AuthorTopic: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"  (Read 38039 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?" Holiday Bowl Games
« Reply #345 on: December 30, 2019, 02:39:15 PM »
permit me a cranky rant.

I  know I’m an old crank, but you cannot turn on the television set during the holiday season without tripping over some hitherto nameless and previously nonexistent holiday football bowl game. Time was there used to be six or eight ball games of note, all clustered around the period between Christmas and New Year’s, and of various degrees of reputation and importance, particularly financial importance to the participants. But these days bowls have sprouted like dandelions, and in my viewpoint are every bit as welcome as dandelions or scorpions.

When I was young, I could name the big bowl games: the Rose Bowl, the Cotton Bowl,  the Sugar Bowl. There was the Bluebonnet bowl (now gone), then came the Fiesta Bowl, and the Sun bowl. Whichs were enjoyable, generally featured one top 25 team against another top 25 team, and were entertaining.

But now, everybody has to get into the act, such that a six and six team from the ACC has to play some weak sister from the MAC conference In the Goodyear Rubber Condom bowl, or the Vac-u-Suck Happy Endings bowl. I remember my bewilderment several years ago when I came across something in the middle of December called the Bahamas bowl, in which a local team was actually playing. Then, there was my delighted coming across the Beef O'brady Bowl... Yes there was actually such a game, now renamed the manzanilla bowl, or somesuch. I did a quick check and they were @40 bowl games. This is bowl inflation, and the same way colleges of experience grade inflation, and it the rest of us have experienced dollar inflation. The value of a postseason bowl game has been inflated away.

Now I understand that for well heeled boosters and fans, this is a good thing. Who doesn’t like to travel, especially to southern climes during The holidays? Boosters can “write off“ the trip as a business expense, as they hobnob with other "business people," their “secretaries “ in tow. Nice deal if you can get it. I’m sure a lot of business is done in prayerful  contemplation during these trips. The financial incentives for the team are great as well. Major bowls carry a purse of $4-6M per team. Lesser bowls such as the Sun Gator, Holiday, Citrus, Liberty, and Independence Bowls, pay our less. Cities and civic boosts love these games, since they get an infusion of tourist dollars and the end of then year. All you need is the ability to raise about $100M to attract the teams. And as you can tell, they sell the naming rights to whoever is buying.

Now there are 80 teams playing in the so-called postseason. Anybody who thinks a six and 16 from the SEC Up against a 10-2 team from the Southern conference, or somesuch is a worthwhile matchup, or for that matter or watch a ball game, has been smoking crack.

The criminal grift known as the NCAA runs a business that, much as the slave economy, is built in unpaid labor, and it likes the current arrangement very much, in the same way defense contractors like prison slave labor or Marse Tom liked Dusky Sally.

We've reached Peak Bowl. Cue the apocalypse.

And yes, I know the solution: shot the damed thing off. Which is why I'm reading a book after I'm done kvetching and wretching.
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #346 on: December 30, 2019, 03:46:52 PM »
The lodge here is full of brohans who all want to sound like ESPN sports analysts.  Probably not one in ten of them ever played the game, especially past the high school level. But it consumes all their waking thoughts.

College sports is a huge financial scam that enriches a few and sucks money out of the pockets of struggling students...and the broad public eats it up and has no clue as to the dark side of it.

Just one more example of how all the things that are fucked up in this world aren't about to be fixed.

You can't fix stupid.

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #347 on: December 30, 2019, 04:05:07 PM »

College sports is a huge financial scam that enriches a few and sucks money out of the pockets of struggling students...and the broad public eats it up and has no clue as to the dark side of it.

Just one more example of how all the things that are fucked up in this world aren't about to be fixed.


Than ks for humoring me.

I'm enough of a fan to enjoy it up to a point. But too much bad football is like too much sugar; you end up feeling like shit after consuming too much.
Nobody should be surprised in this country that everything is for sale.
Part of me is convinced that the proliferation of bowls is the NCAA's way of cutting mid-majors in in a part of the boodle, and continuing  to allow the so-called Power 5 conferences to walk away with the lion's share of the players, the programs and the revenue. No sweeter money than that made on the backs of unpaid labor. You know that the big 5 are able to give 85 scholarships a year? That's obscene.They can warehouse players. LSU has 38 players estimated to go in this year's NFL draft. An obscenity.

Quote
College sports is a huge financial scam that enriches a few and sucks money out of the pockets of struggling students...and the broad public eats it up and has no clue as to the dark side of it.


Avid sports fans know about the NCAA and its many hypocrisies. I'm convinced they just don't care.

I'm just raving like a madman now.
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'Approximately 100 percent' of tariff costs have fallen onto Americans'
« Reply #348 on: January 09, 2020, 07:09:14 AM »
"We are shocked, shocked..."

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'Approximately 100 percent' of tariff costs have fallen onto Americans, new research shows

donald trump flagJoshua Lott/Getty Images

  • President Donald Trump falsely claims that China and other nations have paid the tariffs he levied on thousands of products over the past two years.
  • But "approximately 100 percent" of those costs have fallen onto American buyers, according to a new National Bureau of Economic Research paper.
  • The paper, which uses customs data through October 2019, reflects a series of similar independent findings that have been published over the past year.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage here.

President Donald Trump falsely claims that China and other nations have paid the tariffs he levied on thousands of products over the past two years. But "approximately 100 percent" of those costs have fallen onto American buyers, according to a new National Bureau of Economic Research paper. 

"Using another year of data including significant escalations in the trade war, we find that US tariffs continue to be almost entirely borne by US firms and consumers," the economists — Mary Amiti of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Stephen J. Redding of Princeton, and David E. Weinstein of Columbia University — wrote in a paper that was circulated this week. 

A 10% tariff is associated with about a 10% drop in imports for the first three months, according to the economists, and this relationship becomes more intense as time goes on. So the effects of tariffs, which were increased this fall, may have not yet been fully seen. 

The paper, which uses customs data through October 2019, reflects a series of similar independent findings that have been circulated over the past year.

"The continued stability of import prices for goods from China means US firms and consumers have to pay the tariff tax," New York Federal Reserve economists Matthew Higgins, Thomas Klitgaard, and Michael Nattinger wrote in a November study

The US and China plan to sign this month to sign an interim trade agreement, which was reached in October as the two sides sought to defuse tensions. That stalled several planned escalations, but tariffs were kept on thousands of products shipped between the two largest economies.

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Trump tried to take credit for Ethiopian prime minister's Nobel Peace Prize
« Reply #349 on: January 11, 2020, 03:54:16 AM »
A 'confused' Trump tried to take credit for the Ethiopian prime minister's Nobel Peace Prize



  • President Donald Trump falsely claimed on Thursday that he deserved credit for the Nobel Peace Prize recently awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed.
  • Ahmed was awarded the prestigious prize for negotiating a peace deal between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea following 20 years of bloody conflict. Trump had nothing to do with the peace negotiations.
  • "I made a deal. I saved a country. And I just heard that the head of that country is now getting the Nobel Peace Prize for saving the country. I said, 'What? did I have something do with it?' Yeah," Trump said.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

At a rally in Ohio on Thursday night, President Donald Trump claimed that he deserved credit for the Nobel Peace Prize recently awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed.

"I made a deal. I saved a country. And I just heard that the head of that country is now getting the Nobel Peace Prize for saving the country. I said, 'What? Did I have something do with it?' Yeah," Trump said. "But you know, that's the way it is. As long as we know, that's all that matters."

Trump last year offered to help negotiate an agreement between the Ethiopian prime minister and Egypt's prime minister over a dam on the Nile. But Ahmed was awarded the prestigious prize for negotiating a peace deal between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea following 20 years of bloody conflict. Trump had nothing to do with these peace negotiations.

The Democratic-led House Foreign Affairs Committee slammed Trump's remark, tweeting, "Trump is confused."

House Foreign Affairs Committee @HouseForeign

Trump is confused.
PM @AbiyAhmedAli was awarded the @NobelPrize for his efforts to bring peace to the Horn of Africa, not stalled negotiations about a new dam on the Nile.

If they gave the Nobel for deals that didn’t happen, the Pres. would have a shelf full of them. https://twitter.com/atrupar/status/1215435613203202048 

Aaron Rupar @atrupar
Replying to @atrupar

"I made a deal, I saved a country, and I just heard that the head of that country is now getting the Nobel Peace Prize for saving the country. I said, 'what, did I have something do with it?'" -- Trump whines about not having a Nobel Peace Prize

Embedded video

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Offline Surly1

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These Are the First Living Robots: Machines Made from Frog Stem Cells
« Reply #350 on: January 17, 2020, 11:49:20 AM »
These Are the First Living Robots: Machines Made from Frog Stem Cells

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a new kind of life.

  • Scientists from Tufts University, the University of Vermont, and the Wyss Institute at Harvard have developed tiny, living organisms that can be programmed. Called "xenobots," these robots were made with frog stem cells.
  • The research, published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is meant to aid development of soft robots that can repair themselves when damaged.
  • Ultimately, the hope is these xenobots will be useful in cleaning up microplastics, digesting toxic materials, or even delivering drugs inside our bodies.

What happens when you cross stem cells from a frog heart and frog skin? Not much—that is, until you program those cells to move. In that case, you've created a xenobot, a new type of organism that's part robot, part living thing.

And we've never seen anything like it before.

Researchers from Tufts University, the University of Vermont, and Harvard University have created the first xenobots from frog embryos after designing them with computer algorithms and physically shaping them with surgical precision. The skin-heart embryos are just one millimeter in size, but can accomplish some remarkable things for what they are, like physically squirming toward targets.

"These are novel living machines," Joshua Bongard, a computer scientist and robotics expert at the University of Vermont who co-led the new research, said in a press statement. "They're neither a traditional robot nor a known species of animal. It's a new class of artifact: a living, programmable organism."

By studying these curious organisms, researchers hope to learn more about the mysterious world of cellular communication. Plus, these kinds of robo-organisms could possibly be the key to drug delivery in the body or greener environmental cleanup techniques.

"Most technologies are made from steel, concrete, chemicals, and plastics, which degrade over time and can produce harmful ecological and health side effects," the authors note in a research paper published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "It would thus be useful to build technologies using self-renewing and biocompatible materials, of which the ideal candidates are living systems themselves."

Building Xenobots

Xenobots borrow their name from Xenopus laevis, the scientific name for the African clawed frog from which the researchers harvested the stem cells. To create the little organisms, which scoot around a petri dish a bit like water bears—those tiny microorganisms that are pretty much impossible to kill—the researchers scraped living stem cells from frog embryos. These were separated into single cells and left to incubate.

They differentiated the stem cells into two different kinds: heart and skin cells. The heart cells are capable of expanding and contracting, which ultimately aids the xenobot in locomotion, and the skin cells provide structure. Next, using tiny forceps and an even smaller electrode, the scientists cut the cells and joined them together under a microscope in designs that were specified by a computer algorithm.

Interestingly, the two different kinds of cells did merge together well and created xenobots that could explore their watery environment for days or weeks. When flipped like a turtle on its shell, though, they could no longer move.

Other tests showed whole groups of xenobots are capable of moving in circles and pushing small items to a central location all on their own, without intervention. Some were built with holes in the center to reduce drag and the researchers even tried using the hole as a pouch to let the xenobots carry objects. Bongard said it's a step in the right direction for computer-designed organisms that can intelligently deliver drugs in the body.

Evolutionary Algorithms

image
On the left, the anatomical blueprint for a computer-designed organism, discovered on a UVM supercomputer. On the right, the living organism, built entirely from frog skin (green) and heart muscle (red) cells. The background displays traces carved by a swarm of these new-to-nature organisms as they move through a field of particulate matter.

Sam Kriegman, UVM

While these xenobots are capable of some spontaneous movement, they can't accomplish any coordinated efforts without the help of computers. Really, xenobots couldn't fundamentally exist without designs created through evolutionary algorithms.

Just as natural selection dictates which members of a species live and which die off—based on certain favorable or unfavorable attributes and ultimately influencing the species' characteristics—evolutionary algorithms can help find beneficial structures for the xenobots.

A team of computer scientists created a virtual world for the xenobots and then ran evolutionary algorithms to see which potential designs for the xenobots could help them move or accomplish some other goal. The algorithm looked for xenobots that performed well at those particular tasks while in a given configuration, and then bred those microorganisms with other xenobots that were considered "fit" enough to survive this simulated natural selection.

In the video above, for example, you can see a simulated version of the xenobot, which is capable of forward movement. The final organism takes on a similar shape to this design and is capable of (slowly) getting around. The red and green squares at the bottom of the structure are active cells, in this case the heart stem cells, while the blueish squares represent the passive skin stem cells.

image

Douglas Blackiston

All of this design work was completed over the course of a few months on the Deep Green supercomputer cluster at the University of Vermont. After a few hundred runs of the evolutionary algorithm, the researchers filtered out the most promising designs. Then, biologists at Tufts University assembled the real xenobots in vitro.

What's the Controversy?

Anything dealing with stem cells is bound to meet at least some flack because detractors take issue with the entire premise of using stem cells, which are harvested from developing embryos.

That's compounded with other practical ethics questions, especially relating to safety and testing. For instance, should the organisms have protections similar to animals or humans when we experiment on them? Could we, ourselves, eventually require protection from the artificially produced creatures?

"When you’re creating life, you don’t have a good sense of what direction it’s going to take," Nita Farahany, who studies the ethical ramifications of new technologies at Duke University and was not involved in the study, told Smithsonian Magazine. "Any time we try to harness life … [we should] recognize its potential to go really poorly."

Michael Levin, a biophysicist and co-author of the study from Tufts University, said that fear of the unknown in this case is not reasonable:

"When we start to mess around with complex systems that we don't understand, we're going to get unintended consequences," he said in a press statement. "If humanity is going to survive into the future, we need to better understand how complex properties, somehow, emerge from simple rules."

At its heart, the study is a "direct contribution to getting a handle on what people are afraid of, which is unintended consequences," Levin said.

Source: The University of Vermont

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Offline moniker

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Re: These Are the First Living Robots: Machines Made from Frog Stem Cells
« Reply #351 on: January 17, 2020, 11:57:26 AM »
These Are the First Living Robots: Machines Made from Frog Stem Cells

RE, if you had used your brain like you were supposed to you could be doing wild and crazy stuff like this!

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Re: These Are the First Living Robots: Machines Made from Frog Stem Cells
« Reply #352 on: January 17, 2020, 12:42:08 PM »
These Are the First Living Robots: Machines Made from Frog Stem Cells

RE, if you had used your brain like you were supposed to you could be doing wild and crazy stuff like this!

Probably true, but as it all ended up shaking out, I'm glad I didn't.  I was always bad with doing what I was told or doing what I was supposed to.  lol.

RE
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #353 on: January 17, 2020, 05:46:44 PM »
Quote
Trump whines about not having a Nobel Peace Prize.

He does drone on!

Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

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Re: These Are the First Living Robots: Machines Made from Frog Stem Cells
« Reply #354 on: January 17, 2020, 05:53:01 PM »
These Are the First Living Robots: Machines Made from Frog Stem Cells

RE, if you had used your brain like you were supposed to you could be doing wild and crazy stuff like this!

A gymnastic brain doing back-flips!  The thing locomoting in the video is a STEP in that direction.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline Surly1

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Zero Hedge banned from Twitter after it doxxed a Chinese scientist
« Reply #355 on: February 01, 2020, 03:57:42 AM »
Finance blog Zero Hedge was banned from Twitter after it doxxed a Chinese scientist and claimed they created the Wuhan coronavirus



Will Martin
1 hour ago
  • Financial blog Zero Hedge had its Twitter account permanently suspended on Friday after it published an article doxxing a Chinese scientist, and claiming that they created the deadly Wuhan coronavirus.
  • The story was first reported on Friday by Buzzfeed.
  • "The account was permanently suspended for violating our platform manipulation policy," a Twitter spokesperson told Buzzfeed.
  • Zero Hedge also published the scientist's email address and phone number.
  • Business Insider is not publishing the name of the scientist.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Financial blog Zero Hedge had its Twitter account permanently suspended on Friday after it published an article doxxing a Chinese scientist, and claiming that they created the deadly Wuhan coronavirus.

The story was first reported on Friday by Buzzfeed.

The article, titled "Is This The Man Behind The Global Coronavirus Pandemic?" was published Wednesday, and speculated that a scientist working at Wuhan's Institute of Virology released the virus, which it said was developed in a lab.

"If anyone wants to find out what really caused the coronavirus pandemic that has infected thousands of people in China and around the globe, they should probably pay [the scientist's name] a visit." 

Business Insider is not publishing the name of the scientist named by Zero Hedge. Zero Hedge also published the scientist's email address and phone number.

"The account was permanently suspended for violating our platform manipulation policy," a spokesperson for Twitter said in a statement to BuzzFeed.

Zero Hedge's story describes official theories for the spread of the virus as a "fabricated farce."

Below is a short extract from the Zero Hedge story:

"The real reason behind the viral spread is because a weaponized version of the coronavirus (one which may have originally been obtained from Canada), was released by Wuhan's Institute of Virology (accidentally or not), a top, level-4 biohazard lab which was studying 'the world's most dangerous pathogens'."

The story from Zero Hedge provides no specific evidence that the lab is responsible for the virus' spread, beyond citing a Chinese language press release that says the scientist is currently studying why bats which carry the coronavirus don't get sick.

Wuhan China January 26 coronavirus medics help man

Medics help a patient walk into a hospital in Wuhan, China, on January 26, 2020.
Getty Images

Buzzfeed's story notes that "studying a form of a virus strain found in animals is a standard way to make vaccines, whether for the flu or polio."

Brandon Brown, an associate professor at the University of California, Riverside, and a member of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the International Society of Vaccines, and the Global Health Council told Buzzfeed: "One reason why this institute would be doing immune research would be to prevent what we are seeing right now with the novel coronavirus outbreak." 

The coronavirus outbreak, which is believed to have originated in a wet market in the city of Wuhan, has now infected almost 12,000 people and killed 259.Cases have been reported in the US, UK, and around 20 other countries outside China.

The virus, officially known as 2019-nCoV, can spread from human to human and has infected some people who have not recently traveled to Wuhan.

Zero Hedge is best known for its sensationalist headlines and bearish outlook on the world.

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #356 on: February 01, 2020, 10:57:25 AM »
One idea of a controlled burn is to allow an area which is periodically razed by fire naturally to consume fuel so fuel does not build up so much that catastrophic infernos result.

Australia is the poster child.



The challenge to the psyche of having to evaluate the truth power of Chinese scientists creating the Wuhan coronavirus could be a important part to the creation of an intellectually well rounded citizen.

If even the absurd is kept from us how can we know what is absurd!
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Reply #357 on: February 01, 2020, 11:09:57 AM »
One idea of a controlled burn is to allow an area which is periodically razed by fire naturally to consume fuel so fuel does not build up so much that catastrophic infernos result.

Australia is the poster child.



The challenge to the psyche of having to evaluate the truth power of Chinese scientists creating the Wuhan coronavirus could be a important part to the creation of an intellectually well rounded citizen.

If even the absurd is kept from us how can we know what is absurd!

If I were trying to kill off a lot of useless eaters with a virus, I'd make an effective vaccine first, for obvious reasons.

Although it's an idea that appeals to my inner conspiracy theorist, I'm inclined to think viruses like this are a normal part of our natural world, and do fine without human help........

Other than using our cellular metablolism to replicate, that is.
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Jeremy Grantham warns eventually only the rich will procreate
« Reply #358 on: February 13, 2020, 04:27:50 AM »
Comes The Great Culling, or at least a plot premise from Children of Men.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8LvMcHGZLxU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8LvMcHGZLxU</a>

Jeremy Grantham warns eventually only the rich will procreate as chemicals leave the poor sterile




Jeremy Grantham, co-founder and chief investment strategist of Grantham Mayo van Otterloo, speaks at the ReSource 2012 conference in Oxford, England.

Getty Images

Published Mon, Feb 10 2020 12:10 PM EST

Updated Mon, Feb 10 2020 12:41 PM EST

High-profile investor Jeremy Grantham warned in a letter that falling birth rates in the developed world could accelerate in coming years due to increasing chemical toxicity, allowing only wealthy people to have children.

In recent years, economists have raised concern about the impact on economic growth of slowing birth rates in the developed world. Grantham, who co-founded GMO in the 1970s and is famous for calling the last two major market bubbles, said that trend is poised to accelerate due to increased chemical toxicity in the environment and food products.

"This interference is growing at such a rapid rate that if left alone it is likely to leave us sterile in a few decades with only the rich able to easily afford the healthy lifestyles and the exotic medical help required to have babies," Grantham said.

While acknowledging that changes in lifestyle choices is responsible for at least some of the slowing birth rates, Graham said increased chemical toxicity is making it harder for women to conceive and lowering sperm counts in men.

"The net effect of choice and postponement combined with the recent decade of 'help' from toxicity has been an unexpected and accelerating decline in delivered fertility in developed countries, as well as the critically important China and India, with new annual cohorts of babies already declining in absolute numbers, not just growth rates," Grantham said.

He also pointed to dramatic population declines in some species of insects as an example of how increased chemicals in the environment can hurt reproduction rates.

He ended his letter by warning that major chemical companies could soon be hit by widespread bans on some of their key products.

"The bottom line is this: either endocrine disrupting chemicals will go out of business or we will!" Grantham wrote.

Grantham gained influence as an investor after correctly calling the dotcom bubble in 2000 and the market's dramatic downturn in 2008. GMO has struggled in recent years, however. It reported $62.1 billion in assets under management at the end of 2018, down from about $124 billion in June 2014.

Grantham has long expressed public concern about environmental issues, including launching the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment in 1997. His firm also runs the GMO Climate Change fund.
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Re: Jeremy Grantham warns eventually only the rich will procreate
« Reply #359 on: February 13, 2020, 05:25:57 AM »
Comes The Great Culling, or at least a plot premise from Children of Men.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8LvMcHGZLxU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8LvMcHGZLxU</a>

Jeremy Grantham warns eventually only the rich will procreate as chemicals leave the poor sterile




Jeremy Grantham, co-founder and chief investment strategist of Grantham Mayo van Otterloo, speaks at the ReSource 2012 conference in Oxford, England.

Getty Images

Published Mon, Feb 10 2020 12:10 PM EST

Updated Mon, Feb 10 2020 12:41 PM EST

High-profile investor Jeremy Grantham warned in a letter that falling birth rates in the developed world could accelerate in coming years due to increasing chemical toxicity, allowing only wealthy people to have children.

In recent years, economists have raised concern about the impact on economic growth of slowing birth rates in the developed world. Grantham, who co-founded GMO in the 1970s and is famous for calling the last two major market bubbles, said that trend is poised to accelerate due to increased chemical toxicity in the environment and food products.

"This interference is growing at such a rapid rate that if left alone it is likely to leave us sterile in a few decades with only the rich able to easily afford the healthy lifestyles and the exotic medical help required to have babies," Grantham said.

While acknowledging that changes in lifestyle choices is responsible for at least some of the slowing birth rates, Graham said increased chemical toxicity is making it harder for women to conceive and lowering sperm counts in men.

"The net effect of choice and postponement combined with the recent decade of 'help' from toxicity has been an unexpected and accelerating decline in delivered fertility in developed countries, as well as the critically important China and India, with new annual cohorts of babies already declining in absolute numbers, not just growth rates," Grantham said.

He also pointed to dramatic population declines in some species of insects as an example of how increased chemicals in the environment can hurt reproduction rates.

He ended his letter by warning that major chemical companies could soon be hit by widespread bans on some of their key products.

"The bottom line is this: either endocrine disrupting chemicals will go out of business or we will!" Grantham wrote.

Grantham gained influence as an investor after correctly calling the dotcom bubble in 2000 and the market's dramatic downturn in 2008. GMO has struggled in recent years, however. It reported $62.1 billion in assets under management at the end of 2018, down from about $124 billion in June 2014.

Grantham has long expressed public concern about environmental issues, including launching the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment in 1997. His firm also runs the GMO Climate Change fund.

Grantham is a hell of an investor, and he gets a lot right.....not that bad a guy, either, for a billionaire.

I find this one a little ironic, since population overshoot is at the heart of nearly every existential problem facing mankiind. Procreation is accepted to be a universal right....but in the future I don't see how that can continue unless some circumstance does reduce the fecundity of humans.....but I'm not in favor of doing it with plastic bottles and poison in foodstuffs.

Educated women have fewer babies...so educating women seems like the right approach.....and overcoming the religious opposition to birth control. One man, the Pope, could do more for our future than anyone else.....by recognizing that birth control should also be a universal right for women.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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