AuthorTopic: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"  (Read 12701 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #225 on: October 17, 2018, 06:57:39 AM »
My view is that the Civil War was about State's Rights and little else.

It is intuitively obvious to the most casual of observers.

The facts simply fail to support your "view."

You CAN read, can't you?
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #226 on: October 17, 2018, 07:48:45 AM »
Grandpa was a carpenter
He built houses stores and banks
Chain smoked Camel cigarettes
And hammered nails in planks
He was level on the level
And shaved even every door
And voted for Eisenhower
'Cause Lincoln won the war


            --------- John Prine

Just an excellent example that sprung to mind, of how public perceptions shape politics.

Now people vote for Democrats 'cause Lincoln won the war. It's completely changed in one lifetime. Funny how it's all about the narrative, and the reality comes in a distant second.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #227 on: October 17, 2018, 10:32:33 AM »
Grandpa was a carpenter
He built houses stores and banks
Chain smoked Camel cigarettes
And hammered nails in planks
He was level on the level
And shaved even every door
And voted for Eisenhower
'Cause Lincoln won the war


            --------- John Prine

Just an excellent example that sprung to mind, of how public perceptions shape politics.

Now people vote for Democrats 'cause Lincoln won the war. It's completely changed in one lifetime. Funny how it's all about the narrative, and the reality comes in a distant second.


Great lyric.

People also forget that, "because Lincoln won the war," politically aware blacks were generally Republicans right up through the end of WWII. IN fact, Martin Luther King, Sr. had been a lifelong republican until he endorsed JFK.

 LBJ changed the politics, and the narrative changed in kind.  As it is changing every day as we watch in awe, terror and disgust.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #228 on: October 17, 2018, 10:36:02 AM »
I post this here because, if this ain't something to make you say, "Dafuq?" I don't know what is.
Interesting that i found this today because I actually did #2 last night.

10 Common Items That Could Cause Your Death

Jun 18, 2018 |Bizzare

hot dog

Everyone is acutely aware of the most common causes of death, but there are several everyday items that you might want to be more weary of. Many of them might even be something you use all the time! Keep reading for 10 common items that could kill you.

10. Jacuzzi

You might be surprised to find out that almost every day in the United States someone is killed or drowns in a hot tub. Many of theses deaths are attributed to drowning due to over indulgence in drugs or alcohol, resulting in falling asleep in the hot tub. However, some are also attributed to homicide.

9. Electric Blanket

Image credit:yourbestdigs

Who doesn’t love a warm, cozy electric blanket on a cold night? Well, you might think twice next time you pull it out this winter. Electric blankets cause nearly 5,000 fires per year, which results in about 20 deaths each year.

8. Escalators

escalator

For many people, this is a common fear. Getting your foot, shoe, or clothing stuck in an escalator is a frightening thought. Sadly, it is a reality for about 30 people each year who are killed by escalators and the approximately 17,000 people that are seriously injured. Maybe next time you go to the mall, you’ll opt to take the stairs.

7. Magnets

Magnets, they seem so innocuous right? Everyone has them on their fridge! Wrong. Magnets pose a serious risk to young children who are prone to putting things in their mouths and swallowing them. If a child swallows more than one magnet, the two (or more) will try to find each other through the path of least resistance. This could be through intestinal walls, which can cause major internal damage. Keep magnets out of reach for small kids until they are out of that phase.

6. Dryer Lint

Dryer lint

This is another fire starter item in your home. Nearly 3,000 house fires occur each year as a result of dryer lint. These fires result in about 5 deaths per year. It is very important to clean the lint trap in your dryer before and after each use to prevent build-up. It is also good practice to scrub the lint trap insert with soap and water on a regular basis to prevent a build-up of detergent or fabric softener.

5. Heavy Furniture

bookshelves

Furniture, such as dressers and bookshelves, pose a major risk to small children. Children often want to climb dresser drawers or shelves to see what is on top. This results in the piece of furniture crushing the child, which can lead to death due to internal injuries. Death by furniture is not quite as common as some of the other hazards on this list, but about 200 people were killed by falling furniture over a 16 year period in the US.

4. Headphones

While headphones themselves can’t kill you, they can cause your death. Many people wear headphones while they are out and about either working out or running errands. In some cases, headphones cause a distraction to the pedestrian and result in being hit by a car. Many of these accidents are fatal and could have been avoided. Be alert and keep your volume down if you are in or near a busy roadway.

3. Icicles

This one does not apply to everyone, as not everyone lives somewhere that gets snow and ice, but icicles can definitely be an unexpected killer. Many people each year are injured or even killed by these frozen ice stakes. Make sure to keep an eye out next winter and watch where you’re walking!

2. Beds

This is probably the most upsetting item on this list. Everyone loves to be in their comfy beds trying to get a good night’s rest. But did you know that over 700 people die each year in the United States from falling out of their beds? In fact, Americans are more likely to die each year from falling out of their bed than being killed by a terrorist. Stay safe, sleepers!

1. Hot Dogs

One of America’s favorite foods is also a potential choking hazard to children. Over 10,000 children ages 14 and under are taken to the hospital each year after choking on hot dogs. Of those children, about 75 die each year. Many people do not realize that due to children’s small airways and inability or forgetting to chew properly, hot dogs can be very unsafe. Make sure to cut hot dogs into small enough pieces for your child depending on their age.

While these are just some of the everyday items that can kill you, there are many more. Most of the time these items are harmless, but deaths do occur. Be a little more cautious next time you ride an escalator, don’t leave electric blankets plugged in unattended or overnight, and clean out your dryer’s lint trap! Hopefully, by understanding the risk of these common items, you will be able to keep yourself and your loved ones a bit safer.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #229 on: October 17, 2018, 10:43:47 AM »
Anybody who puts ketchup on a hotdog deserves to choke.

Just kidding. My wife tells a very scary story of almost choking to death on a hotdog when she was a little kid, and being saved by a savvy uncle.

Uncle Oscar, the dentist...LOL. No Heimlich in 1958. Just a guy willing to reach down her throat and pluck it out with his fingers, which she remembers very clearly.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #230 on: October 17, 2018, 11:22:26 AM »
Anybody who puts ketchup on a hotdog deserves to choke.

Just kidding. My wife tells a very scary story of almost choking to death on a hotdog when she was a little kid, and being saved by a savvy uncle.

Uncle Oscar, the dentist...LOL. No Heimlich in 1958. Just a guy willing to reach down her throat and pluck it out with his fingers, which she remembers very clearly.

The only acceptable toppings for hot dogs are mustard, pickle relish, red onions, sauerkraut & chili.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Eddie

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #231 on: October 17, 2018, 01:03:32 PM »
I'm bi on hotdogs.

I can go chili, cheese and onions, or I can got the other way and go Chicago style. I like 'em both a lot, (and I make sure to chew slowly and not eat them while breathing heavily).

In Austin, there were several excellent hot dog places a few years ago, but they seem to have fallen out of favor as everyone has gone paleo or vegan or gluten free, or some other version of healthy food. I hate that.

When in Chicago, a trip to Portillo's is good. Or Max's, which is next door to the Art Institute. My kid took me there, and they're excellent.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #232 on: October 17, 2018, 01:10:42 PM »
I'm bi on hotdogs.

I can go chili, cheese and onions, or I can got the other way and go Chicago style. I like 'em both a lot, (and I make sure to chew slowly and not eat them while breathing heavily).

In Austin, there were several excellent hot dog places a few years ago, but they seem to have fallen out of favor as everyone has gone paleo or vegan or gluten free, or some other version of healthy food. I hate that.

When in Chicago, a trip to Portillo's is good. Or Max's, which is next door to the Art Institute. My kid took me there, and they're excellent.

Next time you are in NY Shity visiting your daughter the scholar, make sure you pick up a Sabrett Hot Dog with Red Onions from a street vendor.  A culinary experience not to be missed!

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Surly1

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #233 on: October 17, 2018, 02:33:16 PM »
Anybody who puts ketchup on a hotdog deserves to choke.

Just kidding. My wife tells a very scary story of almost choking to death on a hotdog when she was a little kid, and being saved by a savvy uncle.

Uncle Oscar, the dentist...LOL. No Heimlich in 1958. Just a guy willing to reach down her throat and pluck it out with his fingers, which she remembers very clearly.

The only acceptable toppings for hot dogs are mustard, pickle relish, red onions, sauerkraut & chili.

RE

IN WV, they served them with hot go chili mustard and cole slaw, and that was news to me. Wonderful.

And then there are chicago style, which as hot dogs go are a different beast altogether. This is the shit, right here. Yellow mustard, chopped white onions,  sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt.



"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #234 on: October 17, 2018, 03:21:54 PM »
Anybody who puts ketchup on a hotdog deserves to choke.

Just kidding. My wife tells a very scary story of almost choking to death on a hotdog when she was a little kid, and being saved by a savvy uncle.

Uncle Oscar, the dentist...LOL. No Heimlich in 1958. Just a guy willing to reach down her throat and pluck it out with his fingers, which she remembers very clearly.

The only acceptable toppings for hot dogs are mustard, pickle relish, red onions, sauerkraut & chili.

RE

IN WV, they served them with hot go chili mustard and cole slaw, and that was news to me. Wonderful.

And then there are chicago style, which as hot dogs go are a different beast altogether. This is the shit, right here. Yellow mustard, chopped white onions,  sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt.


I spent my teens and early twenties hanging in all the cases croutes in Montreal. A good steamie with a real poutine is still heavenly to me. Always at Decarie Hotdog and The pool room...  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montreal_hot_dog
« Last Edit: October 17, 2018, 03:54:22 PM by Nearingsfault »
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Surly1

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US Military Building Plasma Gun Capable of Vaporizing Human Flesh
« Reply #235 on: October 19, 2018, 03:56:05 AM »
For Next Weapon in Anti-Protest Arsenal, US Military Building Plasma Gun Capable of Vaporizing Human Flesh--

At its highest setting, the new laser weapon would painfully vaporize the outer layer of skin from 100 meters away.

An anti-pipeline protester holds a bottle of water near police officers in riot gear during ongoing demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline in 2016. (Photo: Wes Enzinna/MotherJones)

From wood batons to stun batons to water cannons to sound cannons to. . . frickin' plasma lasers that can "vaporize" your skin?

Recent reporting out of the Pentagon reveals that the U.S. military is working on perfecting what they called a Scalable Compact Ultra-short Pulse Laser System (SCUPLS)—or plasma gun, for short—intended for mounting on a truck or a tank.

Billed as the military's latest "crowd control" technology, what this has typically meant is a new "non-lethal" weapon designed for use by militaries or police forces against unruly demonstrators or those standing against powerful state actors or corporate forces.

According to U.S. government documents, the aim of the ongoing project is to develop "a lightweight and energy efficient next-generation Ultra-Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system that can produce sustainable and controllable plasma at range capable of inducing a full spectrum of scalable non-lethal effects." As a so-called "scalable" weapon, it will be able to shoot not only piercing sounds, but also "burn off" or "vaporize" human skin, and ultimately could be used to kill its target.

As the Daily Mail recently explained, the weapon will be able to "produce a range of effects":

  • At the lowest setting, the weapon can produce speech, and it will be able to warn people up to 3,200 feet (1,000m) away by delivering voice messages.
  • When it gets closer, the weapon will deliver a 'Flash-bang effect' by sending an 'acoustic blast of ~ 165+ dB at minimum distance of 100 meters'.
  • It will also be able to send a 'Flash blind effects (6-8 million candela)' momentarily blinding people at minimum distance of 100 meters 
  • The highest setting of the current model will let loose 'Full scalable thermal ablative effects' through common natural clothing (i.e., fabric, denim, leather, etc.) at minimum distance of 100 meters. This would painfully vaporize the outer layer of skin – rather than burning it will be turned into gas.

Vaporizing skin? Yes, that's precisely what "scalable thermal ablative effects" means.

Ultimately, as the government's program plan lays out, the weapon would "have direct application to many other U.S. Government agencies as well as civilian law enforcement. The Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, Department of Justice, the Secret Service, and Customs and Border Protection also desire this full spectrum of effects capability. The ability to non-lethally interdict a threatening person or persons has utility in many security and crowd control applications to include several municipal applications."

Of course, what this often means is using such a weapon—as has long been true with other "crowd control" technologies—in order to intimidate or put down public protest or organized demonstrations that are seen as threatening to powerful interests.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

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Re: US Military Building Plasma Gun Capable of Vaporizing Human Flesh
« Reply #236 on: October 19, 2018, 05:04:19 AM »
For Next Weapon in Anti-Protest Arsenal, US Military Building Plasma Gun Capable of Vaporizing Human Flesh--
[b]At its highest setting, the new laser weapon would painfully vaporize the outer layer of skin from 100 meters away. [/b]

An anti-pipeline protester holds a bottle of water near police officers in riot gear during ongoing demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline in 2016. (Photo: Wes Enzinna/MotherJones)

From wood batons to stun batons to water cannons to sound cannons to. . . frickin' plasma lasers that can "vaporize" your skin?

Recent reporting out of the Pentagon reveals that the U.S. military is working on perfecting what they called a Scalable Compact Ultra-short Pulse Laser System (SCUPLS)—or plasma gun, for short—intended for mounting on a truck or a tank.

Billed as the military's latest "crowd control" technology, what this has typically meant is a new "non-lethal" weapon designed for use by militaries or police forces against unruly demonstrators or those standing against powerful state actors or corporate forces.

According to U.S. government documents, the aim of the ongoing project is to develop "a lightweight and energy efficient next-generation Ultra-Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system that can produce sustainable and controllable plasma at range capable of inducing a full spectrum of scalable non-lethal effects." As a so-called "scalable" weapon, it will be able to shoot not only piercing sounds, but also "burn off" or "vaporize" human skin, and ultimately could be used to kill its target.

As the Daily Mail recently explained, the weapon will be able to "produce a range of effects":

  • At the lowest setting, the weapon can produce speech, and it will be able to warn people up to 3,200 feet (1,000m) away by delivering voice messages.
  • When it gets closer, the weapon will deliver a 'Flash-bang effect' by sending an 'acoustic blast of ~ 165+ dB at minimum distance of 100 meters'.
  • It will also be able to send a 'Flash blind effects (6-8 million candela)' momentarily blinding people at minimum distance of 100 meters
  • The highest setting of the current model will let loose 'Full scalable thermal ablative effects' through common natural clothing (i.e., fabric, denim, leather, etc.) at minimum distance of 100 meters. This would painfully vaporize the outer layer of skin – rather than burning it will be turned into gas.

Vaporizing skin? Yes, that's precisely what "scalable thermal ablative effects" means.

Ultimately, as the government's program plan lays out, the weapon would "have direct application to many other U.S. Government agencies as well as civilian law enforcement. The Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, Department of Justice, the Secret Service, and Customs and Border Protection also desire this full spectrum of effects capability. The ability to non-lethally interdict a threatening person or persons has utility in many security and crowd control applications to include several municipal applications."

Of course, what this often means is using such a weapon—as has long been true with other "crowd control" technologies—in order to intimidate or put down public protest or organized demonstrations that are seen as threatening to powerful interests.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License




This is from the Octopus Doc. Another co-inky-dink...


Q -- Tell me more about the flash gun. Is it difficult to operate, or is it like the weapon on Star Trek, that can stun or kill on different modes?

A -- It is an advanced beam weapon that can operate on three different phases. Phase one, like Star Trek, can stun and maybe kill, if the person has a weak heart. On phase two, it can levitate ANYTHING no matter what it weighs. Phase three is the SERIOUS BUSINESS mode. It can be used to paralyze anything that lives, animal, human, alien and plant. On the higher position on the same mode, it can create a TEMPORARY DEATH. I assure you, any doctor would certify that person is dead, but their life essence lingers in some strange limbo, some kind of terrible state of non-death. In one to five hours the person will revive, slowly; first the bodily functions will begin, and in a few minutes, consciousness followed with full awareness. In that mode the alien scientists re-program the human brain and plant false information. When the person awakes, he 'recalls' the false information as information he gained through life experience. There is no way for a person to learn the truth. The human mind 'remembers' and believes completely the false data. If you attempt to inform them, they would laugh or get angry. They NEVER believe the truth. Their mind always forgets the experience of re-programming. You asked if the flash gun is difficult to operate. A two year old child could use it with one hand. It resembles a flash light, with black glass conical inverted lens. On the side are three recessed knobs in three curved grooves. Each knob is sized differently. The closer the knob to the hand the less the strength. It's that simple. Each knob has three strengths also, with automatic stops at each position. The strongest position will vaporize any thing that lives. That mode is so powerful it will leave NO TRACE of what it vaporized.

Q -- Is the weapon called a Flash Gun or is there a different name in the manuals?

A -- Everybody calls them Flash Guns, or more commonly "The Flash" or "my Flash" when talking about it. In the manual it is first introduced as the ARMORLUX Weapon. After that, it is explained as the Flash Gun.



Remember, this doc is from the 1990's  :o
« Last Edit: October 19, 2018, 06:23:24 AM by Surly1 »
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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"Dafuq?"
« Reply #237 on: October 20, 2018, 07:08:26 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/MJeaQGv5I2g&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/MJeaQGv5I2g&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

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Re: "Dafuq?"
« Reply #238 on: October 21, 2018, 03:52:10 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/MJeaQGv5I2g&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/MJeaQGv5I2g&fs=1</a>

Absolutely fascinating. Have never seen a rainbow so low.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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United States Drops 21 Spots in Global Life Expectancy Rankings
« Reply #239 on: October 21, 2018, 04:01:09 AM »
United States Drops 21 Spots in Global Life Expectancy Rankings

By 2040, an average American’s lifespan is projected to rise from 78.7 to 79.8 years, an increase of just 1.1 years




Spain nabbed the top spot with an average life expectancy of 85.8 years (Wikimedia Commons)

By Meilan Solly

SMITHSONIAN.COM
OCTOBER 19, 2018

4.9K350415.3K

Life expectancies across the globe are projected to rise by an average of 4.4 years over the next two decades, but a study recently published in The Lancet predicts the United States will linger far behind other high-income nations, reaching an average lifespan of just 79.8 years by 2040. Comparatively, frontrunner Spain is forecast to boast an average lifespan of 85.8 years, while Japan sits at a close second with an expected lifespan of 85.7 years.

Newsweek’s Daniel Moritz-Rabson reports that the new rankings find the U.S. dropping from 43rd to 64th place. This staggering 21-spot plunge represents the largest decrease for a high-income nation and suggests that Americans born in 2040 won’t live much longer than those born in 2016. As Ed Cara notes for Gizmodo, average life expectancy in 2016 was 78.7, just 1.1 fewer years than the 2040 projection.

The study, which was led by researchers at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), drew on data from the 2016 Global Burden of Disease study to predict life expectancy in 195 countries and territories. Spain, formerly in fourth place, edged out Japan to nab first, while Singapore (85.4), Switzerland (85.2) and Portugal (84.5) rounded out the remaining spots in the top five.

According to Agence France Presse, the United States’ decline sees it effectively switch places with China. Now in 39th place thanks to an average lifespan of 81.9 years, the Asian powerhouse formerly stood at a lowly 68th.

Other nations projected to enjoy rising life expectancies include Portugal, which jumped from 23rd to fifth after adding 3.6 years to its average lifespan, and Syria, which will move from 137th to 80th by extending its average lifespan from 68.2 years to 78.6 years—assuming, of course, that the country’s devastating civil war soon draws to a close.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, CNN’s Rob Picheta writes that the landlocked African country of Lesotho stands in last place with a predicted life expectancy of 57.3 years. In total, 18 African nations sit at the bottom of the rankings despite seeing lifespan rises between 6.4 and 9.5 years.

“Inequalities will continue to be large,” IHME Director Christopher Murray said in a statement. “In a substantial number of countries, too many people will continue earning relatively low incomes, remain poorly educated, and die prematurely. But nations could make faster progress by helping people tackle the major risks, especially smoking and poor diet.”

The top determinants of average lifespan are so-called “lifestyle” diseases, according to AFP. These include high blood pressure, obesity, high blood sugar and alcohol and tobacco use. Air pollution, which the team estimates is responsible for taking a million lives in China every year, is another key influence.

In general, scientists expect mortality drivers to shift from infectious diseases like malaria to chronic and non-communicable disorders such as diabetes, lung cancer and kidney disease.

CNN’s Picheta points out that U.S. life expectancy has actually declined over the past two years, in part because of the country’s ongoing opioid crisis, which claimed 63,600 lives in 2016. Obesity also poses a threat to residents, affecting four in every 10 adults and 18.5 percent of children.

Lifestyle changes could help offset these issues, Brett Molina writes for USA Today. A June report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that only 23 percent of U.S. adults get enough exercise, while a 2017 study reported just one in 10 Americans eats a sufficient amount of fruits and vegetables.

The team’s findings aren’t set in stone. In fact, the researchers mapped both best- and worst-case scenarios. In the former, 158 countries experienced life expectancy gains of at least five years, while 46 saw gains of 10 years or more. In the latter, nearly half of all countries saw a decrease in life expectancy, with lowest-ranked Lesotho standing at just 45.3 years.

“The future of the world’s health is not pre-ordained, and there is a wide range of plausible trajectories,” lead author Kyle Foreman, director of data science at IHME, said in a statement. “But whether we see significant progress or stagnation depends on how well or poorly health systems address key health drivers.”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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