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1
The Kitchen Sink / Re: Trump and Alex Jones
« Last post by DoctorWhom on Today at 08:06:51 AM »
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So you can "see" it in the math?  Then you can write about it without Palloy's input.  

I have good mathematical intuition. It's just a consequence of numeracy. I used to be a math major. I wasn't that good at the program itself because the topics didn't inspire me, but I was good enough. I need Palloy for the formalization. I know how to ask the right questions. Otherwise, I'm getting back into math – just going to be a several-year slog before I can formally describe how it's not possible for substantial existential-risk-mitigating information to flow through the network of human brains. Without technology, the human species didn't stand much of a chance beyond being warring, tribal apes. And that's what we still are at the moment – pledge allegiance to a flag and all that suicide. And so that's what we'll be returning to minus the pomp and circumstance. Women in particular will not be happy with this arrangement, of course. All our social progress will disappear overnight.

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I'm not entirely sure talking about NTHE with numbers is all that helpful anyways.  I mean, we know the sun will eventually burn out.  Eventually humans are frozen toast...on a long enough timeline.  

Existence is nothing more than a question of how we want to die – not live. Do we want to die with most human beings in literal chains? Because we're seemingly headed back there faster than this civilization exploded in the first place.

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Collapse is mostly a cultural problem IMO.  In our case, it's an anti-cultural problem.  Somewhere between that and a human nature problem.  Our brightest were bright enough to engineer a society that is very physically easy, but emotionally and mentally torturous...even for the mass of stupid that composes most of our species.  Deep down we all know that our way of life is fucking up our human supporting biome.  We all know that we are living the life of fat cats while millions of people are starving and fleeing across the Mediterranean in rubber dingys by the thousands.  

It's purely an information problem, which does manifest as culture. Human beings have to be programmed and maintained certain ways to cooperate on a global scale. Technology is required for this – some kind of Hobbesian Leviathan. There is no alternative.

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Occasionally, in my darker moments, I think to myself that I like this life.  I have a mechanical aptitude.  I like working on machines, and I like operating them as well.  Maybe it's the power they release?  Maybe it's because my father was a truck driver and the smell of diesel reminds me of a time of fulfillment as a child?  Maybe my mechanical aptitude is just genetics?  Whatever the case, I really like engines and machines in general.  It's a visceral liking.  The fact that I'm good at fixing mechanical things just adds to it.  My point, I suppose, is that those things all require fossil fuels to perform their work.  Fossil fuels, and human nature, are responsible for the predicament our civilization is in.  In a way it's like I have a love affair with the enemy.
  
I know the feeling you describe. I get some ineffable pleasure just telling a computer how to add millions of numbers together. Fossil fuels put humanity in a place we were in no way evolved to deal with. Agriculture did this, really. It just facilitated parasite classes of people, in particular those who get fat off the entropy cost-externalized onto the planet. But much of “security”, police, healthcare, most beaucracy, and so forth is parasitism. Humans are parasitic on everything, most notably ourselves – feeding off our own created problems.

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The hemi that drives me around is a marvel of engineering IMO.  My 0-turn mower is the same.  It just cuts grass, but damn you couldn't engineer something to cut grass any better.  A chainsaw is a simply machine, but the work it does to a tree gives you Godlike power.  I suppose that's what machines do.  Deep down it's probably why I like them.  They make me feel powerful.  That's something in a world where the rules make you feel anything but.  I guess if you are rich that's what money does for you.  Makes you feel powerful.  

This idea of power is why I want to see the eclipse this summer. The energies of the Universe dwarf human endeavor by dozens of orders of magnitude. The moon and Sun together will create the perfect reminder – that we are nothing and will return to nothing. The lifespan of the Universe will mostly be spent in darkness on timescales the human mind can only fail to intuitively appreciate, with us nothing more than an infinitesimal speck at the beginning.

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In the end, none of that matters.  For me, it's just an attempt to be happy with my place in life.  There is little I can do to change it because I am not rich, and I will never be rich.  I can't change a damn thing about this society, and I have family to care for...in this society.  I'm just one more, of the billions that collectively make poor decisions with respect to the health of our human supporting biosphere.  Collectively we are destroying the planet.  Nobody forces me to drive a hemi and use small engines to make money.  The Matrix just forces me to make money.  

You are always changing society. We're talking. You're changing to me. I talk to others, and they change. All these factors add up. The Matrix forces me to be something I wish not to be as well. I feel guilty for the fact I'll get a new motorcycle after trashing my old one. I otherwise just rent a car when I need.

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I suppose collapse is happening due to money. 

“Money” is just a neurological embedding reflecting a complex of behaviors. It's treated like an external “thing”, but it can be nothing more than ideas that ultimately manifest in behavior. It's hard for me to explain this quickly. Collapse is happening because we're aggressive apes with a lot of resources. Evolution could not have designed us to naturally handle this situation with grace and large-scale collective intelligence. It's possible the neurological architecture required for the skills we'd identify with intelligence can only evolve in predator species, which would mean all evolved intelligent organisms have to deal with their intelligence architecture being driven by necessarily older brain architecture. That's quite an existence bottleneck to get through. It's something I think about when considering the Fermi Paradox.

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My point is that I, just like you, just like everyone else, are all contributing to collapse via our daily decisions to support BAU.  I fail to see how math is going to elucidate human nature and therefore shed any more light on the collapse of our civilization and our possible extinction.

Math is just a perspective or framework. We fail because we fail with the way information functions and flows in a network of billions of aggressive apes being manipulated by relatively small groups of parasitic people with no interest in our future. Math can explain how these people came to their “power”, which is to say how they came to slide the knife against the throat of our existence.
2
The Kitchen Sink / Re: Trump and Alex Jones
« Last post by Palloy2 on Today at 07:56:53 AM »
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Basically he has no filters.

That sums it up well. If it makes for a lurid headline, its in.  Trump and Jones are both snakeoil salesmen.
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The Kitchen Sink / Re: Trump and Alex Jones
« Last post by DoctorWhom on Today at 07:28:18 AM »
But it's hard to see isn't it? Not very many of us can do it. Knarf should be able to - ask him since it seems to be lacking in your skill set. Need the Buddhist to explain this to you?

Not hard to see at all, which is why I stood down on you right from the beginning.  I've been doing internet moderation since you were in grade school.  I knew what was coming down the pipe here, I had enough chats with you on Reddit to read it clearly enough then.

Far as the Buddhists here are concerned, I have my disputes with them but they are philosophical and not personality based.  I don't agree with Knarf on quite a few things, not the LEAST of which is his not applying for his SS Bennies! LOL.

My latest advice is for you to return to topics of collapse and stop trying to get in a fight with me.  If you continue to pursue this, I will start deleting the posts.  Capische?

RE

As long as you understand your role in these "fights". You saw me for months on reddit and you know challenging the human species is my thing, you know I'm an alcoholic, and you know I have BPD. You also know I'm apologetic and have respect for people as individuals.

Then you invite me here and ask me what my deal is with attacking the human species? After everything you saw on reddit? Well - the human species, as a whole, is suicidal because it doesn't manifest long-term collective intelligence. It's not possible for the human species to do this without technology. That means it's impossible to mitigate our most pertinent existential risks. And yes, I will "fight" anyone on these points. And if there's a collapse, people like John Michael Greer aren't going to be living happily in sustainable forest communities using 19th century tech for long. You'll eventually see the return of Genghis Khan. And people like me will be fighting in those armies. That's the future you insist upon.

Maybe I should become a big-data sociologist. I'm sure people like the Rothschilds would like me "on their side". Artificial Intelligence in the hands of people like me could make sure children come out of schools thinking what the "powers" that be want them to think. Indoctrination on steroids, psychologically tailored to each child in the consideration of a thousand variables and a personal database of life-history. Nothing more than a game of inputs and outputs. Of course I understand the intelligence bottleneck this entails and how it compromises the future of all life on Earth, but the Rothschild family doesn't care. Why should I bother continuing to care? Being a bad guy for once would be fun. Haven't you fantasized about it?
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I know that p.log(p) turns up in information entropy theory, thermodynamic entropy theory, and biological diversity theory. So I wouldn't be surprised if it turned up in network theory, but I don't think I could claim to know the tools of network theory.
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The Kitchen Sink / Re: Trump and Alex Jones
« Last post by luciddreams on Today at 07:06:45 AM »


But I'll tell you what - is Palloy2 or whatever his/her name actually is, good at math? Because I can use his mind to create a model for you. A model that shows just how screwed this species is. It's already in the math. I can "see" it. You think we're screwed? Let's prove it to you.



So you can "see" it in the math?  Then you can write about it without Palloy's input. 

I'm not entirely sure talking about NTHE with numbers is all that helpful anyways.  I mean, we know the sun will eventually burn out.  Eventually humans are frozen toast...on a long enough timeline. 

Collapse is mostly a cultural problem IMO.  In our case, it's an anti-cultural problem.  Somewhere between that and a human nature problem.  Our brightest were bright enough to engineer a society that is very physically easy, but emotionally and mentally torturous...even for the mass of stupid that composes most of our species.  Deep down we all know that our way of life is fucking up our human supporting biome.  We all know that we are living the life of fat cats while millions of people are starving and fleeing across the Mediterranean in rubber dingys by the thousands. 

Occasionally, in my darker moments, I think to myself that I like this life.  I have a mechanical aptitude.  I like working on machines, and I like operating them as well.  Maybe it's the power they release?  Maybe it's because my father was a truck driver and the smell of diesel reminds me of a time of fulfillment as a child?  Maybe my mechanical aptitude is just genetics?  Whatever the case, I really like engines and machines in general.  It's a visceral liking.  The fact that I'm good at fixing mechanical things just adds to it.  My point, I suppose, is that those things all require fossil fuels to perform their work.  Fossil fuels, and human nature, are responsible for the predicament our civilization is in.  In a way it's like I have a love affair with the enemy. 

The hemi that drives me around is a marvel of engineering IMO.  My 0-turn mower is the same.  It just cuts grass, but damn you couldn't engineer something to cut grass any better.  A chainsaw is a simply machine, but the work it does to a tree gives you Godlike power.  I suppose that's what machines do.  Deep down it's probably why I like them.  They make me feel powerful.  That's something in a world where the rules make you feel anything but.  I guess if you are rich that's what money does for you.  Makes you feel powerful. 

In the end, none of that matters.  For me, it's just an attempt to be happy with my place in life.  There is little I can do to change it because I am not rich, and I will never be rich.  I can't change a damn thing about this society, and I have family to care for...in this society.  I'm just one more, of the billions that collectively make poor decisions with respect to the health of our human supporting biosphere.  Collectively we are destroying the planet.  Nobody forces me to drive a hemi and use small engines to make money.  The Matrix just forces me to make money. 

I suppose collapse is happening due to money. 

My point is that I, just like you, just like everyone else, are all contributing to collapse via our daily decisions to support BAU.  I fail to see how math is going to elucidate human nature and therefore shed any more light on the collapse of our civilization and our possible extinction.   
6


Ice from three of the UK's biggest coffee chains has been found to contain bacteria from faeces, according to a BBC investigation.

I take my coffee extremely seriously and brew my own. That way I know whose shit I'm drinking.
Maybe this is what we get for $5/the cup coffee.
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Medicine & Health / Re: The Itchy & Scratchy Show
« Last post by Surly1 on Today at 06:06:16 AM »
I suppose anything is worth a try at this stage. Go down to a heated indoor pool and wade/swim as much as possible, its physiotherapy and chlorine might help the rash.. or make it worse.. I find sea water and leaving the salt on me helps itches and scratches in the past, but its gonna be too cold for that in Alaska.

Good advice. Failing parking your ass in an ocean, maybe a good soak in a warm salt water bath might help the symptoms. What do you have to lose?
An ocean soak a much easier consideration down here than up there.
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Medicine & Health / Re: The Itchy & Scratchy Show
« Last post by Uncle Bob on Today at 05:00:22 AM »
I suppose anything is worth a try at this stage. Go down to a heated indoor pool and wade/swim as much as possible, its physiotherapy and chlorine might help the rash.. or make it worse.. I find sea water and leaving the salt on me helps itches and scratches in the past, but its gonna be too cold for that in Alaska.
9
Knarfs Knewz / 'Vaccine' created for huge cyber-attack
« Last post by knarf on Today at 04:49:32 AM »
Security researchers have discovered a "vaccine" for the huge cyber-attack that hit organisations across the world on Tuesday.

The creation of a single file can stop the attack from infecting a machine.

However, researchers have not been able to find a so-called kill switch that would prevent the crippling ransomware from spreading to other vulnerable computers.

Experts are still unsure about the attack's origins or its real purpose.

Given that the ransom amount - $300 - was relatively small, some are speculating that the attack may be a front for causing wider disruption or making a political statement.

Among the victims of the attack were the Ukrainian central bank, Russian oil giant Rosneft, British advertising firm WPP and US law firm DLA Piper.

Also caught up in the attack was at least one hospital in the US city of Pittsburgh.
A perfc solution

But for those concerned about the attack there appears to be fix, albeit one with limited effectiveness.

By creating a read-only file - named perfc - and placing it within a computer's "C:\Windows" folder, the attack will be stopped in its tracks.

An explanation of how to do this has been posted by security news website Bleeping Computer and has been backed up by several other security experts.

However, while this method is effective, it only protects the individual computer the perfc file is placed on. Researchers have so far been unable to locate a kill switch that would disable the ransomware attack entirely.


Many reports suggest that screens around the world are getting this message showing the ransomware threat

"Even though it will make a machine 'immune'," explained computer scientist Prof Alan Woodward, "It is still a 'carrier' (to use the biological analogy).

"It will still act as a platform to spread the ransomware to other machines on the same network."

For the vast majority of users, simply running an up-to-date version of Windows will be sufficient to prevent the attack taking hold, were it to infect your PC.

The spread of this new ransomware is likely to be much slower than last month's WannaCry attack, researchers predict, as code analysis showed the new attack did not attempt to spread itself beyond the network it was placed on.

Because of this, several experts are predicting that the attack will not spread significantly further than it did on Tuesday, unless it is modified.

"There is low risk of new infections more than one hour after the attack," suggested the MalwareTech blog.
MeDoc fear

So how did it spread? Experts from Cisco's Talos intelligence unit said it believed the attack may have been carried out by exploiting vulnerable accounting software.

"We believe it is possible that some infections may be associated with software update systems for a Ukrainian tax accounting package called MeDoc," the company said in a blog post.

MeDoc initially posted an update to its website on Tuesday saying, in Russian, "Attention! Our server made a virus attack" - though this was later removed, and the company has since denied its software was exploited.

As reported on Tuesday, the method by which victims can pay the ransom fee has been rendered useless. An email address provided by the criminals has been shut down by the hosting provider, while the Bitcoin wallet - where ransoms are deposited - has not been touched.

At the time of writing, the wallet contains approximately $8,000-worth of Bitcoin, not a large return for such a significant and widespread attack.

These factors contribute to a now-prevailing theory that this was a politically motivated attack on Ukraine, coming as it did just as the country is set to celebrate its Constitution Day.

"This looks like a sophisticated attack aimed at generating chaos, not money," said Prof Woodward.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-40427907
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Venezuela's Supreme Court has been attacked by grenades dropped from a helicopter in what President Nicolás Maduro called a "terrorist attack".

Footage on social media shows a police helicopter circling over the city before shots and a loud bang are heard.

The police officer said to have piloted the stolen aircraft issued a statement denouncing the "criminal government". His whereabouts are unknown.

It comes after mass protests against the political and economic crisis.

The Supreme Court is regularly criticised by the Venezuelan opposition for its rulings which bolster Mr Maduro's hold on power.
What happened?

In an address from the presidential palace, President Maduro said the helicopter had flown over the Supreme Court and also the justice and interior ministries.

Officials quoted by Reuters news agency said four grenades were dropped on the court and 15 shots had been fired at the interior ministry.

No injuries were reported but Mr Maduro said "a social event" had been taking place at the Supreme Court and the attack could have caused "dozens of deaths". One of the grenades failed to detonate, he added.

Mr Maduro has placed the military on alert.

"I have activated the entire armed forces to defend the peace," he said. "Sooner or later, we are going to capture that helicopter and those who carried out this terror attack."
Who flew the helicopter?

The police officer identified himself as Oscar Pérez in video statements posted on the social media platform Instagram.

Appearing in military fatigues and flanked by armed, masked men in uniform, he appealed to Venezuelans to oppose "tyranny".

"We are a coalition of military employees, policemen and civilians who are looking for balance and are against this criminal government," he said.

"We don't belong to any political tendency or party. We are nationalists, patriots and institutionalists."

He said the "fight" was not against the security forces but "against the impunity of this government. It is against tyranny".

It is not clear how much support, if any, the officer has.

Mr Maduro said the pilot had worked for former Interior and Justice Minister Miguel Rodriguez Torres, but was no longer with him.

Analysis: Will Grant, BBC News, in Mexico

It is generally an exercise in futility trying to predict if some new twist in Venezuela's long-running crisis is a "turning point" for the country.

There have been scores of seemingly decisive moments over the past few months - from the initial decision to strong-arm the national assembly, to the latest death of a teenage protester in Caracas - that quickly faded into the general malaise afflicting the oil-rich nation.

However, the sight of an apparently disaffected member of the security forces dropping grenades on the Supreme Court and allegedly firing on government buildings is extreme, even by Venezuela's standards.

Whether "Oscar Pérez" is indeed part of a coalition of like-minded "military employees, policemen and civilians" or just a rogue policeman is hard to say.

Certainly President Maduro was quick to dub the incident "a terrorist attack" and used it as a reason to "activate" the armed forces to keep the peace.

However, earlier in the day he, too, had thrown down the gauntlet to his opponents. "If the Bolivarian Revolution was at risk," he said, "what we couldn't do with votes, we would do with arms." The opposition in Venezuela took that as an overt threat.

This helicopter incident may also pass quickly, or it may be more serious. Certainly though, the security situation in Venezuela could hardly be worse ahead of a highly controversial election next month over the government's plan to create a new constituent assembly.

Why now?

There have been almost daily anti-government protests in Venezuela for over two months as the country's economic and political crisis worsens.

Those opposed to the government say they are determined to keep protests going until fresh elections are called and the government is ousted.

More than 70 people have been killed in protest-related violence since 1 April, according to the chief prosecutor's office.
Could this have been a coup attempt?

Although President Maduro called the incident an attack by "terrorists" seeking a coup it is not clear how much support, if any, the police officer has.

Earlier on Tuesday, Mr Maduro reiterated his allegations that the US was supporting coup attempts against his government and warned President Donald Trump that Venezuela would resist such a move.

On Monday, he announced that five people had been arrested, accused of plotting against him and preparing for a US invasion.

However, Venezuela certainly has a history of coup attempts:

    In 1992, the late Hugo Chávez tried to overthrow the government of President Carlos Andres Pérez. The attempt failed and Chávez was arrested and imprisoned. He would eventually be elected president in 1998
    In 2002, Chávez himself survived an attempted coup by rebel military officers

    Months later, security officials foiled another attempt by leading political and military opposition figures

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-40426642
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