AuthorTopic: The Great Laptop Travel Ban  (Read 1343 times)

Offline RE

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The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« on: March 21, 2017, 06:17:50 AM »
WTF is the POINT of this ban?

They're allowing smart phones, and there is nothing I cannot do on a laptop on that I cannot also do on my phone, although it's a bit more inconvenient.

Are terrorists hacking the net while they are flying?  WTF?

It has gone beyond psychotic now.

RE

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39336518

Air travel: How will the new US electronics rules affect me?


Laptops in the cabin will be banned on some flights within days. Image copyright Getty Images

The United States has announced that laptops, e-readers and almost any other electronic device that is not a phone will be banned from cabin luggage on some flights.

The rule only applies to 10 airports, but one of those is the world's busiest international airport - Dubai International.

The new rules come from the US's Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).
What items are affected?

The rule is broad and wide ranging, affecting almost anything that is not a phone.

It says: "Electronic devices larger than a cell phone/smart phone will not be allowed to be carried onboard the aircraft in carry-on luggage or other accessible property."

Anything larger will have to go in checked luggage in the hold.

But the advice does not define that size with any measurements, saying simply that "the approximate size of a commonly available smartphone is considered to be a guideline for passengers".

The department gave a list of examples, but said it was not exhaustive:

    Laptops
    Tablets
    E-readers
    Cameras
    Portable DVD players
    Electronic game units larger than a smartphone
    Travel printers/scanners

It is not clear if the vague sizing could cause problems with interpretation, especially when it comes to larger phones or so-called "phablets" such as the iPhone 7 Plus.

In an accompanying document, the DHS said "their size is well understood by most passengers who fly internationally".
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Advertising for Nintendo's new console specifically highlighted its use on a plane

The examples specifically mention both portable media players and game systems.

But "necessary medical devices" will be allowed on board flights - after a security check.
Which airports are affected?

The new rules apply to 10 airports:

    Queen Alia International, Amman, Jordan
    Cairo International Airport, Egypt
    Ataturk Airport, Istanbul, Turkey
    King Abdulaziz International, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
    King Khalid International, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Kuwait International Airport
    Mohammed V International, Casablanca, Morocco
    Hamad International, Doha, Qatar
    Dubai International, United Arab Emirates
    Abu Dhabi International, United Arab Emirates

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Dubai - the world's busiest international airport - makes the list

The DHS said it chose the airports "based on the current threat picture", but did not provide any more details. It said it may add more airports in future.

There is also no time limit on the rules - they will stay in place "until the threat changes".

The rule change also requires no additional TSA agents, US authorities said - any increased security cost will be borne by the affected airports.
What about connecting flights?

If you are on a business trip from Asia to the United States, it is likely that a Middle Eastern airport like Dubai could be part of your itinerary.

But the document detailing the enhanced security refers to "last point of departure airports" - so if you change planes at one of the affected airports for the last leg of your trip, the rules still apply.

So, for example, going from Dubai to New York - a 14-hour flight - will leave you without a laptop or other device, no matter where you started your journey from.

"TSA recommends passengers transferring at one of the 10 affected airports place any large personal electronic devices in their checked bags upon check-in at their originating airport," the official advice says.
What's the logic behind the ban?

In a statement, the Department of Homeland Security said it was basing its decisions on "evaluated intelligence".

It said terrorists "continue to target commercial aviation" and are trying to find "innovative methods" to make such attacks - including hiding explosives in consumer electronics.

"We note that disseminated propaganda from various terrorist groups is encouraging attacks on aviation, to include tactics to circumvent aviation security."

"We have reason to be concerned," the agency said - but did not address any specific threat.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The TSA dictates flight safety rules on inbound flights - which airline must follow

Instead, they cited three examples of attacks that caused concern: the 2015 downing of an aircraft in Egypt, the attempt to down an airliner in Somalia in 2016, and the 2016 armed attacks against airports in Brussels and Istanbul.

Some of the banned devices may not be much larger than a mobile phone, adding confusion. Homeland Security said they were allowing phones simply because the new rules aim "to balance risk with impacts to the travelling public".
Can an airline or airport refuse?

No. As part of the legal agreements that allow commercial airlines to enter US airspace, they must abide by TSA security rules.

They have just 96 hours to implement the new procedure. This means the new procedures must be in effect by Saturday morning, 25 March, at the latest.

The DHS is also keen to point out that the new rules will apply to a very small proportion of travellers - just 10 of the 250 or so airports which fly to the US.

"A small percentage of flights to the United States will be affected, and the exact number of flights will vary on a day to day basis," it said.
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2017, 07:01:46 AM »
If your laptop has to go in the luggage hold, then you have to check it in earlier and lose control over it, instead of keeping it with you at all times.  This gives them the opportunity to access the laptop and maybe copy the hard drive for a more detailed examination later.

It is probably just part of the incremental plan - next they will come for your phone too, but don't worry, you've got nothing to hide apart from your sedition, and anyway you can put up with the torture until you die.
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Offline RE

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2017, 07:13:16 AM »
If your laptop has to go in the luggage hold, then you have to check it in earlier and lose control over it, instead of keeping it with you at all times.  This gives them the opportunity to access the laptop and maybe copy the hard drive for a more detailed examination later.

It is probably just part of the incremental plan - next they will come for your phone too, but don't worry, you've got nothing to hide apart from your sedition, and anyway you can put up with the torture until you die.

Just don't carry a laptop at all.  Have all your programs and data on a MicroSD Card and swallow it encased in a capsule before you board the plane.

When you land, go through your shit to find the capsule, then buy a new laptop at Best Buy and load your programs to it.

Problem solved.

RE
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Offline Eddie

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2017, 07:15:38 AM »
The main thing this bright idea accomplishes is making it MUCH easier to have your actual electronics stolen, as oppose to your data and your contacts and your email. There'll surely be a raft of stolen laptops.
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Offline RE

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2017, 07:23:30 AM »
The main thing this bright idea accomplishes is making it MUCH easier to have your actual electronics stolen, as oppose to your data and your contacts and your email. There'll surely be a raft of stolen laptops.

Meanwhile, Airlines like Alaska Airlines have invested a fortune in making in-air Wi-Fi available.  How do you think they will react if their passengers are not allowed to bring their laptops on board?  What about all the Bizmen and Day Traders who need to be connected to make those instant trades when their stops are passed while in-flight?  Will they want to give up the laptop when they board the plane?

Trumpty-Dumpty needed to be more specific with this ban and limit it to only Muslims with laptops.

RE
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 07:25:48 AM by RE »
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UK Joins The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2017, 01:09:55 PM »
Ridiculous & Ridiculouser.

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/trafficandcommuting/us-unveils-new-restrictions-on-travelers-from-eight-muslim-majority-countries/2017/03/21/d4efd080-0dcb-11e7-9d5a-a83e627dc120_story.html?utm_term=.3cc1e075759c


Britain follows U.S. in banning some electronics in cabins on certain flights from several Muslim-majority countries
U.S. and U.K. unveil carry-on restrictions for flights from several Muslim-majority nations

Play Video2:40
By Rick Noack, Luz Lazo and Lori Aratani March 21 at 2:23 PM

LONDON — Britain joined the United States on Tuesday in banning passengers traveling from airports in several Muslim-majority countries from bringing laptops, tablets and other portable electronic devices on board with them when they fly.

The U.K. ban applies to six countries, while the U.S. ban applies to 10 airports in eight Muslim-majority countries.

Fliers can still travel with these items, but they must be packed in their checked baggage on U.S.- and U.K.-bound flights from airports across the countries, including busy transit hubs in Istanbul, Dubai and Doha, Qatar.

The British ban also includes some cellphones and is expected to apply to all airports in the six nations. The countries included in the British ban are Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia.

“Direct flights to the U.K. from these destinations can continue to operate to the U.K. subject to these new measures being in place,” a government spokesman said.

It’s unclear when the ban will take effect. “The affected airlines have already been informed, and we expect the measures to be in place in the next couple of days,” the spokesman said.

However, when contacted Tuesday evening, some of the affected British airlines were unable to provide specifics. British Airways referred the question back to the Department for Transport.

Meanwhile, the British Foreign Office updated its risk assessment website to say the measures would take effect “in the coming days but no later than 25 March.”

[ What is the logic behind Trump’s new ‘electronics ban’? People are stumped.]

The decision to announce the ban was made during a meeting on aviation security measures held Tuesday by British Prime Minister Theresa May, who had chaired similar meetings over the last weeks. British authorities also said they had reached out to U.S. officials before the announcement.

A government spokesman added that six British and eight foreign carriers were affected by the ban.

A spokesman for the prime minister’s office said the measures were based on the “same intelligence the U.S. relies on.”
What Trump's revised travel ban misses about terrorist attacks in the U.S.

Play Video1:29

Senior U.S. administration officials said the rules were prompted by “evaluated intelligence” that terrorists continue to target commercial aviation by “smuggling explosives in portable electronic devices.”

“Based on this information, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly and Transportation Security Administration acting administrator Huban Gowadia have determined it is necessary to enhance security procedures for passengers at certain last-point-of-departure airports to the United States,” officials said late Monday.

Federal officials initially described the ban as indefinite. But a spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security, David Lapan, said the directive runs until Oct. 14, and could be extended for another year “should the evaluation of the threat remain the same.”

[Second federal judge blocks revised Trump travel ban]

The officials would not provide details on the threats. One example they cited involved a bomb, possibly hidden in a laptop, that exploded on board a Somali plane going from Mogadishu to Djibouti, not a U.S.-bound flight.

However, a person familiar with the security warning said the government has long been concerned about the aspirations of a Syria-based terrorist group to build explosive devices hidden inside electronics in a way that would be hard to detect.

In 2014, such concerns led to a tightening of security procedures on U.S.-bound flights, but at the time, some officials said the design of such devices did not appear to have moved past the planning stages. One person familiar with the new restrictions said they were based on more recent intelligence that suggested terrorists had gotten further along in developing such hidden explosives.

James Norton, a homeland security consultant who was a ranking official at the Department of Homeland Security when the liquid ban went into effect just over a decade ago, said a sudden change like this signals a significant threat.

“It seems fairly urgent,” Norton said. “My initial reaction is this is based on some sort of information that the intelligence community came across as a whole. They are trying to address it working with the airlines and the countries directly trying to implement some sort of a plan.”

He said the electronic ban mirrors the sudden ban against liquids that went into effect Aug. 10, 2006, after British and U.S. intelligence uncovered a plot to simultaneously blow up as many as 10 U.S.-bound passenger jets with liquid explosives hidden in carry-on luggage. Authorities arrested 24 suspects that day and launched new security measures that snarled air traffic. Travelers had to undergo special inspections after drinks and most other liquids and gels were banned as carry-on items.

“That happened overnight based on a bunch of arrests on an incredible threat,” Norton said Norton. In this case, the response suggests urgency to prevent devices from going onto U.S. bound aircraft from those specific countries.

“Evidence can be anything,” Norton said. “It is hard to know until they make some sort of announcement in terms of why they are doing this — why they picked those countries and those flights. My guess is just like with the liquid ban that they came across a potential threat.”

British terrorism experts were baffled by the movey, and said the differing specifics of the American and British bans appeared contradictory. Whereas Tunisia is included in the British ban, for instance, airports in that country are not affected by U.S. restrictions.

“I suspect that the U.K. included Tunisia in its ban due to the fact that airlines regularly fly out of that country into Britain,” said Daniel Falkiner, a London-based security analyst.

“As to why the U.S. has included airports from five more nations in its ban; this may be linked to the Trump administration’s emphasis on displaying an abundance of caution when addressing the threat of terrorism to the U.S., regardless of the potential this may have on relations with partners and allies,” Falkiner said.

“In contrast, the U.K. has very close political and security ties with the Gulf States, for example, which may mean London is more content than Washington is with the security protocols at major regional hubs like Dubai,” Falkiner said.
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Security experts also said that it would be extremely unusual for the British government to announce such extensive restrictions – which affect flights from tourist destinations of British travelers such as Tunisia or Egypt – without the emergence of new details in recent weeks.

But another U.S. security expert questioned how the ban was applied.

“Why should I feel safer if the laptop is stowed in the belly of the plane and the perpetrator can use his iPhone to set if off?” said a senior official with an international travel organization. “I’m not personally privy to what [information] the TSA or DHS has, but I just don’t get it.”

The official, who asked not to be identified because he works in the industry, said that the logistics of enforcing the laptop ban will be daunting, particularly in instances where passengers take connecting flights elsewhere in the world before boarding a plane bound for the U.S.

“You’ve got to wonder, if somebody’s connecting and doesn’t have access to his checked bag to put his laptop in, what does he do?” the official asked. “I guess people will figure out that if you’re connecting in Casa Blanca, you’d better have your laptop in your checked bag.”

Under the restrictions, travelers to the United States from 10 mostly Middle Eastern airports will be required to put all personal electronic devices larger than a cellphone or smartphone in their checked baggage. U.S. airlines are not affected by the ban because none offer direct U.S.-bound flights from the affected airports.

Ten airports in eight countries — Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates — are affected. Officials said the airports were selected based on the “current threat picture.”

The airports are: Queen Alia International Airport (AMM) in Jordan, Cairo International Airport (CAI) in Egypt, Ataturk International Airport (IST) in Turkey, King Abdulaziz International Airport (JED) and King Khalid International Airport (RUH) in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait International Airport (KWI) in Kuwait, Mohammed V International Airport (CMN) in Morocco, Hamad International Airport (DOH) in Qatar, and Dubai International Airport (DXB) and Abu Dhabi International Airport (AUH) in the United Arab Emirates.

Officials said the change will affect passengers who travel on roughly 50 daily flights. Crew members are not included in the device ban.

Turkey’s transport minister, Ahmet Arslan, criticized the ban Tuesday, telling reporters in Ankara that it was not “beneficial” for passengers and that Turkey already has stringent security measures in place, according to Turkey’s semiofficial Anadolu news agency. He added that Turkish officials had spoken about the regulations with their American counterparts and were discussing whether the Trump administration should “step back.”

Word of the ban was first made public Monday afternoon — not by administration officials but in a tweet sent out by Royal Jordanian Airlines. Initially, U.S. officials declined to comment on the report, saying only that they would provide an update “when appropriate.”

In the tweet, which was later deleted, airline officials advised passengers of the new requirements that would affect travelers on its flights to New York, Chicago, Detroit and Montreal.

“Following instructions from certain concerned U.S. departments, we kindly inform our dearest passengers departing to and arriving from the United States that carrying any electronic or electrical device on board the flight cabins is strictly prohibited,” the tweet read.

It noted that cellphones and medical devices are excluded from the ban.

Emirates Airlines issued a similar statement Tuesday, saying “electronic devices larger than a cellphone/smart phone, excluding medical devices, cannot be carried in the cabin of the aircraft” on U.S.-bound flights. The U.S. routes of Emirates include Dulles International Airport.

Late Monday evening, the airline issued a follow-up tweet: “Further updates will be announced soon regarding #electronicban.”

U.S. officials began outlining the new rules to carriers Sunday.

A spokesman for the International Air Transport Association, which represents international carriers including Royal Jordanian, said they were not informed of the new restrictions and were working to get additional information from U.S. authorities.

Officials said airlines will have 96 hours to comply with the restrictions. Carriers that fail to follow them risk losing their authorization to operate in the United States.

James Buck, a professional photographer from Burlington, Vt., was vacationing in Jordan when he read about the ban on Facebook on Monday. As of Tuesday, he said it was still unclear if his Royal Jordanian flight scheduled to leave at 3 a.m. Thursday from Queen Alia International Airport to Montreal will be affected.

“It is really scary because I don’t know what the ban is about. I don’t know if there is a specific threat,” he said. “It only applies to these airlines, so should I try to rebook myself on another airline to get out of here?”

Like other travelers, Buck has plenty of questions about the ban. He said he hasn’t heard from the airline or seen any government notices for travelers. The questions from travelers on social media, mostly, are about what exactly the ban means. Does it apply to his cameras. Can he bring a big smartphone?

“It’s troubling to me that the State Department hasn’t posted a travel warning on its website or any travel explanation,” Buck said. “Is there any current situation that we need to be aware of? Has there been an attack? Has there been a threat? Has something changed? It is unbelievable that the information was disseminated so poorly.”

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Information that travelers have received also has been conflicting and inaccurate, he said. First, he read that the ban would take effect immediately and last only 96 hours. Then the airline said it had 96 hours to implement the ban and that it would last indefinitely.

“So now it’s not even clear if the ban will be in place by the time I fly or not,” Buck said. “The worst part of it is they are not telling us whether there is a threat or not. I have no idea whether it’s safe to fly or not.”

Buck had been traveling in Jordan since March 13, photographing sites and the desert, and carrying equipment that is worth half his annual salary, he said.

“I’ve got a backpack full of cameras and a laptop and stuff,” he said, adding that he’d spent the entire day Tuesday driving all over Amman trying to find a hard case. “No luck.”

Noack reported from London. Aratani and Lazo reported from Washington. Devlin Barrett, Ashley Halsey, Carol Morello and Brian Murphy contributed to this report from Washington. Zeynep Karatas contributed to this report from Istanbul.
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Offline RE

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The REAL Reason for The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2017, 04:21:02 AM »
JMHO here.

This ban has nothing to do with EITHER "bomb threats" or "cyber security".

It's an attempt to limit travel by Muslims from these countries, as an "end around" since both of El Trumpo's travel bans to date have been squashed by the Judiciary.  They are using Administrative Law and "Homeland Security" as the means to do this and take it outside the purview of the Judicil Branch of Da Goobermint.

Really, nobody who does Bizness these days can travel without a Laptop, and few people want to trust their laptop to the baggage handlers.  I know I don't.  Besides the information contained, these suckers are EXPENSIVE!  (relatively speaking of course).  I don't check my Cameras either, I always carry them with me too onto the plane.

Say you were a Muslim Journalist traveling out of one of these countries.  You have accumulated tons of pics and information on your cameras and laptops which you hope to disseminate to the media.  If not the MSM, at least to the alt-media.  But, when you arrive at your destination, your bag is GONE!  "Sorry, it was lost, but here is $1000 in the insurance you took out on your bag.  Have a nice day, and we're REALLY sorry about this!  :( "

This is mainly an attempt to staunch the flow of information out of these countries.

RE
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2017, 07:15:13 AM »
It's likely to cause a backlash from businessmen, who want to keep working on the 15 hour flight to the US, so it's another badly thought out plan.  What a bunch of amateurs.
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Offline RE

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2017, 12:11:23 AM »
Are Saudi Princes allowed to carry laptops on their Private Jets?  ???  :icon_scratch:

RE

http://www.businessinsider.com/us-government-laptop-ban-effect-today-what-we-know-2017-3

The US government's laptop ban is now in effect — here's what we know so far

Etihad Airways A380 JFK Flags Etihad Airbus A380's inaugural flight to New York JFK International Airport. Etihad

The Department of Homeland Security's ban on large electronics is now officially in effect.

The ban, which was announced on Tuesday, forbids passengers from bringing any electronic devices larger than a cell phone into the cabin of certain flights to the US.

Airlines were sent scrambling for answers to the operational nightmare created by the ban, after getting just 96 hours to comply or risk losing their license to fly into the US.

 There are still a lot of unanswered questions about the ban's motives, its effectiveness at deterring a terrorist attack, the huge loopholes left open by the Trump administration, and how airlines are expected to comply with the ban and a Federal Aviation Administration prohibition against checking lithium-ion battery devices.

Here's what we know so far.

What's the ban?

The ban requires passengers to place all electronic items larger than a cell phone in their checked luggage so the devices cannot be accessed in flight. This includes laptops, tablets, e-readers, portable DVD players, gaming devices larger than a smartphone, and travel-size printers and scanners. However, necessary medical devices are exempt.

The new policy covers only non-stop flights to the US coming from one of 10 airports in the Middle East and North Africa — including a few of the busiest transit hubs in the world: Istanbul, Turkey and Dubai in the UAE.

Flights from the US to these destinations will not be affected.

Laptop ban airlines and airports DHS TSAMike Nudelman/BI Graphics

As a result, a total of nine airlines, including industry heavyweights such as Emirates, Etihad, Qatar Airways, and Turkish Airlines, will have to deal with the consequences of the ban.

But not all flights from these airlines into the US will be affected by the ban.

 For instance, Emirates offers flights to New York's JFK International Airport and Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey from Dubai that stop in Milan, Italy and Athens, Greece. On Thursday, Emirates confirmed that passengers on these flights will be permitted to have their laptops and other electronic devices with them in the cabin.

In addition, no flights operated by US or European airlines will be affected directly by the ban because none offer non-stop service to the US from that region of the world. However, several US carriers including American, United, JetBlue, and Alaska could see their business take a hit. This is because airlines such as Qatar, Turkish, and Emirates feed passengers directly into their respective domestic networks.

How will the ban work?

The ban calls for all large electronic devices to be packed with checked luggage at each passenger's point of origin. This means that those transiting through the affected airports will be without their devices from the onset of their trip. For instance, if you are traveling from Mumbai, India to Atlanta, GA via Doha, Qatar, your laptop will have to be checked in Mumbai even though it's not one of the airports on the banned list.

Qatar Airways Business Class Q Suite Qatar Airways Q Suite business class. Qatar Airways

However, those flying with Emirates through Dubai will have the benefit of a work-around that will allow passengers to have access to their laptops until it's time to board their flights. For passengers, Emirates' complimentary laptop handling service will allow them to have access to their devices during the first leg of their journey along with their layover in Dubai.

Passengers who use the service will be required to declare their large electronic devices to security agents before boarding US-bound flights. The devices would then be packed in secure boxes and stored in the aircraft's cargo hold. The boxes would be returned to the travelers once they reached the US.

Other airlines such as Qatar Airways have indicated they will implement extra security measures to ensure the security of the devices. Although none have yet to clarify what those measure are.

According to US officials, there's no set date for the end of the ban and its need will be periodically reviewed.

Why the ban?

According to senior administration officials, the decision to implement these security measures is a result of intelligence showing a risk for terrorist activity involving commercial aviation.

"Evaluated intelligence indicates that terrorist groups continue to target commercial aviation and are aggressively pursuing innovative methods to undertake their attacks, to include smuggling explosive devices in various consumer items," an official said on Monday.

dubai airport Emirates Airbus A380 at Dubai International Airport. REUTERS/Ashraf Mohammad

Whatever this intelligence consists of, it was substantial enough for the national-security apparatus to act.

 But confusing matters was that the UK issued a similar ban Tuesday but excluded four airports — Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, Doha, Qatar, and Casablanca, Morocco — featured in the US ban.

In addition, several aviation industry analysts who have spoken with Business Insider question whether a ban of this type would even be effective in countering a terrorist attack. Doha, Dubai, and Abu Dhabi are major international transit hubs with extensive multilayered security procedures. US-bound flights are also screened in dedicated facilities using well-trained security professionals who often have experience in law enforcement or the military.

In fact, Abu Dhabi International Airport is equipped with a US Customs and Border Protection pre-clearance facility where passengers and bags headed for the US are screened by US customs officials.

Hamad International Airport Qatar Hamad International Airport in Doha, Qatar. Hamad International Airport

Also, areas of world known to be hotbeds for terrorist activity have been left off the list banned countries. For example, Pakistan International Airlines' flight from Lahore to JFK International by way of Manchester, England is not covered by the ban. Which means, it's possible for terrorists to simply bypass the banned airports and reach the US through any number of European transit hubs.

 

 

 

The lithium battery problem

The electronics ban will have a few unintended side effects. One of the most serious is the large number of lithium-ion batteries in the cargo hold of an airliner.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, it's behavior with potentially catastrophic consequences.

"FAA battery fire testing has highlighted the potential risk of a catastrophic aircraft loss due to damage resulting from a lithium battery fire or explosion," the agency wrote in an alert in February. "Current cargo fire suppression systems cannot effectively control a lithium battery fire."

Administration officials told journalists on Monday that they were working with the FAA to maintain a safe flying environment, but they did not state specifics. Business Insider asked DHS for specifics on Tuesday but has not yet heard back from officials.

This is particularly concerning for Michael Mo, the cofounder and CEO of KULR Technologies, a company that specializes in thermal-management systems for batteries.

Turkish Airlines Airbus a330 300 Turkish Airlines Airbus A330-300. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

"Lithium-ion batteries are inherently volatile. It's statistics. It's not a matter of if, but a matter of when one of these things blow," Mo told Business Insider in an interview. "So when that happens, it's better to have humans nearby to react and put out the fire."

According to Mo, the only saving grace here is that spare batteries and power banks are still prohibited. Which means only batteries fitted inside devices will be stored with cargo. Even though it's not perfectly safe, these batteries tend to be more stable and less likely to combust.

With the laptop ban still in its infancy, more details will likely emerge in the near future. Stay tuned.

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Offline K-Dog

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2017, 04:46:05 AM »
A total Trump brain fart.  To ease the problem of the new lithium battery incendiary bombs now in the cargo hold perhaps passengers should be required to remove their laptop batteries and bring them into the passenger compartment to keep the existing demographic distribution of batteries.  But I'm not sure how that makes things safer.  Maybe it was not a problem to begin with?
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 04:49:47 AM by K-Dog »
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Offline RE

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2017, 06:56:00 AM »
A total Trump brain fart.  To ease the problem of the new lithium battery incendiary bombs now in the cargo hold perhaps passengers should be required to remove their laptop batteries and bring them into the passenger compartment to keep the existing demographic distribution of batteries.  But I'm not sure how that makes things safer.  Maybe it was not a problem to begin with?

Actually, even cell phone batteries are prohibited inside the cabin if they are not istalled in the phone.  I found this out when I purchased a spare battery for my phone.  Apparently there is a greater likelihood of them exploding if they are not connected to a device.  Laptop batteries are even bigger, so they're definitely prohibited.

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Re: The Great Laptop Travel Ban
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2017, 12:44:35 PM »
Mrs. Dog has the right comment about the laptop ban.

"What is this supposed to accomplish?  All ithis will do is piss people off."
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

 

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