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Economics / Putin death stare: Snoozing officials poop pants
« Last post by azozeo on Today at 04:17:55 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ee5IDRMznSE&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Ee5IDRMznSE&fs=1</a>
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Agelbert Newz / Mickey Mouse placebo software
« Last post by agelbert on Today at 04:16:14 PM »


Dieselgate: Green group grumbles over 'Mickey Mouse' summit

SNIPPET:

The recent diesel summit agreement to upgrade software     in five million vehicles, set up a mobility fund, and offer buyer’s bonuses can be described as “Mickey Mouse policies” that may cut harmful emissions by five percent at best, Jens Thurau quoted Environmental Action Germany (DUH) head Jürgen Resch as saying, in an article for Deutsche Welle.

   

Many diesel car owners have realised “that the placebo software updates    won’t prevent their cars from being affected by driving bans”, said Resch in a press release. DUH has called on all political parties to make clear before the September general elections if they were willing to push for the measures necessary to enable cities to comply with air quality limits, including “dirty diesel vehicle” driving bans.

http://www.dw.com/en/dieselgate-green-group-grumbles-over-mickey-mouse-summit/a-40106902

3
Watch The Speech That Should End The Confederate Monuments Debate For Good
New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s address makes it even harder to defend statues honoring the “cult of the Lost Cause.”
By Christopher Mathias

Hours after a crane lifted a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from its pedestal in New Orleans’ Lee Circle on Friday ― where it had loomed over the black-majority city for 133 years ― Mayor Mitch Landrieu (D) delivered a speech on race that many are already hailing as historic.

“These statues are not just stone and metal,” Landrieu told a crowd at Gallier Hall. “They are not just innocent remembrances of a benign history. These monuments purposefully celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy, ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement and the terror that it actually stood for.”

The Lee statue was the fourth and final Confederate statue Landrieu had slated for removal from public property in the city. He received death threats over the decision, as did the city contractors he hired to remove the statues.

But in his speech Friday, Landrieu didn’t shrink away from calling these statues what they are: symbols of white supremacy and white terror.

“Best part about Mitch Landrieu’s speech is how he outlines how most existing Confederate iconography arose as part of campaigns of terror,” said Atlantic writer Vann Newkirk II. 

“Please read this profound speech...” tweeted Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.).

“Remarkable speech... on Confederate monuments and why they must come down,” said Washington Post journalist Wesley Lowery.

Author and former NPR host Michele Norris called the speech a “must-read.”

Jamelle Bouie also tweeted that people should “take the time” to read Landrieu’s speech in its entirety. You can do that here: 

Thank you for coming.

The soul of our beloved city is deeply rooted in a history that has evolved over thousands of years; rooted in a diverse people who have been here together every step of the way—for both good and for ill. It is a history that holds in its heart the stories of Native Americans—the Choctaw, Houma Nation, the Chitimacha. Of Hernando de Soto, Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, the Acadians, the Islenos, the enslaved people from Senegambia, Free People of Color, the Haitians, the Germans, both the empires of France and Spain. The Italians, the Irish, the Cubans, the south and central Americans, the Vietnamese, and so many more.
 
You see, New Orleans is truly a city of many nations, a melting pot, a bubbling cauldron of many cultures. There is no other place quite like it in the world that so eloquently exemplifies the uniquely American motto: e pluribus unum: out of many we are one. But there are also other truths about our city that we must confront. New Orleans was America’s largest slave market, a port where hundreds of thousands of souls were bought, sold, and shipped up the Mississippi River to lives of forced labor, of misery, of rape, of torture. America was the place where nearly 4,000 of our fellow citizens were lynched, 540 alone in Louisiana; where the courts enshrined “separate but equal”; where Freedom riders coming to New Orleans were beaten to a bloody pulp. So when people say to me that the monuments in question are history, well, what I just described is real history as well, and it is the searing truth.
 
And it immediately begs the questions, why there are no slave ship monuments, no prominent markers on public land to remember the lynchings or the slave blocks; nothing to remember this long chapter of our lives; the pain, the sacrifice, the shame … all of it happening on the soil of New Orleans. So for those self-appointed defenders of history and the monuments, they are eerily silent on what amounts to this historical malfeasance, a lie by omission. There is a difference between remembrance of history and reverence of it.
 
For America and New Orleans, it has been a long, winding road, marked by great tragedy and great triumph. But we cannot be afraid of our truth. As President George W. Bush said at the dedication ceremony for the National Museum of African American History & Culture, “A great nation does not hide its history. It faces its flaws and corrects them.” So today I want to speak about why we chose to remove these four monuments to the Lost Cause of the Confederacy, but also how and why this process can move us towards healing and understanding of each other. So, let’s start with the facts.
 
The historic record is clear: The Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, and P.G.T. Beauregard statues were not erected just to honor these men, but as part of the movement which became known as The Cult of the Lost Cause. This “cult” had one goal—through monuments and through other means—to rewrite history to hide the truth, which is that the Confederacy was on the wrong side of humanity. First erected over 166 years after the founding of our city and 19 years after the end of the Civil War, the monuments that we took down were meant to rebrand the history of our city and the ideals of a defeated Confederacy. It is self-evident that these men did not fight for the United States of America. They fought against it. They may have been warriors, but in this cause they were not patriots. These statues are not just stone and metal. They are not just innocent remembrances of a benign history. These monuments purposefully celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy, ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement and the terror that it actually stood for.
 
After the Civil War, these statues were a part of that terrorism as much as a burning cross on someone’s lawn; they were erected purposefully to send a strong message to all who walked in their shadows about who was still in charge in this city. Should you have further doubt about the true goals of the Confederacy, in the very weeks before the war broke out, the Vice President of the Confederacy, Alexander Stephens, made it clear that the Confederate cause was about maintaining slavery and white supremacy. He said in his now famous “corner-stone speech” that the Confederacy’s “cornerstone rests upon the great truth, that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery—subordination to the superior race—is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first in the history of the world based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.”
 
Now, with these shocking words still ringing in your ears, I want to try to gently peel from your hands the grip on a false narrative of our history that I think weakens us, and make straight a wrong turn we made many years ago. We can more closely connect with integrity to the founding principles of our nation and forge a clearer and straighter path toward a better city and a more perfect union.
 
Last year, President Barack Obama echoed these sentiments about the need to contextualize and remember all our history. He recalled a piece of stone, a slave auction block engraved with a marker commemorating a single moment in 1830 when Andrew Jackson and Henry Clay stood and spoke from it. President Obama said, “Consider what this artifact tells us about history. … On a stone where day after day for years, men and women … bound and bought and sold and bid like cattle on a stone worn down by the tragedy of over a thousand bare feet. For a long time the only thing we considered important, the singular thing we once chose to commemorate as history with a plaque, were the unmemorable speeches of two powerful men.”
 
A piece of stone—one stone. Both stories were history. One story told. One story forgotten or maybe even purposefully ignored. As clear as it is for me today … for a long time, even though I grew up in one of New Orleans’ most diverse neighborhoods, even with my family’s long proud history of fighting for civil rights … I must have passed by those monuments a million times without giving them a second thought. So I am not judging anybody, I am not judging people. We all take our own journey on race.
 
I just hope people listen like I did when my dear friend Wynton Marsalis helped me see the truth. He asked me to think about all the people who have left New Orleans because of our exclusionary attitudes. Another friend asked me to consider these four monuments from the perspective of an African American mother or father trying to explain to their fifth-grade daughter who Robert E. Lee is and why he stands atop of our beautiful city. Can you do it? Can you look into that young girl’s eyes and convince her that Robert E. Lee is there to encourage her? Do you think she will feel inspired and hopeful by that story? Do these monuments help her see a future with limitless potential? Have you ever thought that if her potential is limited, yours and mine are too? We all know the answer to these very simple questions. When you look into this child’s eyes is the moment when the searing truth comes into focus for us. This is the moment when we know what is right and what we must do. We can’t walk away from this truth.
 
And I knew that taking down the monuments was going to be tough, but you elected me to do the right thing, not the easy thing and this is what that looks like. So relocating these Confederate monuments is not about taking something away from someone else. This is not about politics. This is not about blame or retaliation. This is not a naive quest to solve all our problems at once.
 
This is, however, about showing the whole world that we as a city and as a people are able to acknowledge, understand, reconcile and most importantly, choose a better future for ourselves, making straight what has been crooked and making right what was wrong. Otherwise, we will continue to pay a price with discord, with division and, yes, with violence.
 
To literally put the Confederacy on a pedestal in our most prominent places of honor is an inaccurate recitation of our full past. It is an affront to our present, and it is a bad prescription for our future. History cannot be changed.  It cannot be moved like a statue. What is done is done. The Civil War is over, and the Confederacy lost and we are better for it. Surely we are far enough removed from this dark time to acknowledge that the cause of the Confederacy was wrong.
 
And in the second decade of the 21st century, asking African Americans—or anyone else—to drive by property that they own; occupied by reverential statues of men who fought to destroy the country and deny that person’s humanity seems perverse and absurd. Centuries-old wounds are still raw because they never healed right in the first place. Here is the essential truth: We are better together than we are apart.
 
Indivisibility is our essence. Isn’t this the gift that the people of New Orleans have given to the world? We radiate beauty and grace in our food, in our music, in our architecture, in our joy of life, in our celebration of death; in everything that we do. We gave the world this funky thing called jazz, the most uniquely American art form that is developed across the ages from different cultures. Think about second lines, think about Mardi Gras, think about muffaletta, think about the Saints, gumbo, red beans and rice. By God, just think.
 
All we hold dear is created by throwing everything in the pot; creating, producing something better; everything a product of our historic diversity. We are proof that out of many we are one — and better for it! Out of many we are one — and we really do love it! And yet, we still seem to find so many excuses for not doing the right thing. Again, remember President Bush’s words. “A great nation does not hide its history. It faces its flaws and corrects them.”
 
We forget, we deny how much we really depend on each other, how much we need each other. We justify our silence and inaction by manufacturing noble causes that marinate in historical denial. We still find a way to say, “Wait, not so fast.” But like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Wait has almost always meant never.” We can’t wait any longer. We need to change. And we need to change now.
 
No more waiting. This is not just about statues, this is about our attitudes and behavior as well. If we take these statues down and don’t change to become a more open and inclusive society this would have all been in vain. While some have driven by these monuments every day and either revered their beauty or failed to see them at all, many of our neighbors and fellow Americans see them very clearly. Many are painfully aware of the long shadows their presence casts; not only literally but figuratively. And they clearly receive the message that the Confederacy and the cult of the lost cause intended to deliver.
 
Earlier this week, as the cult of the lost cause statue of P.G.T Beauregard came down, world renowned musician Terence Blanchard stood watch, his wife Robin and their two beautiful daughters at their side. Terence went to a high school on the edge of City Park named after one of America’s greatest heroes and patriots, John F. Kennedy. But to get there he had to pass by this monument to a man who fought to deny him his humanity.

He said, “I’ve never looked at them as a source of pride … it’s always made me feel as if they were put there by people who don’t respect us. This is something I never thought I’d see in my lifetime. It’s a sign that the world is changing.” Yes, Terence, it is. And it is long overdue. Now is the time to send a new message to the next generation of New Orleanians who can follow in Terence and Robin’s remarkable footsteps.
 
A message about the future, about the next 300 years and beyond: Let us not miss this opportunity, New Orleans, and let us help the rest of the country do the same. Because now is the time for choosing. Now is the time to actually make this the City we always should have been, had we gotten it right in the first place.
 
We should stop for a moment and ask ourselves: At this point in our history — after Katrina, after Rita, after Ike, after Gustav, after the national recession, after the BP oil catastrophe and after the tornado — if presented with the opportunity to build monuments that told our story or to curate these particular spaces, would these monuments be what we want the world to see? Is this really our story?
 
We have not erased history; we are becoming part of the city’s history by righting the wrong image these monuments represent and crafting a better, more complete future for all our children and for future generations. And unlike when these Confederate monuments were first erected as symbols of white supremacy, we now have a chance to create not only new symbols, but to do it together, as one people. In our blessed land we all come to the table of democracy as equals. We have to reaffirm our commitment to a future where each citizen is guaranteed the uniquely American gifts of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
 
That is what really makes America great and today it is more important than ever to hold fast to these values and together say a self-evident truth that out of many we are one. That is why today we reclaim these spaces for the United States of America. Because we are one nation, not two; indivisible with liberty and justice for all, not some. We all are part of one nation, all pledging allegiance to one flag, the flag of the United States of America. And New Orleanians are in …  all of the way. It is in this union and in this truth that real patriotism is rooted and flourishes. Instead of revering a four-year brief historical aberration that was called the Confederacy, we can celebrate all 300 years of our rich, diverse history as a place named New Orleans, and set the tone for the next 300 years.

After decades of public debate, of anger, of anxiety, of anticipation, of humiliation and of frustration. After public hearings and approvals from three separate community led commissions. After two robust public hearings and a 6–1 vote by the duly elected New Orleans City Council. After review by 13 different federal and state judges. The full weight of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government has been brought to bear and the monuments, in accordance with the law, have been removed. So now is the time to come together and heal and focus on our larger task. Not only building new symbols, but making this city a beautiful manifestation of what is possible and what we as a people can become.
 
Let us remember what the once exiled, imprisoned, and now universally loved Nelson Mandela and what he said after the fall of apartheid. “If the pain has often been unbearable and the revelations shocking to all of us, it is because they indeed bring us the beginnings of a common understanding of what happened and a steady restoration of the nation’s humanity.”  So before we part let us again state the truth clearly.
 
The Confederacy was on the wrong side of history and humanity. It sought to tear apart our nation and subjugate our fellow Americans to slavery. This is the history we should never forget and one that we should never again put on a pedestal to be revered. As a community, we must recognize the significance of removing New Orleans’ Confederate monuments. It is our acknowledgment that now is the time to take stock of, and then move past, a painful part of our history.
 
Anything less would render generations of courageous struggle and soul-searching a truly lost cause. Anything less would fall short of the immortal words of our greatest president, Abraham Lincoln, who with an open heart and clarity of purpose calls on us today to unite as one people when he said, “With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation’s wounds … to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.”
Thank you.
4
This seems to be an escalation of the hatred the left has for the right (alt-right) and it will only make them escalate their tendency for violent revenge. We ( america ) is starting to split down the seams in a hurry.

I hold with those who argue for the removal of the statues and remote events in either a cemetery or museum, where they be properly curated. Each statue is a work of art, that represents hundreds of hours of effort on the part of some(Usually unknown or unrecognized) artist. To destroy such a monument is indistinguishable from what the Talaban do. Relocate them in the right place and provide some context for understanding what they meant, which often had less to do with the Civil War and far more to sending a social message.

That said, I am sick to death of Republiconfederates in general and the rewriting of history specifically, best summed up in the narrative of the so-called "lost cause." What Confederates did was treason, pure and simple. They got off easy because Lincoln and Grant. A Surly post Civil War presidency would have seen hundreds more hangings and the amputation of right hands... The Stars and Bars would today be as anathema as the Swastika is today in Germany.

Monuments in some southern towns like New Orleans commemorated white insurrections and assaults on what were integrated police departments. Many were elevated as a reinforcement for the establishment of Jim Crow. So those who argue "heritage not hate" can roll that into a tight tube and pound it up their asses.

Trump's behavior is leading directly to a schism in this country unlike any I have seen. It is rapidly becoming a case of "which side are you on?" But never think that this is about statues and monuments. It is about our government's betrayal of the promise made to emancipated blacks in 1863. We withdrew Federal troops from the occupied south in 1877 in return for a Republican Hayes presidency, confirming the elevation of the KKK and a 40 year reign of domestic terror.

With no troops to enforce the Fourteenth and Fifteen Amendments, Reconstruction was at an end. Across the South lynching, disenfranchisement, and segregationist laws proliferated. It would not be until after the Second World War and the 1960s Civil Rights Movement that Jim Crow segregation would be outlawed.

Blacks endured the dark days of sharecropping, debt peonage, disfranchisement, segregation, and lynching in the wake of the end of Reconstruction in 1877.  African Americans and their allies continued to struggle for a more complete freedom. Land ownership among former slaves continued to rise slowly in the most adverse circumstances and with the great black migrations to northern cities, blacks began to have other opportunities in industrial work. And BTW, anyon who says that there was less racism in the north than the south is full of shit. I was there.


Well there's certainly a purging going on currently.

It's as if America is over the porcelain god hemorrhaging past decades atrocities.

I still believe the best times in this country were the 1830's to 1850's for the white settlers.

Post war of 1812 (which was about throwing the crown out of the  country AGAIN) until pre 1900's.
5
History / Re: It’s Time To Blow Up Mount Rushmore
« Last post by azozeo on Today at 02:46:50 PM »
Crazy Horse kicked Custer's ass good & hard & he got his own mountain.
Ironic that the Crazy Horse mountain is in the deep south.

I remember as a boy "talk" about adding J.F.K. to Rushmore after the assassination.
6
This seems to be an escalation of the hatred the left has for the right (alt-right) and it will only make them escalate their tendency for violent revenge. We ( america ) is starting to split down the seams in a hurry.

I hold with those who argue for the removal of the statues and remote events in either a cemetery or museum, where they be properly curated. Each statue is a work of art, that represents hundreds of hours of effort on the part of some(Usually unknown or unrecognized) artist. To destroy such a monument is indistinguishable from what the Talaban do. Relocate them in the right place and provide some context for understanding what they meant, which often had less to do with the Civil War and far more to sending a social message.

That said, I am sick to death of Republiconfederates in general and the rewriting of history specifically, best summed up in the narrative of the so-called "lost cause." What Confederates did was treason, pure and simple. They got off easy because Lincoln and Grant. A Surly post Civil War presidency would have seen hundreds more hangings and the amputation of right hands... The Stars and Bars would today be as anathema as the Swastika is today in Germany.

Monuments in some southern towns like New Orleans commemorated white insurrections and assaults on what were integrated police departments. Many were elevated as a reinforcement for the establishment of Jim Crow. So those who argue "heritage not hate" can roll that into a tight tube and pound it up their asses.

Trump's behavior is leading directly to a schism in this country unlike any I have seen. It is rapidly becoming a case of "which side are you on?" But never think that this is about statues and monuments. It is about our government's betrayal of the promise made to emancipated blacks in 1863. We withdrew Federal troops from the occupied south in 1877 in return for a Republican Hayes presidency, confirming the elevation of the KKK and a 40 year reign of domestic terror.

With no troops to enforce the Fourteenth and Fifteen Amendments, Reconstruction was at an end. Across the South lynching, disenfranchisement, and segregationist laws proliferated. It would not be until after the Second World War and the 1960s Civil Rights Movement that Jim Crow segregation would be outlawed.

Blacks endured the dark days of sharecropping, debt peonage, disfranchisement, segregation, and lynching in the wake of the end of Reconstruction in 1877.  African Americans and their allies continued to struggle for a more complete freedom. Land ownership among former slaves continued to rise slowly in the most adverse circumstances and with the great black migrations to northern cities, blacks began to have other opportunities in industrial work. And BTW, anyon who says that there was less racism in the north than the south is full of shit. I was there.

7
History / Re: It’s Time To Blow Up Mount Rushmore
« Last post by Surly1 on Today at 02:13:30 PM »
Jefferson has a more damning record, according to the Left. He also owned slaves and is widely believed to have had a relationship with one of the women he kept as property. That relationship is considered by many liberals to have amounted to rape.

It's "widely believed" because it's a demonstrable fact. There is DNA evidence, not to mention a historical record. The relationship part, not the rape part. The relationship between Jefferson and Sally Hemmings was complicated, but it was clearly consensual, of long standing, and resulted in children whose descendants live today. Does that make Jefferson a racist? I doubt that Sally Hemmings thought so, and she was the one to whom such a thing would have mattered, not some BLM revisionist historian..

Many of the African-American Hemings line are quite proud of their ostensible Jefferson connection. Their reunions make the paper here from time to time. Their attitude towards the relationship is probably best summed up as a shrug.

There's been a lot of back and forth over the years as to whether it was Jefferson or his brother who left the pecker tracks. It doesn't matter. I actually agree with Eddie on this. In the time and place where TJ and Sally existed, slavery was a fact of life, as immutable as sunrise. It is really wrong to judge it through the lens of the present. We can no more easily summon their POV than they could imagine our own.

By some counts, she bore him six children. That speaks to a relationship of long standing, which by definition. had to be consensual. No one has a long term intimate relationship with another who hates their guts.
8
Environment / Re: The Oceans are Coming? BFD, I got other Worries.
« Last post by azozeo on Today at 12:59:02 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Kh5VRIgWuiM&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Kh5VRIgWuiM&fs=1</a>
9
Agelbert Newz / Re: GREAT posts from K-Dog, Surly and Eddie!
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 12:37:51 PM »
GREAT posts from K-Dog, Surly and Eddie!  


Yes, saying both sides are responsible for a murder was beyond stupid of him.


If I was within 500 miles of that Robert E. Lee statue that statue would be having a new coat of red paint.  Blood red.

Hint Hint Surly.  How far away are you?


Three hours. Locals are doing what they can.



K-Dog , glad to see you on the side of the angels here.   

Surly, thank you for tirelessly continuing to fight the good fight. Watch your back, bro.

XYT — Simplifying EVs   

August 13th, 2017 by The Beam

SNIPPET:

The global race to cater to the growing electric car market is intensifying every day. All of the major car manufacturers are now pushing in this direction, and Tesla is constantly making headlines for its relentless advancement and ambitions to popularise electric vehicles. And amongst all of this largesse, there are smaller, more niche manufacturers breaking through and trying to find their own space in the industry.

We recently reported on the new Sion prototype, the first car to make use of external solar panels to give the vehicle extra charging capability for increased range, and now we’re introducing the unique electric vehicles from French manufacturer XYT.

It’s first car is made of just 580 pieces.


Aside from simplicity, what separates these cars from other cars is their modular and customisable design. Instead of the one-size-fits-all type of offering delivered by other manufacturers, the XYT gives the option of customizing and changing the vehicle based on your needs and desires.

Full article with a video:

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/13/xyt-simplifying-evs/

I read a Consumer Reports review of the the new Volt last night. All electric, not a hybrid, 200-plus miles on a charge. The only negative is that you need a dedicated 240V charging station, and even then it takes 10 hours to fully charge from a fully discharged condition. There is some kind of rapid charge option. Not sure if that's something you can do at home, doubtful.

But the reviewers loved it, and the price is cheaper than the new Tesla, and performance is comparable, apparently.

My next car, most likely.


Eddie, good for you.    I wish I could get a fully electric vehicle too. 

That modular French EV looks a little like the "Thing" that VW made a long time ago.
The Volkswagen Type 181 is a two-wheel drive, four-door, convertible, manufactured and marketed by Volkswagen from 1968 to 1983. Originally developed for the West German Army, the Type 181 was also sold to the public, as the Kurierwagen in West Germany, the Trekker (RHD Type 182) in the United Kingdom, the Thing in the United States (1973–74), the Safari in Mexico and South America, and Pescaccia in Italy. Civilian sales ended after model year 1980.

Of course the Thing wasn't modular so the XYT is a much better, and also electric, GREEN Thing , so to speak.   

I posted this comment on the XYT EV thread. Everybody says that EV battery pack size (at current maximum energy densities available - which are being improved as we speak) is limited because the increase in battery pack weight reaches a point of diminishing returns for range increase. HOWEVER, most people do not realize that when people are carried in an EV, the protection of the battery pack ALSO increases the WEIGHT due to crash test requirements! So, I posted this comment:

I wonder when a range extender cart that just has a big battery pack in it on an ultralight frame (doesn't carry people so it would NOT need to pass any crash tests, a factor that now limits the size of the battery pack beyond the battery weight issue) will be invented.

 It would make sense, simply because most people don't drive more that 25 miles on any given day. The (e.g. 200 added miles) battery cart could be hitched to the vehicle for long trips. This would totally eliminate the "range extender" small internal combustion engine requirement for hybrids.

The battery cart trailer could be charged slowly at the home of a person from solar panels, simply because it would be rarely used.

In addition it would be available to provide emergency power to a home.

An extra battery pack, unlike an extra car engine or portable internal combustion powered generator, enhances the Renewable Energy storage options without increasing the maintenance costs. 

Thanks AG. I once had a VW Thing. I love those old rattletraps. It was a hoot to drive on the beach. I let the kids drive it down there when they were way underage. Some good memories for me, and I hope for them too. I have to wear out my current Volt before I'm ready for the new one. I only have 22K on it. LOL.
10

Continued from the previous post on Matthew 13:1-58


Parable no. 5 (v. 44), the hidden treasure found in the field, is a metaphor for the people in the world in whom Christ establishes His kingdom. In order to possess them, He gave His own life. He hides this treasure, God's redeemed saints, in the world until He redeems or purchases the whole world when He will come again to liberate not only the believer within the world but the world itself (Rom. 8:19-26; Rev. 21).



Parable no. 6 (vv, 45-46) is similar to the fifth parable, with the pearl symbolizing the sinner. The pearl at its heart is a grain of hard and lifeless sand, even as the sinner is dead in his sins and trespasses.

But when the sand comes in touch with the living organism, the oyster, the sand becomes transformed into a pearl. As a result of this contact, it becomes a thing of exquisite beauty and precious indeed.

Thus, the precious pearls in the world are the sinners who, because of having become absorbed into the Spiritual Body of Jesus Christ, have become His kingdom (Rev. 1:6). For this to be accomplished, Jesus Christ had to sacrifice His own life, but He arose from the dead to be forever the living organism in whom we dwell.

The hair splitters out there might argue that the oyster is simply responding to an irritant by covering that irritating particle with the same type of exquisite Calcium Carbonate (i.e. mother of pearl) that said oyster uses to build its own shell, as these bivalves are DNA programmed to do.

Quote
A pearl is created in the mantle of a mollusk when an irritant particle is surrounded by layers of nacre. Although most bivalves can create pearls, oysters in the family Pteriidae and freshwater mussels in the families Unionidae and Margaritiferidae are the main source of commercially available pearls because the calcareous concretions produced by most other species have no lustre. 

As a result of the oyster's biological immunological response, a pearl is formed. Also, the irritating particle is not necessarily a grain of sand, as oysters often simply push most grains of sand out of their shell.

True, the oyster is certainly not celebrating the presence of an irritant, but the point is that something of exquisite value is formed from something lacking value. 

Furthermore, the fact is that an irritating particle (most naturally-occuring pearls are formed around a tenacious parasite) is an appropriate metaphor for a sinner. The parasite's modus vivendi is an appropriate analogy for evil caused spiritual death, even more so than the lifeless grain of sand. As the parasite is encased, it dies and a beautiful pearl replaces it.

In addition, the shell that protects the pearl as it is being formed is an excellent analogy for Christ's protection while we grow spiritually. Also, the fact that pearls are only produced by oysters in unpolluted, pristine water is analogous to spiritual protection beyond the shell itself.

Finally, the oyster, because it suffers to produce that pearl, is an appropriate symbol of Christ's suffering to redeem us from evil. 

So, though all metaphors and analogies have their limits, the parables of the buried treasure and the pearl evidence the boundless love and compassion that Christ has for us in suffering for us and in caring for us while we grow spiritually (by hiding us to protect us from spiritual harm).   


Continued tomorrow:
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