couple of thousand where I want to visit, half of whom are 1st Nation. I'd like to check it out in person.

I'd like to live on the land here long enough to raise a couple of really kick-ass gardens, the kind that challenge your food storage skills. So far my food growing is a weak point. I'd like to get my hoop house into use again. Play around with aquaculture.

I'd love to live for a year or two anchored out in Coral Bay, the last remaining boat-bum refuge in US waters. But unless I sold off everything and took the SS pension early, it'd be a financial drain I'd probably not recover from, at my age. Still, it's tempting..... :) That one will probably remain an unfulfilled fantasy. I did get to sail across an ocean once, with some friends, so it isn't a totally unrequited dream, exactly. But that was a couple of exciting weeks sandwiched between decades of work, not like living aboard full time.

My greatest accomplishment has been seeing my kids raised and grown, with them decently educated and pursuing their own dreams. Funny, but had you asked me about what would have made me happy when I was 25, that one wouldn't have even occurred to me. Perspectives do change, or have for me anyway.

When I bought the stead, I told myself that it was the process that was important, not the outcome. Outcomes are frequently miscalculated, but day-to-day living, working toward your goals, is a satisfying thing, if you aren't too hard on yourself.

« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 03:21:03 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16297
    • View Profile
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2017, 04:35:31 PM »
I wish I was old enough to have been there in the Summer of Love in Haight-Ashbury.  I wish I had made it to Woodstock, but I was only 12 and my plans to run away from Summer Camp to go there were derailed.  I wish I had been on the bus with Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, I wish I had been there to hear Allen Ginsburg read his poetry in some seedy Greenwich Village bar.  Alas, I was born a bit too late for all of that, but I did get to experience a whole lot that came after it, so I am greatful for that.


That's grateful, g-r-a-t-e-f-u-l, chief. Just sayin'.

I probably heard about Woodstock about a year after the fact. The record album was one of those important cultural anthropological artifacts. Even rural kids on a farm in Texas could get the zeitgeist of Woodstock. That's closely bound up in my memory with discovering pot and other various mind altering substances, which I was introduced to by my childhood best friend who was three years older and lived in the city. He is gone now. I wrote about him here.

http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/forum/index.php/topic,1702.420.html

I'm trying to remember when I discovered Kesey and the Pranksters.

I know I started hearing about the bus trip around the time Kerouac died, which was in the same general time frame, fall of '69. The first time I read about Kerouac was his obituary in a magazine. There were a lot of those print magazines back then, and my small town school had an exceptionally good library, for which I'm still grateful.

The Furthur bus trip happened in "64. I was in the 3rd grade, and still reading Swiss Family Robinson and Robinson Crusoe and Treasure Island, living the lonely life of a country kid growing up nine miles from town. So it took maybe five years for that famous trip to filter out into the boonies where I was raised.

I read Sometimes a Great Notion (Kesey's lesser known autobiographical novel), and Tom Wolf's famous bestselling account of the Pranksters, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Might have been high school, or early college. When Kesey got busted and absconded to Mexico, it was all in Rolling Stone. I got a lot of Kesey's story there. Those guys were heroes to me. Fellow psychonauts, pioneers, trailblazers. I wanted to be just like them.

 In '71, the Last Whole Earth Catalog became a bestseller, and it was the perfect guide for me. I literally read it from cover to cover, over and over again.

It was like a self-study course for young counterculture wannabes, that book. Everything from homesteading to nomadics to cybernetics. I still credit Stewart Brand and Lloyd Kahn and all the WEC reviewers for opening my eyes and my mind to all kinds of possibilities. That's the first place I read bout Albert Bates  and Stephen Gaskin and The Farm. I can't help but wonder what would have happened if I'd skipped college and just showed up there. I lacked the confidence though. I thought I need a college education. By the time I looked up, I was in my 30's. Another path not taken.

Not much of Kesey made it to the net. Just a few videos. Here's one of his last public appearances.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/pacbkF1KWCI&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/pacbkF1KWCI&fs=1</a>







« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 04:51:30 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34788
    • View Profile
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2017, 04:52:45 PM »
That's grateful, g-r-a-t-e-f-u-l, chief. Just sayin'.

I blow that one all the time. lol.

Quote
I probably heard about Woodstock about a year after the fact. The record album was one of those important cultural anthropological artifacts. Even rural kids on a farm in Texas could get the zeitgeist of Woodstock. That's closely bound up in my memory with discovering pot and other various mind altering substances, which I was introduced to by my childhood best friend who was three years older and lived in the city. He is gone now. I wrote about him here.

I was already into music at this time because of my friend Randi, the Pirate Radio guy who was also 3 years older than me.  We listened to alternative radio of the era which is how we got stuff to talk about when we went on the air in the first station we named WQLB and only reached a few blocks from his house.  By the time we hooked up with Alan, we had a 40' tower and could reach most of Long Island or to Manhattan if we pointed that way.

So I knew about Woodstock before it went off, and while at summer camp in NH made plans to run away to go to it.  Me and two friends got as far as the bus station in Contocook, where the manager figured we were from the camp and called them.  A couple of couselors came and dragged us back to camp. lol.

I hope you do get the chance to retire, at least in the sense of getting off the daily job of drilling teeth and building all the things you dream of having on the toothstead.  It's great to be just doing what you want to do for your own dreams, rather than to make a buck every day to buy the food you need and the toys you want.  I wish I was healthier, but then if I was healthier I would not have been able to retire.  So it's a trade off there.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Palloy2

  • Administrator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 6097
    • View Profile
    • Palloy's Blog
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2017, 07:30:03 PM »
When I was a blossoming teenager it was Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix.  The Who did "My Generation", with the line "Hope I die b'fore I get old", which at the time I thought was 60.  The Beach Boys did "I wish they all could be Californian girls", and I did get to marry one eventually, but it didn't last long.

Nothing on my bucket list now.  I was going to go to India and maybe look after their tigers, or maybe become a Sanyassin and go through an early "death" from this worldly life, and rebirth to spend my time sitting and thinking.  But this way of doing that is OK too.

Not all South Pacific islands are low-lying coral atolls.  Some are volcanic, being on the Ring of Fire, so high with good soil, lots of rain and raging rivers.



"The State is a body of armed men."

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16297
    • View Profile
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2017, 08:55:55 PM »
We'll be joining you at Christmas then? Your place sounds very nice.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34788
    • View Profile
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2017, 12:45:48 AM »
When I was a blossoming teenager it was Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix.  The Who did "My Generation", with the line "Hope I die b'fore I get old", which at the time I thought was 60.  The Beach Boys did "I wish they all could be Californian girls", and I did get to marry one eventually, but it didn't last long.

That's the first time you mentioned an ex-wife!  How long did your marriage last?  Mine went 3 years, though we were together for 3 before that.

Quote
Not all South Pacific islands are low-lying coral atolls.  Some are volcanic, being on the Ring of Fire, so high with good soil, lots of rain and raging rivers.

The volcanic islands are definitely better than the low lying Atolls.  Of course, there's always the risk the volcano that built the island will go active again.  But we have that same issue here in Alaska.  If Redoubt or Spurr blow Mt. St. Helens style, Anchorage is toast.  We probably won't do much better in the Mat-Su Valley.


RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Palloy2

  • Administrator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 6097
    • View Profile
    • Palloy's Blog
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2017, 09:21:59 AM »
I've been married and divorced three times - anyone would think I'm difficult to live with.  :o  16 years altogether.  Doing it again is definitely not on my bucket list.

The nearest active volcano to here is 70 Km away and downwind, so I'm not too worried about it.  Earthquakes are quite common though.  I know I've slept through a 4.6, and mostly they can be confused with thunder, of which there is a lot.  The house is reinforced with steel bars through the floor slab, walls and roof, so it can't fall down.  It would be more dangerous to run outside where you could be hit by a falling tree.
"The State is a body of armed men."

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34788
    • View Profile
Re: Bucket List
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2017, 10:15:27 AM »
I've been married and divorced three times - anyone would think I'm difficult to live with.  :o  16 years altogether.  Doing it again is definitely not on my bucket list.

The nearest active volcano to here is 70 Km away and downwind, so I'm not too worried about it.  Earthquakes are quite common though.  I know I've slept through a 4.6, and mostly they can be confused with thunder, of which there is a lot.  The house is reinforced with steel bars through the floor slab, walls and roof, so it can't fall down.  It would be more dangerous to run outside where you could be hit by a falling tree.

Once was enough for me.

I've been through a half dozen or so quakes up here.  Two of them over 6.0.  Rattles the digs pretty good, but I think it would take an 8 to bring the place down and it would need to be pretty close.  They build the stuff up here to handle the shakers.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
16 Replies
2740 Views
Last post April 09, 2015, 07:17:52 AM
by Eddie
0 Replies
268 Views
Last post February 06, 2017, 02:51:56 AM
by Guest
39 Replies
1018 Views
Last post August 26, 2018, 11:09:09 AM
by RE