AuthorTopic: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"  (Read 13183 times)

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 7161
    • View Profile
Re: "Dafuq?"
« Reply #240 on: October 21, 2018, 09:32:25 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/MJeaQGv5I2g&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/MJeaQGv5I2g&fs=1</a>

Absolutely fascinating. Have never seen a rainbow so low.


The cosmic juice has arrived  :icon_sunny:

We'll all be glowin' like Dorothy's Rainbow before to long.

5D here we glow  :icon_sunny:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14501
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
YOUR POOP IS PROBABLY FULL OF PLASTIC
« Reply #241 on: October 23, 2018, 03:03:34 AM »
YOUR POOP IS PROBABLY FULL OF PLASTIC

GETTY IMAGES

EVERY MINUTE, A dumptruckful of plastic plops into the world's oceans. That's eight billion metric tons every year. Once waterborne, whatever doesn't wash ashore eventually breaks down into itty bits. The puniest pieces—the ones smaller than 5 millimeters wide—are called microplastics, and their fates are numerous. Some glob onto an Alaska-sized gyre of plastic debris swirling in the Pacific Ocean. Others sink to a variety of depths, according to their densities, perfusing the world's waters. Still others get ingested by marine life, including fish and shellfish, which are in turn ingested by other animals, like birds and humans.

All of this is a mess, from an ecological perspective. But it's that last bit—the microplasticine infiltration of food webs—that worries not just ecologists but gastroenterologists. If microplastics are invading the things we eat, it's possible that they're invading our stomachs and intestines, too. But while the matryoskha-nature of food chains certainly suggests that human guts harbor microplastics, nobody's really bothered to look in a systematic way.

Until now! Today at the United European Gastroenterology meeting in Vienna, researchers announced they have detected microplastics in stool samples from every single one of a small group of international test subjects. "Plastics are pervasive in everyday life and humans are exposed to plastics in numerous ways," said Philipp Schwable, a gastroenterologist at the Medical University of Vienna, who led the study, via email. And yet, even he did not expect that every poo would test positive.

The pilot study tested eight subjects from eight different countries: Austria, Italy, Finland, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, and the UK. Each maintained a food diary the week before donating their stools, which they deposited in glass jars, wrapped in biohazard bags, and shipped in cardboard boxes marked "Biological Substance, Category B" to the Environment Agency Austria for analysis. It's the first study of its kind—"maybe because it is not the most pleasant material to work with," Schwable says, but also because it required close collaboration between doctors and analytical chemists, the latter of whom identified the plastics with a method called Fourier-transform infrared micro-spectroscopy.

Every participant's poop tested positive for plastics, from polyethylene (commonly found in plastic bags) to polypropylene (bottle caps) to polyvinyl chloride (the "PVC" in PVC pipe). In fact, of the ten types of plastic that the researchers screened for, nine were detected. On average, the researchers turned up 20 particles of microplastic per quarter pound of poop.

The small number of study participants and the sheer number of ways a person could ingest microplastics make the first question tough to answer. "Everywhere we look for microplastics we find them," says Stephanie Wright, who studies the potential impacts of microplastics on human health at King's College London and was unaffiliated with the study. The test subjects' food logs showed that all of the participants—none of whom are vegetarians and six of whom consumed fish the week before collecting their samples—also consumed plastic-wrapped foods and drank from plastic bottles. Whether the plastic in their stools came from the seafood, the packaging, or something else entirely (microplastics have been found in everything from beer to table salt) remains unclear. "Now that we know there is microplastic present in stool, and we know how to detect it, we aim to perform a larger study including more participants," Schwable says.

Wright says future studies would also benefit from a closer look. The microscopy method Schwable and his colleagues used is common in microplastic analysis, but can't detect particles smaller than 20 microns—about the size of a human skin cell. Wright says a different method, called Raman spectroscopy, could resolve microplastics as small as one micron wide.

It's also tough to say how harmful the microplastics are to humans, because no studies on microplastic toxicity in humans have been performed. Animal studies have shown that microparticles can infiltrate an affected critter's bloodstream, lymphatic system, and perhaps their liver, all while collecting in their guts with potentially harmful consequences for their organs, intestines, and hormone regulation.

What the study does suggest is that microplastics, which have already infiltrated the world's oceans and many of its organisms, appear to have infiltrated our insides, as well.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 7161
    • View Profile
Re: YOUR POOP IS PROBABLY FULL OF PLASTIC
« Reply #242 on: October 23, 2018, 11:29:37 AM »
YOUR POOP IS PROBABLY FULL OF PLASTIC


<header></header>
<div>
<figure>
<div>
<div><img src="https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_2400,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg" srcset="https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_220,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 220w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_275,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 275w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_314,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 314w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_440,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 440w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_550,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 550w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_582,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 582w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_628,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 628w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_660,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 660w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_799,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 799w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_825,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 825w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_942,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 942w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_1164,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 1164w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_1598,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 1598w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_1746,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 1746w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_2397,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 2397w, https://media.wired.com/photos/5bce42b89a67d17e1fe9476e/master/w_2400,c_limit/bottlecaps-645968908.jpg 2400w" sizes="(max-width: 599px) calc(100vw - (20px * 2)), (max-width: 899px) calc(100vw - (50px * 2)), (max-width: 1231px) calc(100vw - (50px * 2) - 100px - (50px * 2) - 300px), 582px" /></div>
</div>
<figcaption>
<div><cite>GETTY IMAGES</cite></div>
</figcaption>
</figure>
</div>
<article>
<div>
<p><span>EVERY MINUTE, A </span>dumptruckful of plastic plops into the world's oceans. That's eight billion metric tons every year. Once waterborne, whatever doesn't wash ashore eventually breaks down into itty bits. The puniest pieces—the ones smaller than 5 millimeters wide—are called microplastics, and their fates are numerous. Some glob onto an Alaska-sized gyre of plastic debris swirling in the Pacific Ocean. Others sink to a variety of depths, according to their densities, perfusing the world's waters. Still others get ingested by marine life, including fish and shellfish, which are in turn ingested by other animals, like birds and humans.</p>
<p>All of this is a mess, from an ecological perspective. But it's that last bit—the microplasticine infiltration of food webs—that worries not just ecologists but gastroenterologists. If microplastics are invading the things we eat, it's possible that they're invading our stomachs and intestines, too. But while the matryoskha-nature of food chains certainly suggests that human guts harbor microplastics, nobody's really bothered to look in a systematic way.</p>
<p>Until now! Today at the United European Gastroenterology meeting in Vienna, researchers announced they have detected microplastics in stool samples from every single one of a small group of international test subjects. "Plastics are pervasive in everyday life and humans are exposed to plastics in numerous ways," said Philipp Schwable, a gastroenterologist at the Medical University of Vienna, who led the study, via email. And yet, even he did not expect that every poo would test positive.</p>
<p>The pilot study tested eight subjects from eight different countries: Austria, Italy, Finland, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, and the UK. Each maintained a food diary the week before donating their stools, which they deposited in glass jars, wrapped in biohazard bags, and shipped in cardboard boxes marked "Biological Substance, Category B" to the Environment Agency Austria for analysis. It's the first study of its kind—"maybe because it is not the most pleasant material to work with," Schwable says, but also because it required close collaboration between doctors and analytical chemists, the latter of whom identified the plastics with a method called Fourier-transform infrared micro-spectroscopy.</p>
<p>Every participant's poop tested positive for plastics, from polyethylene (commonly found in plastic bags) to polypropylene (bottle caps) to polyvinyl chloride (the "PVC" in PVC pipe). In fact, of the ten types of plastic that the researchers screened for, nine were detected. On average, the researchers turned up 20 particles of microplastic per quarter pound of poop.</p>
<div>
<div>
<div data-cne-interlude="">
<div>
<figure></figure>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<p>The small number of study participants and the sheer number of ways a person could ingest microplastics make the first question tough to answer. "Everywhere we look for microplastics we find them," says <a href="https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/stephanie-wright(06e7b1c7-2725-4437-96bf-dabc12b00e1b)/biography.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stephanie Wright[/url], who studies the potential impacts of microplastics on human health at King's College London and was unaffiliated with the study. The test subjects' food logs showed that all of the participants—none of whom are vegetarians and six of whom consumed fish the week before collecting their samples—also consumed plastic-wrapped foods and drank from plastic bottles. Whether the plastic in their stools came from the seafood, the packaging, or something else entirely (microplastics have been found in everything from <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25056358" target="_blank" rel="noopener">beer[/url] to <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.est.5b03163" target="_blank" rel="noopener">table salt[/url]) remains unclear. "Now that we know there is microplastic present in stool, and we know how to detect it, we aim to perform a larger study including more participants," Schwable says.</p>
<p>Wright says future studies would also benefit from a closer look. The microscopy method Schwable and his colleagues used is common in microplastic analysis, but can't detect particles smaller than 20 microns—about the size of a human skin cell. Wright says a different method, called Raman spectroscopy, could resolve microplastics as small as one micron wide.</p>
<p>It's also tough to say how harmful the microplastics are to humans, because no studies on microplastic toxicity in humans have been performed. Animal studies have shown that <a href="http://www.fao.org/3/a-i7677e.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">microparticles can infiltrate an affected critter's bloodstream[/url], lymphatic system, and perhaps their liver, all while collecting in their guts with potentially harmful consequences for their organs, intestines, and hormone regulation.</p>
<p>What the study does suggest is that microplastics, which have already infiltrated the world's oceans and many of its organisms, appear to have infiltrated our insides, as well.</p>
</div>
</article>



It's out of control, the whole shootin' match.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 7161
    • View Profile
"Dafuq?" Utube alters OUR comments
« Reply #243 on: October 23, 2018, 11:42:06 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ptiWBrd9YbQ&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ptiWBrd9YbQ&fs=1</a>
« Last Edit: October 23, 2018, 11:50:01 AM by azozeo »
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 7161
    • View Profile
The Last Straw - EU votes on Plastic ban tomorrow....
« Reply #244 on: October 23, 2018, 11:48:51 AM »
YOUR POOP IS PROBABLY FULL OF PLASTIC

GETTY IMAGES

EVERY MINUTE, A dumptruckful of plastic plops into the world's oceans. That's eight billion metric tons every year. Once waterborne, whatever doesn't wash ashore eventually breaks down into itty bits. The puniest pieces—the ones smaller than 5 millimeters wide—are called microplastics, and their fates are numerous. Some glob onto an Alaska-sized gyre of plastic debris swirling in the Pacific Ocean. Others sink to a variety of depths, according to their densities, perfusing the world's waters. Still others get ingested by marine life, including fish and shellfish, which are in turn ingested by other animals, like birds and humans.

All of this is a mess, from an ecological perspective. But it's that last bit—the microplasticine infiltration of food webs—that worries not just ecologists but gastroenterologists. If microplastics are invading the things we eat, it's possible that they're invading our stomachs and intestines, too. But while the matryoskha-nature of food chains certainly suggests that human guts harbor microplastics, nobody's really bothered to look in a systematic way.

Until now! Today at the United European Gastroenterology meeting in Vienna, researchers announced they have detected microplastics in stool samples from every single one of a small group of international test subjects. "Plastics are pervasive in everyday life and humans are exposed to plastics in numerous ways," said Philipp Schwable, a gastroenterologist at the Medical University of Vienna, who led the study, via email. And yet, even he did not expect that every poo would test positive.

The pilot study tested eight subjects from eight different countries: Austria, Italy, Finland, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, and the UK. Each maintained a food diary the week before donating their stools, which they deposited in glass jars, wrapped in biohazard bags, and shipped in cardboard boxes marked "Biological Substance, Category B" to the Environment Agency Austria for analysis. It's the first study of its kind—"maybe because it is not the most pleasant material to work with," Schwable says, but also because it required close collaboration between doctors and analytical chemists, the latter of whom identified the plastics with a method called Fourier-transform infrared micro-spectroscopy.

Every participant's poop tested positive for plastics, from polyethylene (commonly found in plastic bags) to polypropylene (bottle caps) to polyvinyl chloride (the "PVC" in PVC pipe). In fact, of the ten types of plastic that the researchers screened for, nine were detected. On average, the researchers turned up 20 particles of microplastic per quarter pound of poop.

The small number of study participants and the sheer number of ways a person could ingest microplastics make the first question tough to answer. "Everywhere we look for microplastics we find them," says Stephanie Wright, who studies the potential impacts of microplastics on human health at King's College London and was unaffiliated with the study. The test subjects' food logs showed that all of the participants—none of whom are vegetarians and six of whom consumed fish the week before collecting their samples—also consumed plastic-wrapped foods and drank from plastic bottles. Whether the plastic in their stools came from the seafood, the packaging, or something else entirely (microplastics have been found in everything from beer to table salt) remains unclear. "Now that we know there is microplastic present in stool, and we know how to detect it, we aim to perform a larger study including more participants," Schwable says.

Wright says future studies would also benefit from a closer look. The microscopy method Schwable and his colleagues used is common in microplastic analysis, but can't detect particles smaller than 20 microns—about the size of a human skin cell. Wright says a different method, called Raman spectroscopy, could resolve microplastics as small as one micron wide.

It's also tough to say how harmful the microplastics are to humans, because no studies on microplastic toxicity in humans have been performed. Animal studies have shown that microparticles can infiltrate an affected critter's bloodstream, lymphatic system, and perhaps their liver, all while collecting in their guts with potentially harmful consequences for their organs, intestines, and hormone regulation.

What the study does suggest is that microplastics, which have already infiltrated the world's oceans and many of its organisms, appear to have infiltrated our insides, as well.



It's out of control, the whole shootin' match.



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/CqMUFdLcbdI&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/CqMUFdLcbdI&fs=1</a>
« Last Edit: October 23, 2018, 01:08:38 PM by Surly1 »
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14501
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: "Dafuq?" Utube alters OUR comments
« Reply #245 on: October 23, 2018, 01:12:42 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ptiWBrd9YbQ&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ptiWBrd9YbQ&fs=1</a>

I watched this with interest. While I don't put it past Google to do something like this, I wonder if it's not analogous to the browser settings you can enable to do autocorrect. Sometimes I make posts here, then have to go in and change words because autocorrect chose the wrong word.

Just don't know.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 7161
    • View Profile
Re: "Dafuq?" Utube alters OUR comments
« Reply #246 on: October 23, 2018, 01:16:37 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ptiWBrd9YbQ&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ptiWBrd9YbQ&fs=1</a>

I watched this with interest. While I don't put it past Google to do something like this, I wonder if it's not analogous to the browser settings you can enable to do autocorrect. Sometimes I make posts here, then have to go in and change words because autocorrect chose the wrong word.

Just don't know.


I possess an iPhone from my employer for correspondence purposes.

We have a work related language we use when texting. Auto correct gets stuck on stupid every time. So annoying.

Either their tech is so advanced to alter alt. theory or your content watched sets off alarms to be on a hit list.
I'm not a subscriber, nor do I intend to become one. Yeah, the juries still out but they're will be a "tell" somewhere down the line.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2018, 01:22:17 PM by azozeo »
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 7161
    • View Profile
"Dafuq?" Hubble Fixed by "Jiggling It"
« Reply #247 on: October 27, 2018, 02:51:16 PM »

October 26, 2018

The Hubble space telescope is close to resuming full operations after Nasa “jiggled it around”.

The telescope was sidelined earlier this month after a gyroscope failed, leaving it unable to point in the right direction during observations.

The device had been expected to fail at some point this year, but the surprise came when a backup did not kick in properly after the initial failure. As a result, Hubble has remained in so-called safe mode and all science observations are on hold.

Gyroscopes are needed to keep Hubble pointing in the right direction as it operates 340 miles (545km) above Earth. Precise pointing is crucial: astronomers use the telescope to peer deep into the cosmos, revealing faraway galaxies, black holes and solar systems. Last week, astronomers said they may have discovered the first moon outside our solar system, with Hubble’s help.

The problem with the backup gyroscope was spotted when detectors in the gyroscope wrongly signalled that the wheel within the device was rotating at a much greater rate than that 19,200 revolutions per minute it should be spinning at.


https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/oct/26/hubble-telescope-fixed-by-jiggling-it-around
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline K-Dog

  • Administrator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 2694
    • View Profile
    • K-Dog
Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #248 on: October 28, 2018, 06:51:35 PM »

Dafuq sez it all !

If those pixels could be beamed 11 years into the past..........................


Nobody would believe it.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 06:54:16 PM by K-Dog »
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 7161
    • View Profile
Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #249 on: October 28, 2018, 07:19:50 PM »

Dafuq sez it all !

If those pixels could be beamed 11 years into the past..........................


Nobody would believe it.



The Kool-Aid smerk, it started with PaPa Smurf.....

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/uWiAQ1IXECg&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/uWiAQ1IXECg&fs=1</a>

nazi-motherfuckers all of 'em
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14501
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #250 on: November 09, 2018, 09:10:10 AM »
Rick Scott Accuses Democrats of Trying to Thwart G.O.P.’s Successful Voter Suppression

By

11:05 A.M.

Photograph by Joe Raedle / Getty

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA (The Borowitz Report)—In a hastily called press conference on Thursday evening, Florida Governor Rick Scott accused Democrats of nefariously plotting to undo the Republican Party’s highly successful voter-suppression effort.

“As Republicans, we have worked tirelessly to intimidate, discourage, and otherwise disenfranchise millions of Florida voters,” a visibly enraged Scott said. “We are not about to let Democrats swoop in at the last minute and ruin all of that fine work.”

Scott angrily singled out the Broward County and Palm Beach County supervisors for their “rampant enforcement of the right to vote.”

“They are literally finding votes by people we are a hundred per cent sure we had scared away from the voting booths,” he said. “This will not stand.”

The Florida governor said that if Democrats think that they can undermine the Republicans’ arduous and painstaking efforts to suppress votes in Florida, “they better think again.”

“I will not sit idly by while every vote is counted,” Scott said. “This is Florida, goddammit.”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14501
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Dept. of "It Takes a Good Guy With a Gun..."
« Reply #251 on: November 13, 2018, 06:30:34 PM »
Lethal force seems like a respectable reaction to property theft...



... and why you don't give security guards rent-a-cops lethal weapons.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34740
    • View Profile
Re: Dept. of "It Takes a Good Guy With a Gun..."
« Reply #252 on: November 13, 2018, 06:43:35 PM »
... and why you don't give security guards rent-a-cops lethal weapons.

The Fascist State Cops aren't any more accurate.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14501
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
DNA Tests Prove Aboriginal Australians Are the World's Oldest Culture
« Reply #253 on: November 17, 2018, 07:33:56 AM »
DNA Tests Prove Aboriginal Australians Are the World's Oldest Culture
The genetic study helps show that the ancestors of today's Aboriginals came here about 58,000 years ago.



Research published this week by Nature has confirmed Australia's Aboriginal people are the Earth's most ancient civilisation. "A genomic history of Aboriginal Australia" is a world-first genomic study that helps reveal how ancestors of today's Aboriginals reached what is now Australia about 58,000 years ago.

Led by Professor Eske Willerslev from the University of Cambridge, the study was co-authored by elders from Indigenous communities around Australia. The team was able to sequence the genome of 83 Aboriginal people, as well as 25 Papuans from the New Guinea highlands. Researchers collected saliva from widely dispersed geographic and linguistic groups to retrieve the DNA. Previously, only three Aboriginal Australian genomes had been sequenced.

Prior to this study being published, some scientists had debated whether or not modern Aboriginal people are the descendants of ancient tribes who first populated Australia. This research, the most comprehensive genomic study of Indigenous Australians to date, also helps to confirm that all humans share the same common ancestors from a single African migration event.

That event occurred when both Papuan and Aboriginal ancestors left Africa as part of a larger group of migrants around 72,000 years ago, then split with that main group of early humans about 58,000 years ago. Probably the first group of humans to cross an ocean, they reached "Sahul"—the supercontinent that was made up of modern day Tasmania, Australia, and New Guinea together—and then split apart about 37,000 years ago. The supercontinent only split up around 8,000 years ago.

"Australia has one of the longest histories of continuous human occupation outside Africa, raising questions of origins, relatedness to other populations, differentiation and adaptation," the study concludes. "We find that Aboriginal Australians and Eurasians share genomic signatures... a common African ancestor."

As the research also shows, Aboriginal civilisations have lived in Australia for so long that they've been able to adapt biologically to its environment. This means that groups living in different parts of the country adapted in different ways according to weather conditions. Because they were so geographically isolated from each other—Australia's landmass being particularly vast—genetic diversity between different tribal groups is huge. Aboriginal Australians living in desert regions, for example, were able to withstand sub-zero night temperatures without increasing their metabolic rates. Europeans can't do this.

With the rise of anti-immigration sentiment in Australia, there's no better time to acknowledge that most of us are fairly recent arrivals on land owned by the oldest civilisation on earth.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 7161
    • View Profile
Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #254 on: December 05, 2018, 03:54:50 PM »

Surly,
This ones for your dept.
Nobody & I mean no scientists know what da' fuq this is all about.
There was just another one of these events today & it was stronger. Only 1 blog on today's event & it wont search out currently.
The guys site was hit I think.

Anyway here's the last msm article on this strange phenom.
Any diners with intel please post.

https://en.azvision.az/news/97149/mystery-seismic-waves-ripple-around-the-world-and-no-felt-it-or-understands-why-report.html
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
3 Replies
1487 Views
Last post May 14, 2013, 05:59:34 PM
by Snowleopard
3 Replies
1372 Views
Last post November 12, 2015, 01:49:04 PM
by K-Dog
0 Replies
302 Views
Last post July 14, 2017, 06:48:21 PM
by Palloy2