AuthorTopic: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"  (Read 21302 times)

Offline Surly1

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Idiot Emergency
« Reply #300 on: February 15, 2019, 09:57:58 AM »
Photo: Getty

Less than 24 hours afterannouncing his intent to declare a national emergencyin order to begin construction on a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico, President Donald Trump made it official in a wildly incoherent Rose Garden address on Friday.

After initially riffing about China, Brexit, Syria, and North Korea, Trump got down to business...sort of. There was a lot of rambling nonsense.

Embedded video
CBS News @CBSNews

"We don't control our own border," Trump said. "We are going to confront the national security crisis on our southern border and we are going to do it one way or the other -- we have to do it." https://cbsn.ws/2GG2ErP 

“So I’m gonna be signing a national emergency,” Trump finally said. “And it’s been signed many times before!”

“There’s rarely been a problem,” Trump added. “They sign it! Nobody cares.”

“So we’ll see what happens. China’s coming here next week, by the way,” he interjected, before finally getting to the point:

So, we’re going to be signing, today, and registering national emergency. And, it’s a great thing to do, because we have an invasion of drugs, invasion of gangs, invasion of people. It’s unacceptable.

He also said, in a weirdly sarcastic tone, that he expected to be sued.

Embedded video
Washington Examiner @dcexaminer

Trump now outlining what he thinks will happen next:

"And we will then be sued and they will sue us in the 9th Circuit and we will possibly get a bad ruiling and then we'll end up in the Supreme Court and then we'll win in the Supreme Court ..."

Trump’s declaration—which has prompted a round oflukewarm objectionsfrom congressional Republicans—follows weeks of bipartisan congressional negotiation on a deal to prevent another government shutdown. Notably, the deal gives the president$1.3 billion for border securityinstead of the $5.7 billion he requested for a wall. Given Trump’s plan to shuffle billions into his wall through the emergency declaration, however, Democrats might be wondering why they conceded to offering any money at all.

Trump’s national emergency order is virtually certain to face any number of protracted legal challenges; House Democrats arealready preparing to vote on a motion against the order in Congress, and, failing that, take it to court if necessary—a likely outcome given the GOP’s control of the Senate.

After declaring his national emergency, the president is scheduled to fly to his private estate in Mar a Lago, Florida, where he will presumably spend the weekend golfing.

Update, 11:15 a.m. ET: While Trump rambled, Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders shared a picture of the president signing his national emergency:

Sarah Sanders @PressSec

President @realDonaldTrump signs the Declaration for a National Emergency to address the national security and humanitarian crisis at the Southern Border.

Democrats were quick to respond to Trump’s announcement:

Phil Mattingly @Phil_Mattingly

Joint @SpeakerPelosi/@SenSchumer statement: “The Congress will defend our constitutional authorities in the Congress, in the Courts, and in the public, using every remedy available.”

Update, 11:24 p.m. ET:The press conference is going great.

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A reporter asks Trump where he gets his statistics on immigration and crime from. Trump scolds him and tells his to "sit down."

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline agelbert

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Re: Idiot: Emergency!!!!!!!!!
« Reply #301 on: February 15, 2019, 10:10:43 AM »

Yep.

Quote
A naughty person, a wicked man, walketh with a froward mouth. He winketh with his eyes, he speaketh with his feet, he teacheth with his fingers; Frowardness is in his heart, he deviseth mischief continually; he soweth discord. -- Proverbs 6:12-14 (KJV)

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #302 on: February 15, 2019, 10:15:50 AM »
Goddam right he'll be sued, and if the SCOTUS gives him a pass (which they might)  you can stick a fork in the political experiment formerly known as America, because we're done.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline azozeo

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #303 on: February 15, 2019, 10:21:27 AM »
Goddam right he'll be sued, and if the SCOTUS gives him a pass (which they might)  you can stick a fork in the political experiment formerly known as America, because we're done.


Beautiful  :icon_sunny: Segway Edward......

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Isnít Looking to Retire Yet, But Is Another Supreme Court Justice Ready to Go?

https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/ruth-bader-ginsburg-isnt-looking-to-retire-yet-but-is-another-supreme-court-justice-ready-to-go
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #304 on: February 15, 2019, 11:57:56 AM »
Goddam right he'll be sued, and if the SCOTUS gives him a pass (which they might)  you can stick a fork in the political experiment formerly known as America, because we're done.

Because then we will have a king. So much for "limited government" republicans.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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A Weak and Rambling President Declares a Fake National Emergency
« Reply #305 on: February 16, 2019, 06:39:31 AM »
The New Yorker take on yesterday's Trumpster fire.

A Weak and Rambling President Declares a Fake National Emergency

By

February 15, 2019

President Trump’s fictitious border crisis is a central element of the political narrative he has constructed for his white-nationalist base, and it’s one he can’t easily back away from.

Photograph by Sarah Silbiger / NYT / Redux

On Friday morning, Donald Trump walked up to a lectern in the White House Rose Garden to make an announcement of monumental importance that clearly couldn’t wait a moment longer. “Before we begin,” he said, “I’d like to just say that we have a large team of very talented people in China. We’ve had a negotiation going on for about two days. It’s going extremely well.” Then Trump brought up North Korea, Syria, and the state of the U.S. economy. Finally, he moved on to the business of the moment: a desperate effort to put the best possible face on the humiliating defeat that he suffered on Capitol Hill over funding for his border wall. “We are going to be signing today, and registering, a national emergency,” he said. “And it’s a great thing to do because we have an invasion of drugs, an invasion of gangs, an invasion of people, and it’s unacceptable.”

He didn’t leave it at that; he doesn’t know the concept. Instead, he sought to justify his action by trotting out some of his old lies about undocumented immigrants, and some he’s added to his repertoire more recently. “We have far more people trying to get into the country today than probably we’ve ever had before.” (The number of interdictions at the southern border is running at roughly half the level it was a decade ago.) The crime and drug problem in El Paso is “a hundred per cent” better since the construction of a border barrier. (El Paso has long had one of the lowest crime rates of any city in the country.) Federal prisons are full of illegal immigrants. (Even setting aside people being held for immigration offenses, undocumented immigrants make up a tiny proportion of the federal-prison population.)

Trump’s description of the situation at the border is almost entirely fictitious, of course, but in one sense it is real. It’s a central element of the political narrative he has constructed for his white-nationalist base over the past three and a half years, and, as he helpfully sought to explain, it’s one he can’t easily back away from at this stage. “I ran on a very simple slogan: ‘Make America Great Again,’ ” he said. “If you’re going to have drugs pouring across the border, if you’re going to have human traffickers pouring across the border in areas where we have no protection, in areas where we don’t have a barrier, then it’s very hard to make America great again.”

In this carefully concocted narrative, the wall isn’t a mere stretch of concrete or steel fencing stretching along the border; it’s a symbol of national sovereignty and regeneration. But, if it’s so important, why didn’t Trump get it built during his first two years in office, when the Republicans controlled both houses of Congress? Trump’s failure to get his own party to support what was arguably his signature campaign pledge demonstrates that he is fundamentally a weak and isolated President. But, of course, he can’t admit that publicly, either. Instead, he said, “It would have been great to have done it earlier. But I was a little new to the job, a little new to the profession. And we had a little disappointment for the first year and a half. People that should have stepped up did not step up. But we’re stepping up now.” Take that, Paul Ryan!

This official unveiling of the former House Speaker as Trump’s 2020 whipping boy didn’t come as a surprise. Neither did the declaration of a national emergency. Trump has been threatening to make this move for months, and Mitch McConnell, the Majority Leader in the Senate, had announced his intentions from the Senate floor on Thursday afternoon. Earlier on Thursday, according to a tick-tock by the Washington Post, Trump was still threatening to veto the bipartisan spending deal that allotted $1.375 billion to border barriers. In order to get him to sign the bill and keep the government open, McConnell agreed to support the declaration of an emergency and encouraged other Republicans to support it.

Here was yet another example of how the G.O.P. leadership’s Faustian pact with Trump has driven them to enable his more authoritarian tendencies. During his Rose Garden address, Trump freely conceded that his emergency decree will immediately be challenged in the lower courts, and quite likely get snagged there. But citing what happened to his travel ban, he said he was hopeful of prevailing in the Supreme Court—an outcome that can’t be ruled out given its conservative tilt.

If this happens, Trump will have succeeded in undermining the principle that the President proposes and the Congress disposes, which is contained in Article I of the Constitution. And, as Democrats and Republicans were quick to point out, he will have set a precedent. In a statement issued on Friday afternoon, Thom Tillis, a Republican senator from North Carolina, invoked the prospect of “President Elizabeth Warren declaring a national emergency to shut down banks and take over the nation’s financial institutions.”

Trump doesn’t care about precedent, of course. After he had finished his peroration, CNN’s Jim Acosta, who is possibly his least favorite reporter, asked him to explain the disconnect between his description of what’s happening at the border and data from his own government that shows border crossings “at a near record low” and “undocumented immigrants committing crimes at lower levels than native Americans.” Trump dodged the question and called CNN “fake news.” The next questioner, Playboy’s Brian Karem, followed up Acosta’s question and asked Trump to say where he gets his figures. “I get my numbers from a lot of sources, like Homeland Security, primarily,” Trump replied. “And the numbers that I have from Homeland Security are a disaster.”

Another of the reporters asked to what degree outside conservative voices had influenced Trump’s thinking on the national emergency. Rather than dismissing the question as impertinent, he said, “Look, Sean Hannity has been a terrific supporter of what I do. . . . Rush Limbaugh, I think he’s a great guy. Here’s a guy who could speak for three hours without a phone call. Try doing that sometime.” Turning to Ann Coulter, who has excoriated the President on Twitter this week for agreeing to a budget deal that won’t fund the wall, Trump recalled that in 2016 she had predicted he would win the election. “So I like her,” he said. “But she’s off the reservation.”

Arguably, the most revealing exchange came when Peter Alexander, of NBC News, asked Trump to admit that the spending deal he was to sign later in the day gave him less money for his wall than he could have got before the government shutdown. Of course, Trump never admits anything. He insisted that he’d got “billions and billions of dollars for other things—port of entries, lots of different things” from Congress. But, when it came to the wall, he went on, “they skimped.” Then he added, “So I did—I was successful in that sense, but I want to do it faster. I could do the wall over a longer period of time. I didn’t need to do this, but I’d rather do it much faster.”

It will be interesting to see what the courts make of Trump’s admission that, when it came time to declare a national emergency, he didn’t “need to do this.” At the least, it was good to get it on the record from his own lips. Inside the Reagan Administration there used to be a saying: “Let Reagan be Reagan.” In the Trump Administration such a statement would be entirely redundant. The President lets it all hang out: the incoherence, the fabrications, the mendacity, the raging but delicate ego, the attention-deficit disorder, and, occasionally, the revealing shards of self-illumination. He just can’t help himself.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #306 on: March 30, 2019, 01:25:33 PM »

At First We Didnít Believe ItĒ: Fast-Melting Greenland Glacier Starts Growing Again In Massive U-Turn

03/29/2019

A large and fast-melting glacier in Greenland is growing again, according to a new NASA study. The Jakobshavn (YA-cob-shawv-en) glacier on Greenlandís west coast had reportedly been retreating by around 1.8 miles and thinning by nearly 130 feet annually in 2012.


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-28/first-we-didnt-believe-it-fast-melting-greenland-glacier-starts-growing-again
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #307 on: April 09, 2019, 01:19:05 PM »


Japan Grounds Fleet of F-35As After Fighter Jet Disappears in Mid-Air Ė Reports



Japan has 13 operational F-35s, with nearly 150 more on order. The planes are based with the 302nd Squadron at the Misawa Air Base in Aomori, northern Japan.

A Japan Air Self-Defence Force spokesman has confirmed to Sputnik that one of its F-35s has gone missing with one pilot said to be on board. ďIt disappeared from radars,Ē the spokesman said, adding that a search for the plane is underway.

Earlier, Japanese national broadcaster NHK reported that an air force F-35A disappeared from radar screens during a routine training flight.

According to the military, ground control lost contact with the plane at around 7:27 pm on Tuesday, about 135 km northeast of Misawa city, during training. The plane is believed to have one pilot onboard.


https://sputniknews.com/asia/201904091073956500-japanese-f-35-radar-disappears/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

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Most Restaurant Workers Donít Earn Enough to Feed Their Own Families
« Reply #308 on: April 30, 2019, 08:46:26 AM »
No doubt the workers described lack sufficient "financial acumen" and piss their money away on rent, groceries and other evidences of riotous living.

Most Restaurant Workers Donít Earn Enough to Feed Their Own Families


Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks during an event to introduce the Raise the Wage Act in the Rayburn Room at the U.S. Capitol on January 16, 2019, in Washington, D.C. The proposed legislation, which will gradually raise the minimum wage to $15 by 2024, is unlikely to pass in the Republican-controlled Senate.
CHIP SOMODEVILLA / GETTY IMAGES


When Venorica Tucker was in high school, she worked as a server in a restaurant owned by the Marriott Corporation in Washington, D.C. It was the mid-1960s and her wage was 66 cents an hour, plus tips.

Now 70 years old, Tucker currently serves food and bartends as a contractor at the U.S. House of Representatives, and while her wages have risen significantly over the past 50-plus years, she still often finds herself scrambling.

Her salary, she says, varies with the congressional calendar. “In this job, when there’s no work, there’s no pay. I had a really hard time during the government shutdown. Remember, it lasted more than a month and even though I was able to collect unemployment benefits, being without a job for so long meant that I fell behind on my bills. I’m still playing catch-up four months later.”

Tucker emphasizes that she works extremely hard and believes that she deserves to be compensated fairly and treated with respect, free from the economic exploitation and sexual harassment that are rampant in the industry. And she is not alone in voicing these basic demands.

According to Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, a nonprofit organization and worker center that supports and connects restaurant workers throughout the country, more than 13 million U.S. residents, the majority of them women of color, are employed in restaurants. In 18 states, they earn a base pay of $2.13 an hour plus tips, a sub-minimum wage that has been frozen since 1991. Twenty-six states pay a somewhat higher sub-minimum, while just seven — Alaska, California, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon and Washington — provide the full federal minimum to those who serve our food when we dine out.

This leaves hundreds of thousands of workers in poverty; in New York City alone, a winter 2019 survey conducted by Restaurant Opportunities Centers United and the Community Service Society found that 36 percent of tipped workers employed in eateries, nail salons and car washes lived at or below the federal poverty line — $16,460 for a two-person household; $25,100 for four — and more often than not, had to rely on food stamps, soup kitchens and Medicaid.

New York is not an anomaly. The Economic Policy Institute found that in states that allow payment of a sub-minimum wage, 18.5 percent of workers are impoverished; in states where everyone earns the federal minimum, the poverty rate drops to 11.1 percent. Furthermore, the institute notes that closing the loophole in the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 that allows payment of a sub-minimum wage, and upping the hourly minimum to $15 by 2024, would boost the wages of 38.1 percent of African American and 23.2 percent of white workers.

Support for the Raise the Wage Act

This is why Restaurant Opportunities Centers United is supporting the Raise the Wage Act, H.R.582, legislation to abolish the sub-minimum wage and bring tipped workers up to the federal standard. The bill was introduced by Bobby Scott (D-Virginia); a Senate companion bill, S.150, was introduced by Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont). Restaurant Opportunities Centers United is also supporting state efforts to enact what they are calling One Fair Wage laws.

nthony Advincula, public affairs officer at Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, notes that 16 states are presently considering One Fair Wage bills, but emphasizes that opposition from the National Restaurant Association — dubbed “the other NRA” — has been fierce.

“If passed, H.R.582 would stifle new job creation, impose undue harm to the nation’s small business owners, and harm those it proclaims to help,” National Restaurant Association spokeswoman Mollie O’Dell wrote in an email to Truthout.

Not surprisingly, Restaurant Opportunities Centers United disagrees. “They’ve created a fake grassroots organization, called Restaurant Workers of America, to invoke fear that restaurants will close and jobs will be eliminated,” Advincula says. “The truth is that the industry does not want to eliminate the sub-minimum wage because it will cost them. But this is a racial and gender justice issue. The majority of workers who are exploited by the sub-minimum wage are immigrants, people of color and single mothers who live in poverty despite working full-time.”

Furthermore, an in-depth investigation by the Columbia Journalism Review confirms that Restaurant Workers of America is wholly funded by restaurant owners. In addition, the investigation found that its representatives have missed few opportunities to appear with “restaurant industry trade groups and Republican politicians” since coming together in 2017.

That said, the National Restaurant Association and Restaurant Workers of America have been effective in undermining One Fair Wage campaigns in New York, Michigan and Washington, D.C.

In New York, Advincula says, Gov. Andrew Cuomo has the authority to instruct the commissioner of labor to end the sub-minimum wage — something he said he intended to do. Seven hearings on this issue were held in different parts of the state between April and June 2018. “Everything was set in motion to make this change but Cuomo has not fulfilled his promise,” Advincula reports. “The issue seems stalled. We have contacted the governor again and again to say that he should listen to the majority of restaurant workers. Instead, he has listened to the Restaurant Workers of America and the National Restaurant Association. Their campaign has been appalling. It’s obscene to hear restaurant workers argue that no, they don’t need an increase in the minimum wage, that things are fine as they are. We assume that this is why Cuomo has backed off on his pledge to abolish the sub-minimum [wage].”

Diana Ramirez is the senior policy advocate at Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, but, until recently, she led the Washington, D.C., chapter of the organization and coordinated last year’s ballot initiative to bring One Fair Wage to the District of Columbia. As the campaign unfolded, the D.C. chapter of Restaurant Opportunities Centers United zeroed in on endemic, industry-wide sexual exploitation — as well as the inadequate base pay — since workers whose wages rely on tips often feel silenced when it comes to fighting back against predatory behavior. “The rate of sexual harassment for restaurant workers is the highest of any industry,” she says. “The ‘customer is always right’ mentality has made it hard for tipped workers who have to depend on the generosity of patrons.”

A broad coalition of women’s rights, labor and racial justice groups came together in 2016 in support of One Fair Wage — coalition members ranged from the D.C. chapter of the National Organization for Women, to Forward Together, the Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, the Democratic Socialists of America, and Jews United For Justice. The goal was to put a One Fair Wage measure — called Initiative 77 — on the July 2018 ballot.

Opposition from the Restaurant Workers of America and the National Restaurant Association was immediate. “They got workers, mostly white male bartenders working in high-end establishments, to come out and yell at women of color wherever we went,” Ramirez told Truthout. “It’s a Trumpian effect: Somehow you doing better will make me worse off.”

Ignoring the Community’s Desires

Despite the pushback, the ballot initiative in Washington, D.C., passed with 56 percent of the vote, and voters in all but one neighborhood supported One Fair Wage. But the victory was short-lived. Ramirez points out that after the ballot measure passed, the restaurant association went into high gear and successfully lobbied the D.C. City Council to overturn the measure.

“The Council essentially told Black people, the majority population in D.C., that their vote did not matter,” Ramirez explains. “People were outraged and after the vote was repealed, an influx of racial justice and pro-democracy groups came to Restaurant Opportunities Centers United and said, ‘We want to work with you to protect democracy.’”

A referendum on this is now before the courts. “It can take a year, until late 2019 or early 2020,” Ramirez says, “but this is not something we’re going to drop. We’re continuing to organize for One Fair Wage. It’s the future of the restaurant industry, whether they like it or not.”

A similar fight is unfolding in Michigan. “Most Michiganders in the restaurant industry — tipped and non-tipped — earn less than $12 an hour,” Deputy Director Alicia Farris from the Michigan branch of Restaurant Opportunities Centers United begins. “We’re talking about parents and kids. Since we know that kids growing up in poverty start out at a deficit, we worked hard to get One Fair Wage on the 2018 ballot.” Farris says that Restaurant Opportunities Centers United mobilized hundreds of volunteers to collect the 253,000 signatures required by the Board of State Canvassers and despite a challenge from the National Restaurant Association, they got the go-ahead to bring the issue to Michigan’s voters.

Then something unexpected happened. On September 5, 2018, the state legislature passed One Fair Wage. “The lame duck session began the day after Election Day and ended right before Christmas,” Farris says. “It turned out that the legislature had passed [One Fair Wage] in order to gut it.” According to the Michigan chapter of Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, the lame duck session voted to raise the state’s overall minimum incrementally, not getting to $12.05 an hour until 2030. Their raise to the sub-minimum was even paltrier: They raised it by seven cents an hour, from $3.52 to $3.59, effective March 29 of this year. The original measure raised the sub-minimum from $3.52 to $12 by 2024.

An editorial in USA Today elaborates further: “Faced with ballot initiatives that would have raised the minimum wage and established sick time for all the state’s workers, Republicans instead passed both proposals last summer as a way to keep them off the ballot and make them easier to change.”

The courts are presently considering whether a 1964 opinion barring the legislature from “amend[ing] a citizen-initiated proposal in the same legislative session” will hold sway.

Meanwhile, Farris says that members of Restaurant Opportunities Centers United are continuing to speak to legislators, doing Get Out the Vote work and educating the community about the legislative process. “You’d be surprised how many people don’t know what lame duck means,” she says, noting that because many restaurant workers have little time to research political policy in depth, the organizing challenge is enormous. “People get scared when someone persuasive comes along and tells them that ending the sub-minimum wage will lead to job losses,” she adds. But this is why the Michigan chapter of Restaurant Opportunities Centers United is working overtime to counter the misinformation being pushed by astroturf groups like the Restaurant Workers of America.

Workers Continue to Be Exploited

Meanwhile, the majority of tipped restaurant workers continue to face economic insecurity. Trupti Patel has been a Washington, D.C.-area server for the past nine years. “Most restaurant managers in the U.S. are white men,” Patel says. “If they feel miffed by you, or if you did not jump when they flirted, you can end up with crappy shifts or a station that does not get much traffic.” Patel believes that abolition of the sub-minimum wage will reduce this dynamic. “The income in restaurant work fluctuates; it is not stable but our bills are a constant,” she continues. “The U.S. is the only country in the world where hospitality is not considered a profession. I do not get health insurance even though I work full-time. I pay $423 a month out of pocket for it. Workers in non-tipped industries have predictable pay, retirement benefits, health insurance and paid time off. This is rarely offered in the hospitality trade.”

« Last Edit: April 30, 2019, 08:50:26 AM by Surly1 »
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline g

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Re: Most Restaurant Workers Donít Earn Enough to Feed Their Own Families
« Reply #309 on: April 30, 2019, 09:08:34 AM »
Until we know what they don't report, which is the reason most stay in the profession, this is nothing more than campaign rhetoric aimed at the sheeple by the vote buyers. 

 

Offline Surly1

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Re: Most Restaurant Workers Donít Earn Enough to Feed Their Own Families
« Reply #310 on: April 30, 2019, 09:27:52 AM »
Until we know what they don't report, which is the reason most stay in the profession, this is nothing more than campaign rhetoric aimed at the sheeple by the vote buyers.

Spoken like a true plutocrat, with a plutocrat's keen insight into the lives of working people.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #311 on: April 30, 2019, 10:24:09 AM »
My favorite waiter is a millenial......a recovering alcoholic covered in tattoos, who has now busted his ass to get through community college (taking advantage of a program for recovering addicts). He is making straight A's and I've been cheering him on for about two years,

He has one more class and he can apply to dental hygiene school (yes, my idea). He might go into nursing instead (which is okay with me.)

If I had anything at all to do with keeping him encouraged and working hard, I am super proud of myself. But I'm more proud of him. I tip the shit out of him.

I still say the best way to fight poverty is to make some money. I've been fighting poverty my whole life, and I'm still fighting. I won't go down easy.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #312 on: April 30, 2019, 02:18:14 PM »
My favorite waiter is a millenial......a recovering alcoholic covered in tattoos, who has now busted his ass to get through community college (taking advantage of a program for recovering addicts). He is making straight A's and I've been cheering him on for about two years,

He has one more class and he can apply to dental hygiene school (yes, my idea). He might go into nursing instead (which is okay with me.)

If I had anything at all to do with keeping him encouraged and working hard, I am super proud of myself. But I'm more proud of him. I tip the shit out of him.

I still say the best way to fight poverty is to make some money. I've been fighting poverty my whole life, and I'm still fighting. I won't go down easy.

That is good work.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #313 on: May 14, 2019, 12:06:05 PM »
This one is truly one of the Things That Make Me Say 'Dafuq:' there are political ratfuckers, and then there are political ratfuckers.  Or perhaps, since Trump lies with impunity and a republican Senate shrugs, criminals everywhere figure that they can get by with it.

the money quote:

Rudy 9-11:
ďWeíre not meddling in an election, weíre meddling in an investigation, which we have a right to do.Ē

Honest to Christ, you can't make this stuff up.

Ukraine Prosecutor Made Up Biden Claim, Kiev Lawmaker Says--
--Alleged bid to curry favor with Trump and Giuliani draws ire
--Prosecutorís spokeswoman denies the letter came from him.



By and
Updated on

A Ukrainian lawmaker accused his country’s top prosecutor of manufacturing a “conspiracy” about U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, adding to a political intrigue playing out from Kiev to Washington.

The lawmaker, Serhiy Leshchenko, said he had been given parts of a letter written by the prosecutor with the intent of currying favor with the Trump administration. The letter was sent by the prosecutor through unofficial channels to President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, the lawmaker told journalists on Monday in Kiev as he distributed copies of two pages.

Serhiy Leshchenko

Serhiy Leshchenko

The letter, purportedly written by Prosecutor General Yuriy Lutsenko, said that Biden, while U.S. vice president, personally received income from a Ukrainian natural gas company in exchange for “lobbying activities and political support.”

The lawmaker said those allegations were false.

As Leshchenko explained it, the prosecutor was trying to hold onto his job in a new administration. The incoming Ukrainian president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, campaigned on a vow to fight corruption and has said he would name a new prosecutor general.

“I can assume that Lutsenko’s plan is simple” -- that is, to build intrigue around Biden to show U.S. authorities that the prosecutor can be a useful partner, Leshchenko told reporters.

Larysa Sargan, a spokeswoman for the prosecutor general, denied that Lutsenko or anyone in his circle had written such a letter. The pages, which were reviewed by Bloomberg News, didn’t include dates or information about the sender or addressee, and their authenticity couldn’t be verified.

Giuliani didn’t respond to requests for comment.

Ukrainian officials have been drawn deeper into a dispute over Giuliani’s claim that Biden, as U.S. vice president, had intervened in Ukrainian politics to head off an investigation of the gas company, Burisma Group, where his son was a board member. Burisma and its wealthy owner, Mykola Zlochevsky, have denied any wrongdoing.

Read More: Ukraine Ex-Official Casts Doubt on Biden Conflict Claim

Leshchenko, a former investigative journalist, was a supporter of Zelenskiy and has taken part in some election and transition meetings. He didn’t say when the letter to Giuliani was sent. He said he had received the excerpts through people allied with U.S. conservatives.

Giuliani told the New York Times last week that he planned to visit Kiev to urge President-elect Zelenskiy to pursue inquiries into matters of interest to Trump, including an investigation into Biden’s involvement with Burisma. “We’re not meddling in an election, we’re meddling in an investigation, which we have a right to do,” he told the Times.

``There's nothing illegal about it,'' Giuliani told the paper. ``Somebody could say it's improper.''

The controversy centers around Biden’s March 2016 ultimatum to Ukraine to fire the country’s then-prosecutor general as the U.S. and its partners pushed the country to deal with official corruption. Giuliani alleged that the demand by then-Vice President Biden raised questions about potential conflicts of interest.

Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, sat on the board of Burisma, whose owner had at one point been under investigation. The case against Burisma had been dormant when Biden demanded the firing, a former Ukrainian deputy prosecutor, Vitaliy Kasko, told Bloomberg News last week.

Giuliani quickly canceled the trip amid criticism that he was enlisting a foreign government to help get Trump re-elected.

Biden responded that Giuliani's planned trip to Ukraine was "inappropriate."

"I can’t remember any lawyer representing the president, conferring with the president, deciding to go overseas where a government that relies on U.S. largess to try to get them to do something that everyone knows never happened," Biden said in an interview in New Hampshire posted on Twitter Monday. "It’s sort of Giuliani’s style and this administration."

A spokesman for Biden had previously said he didn’t talk to his son about his business. Hunter Biden left Burisma’s board last month.

Read More: Giuliani Earns Millions Telling Countries to Boost Police Forces

Giuliani, who had planned to give a speech to a Jewish group in Kiev, told Bloomberg News over the weekend that he would reschedule the event for the fall.

Giuliani has labeled Leshchenko an enemy of Trump, accusing him of revealing a so-called “black ledger” from the country’s Party of Regions that detailed payments to people including former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

Giuliani and others close to Manafort have called the ledger fraudulent. Leshchenko on Monday said the ledger was authentic. Ukrainian prosecutors have said it is genuine and are investigating payments recorded there.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #314 on: May 21, 2019, 08:26:31 PM »
Something that made me say, 'Dafuq?" but in a good way. Saw this on Sportscenter on Monday and could't figure out what I had seen.

These girls had some... balls.

An Engineering School Pulls Off an ‘Epic Trick Play’

The former Angola Christian Church, which has become the Furth Center for Performing Arts at Trine University
The former Angola Christian Church, which has become the Furth Center for Performing Arts at Trine UniversityCourtesy of Trine University

Last month we wrote about the surprising partnership in Angola, Indianabetween a city-redevelopment movement, which has brought new life and activity to a historic small-city downtown, and the adjoining Trine University, which has had an extremely high success rate in placing its graduates in jobs or advanced-degree programs.

Over the past two decades, smaller private universities across the country, especially those far from major cities, have struggled to attract students and keep their doors open. But as detailed here, in those two decades Trine has quadrupled its enrollment, and it claims that graduates leave with an average student-debt burden of less than $30,000.

“There are good things and bad things about a reputation as an engineering school,” the president of Trine, Earl Brooks told me, when I spoke with him in Angola last month. “The good thing is the job-placement rate. The bad thing is people thinking you’re only about engineering.”


Want proof that Trine is not just about engineering? And that a cannily analytical approach to possibilities can pay off in many realms? Please read on:

This past weekend, the Trine Thunder women’s softball team made it to the Division III national championship series, which will be held this coming week in Tyler, Texas. The Thunder advanced over the Knights of SUNY Geneseo with what Yahoo Sports News described as “the greatest hidden ball trick you’ve ever seen,” and which ESPN also featured in its nightly “Plays of the Day” recap. The MLB.com report on the game was headlined, “You’ll need at least eight viewings to figure out how this wild hidden ball trick worked.”

Justin Cohn of The Journal Gazette of Fort Wayne, Indiana, the nearest large city to Trine, has a story with the headline “Trine softball’s epic trick play,” and Trine’s news service has more detailed reports here. As you’ll see, the play took careful planning, elaborate choreography, dramatic aplomb, and—for the last out in a playoff game—daring and guts.

We’ll follow the Thunder as they move on to the next round, against Illinois Wesleyan. (For how the game looked from the Geneseo perspective, including a reflection on what was still the best-ever season in the school’s history, see this post-game interview. )


To spell out what is happening here: In the final inning, SUNY Geneseo was down by two, with two outs, but with runners on first and second. After a pitch, the Trine pitcher got the ball back from the catcher—and then whirled and appeared to be trying to pick off the runner at second.

The pitcher put everything into that fast throw toward second base—and then the rest of the Trine team acted for all the world as if she’d badly mis-thrown the ball. Two infielders valiantly dived into the dirt, as if trying to stop the ball before the runners could advance. Outfielders frantically ran up, as if trying to get the ball back into the infield before SUNY could tighten the score.

But of course the pitcher had merely mimed the throw, and was hiding the ball in her glove the whole time. The contortions of the infielders and outfielders were all an act. The act convinced the SUNY runner, who saw an opening to score—and as she moved on from second, the pitcher ambled over to tag her out and end the game.

Sympathies to the Knights, and good luck to the Thunder!


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/PAfH6-6BIow" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/PAfH6-6BIow</a>
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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