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Frostbite Falls Newz / Re: 🔥 Frostbite Falls Fireside Chats
« Last post by Nearingsfault on Today at 05:27:51 PM »
I've been playing around lately with my own mixes. This one is 90 percent canola oil and 10 percent beeswax dregs. It's interesting how little it takes to solidify the mix. I assume this would work for a lip balm as well...
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Exept Trumpovetsky isn't "MAGAing".  He's rapidly flushing it down the toilet.  I don't think J6P is completely unaware of this.

The Demodopes have about a year to come up with a ticket and a platform to sell to voters idiots.  Time will tell to see what they come up with.  I don't think they will nominate Killary again, that is suicide.  We'll see.  Or at least you will since I'll likely be pushing up daisies in 2 years.

RE

“Stupid is as stupid does”. Would it have been smart to vote for Hillary? It’s a question of choices, and hard choices at that.
I'll ignore your daisies and tell you to pick a pocket full of posies.

That J6P would become aware goes against the idea that as things get crazy positive feedback will only make things more crazy.  In the absence of any clues on which to build, would not J6P simply get more and more irrational as he craves answers that nobody has?  Nature and the human mind abhor a vacuum.  Bullshit will fill a mind before it goes empty and people not used to ambiguity are very uncomfortable with it.

http://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/an-odor-of-perfidy/#comment-381165

Of course they will be fed bullshit, and of course they will eat it up.  But what FLAVOR of bullshit?  Chocolate or Vanilla?

RE

This is kinda fun.  Polling another website for posts to dissect.  Fun because I mean well, I intend no harm.  Tucsonspur makes the point 'Would it have been smart to vote for Hillary?  Good point, the choice indeed was not easy.  Tucsonspur also makes the point that 'the left' has nothing to offer middle America and agree with him.  'The left' went astray and forgot what they were all about.  Another interpretation is a bait and switch was done on what is referred to as 'the left', and only confused people want to drink the new substitute flavor of Kool-Aid.  I favor the latter explanation.

Quote
tucsonspur November 17, 2018 at 4:02 pm #

Trump’s rhetoric “cuts like a knife, but it feels alright”. People felt him, adored the anti-establishment tone and irreverent approach. Some of his rhetoric might be illogical, but maybe that didn’t matter when people realized that they were being force fed the illogic of political correctness and the rest of the Left’s unpalatable menu.

The strength of simple rhetoric is just that, simplicity-no egg head bullshit to perplex and deceive. The TWATs will ebb and flow.

The next comment after mine appears to have been sparked with my question but it diverged.  Then it was trolled.

Quote
JohnAZ November 17, 2018 at 3:22 pm #

Interesting exercise.

If things go on as they seem to be heading?

What will the USA look like?

From there JohnAZ made a list of worst case scenarios.  It was interesting to read but intellectually it is no more than a classic 'How I spent my Summer Vacation' essay in style.  Just a list of doom to support his introductory 'what it will look like' and nothing more, no cause and effect given or implied.

The answer to what flavor of bullshit they will choose, chocolate or vanilla, will be picked on what helps them out the most.  Trump promises bull and the Dems don't promise anything but a rainbow.  A rainbow that really does not mean anything to anybody and only pisses people off.  People will go for the bull.  It is a no-brainer and that's the point.  Without anything to compare it to people don't know it's bull.
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Exept Trumpovetsky isn't "MAGAing".  He's rapidly flushing it down the toilet.  I don't think J6P is completely unaware of this.

The Demodopes have about a year to come up with a ticket and a platform to sell to voters idiots.  Time will tell to see what they come up with.  I don't think they will nominate Killary again, that is suicide.  We'll see.  Or at least you will since I'll likely be pushing up daisies in 2 years.

RE

I'll ignore your daisies and tell you to pick a pocket full of posies.

That J6P would become aware goes against the idea that as things get crazy positive feedback will only make things more crazy.  In the absence of any clues on which to build, would not J6P simply get more and more irrational as he craves answers that nobody has?  Nature and the human mind abhor a vacuum.  Bullshit will fill a mind before it goes empty and people not used to ambiguity are very uncomfortable with it.

http://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/an-odor-of-perfidy/#comment-381165

Of course they will be fed bullshit, and of course they will eat it up.  But what FLAVOR of bullshit?  Chocolate or Vanilla?

RE
4
Exept Trumpovetsky isn't "MAGAing".  He's rapidly flushing it down the toilet.  I don't think J6P is completely unaware of this.

The Demodopes have about a year to come up with a ticket and a platform to sell to voters idiots.  Time will tell to see what they come up with.  I don't think they will nominate Killary again, that is suicide.  We'll see.  Or at least you will since I'll likely be pushing up daisies in 2 years.

RE

I'll ignore your daisies and tell you to pick a pocket full of posies.

That J6P would become aware goes against the idea that as things get crazy positive feedback will only make things more crazy.  In the absence of any clues on which to build, would not J6P simply get more and more irrational as he craves answers that nobody has?  Nature and the human mind abhor a vacuum.  Bullshit will fill a mind before it goes empty and people not used to ambiguity are very uncomfortable with it.

http://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/an-odor-of-perfidy/#comment-381165
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The Diner Pantry / 🥩 Doomstead Diner Lunch Special: 11/17/2018
« Last post by RE on Today at 11:33:42 AM »


MOAR really expensive Wagyu Beef here for lunch today at the Diner.  Even at half price, this shit will run your CC bill into the stratosphere.  I admit to once paying $500 for a Wagyu Steak dinner.  Not the best expenditure of money I ever made, although it was quite good.

RE

Today's Diner Lunch Special

Wagyu Beef 🐄 Carpaccio Appetizer

Wagyu Steak🥩 Sandwich
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Hello. I told you I wuz blue collar, and redneck too.

No....I'm not, but it isn't black and white. I am a self-employed service provider, the same as an electrician. I have a license, like an electrician. And like an electrician, if I'm injured (or if I have no work) my income stops completely.

I think what you need to understand is that many skilled tradesmen, maybe most of them, are self-employed. And truck drivers. That makes them pretty much the same as me, for tax purposes, basically. No deductions from a paycheck. You have to budget your own taxes.

"Blue collar" , in this instance, might be be construed to mean they are employees of  somebody, probably mostly large corporations.

Do you forget I was a self-employed truck driver?

The difference here is that trucking is not a government licensed criminal racket with limited membership.  Pretty much anybody can buy a truck and become an O-O without too many hoops to jump through.  You get your CDL (I did it in 2 weeks at Schneider in Green Bay, WI) and then you buy a tractor, cough up money for Insurance and register and you are now a Bona Fide Independent Trucker! As a result, you can't squeeze as much money out of your clients as a dentist can.  The market isn't artificially limited the way dentistry is.  But you can do OK with it, at least when the freight is moving anyhow.

"Blue Collar" vs "White Collar" is a Class distinction more than a monetary distinction.  A Plumber is considered "Blue Collar", but some plumbers make more money than even criminal dentists.  No mater how much money you make as a Plumber though, you never get the respect that a Dentist gets.  You're "low class" while dentists are "high class".  Buty not to me of course.  To me, Plumbers are generally OK decent people who don't destroy the teeth of their patients and cause them a lifetime of suffering.  Dentists on the other hand are Criminal Racketeers who abuse their patients and profit mightily from it.

RE
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History / Re: Civil War Litigation Thread
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 10:27:58 AM »


His Austin stable was awfully close to the saloons and whorehouses. Just sayin'.

I expect his wife probably knew this, and chose to overlook it.

Did you notice that although Lee surrendered in April, 1865, that it took the Union Army until August, 1866 to arrive?

I expect that was a fairly lawless year, and filled with all manner of starvation, theft, murder and what-not. And a time of much fear and wondering about what would happen when the Union troops did arrive. Smells like the stuff for a good novel. Wish I could type faster.
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IMHO. I always thought if you worked with your hands, you were blue collar.

By that definition, Eddie is Blue Collar.  ::)

RE

Hello. I told you I wuz blue collar, and redneck too.

No....I'm not, but it isn't black and white. I am a self-employed service provider, the same as an electrician. I have a license, like an electrician. And like an electrician, if I'm injured (or if I have no work) my income stops completely.

I think what you need to understand is that many skilled tradesmen, maybe most of them, are self-employed. And truck drivers. That makes them pretty much the same as me, for tax purposes, basically. No deductions from a paycheck. You have to budget your own taxes.

"Blue collar" , in this instance, might be be construed to mean they are employees of  somebody, probably mostly large corporations.
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History / Re: Civil War Litigation Thread
« Last post by Surly1 on Today at 10:15:41 AM »
The order may have been unpopular with his troops but was doubtless faithful to Lincoln's desired outcome for a "soft peace." And more important, enforced a needed discipline on an occupying force with little external restraint. Smells like the right thing to do. By some accounts, Custer was an exemplary officer, right up until he divided his command at the mouth of the Little Bighorn,
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History / Re: Civil War Litigation Thread
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 09:52:54 AM »
Just like everywhere else in the South, it was the movers and shakers who were the slave owners, and it was they who led the Trump Jefferson Davis voters into the war, by a bunch of shit-talking.

Some parts of Texas, including East Texas, had pockets of Union people. Even today, hidden on the lost byways, are little communities usually called something like "Union Chapel".

The real center of Big Cotton in Texas, which WAS the pre-war economy, and a large part of the Confederacy's GDP...was Hempstead. The railroad came there before the war, and it was in that really sweet belt of farmland west and north of Houston, and east of Austin......Brenham, Columbus, La Grange.

In the immediate time after the war, Custer was housed (and shmoozed by) the people who owned the biggest plantation there. As a result of his largesse, it still stands. They later moved to Austin, and Custer's wife loved my town.

Custer had his fuckin' hands full. I didn't really know about that part until I read this:

Gen Phil Sheridan sent Custer and a thousand or so volunteer troops to Texas in 1866 to help restore and maintain order, but Custer had his hands full maintaining order among his own troops. The conflict arose over Custer’s refusal to let the soldiers pillage and plunder the countryside to their heart’s content.

When they arrived at Hempstead in August of 1866, Custer issued orders that made it clear that “foraging” the land and its bounty would not be tolerated. Anyone found guilty of disobeying those orders would have his head shaved and receive 25 lashes of the whip. Once bloody and shorn soldiers started showing up in camp, the foraging stopped.

This measure, though successful, was also controversial. Custer was accused of violating the Reconstruction Laws that “no cruel or unjust punishment” be inflicted on “disturbers of the public peace and criminals.” Custer argued that the punishment was neither cruel nor unjust and, besides, it worked, which allowed him to follow his own orders in regard to protecting Texas planters and farmers from the troops.

The New York Times seemed to agree. “Gen’l Custer, knowing that the trial for desertion was a farce, tried every humane way to save his army from going to pieces, but failed,” a correspondent wrote. “He then tried a new way, and flogged several men and shaved their heads. This had the desired effect, but brought down the friends of these soldiers upon him, who charge him with being disloyal, inhuman, and everything that is bad. Now, I leave it to everyone if Custer didn’t do right.”

Custer’s peculiar disciplinary measures alienated many of his troops (and some authorities in Washington) but not the people who Texas, who would generally recall Custer fondly, mainly because he had protected them from those who would have preyed upon the land and the people who lived on it and from it.

The ban on foraging was particularly galling to the soldiers as they marched into Texas with a lot or orders and drills but few rations. Custer assured them that rations would be available at Hempstead, but that turned out to be not true. The troops spent two unhappy months there, and then marched to Austin. The Custers moved into the old Blind Asylum building on the outskirts of town, now restored and a part of the University of Texas campus.
For Custer’s wife, Libbie, who wrote about her experiences in Texas in her book “Tenting on the Plains,” the stay in Austin was an idyllic time, coming as it did between the Civil War and the Indian Wars on the Plains. They spent a lot of time horseback riding and at the race track. Custer liked a little place on Shoal Creek so much that he had a makeshift jail built there. “Armstrong was having the time of his life, even while performing the unpleasant and unrewarding task of taming Texas,” one biographer wrote. For her part, Libbie enjoyed the luxuries of a bathtub, furniture, a fireplace and a social life.   

It was nice while it lasted. He was mustered out of the volunteers in February of 1867, and would eventually take command of the Seventh Cavalry, where he would meet his fate and seal his name in the history books at Little Big Horn. The Texas legislature passed a resolution of condolence, noting that Custer had endeared himself to the people of Texas during his brief stay.




http://www.texasescapes.com/ClayCoppedge/Custer-in-Texas.htm
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