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1
Economics / Re: The Death Rattle of Social Security
« Last post by RE on Today at 02:46:13 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Doors_of_Perception#Synopsis

Quote
After a brief overview of research into mescaline, Huxley recounts that he was given 4/10 of a gram at 11:00 am one day in May 1953. Huxley writes that he hoped to gain insight into extraordinary states of mind and expected to see brightly coloured visionary landscapes. When he only sees lights and shapes, he puts this down to being a bad visualiser; however, he experiences a great change in his perception of the external world.

By 12:30 pm, a vase of flowers becomes the "miracle, moment by moment, of naked existence". The experience, he asserts, is neither agreeable nor disagreeable, but simply "is". He likens it to Meister Eckhart's "istigheit" or "is-ness", and Plato's "Being" but not separated from "Becoming". He feels he understands the Hindu concept of Satchitananda, as well as the Zen koan that, "the dharma body of the Buddha is in the hedge" and Buddhist suchness. In this state, Huxley explains he didn't have an "I", but instead a "not-I". Meaning and existence, pattern and colour become more significant than spatial relationships and time. Duration is replaced by a perpetual present.[38]

Reflecting on the experience afterwards, Huxley finds himself in agreement with philosopher C. D. Broad that to enable us to live, the brain and nervous system eliminate unessential information from the totality of the Mind at Large.

The Milkmaid by Johannes Vermeer. "That mysterious artist was truly gifted with the vision that perceives the Dharma-Body as the hedge at the bottom of the garden", reflected Huxley.

In summary, Huxley writes that the ability to think straight is not reduced while under the influence of mescaline, visual impressions are intensified, and the human experimenter will see no reason for action because the experience is so fascinating.

Temporarily leaving the chronological flow, he mentions that four or five hours into the experience he was taken to the World's Biggest Drug Store (WBDS), where he was presented with books on art. In one book, the dress in Botticelli's Judith provokes a reflection on drapery as a major artistic theme as it allows painters to include the abstract in representational art, to create mood, and also to represent the mystery of pure being.[41] Huxley feels that human affairs are somewhat irrelevant whilst on mescaline and attempts to shed light on this by reflecting on paintings featuring people.  Cézanne's Self-portrait with a straw hat seems incredibly pretentious, while Vermeer's human still lifes (also, the Le Nain brothers and Vuillard) are the nearest to reflecting this not-self state.

For Huxley, the reconciliation of these cleansed perceptions with humanity reflects the age old debate between active and contemplative life, known as the way of Martha and the way of Mary. As Huxley believes that contemplation should also include action and charity, he concludes that the experience represents contemplation at its height, but not its fullness. Correct behaviour and alertness are needed. Nonetheless, Huxley maintains that even quietistic contemplation has an ethical value, because it is concerned with negative virtues and acts to channel the transcendent into the world.

The Red Hot Poker flowers in Huxley's garden were "so passionately alive that they seemed to be standing on the very brink of utterance".

After listening to Mozart's C-Minor Piano Concerto, Gesualdo's madrigals and Alban Berg's Lyric Suite, Huxley heads into the garden. Outside, the garden chairs take on such an immense intensity that he fears being overwhelmed; this gives him an insight into madness. He reflects that spiritual literature, including the works of Jakob Böhme, William Law and the Tibetan Book of the Dead, talk of these pains and terrors. Huxley speculates that schizophrenia is the inability to escape from this reality into the world of common sense and thus help would be essential.

After lunch and the drive to the WBDS he returns home and to his ordinary state of mind. His final insight is taken from Buddhist scripture: that within sameness there is difference, although that difference is not different from sameness.

The book finishes with Huxley's final reflections on the meaning of his experience. Firstly, the urge to transcend one's self is universal through times and cultures (and was characterised by H. G. Wells as The Door in the Wall).  He reasons that better, healthier "doors" are needed than alcohol and tobacco. Mescaline has the advantage of not provoking violence in takers, but its effects last an inconveniently long time and some users can have negative reactions. Ideally, self-transcendence would be found in religion, but Huxley feels that it is unlikely that this will ever happen. Christianity and mescaline seem well-suited for each other; the Native American Church for instance uses the drug as a sacrament, where its use combines religious feeling with decorum.

Huxley concludes that mescaline is not enlightenment or the Beatific vision, but a "gratuitous grace" (a term taken from Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologica).  It is not necessary but helpful, especially so for the intellectual, who can become the victim of words and symbols. Although systematic reasoning is important, direct perception has intrinsic value too. Finally, Huxley maintains that the person who has this experience will be transformed for the better.

I rest my case...however, I know my case cannot possible be rested with you...RE.  However, this makes a pretty good point.

It is rested.  I have no illusions I could possibly convince any diners of my philosophy on this topic. lol.

RE
2
Knarfs Knewz / Ohio government websites hacked with pro-ISIS propaganda
« Last post by knarf on Today at 02:39:37 PM »
Several Ohio government websites were hacked with pro-ISIS messages Sunday morning.

Affected sites include:

    Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections
    Casino Control
    Ohio First Lady
    Office of Workforce Transformation
    Office of Health Transformation
    Inspector General
    Ohio governor
    Medicaid

The sites' homepages were replaced with the same black background accompanied by music. By 1 p.m., all of the affected sites appeared to no longer be online.

The top of the pages read, "Hacked By Team System DZ."

Below that, the sites said, "Anti: Govt all word. You will be held accountable Trump, you and all your people for every drop of blood flowing in Muslim countries."

Toward the bottom, the sites said, "I Love Islamic state." The Team System Dz Facebook page was also included.

A spokesperson for the governor's office issued the following statement Sunday afternoon:

"As soon as we were notified of the situation we immediately began to correct it and will continue to monitor until fully resolved."

A spokesperson for the Ohio Department of Administrative Services provided the following statement:

“State of Ohio IT staff are working to restore the computer systems that were impacted today.  All affected servers have been taken off line and we are investigating how these hackers were able to deface these websites. We also are working with law enforcement to better understand what happened.”

USA Today reports that Team System DZ is described as a group of "anti-Israeli Arab teenagers," according to Zone-H.

According to VICE, Team System DZ has hacked numerous random websites, including the University of New Brunswick's student union site and a Canadian food truck's sandwich site. The Daily Mail reports the group hacked an English rugby team's site.

Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel posted the following in response to the site hacks:


OH Dept of Corrections website right now, this is what you see. Wake up freedom-loving Americans. Radical Islam infiltrating the heartland.

http://www.wkyc.com/news/local/ohio/ohio-department-of-rehabilitation-and-correction-website-hacked-with-pro-isis-propaganda/451939312
3
Doomsteading / RE Gets a Stealth Van!: A visit with the old Bugout Machine
« Last post by RE on Today at 02:35:38 PM »
My upstairs neighbor the Native UE Carpenter helped me get the seat out of the van, so now I don't have to go over to the Dealership to get this figured out/done.  I had the latching mechanism right, I just didn't have the muscle power to pull it out.  It took Eddie (the Native guy, not our Eddie) about 30 seconds, then he carried it and dropped it in my digs for another 30 seconds of work.  I paid him in Barter.  He doesn't drink beer so I gave him a couple of frozen T-Bone Steaks.  :icon_sunny:

With that area now cleared out for storage of Preps and to make a comfortable Office area to work and administer the Diner while on the road, I can now get SaVannah fully Road Ready for this Summer's Adventures here on the Last Great Frontier.  She won't be accompanying me (or carrying me really) down to the Lower 48 for the Total Eclipse of the SUN☼ this year, but next year she will get to tour the crappy part of the FSoA with me, assuming SHTF Day doesn't come between now and then.  For this trip, I am just renting a Dodge Grand Caravan.

Getting SaVannah fully ready though is a pretty big job overall, and I'm not even talking getting the Solar Panels installed or getting a new Heavy Duty Tow Package to pull a big trailer.  Just getting all the right Preps selected and stowed efficiently so I can get to them as needed and also still be able to have good room for sleeping is quite a challenge!  I go out every day to my carport and experiment with different ideas to do things creatively (and as CHEAP as I can!).  For instance, I would like an Awning over the main Side Door entrance when parked at a campsite.  You can get some really nice ones that deploy electrically, and I might go for one of those at some point but they are rather expensive.  Besides that, since they are attached on the outside they do more to ruin the Stealth aspect of the "stock" look than even the solar panels do.  Being on the roof which is raised and laying flat unless angled up  for deployment at a campsite, you really could not see the PV panels from street level, you would need to be about 7'6" to do that.  From the street, it should look more or less like a normal roof rack unless deployed and angled up.

So I have been experimenting with just using a cheap Tarp I picked up at 3 Bears and how to get it attached quickly and easily, and in such a way it will withstand at least a mild breeze without blowing off into the woods.  I'm trying to do this without making any permanent modifications to the exterior, such as installing permanent attachment points.  Overall, I am making the effort keep SaVannah as "stock" as possible both inside and outside.  I'm sure I will have to compromise on this eventually, but so far I have figured out some means of doing everything I want so far without drilling any new holes into SaVannah.

In terms of drilling holes, this finally gave me an excuse to Unbox one of my prep sets purchased a few years ago, a 7 tool set of 18V "ONE+" tools from Ryobi purchased at Home Depot ON SALE.  Drill, Circular Saw, Reciprocating Saw. Light and 2 Batts and the Charger.  I got all that for under $200!  Just the batts alone cost $60 for  a set of two Ni-Cads, and Li-I for 2 is $100.  Ryobi isn't quite as high quality as Dewalt or Mikita, but it's a huge step up over Black & Decker.  For some of the stuff I am doing I will need a jig saw also, so I'll probably hit Home Depot sometime next week for one of those.  $50 when I priced it online.   For right now though I have so far been able to get away with using an Electric Turkey Carving Knife for jig type work, since I am using mostly cardboard and foam insulation, and the electric knife is pretty good with cutting those as long as they don't get too thick.  I learned this trick while installing Ethafoam on Gymnastics Spring Floors.  :icon_sunny:

Besides the construction though is the actual STUFF to stuff into the van (sic).  For this, I already HAVE every prep known to mobile man, and a few of them actually made it all the way up here from my OTR years, like my Immersion Heater (great for warming up soup or coffee prior to arguing with a lumper on how much he will charge to unload the box) and my portable Walkie-Talkie style CB Radio (good for being able to get out of the truck and not have to sit by your CB to get you dock call, which if you miss you are probably fucked for another 24 hours.  Nowadays, maybe they use smart phones and text messages for this).

Most of the shit however has been purchased up here in the years since 2008 getting ready for SHTF Day.  Quite a bit of the stuff sits in Tioga, my old Bugout Machine in it's Storage Unit spot where it hasn't moved from in roughly 2 years.  Both batteries are doornail dead and one of the tires on the rear duallies is a bit flat.  Otherwise, I think it still works, but I haven't had a reason to get it working.  It just costs too much gas to drive that mother fucker anywhere.  If it ever gets driven again, it will make one trip out into the Bush and that's where it will remain, along with my frozen body when my Preps run out.

For more current active traveling around, SaVannah is much better of course, though obviously nowhere NEAR so spacious and comfortable inside as Tioga.  Neither is it possible to store anywhere near as many Preps in SaVannah.  So there has to be triage on this, as to what I just really need or want to have with me, on what should generally be no more than a month between resupply trips.  One has to remember Stealth Van living will only last as long as BAU does, AKA the ability to buy affordable gas at the pump.  Once that is gone, SaVannah is parked wherever the last tank of gas and jerry cans ran out, and as permanent living quarters stuck in the middle of nowhere go that is pretty Spartan, although better than a tent.

Anyhow, in terms of getting SaVannah ready, I needed to go over to the storage facility a couple of miles down the road where Tioga resides and pull some of the preps from her and transfer them to SaVannah.  We now have a dual heating system installed, both electric if I have a plug in and kerosene if I don't.  Emergency backup, I can always flip on the engine and use the van heat itself.  Now have 4 forms of cooking available, charcoal in a lovely cast iron Hibachi, propane stove, electric hot plate and Toaster Oven and in a real pinch I can heat stuff up over one of the kerosene lamps.  Also of course the 12V DC immersion heater.  Van cooling while parked has been solved with a 12V DC Bilge Blower along with a 12V 12" diameter exhaust fan for the front passenger window and anohter 8" circuating fan for the interior.  I don't see a need for a portable A/C unit at the moment.

Electrics are gradually coming together, I'm still deciding on how to install my various inverters and whether to run a dedicated line from the starter batt to the inverters inside the cabin, or run an AC line from the engine compartment into the cabin when parked.  I haven't dropped in my Deep Cycle Marine Batt yet, but I know where it will go, under the rear bench seat that converts to a bed.  For Water, I have a 5 Gallon jerry can with a spout valve that will go in the rear, accessible from the rear doors.

Other hardware on the list includes two coolers, folding table and chair, and 9' Beach Umbrella for shade and rain protection over a campsite Picnic table.  I may go for a partable Gazebo/Screen House if I have enough room.  Vaccumm sealed Rice, Dried Beans, Teriyaki Beef Jerky and Vitamins good for around 2 months is going in the overhead compartments.

For clothing and other essentials, I have Sterilite Drawer containers, though I think 2 and maybe 3 are the most I can fit.  Then my stools to be able to get my crippled ass in and out of the van.  I'm hoping to have the whole thing together by the end of next week.

Assuming I do finish the job next week, after July 4th (when I want to go do the Parade in Wasilla on the Ewz), I will head on down the road to the Kenai Peninsula for the Dip Netting Adventure, and then do some further Adventures here in Alaska until the hearing date of Aug 16th.

So far, everything but my health is holding up OK on this plan.  I'll update when I am closer to being finished with Van Modifications and supplies are all in place.

RE
4

Wind turbines at Avangrid Renewables’ Baffin Wind Power Project.

In a windsurfers’ paradise, turbines capture gusts that pick up at exactly the right time - or the wrong time, if you're trying to sell natural gas.

As attractive a renewable-energy concept as wind power is, it’s plagued by a fundamental flaw. It blows the most in the dead of night, precisely when there’s the least demand for electricity. That’s true for just about every wind-blown spot across the U.S., from the foothills of the Tehachapi Mountains in California to the coastal plains of North Carolina.

And then there’s South Texas.

It is to wind, engineers have discovered in recent years, a bit like what Napa Valley is to wine and Georgia is to peaches. For not only does the state’s Gulf Coast generate strong evening gusts, but it also blows fiercely in the middle of the day, just as electricity consumption is peaking.

It’s the result of something called convection currents—a phenomenon caused by the gap between the temperature on the water and land—and it’s allowing wind farms owned by Apex Clean Energy Inc. and Avangrid Inc. to tap into the midday spike in electricity prices that comes as air conditioners start to hum.



In the cut-throat Texas energy market, the construction of these coastal wind turbines—some 900 in all—has had a profound impact. It’s been terrific for consumers, helping further drive down electricity bills, but horrible for natural gas-fired generators. They had ramped up capacity in recent years anticipating that midday price surge would mostly be theirs, not something to share with renewable energy companies. Without that steady cash influx, the business model doesn’t really work, the profits aren’t there and companies including Calpine Corp., NRG Energy Inc. and Exelon Corp. are now either postponing new gas-fired plants or ditching them all together.

Wind power “is a disruptive technology and it’s increasing,” said Paul Patterson, a utility analyst at Glenrock Associates LLC in New York. “That’s a problem for other resources that are competing in that market.”

And it’s not just the coastal turbines that are cutting into gas-fired plants’ business. When inland farms are included, wind power now supplies about a fifth of Texas’s electricity market. Solar power is also growing in the state. All of this helped push the average on-peak price set by Ercot—the grid operator that controls most of the Texas market—down 55 percent the past five years to $25.34 per megawatt hour, according to data compiled by Genscape Inc.

Clean energy is also grabbing a bigger piece of the market nationwide: By 2040, renewable resources such as wind and solar power will supply just as much of America’s electricity demand as gas, according to a Bloomberg New Energy Finance outlook. Globally, the cost of renewable power is dropping so quickly that gas will never become the dominant fuel, the report showed.

Many of the Gulf Coast turbines are clustered amid cattle ranches in a spot not far from Padre Island, a 130-mile-long barrier reef famous for its white-sand beaches, water parks, sea turtle-watching and windsurfing.

It is that last pastime that served as something of an indicator to turbine operators that the wind power here was going to be a bit different. Randy Rhodes, the manager of Worldwinds Windsurfing Inc., said he’s traveled all over the U.S., Mexico and the Caribbean searching for killer winds and “the Gulf Coast is the best.” He knows all about convection currents, or thermal winds as he refers to them, and can lecture at length about the topic.

“When the land heats up during the day, the difference in temperature sucks the colder air from the Gulf to the land, and that’s when we get the stronger wind,” Rhodes said. “We’ll get a bump in the afternoon of another five miles per hour or so because of that thermal.”

It’s not that there isn’t a gap in land and sea temperatures elsewhere in the U.S. but it’s just typically not as pronounced as it is Texas. “If you’re up in the northeast, even though it gets pretty hot in the summer, you still don’t have the delta between the temperature variances as great as you have along the Texas gulf coast,” said Jeff Ferguson, senior vice president of development at Apex, which has five turbine projects in the area. “It’s just a perfect place to develop a wind resource.”

Wind gusts can reach higher maximum speeds elsewhere in the country, but again, those tend to come at night, when they’re less valuable (storing renewable electricity for later use remains a costly endeavor).

If there’s one bit of good news for the beleaguered Texas gas-fired plant operators, it’s that there aren’t a lot of new coastal wind projects in the works. That’s because the market is so oversupplied that it’s even difficult for the wind guys to make money at these electricity rates. And besides, it’s hard to acquire land by the water at reasonable prices.

“It’s pretty slim pickings right now,” Ferguson said. “God is not manufacturing more coastal property.”

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-06-20/texas-is-too-windy-and-sunny-for-old-energy-companies-to-make-money
5
Economics / Re: The Death Rattle of Social Security
« Last post by luciddreams on Today at 02:30:19 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Doors_of_Perception#Synopsis

Quote
After a brief overview of research into mescaline, Huxley recounts that he was given 4/10 of a gram at 11:00 am one day in May 1953. Huxley writes that he hoped to gain insight into extraordinary states of mind and expected to see brightly coloured visionary landscapes. When he only sees lights and shapes, he puts this down to being a bad visualiser; however, he experiences a great change in his perception of the external world.

By 12:30 pm, a vase of flowers becomes the "miracle, moment by moment, of naked existence". The experience, he asserts, is neither agreeable nor disagreeable, but simply "is". He likens it to Meister Eckhart's "istigheit" or "is-ness", and Plato's "Being" but not separated from "Becoming". He feels he understands the Hindu concept of Satchitananda, as well as the Zen koan that, "the dharma body of the Buddha is in the hedge" and Buddhist suchness. In this state, Huxley explains he didn't have an "I", but instead a "not-I". Meaning and existence, pattern and colour become more significant than spatial relationships and time. Duration is replaced by a perpetual present.[38]

Reflecting on the experience afterwards, Huxley finds himself in agreement with philosopher C. D. Broad that to enable us to live, the brain and nervous system eliminate unessential information from the totality of the Mind at Large.

The Milkmaid by Johannes Vermeer. "That mysterious artist was truly gifted with the vision that perceives the Dharma-Body as the hedge at the bottom of the garden", reflected Huxley.

In summary, Huxley writes that the ability to think straight is not reduced while under the influence of mescaline, visual impressions are intensified, and the human experimenter will see no reason for action because the experience is so fascinating.

Temporarily leaving the chronological flow, he mentions that four or five hours into the experience he was taken to the World's Biggest Drug Store (WBDS), where he was presented with books on art. In one book, the dress in Botticelli's Judith provokes a reflection on drapery as a major artistic theme as it allows painters to include the abstract in representational art, to create mood, and also to represent the mystery of pure being.[41] Huxley feels that human affairs are somewhat irrelevant whilst on mescaline and attempts to shed light on this by reflecting on paintings featuring people.  Cézanne's Self-portrait with a straw hat seems incredibly pretentious, while Vermeer's human still lifes (also, the Le Nain brothers and Vuillard) are the nearest to reflecting this not-self state.

For Huxley, the reconciliation of these cleansed perceptions with humanity reflects the age old debate between active and contemplative life, known as the way of Martha and the way of Mary. As Huxley believes that contemplation should also include action and charity, he concludes that the experience represents contemplation at its height, but not its fullness. Correct behaviour and alertness are needed. Nonetheless, Huxley maintains that even quietistic contemplation has an ethical value, because it is concerned with negative virtues and acts to channel the transcendent into the world.

The Red Hot Poker flowers in Huxley's garden were "so passionately alive that they seemed to be standing on the very brink of utterance".

After listening to Mozart's C-Minor Piano Concerto, Gesualdo's madrigals and Alban Berg's Lyric Suite, Huxley heads into the garden. Outside, the garden chairs take on such an immense intensity that he fears being overwhelmed; this gives him an insight into madness. He reflects that spiritual literature, including the works of Jakob Böhme, William Law and the Tibetan Book of the Dead, talk of these pains and terrors. Huxley speculates that schizophrenia is the inability to escape from this reality into the world of common sense and thus help would be essential.

After lunch and the drive to the WBDS he returns home and to his ordinary state of mind. His final insight is taken from Buddhist scripture: that within sameness there is difference, although that difference is not different from sameness.

The book finishes with Huxley's final reflections on the meaning of his experience. Firstly, the urge to transcend one's self is universal through times and cultures (and was characterised by H. G. Wells as The Door in the Wall).  He reasons that better, healthier "doors" are needed than alcohol and tobacco. Mescaline has the advantage of not provoking violence in takers, but its effects last an inconveniently long time and some users can have negative reactions. Ideally, self-transcendence would be found in religion, but Huxley feels that it is unlikely that this will ever happen. Christianity and mescaline seem well-suited for each other; the Native American Church for instance uses the drug as a sacrament, where its use combines religious feeling with decorum.

Huxley concludes that mescaline is not enlightenment or the Beatific vision, but a "gratuitous grace" (a term taken from Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologica).  It is not necessary but helpful, especially so for the intellectual, who can become the victim of words and symbols. Although systematic reasoning is important, direct perception has intrinsic value too. Finally, Huxley maintains that the person who has this experience will be transformed for the better.

I rest my case...however, I know my case cannot possible be rested with you...RE.  However, this makes a pretty good point. 
6
NASA is “on the verge” of announcing the discovery of alien life, according to a new video by hacking group Anonymous.

NASA is “on the verge” of announcing the discovery of alien life, according to the latest video from hacktivist group Anonymous.

The hackers published a YouTube clip overnight which claims a NASA scientist made the announcement at the last meeting of the US Science, Space and Technology committee.

It comes after NASA’s Kepler space observatory discovered 219 “potential new worlds” in other solar systems.

TWO VIDEOS

It can spot tiny drops in a distant star’s brightness when a planet crosses in front of it, called a transit.

The latest groundbreaking discoveries were among 2335 planets beyond our solar system that have been verified after being found by Kepler.

Of these, only 30 planets have been found to be earth-like planets potentially able to host life.

“This carefully-measured catalogue is the foundation for directly answering one of astronomy’s most compelling questions — how many planets like our Earth are in the galaxy?” said Susan Thompson, Kepler research scientist.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/space/hacking-group-anonymous-claims-nasa-is-about-to-announce-evidence-of-alien-life/news-story/e4b56dc2f3b4cb7e20beb728cd360e9e
7
Economics / Re: The Death Rattle of Social Security
« Last post by luciddreams on Today at 02:18:56 PM »


Because it's NOT part of a Spiritual Practice for you.  That doesn't mean it's not part of a Spiritual Practice for me.  You and I are two different people, and we don't perceive the world in the same way.  You do what is right for you, I do what is right for me.  Dont judge me based on your view of the world.

RE

Well, I can only form an opinion based on "my view of the world."  We all have opinions.  I'm not sitting in judgement of you.  I'm just expressing my opinion based on the knowledge I have gained with respect to what constitutes a spiritual practice. 

It's not fair to say that I'm "judging" you for expressing my opinion. 

It's also ludicrous to mount an argument that smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol amounts to spiritual practice.  It doesn't.  I suppose if we're to embrace "sheilaism" as an acceptable spirituality then shooting up heroine could be argued to be spiritual.  I'm sure you can find some obscure Chinese spirituality that features opium as a regular part of the daily ritual.  Opium...heroine...what's the difference besides concentration and route of transmission? 

If you want to go on thinking that you are spiritual with industrial produced nicotine and hard liquor then by all means...enjoy! 

I'm not trying to demean your outlook.  I'm not judging you.  I'm not saying you are somehow less then Knarf (or me for that matter).  I'm just saying that consumer drugs do not make a serious spirituality.

Now if you want to talk about hallucinogenic substances as spirituality...I'll be a bit more in agreement.  The Doors Of Perception , released by Aldous Huxley, pretty much argues that spirituality got it's start from psychotropic mushrooms.  At least I think it was that book :icon_scratch:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Doors_of_Perception

At any rate, I've read a book that contended that the mystic Hindu's got their epiphanies from tripping. 
8
Economics / Re: The Death Rattle of Social Security
« Last post by RE on Today at 01:56:13 PM »
The Natives didn't smoke packs of industrially produced, monocultured, chemical laden, cancer sticks RE.  They passed around a peace pipe with a bit of homegrown tobacco in it. 

Far as the alcohol goes...the Christians getting drunk on Vino aren't practicing any type of spirituality.  That's why most churches use grape juice instead of wine.  Alcohol is considered bad...mmmkay! 

It's all about context really. 

Drinking alcohol to excess is certainly part of the ancient pagan spirituality.  But even then it was just for festivals celebrating the likes of Dionysis...the God of Wine.  It wasn't a daily ritual.  At least not spiritually. 

However, I won't argue with you on this, as it's obvious that drinking alcohol and smoking cancerettes is no spiritual practice.

It's not obvious to me.  This is just your opinion.

RE

yeah, mine, and just about every spiritual leader from just about every spiritual tradition on the planet.

Arguing something is true just because a lot of "leaders" believe it's true doesn't make it true.  Just look at what all the "leaders" say about growth for instance.

I drink alcohol to excess often.  I'd never claim that was part of a spiritual practice.

Because it's NOT part of a Spiritual Practice for you.  That doesn't mean it's not part of a Spiritual Practice for me.  You and I are two different people, and we don't perceive the world in the same way.  You do what is right for you, I do what is right for me.  Dont judge me based on your view of the world.

RE
9
This is great. I forgot you were a gymnastics coach. I've always liked gymnastics, but my appreciation for coaches skyrocketed when someone linked this catch on reddit:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frU3GkGBE2U

BTW, it was spotting this very same skill myself that I broke my neck while rotating the gymnast who released early on her dismount off the high bar.

RE

This is a tragedy on par with an adult teaching a child how to hunt, and getting shot in the process. This is a manifestation of the inherent unfairness of a Universe demanding that we take risks. I desire that your student and yourself came to good terms.

No animosity or issues with the gymmie, this is part of the job and the risk you take when you do it.  Or the risk you take when you do the tricks yourself, and I took many of them and should have been dead or quadraplegic many times over in the years before.  It catches up with you eventually, usually when you least expect it. You can't beat the odds forever.

On the other hand, there was PLENTY of animosity between me and the gym owner.  Fortunately I beat his ass in court and got a nice settlement out of it and an early retirement.  :icon_sunny:

RE
10
Also, I like kittens.

Okay - love really.

Kittens are very popular on the Diner.  :icon_sunny:


RE
:emthup: :emthup: :emthup: :icon_sunny:

Doctorwhom,

Please ignore Palloy2. That fellow is Mr. "it can't be done" unless he is the one in charge of doing it, of course.  :evil4:

I have a suggestion for the child with behavioral problems. I am not a medical doctor, but being an older man, I have some experience with most types of human behavior.

I suggest engaging the child in physical activity that requires a high degree of motor skills. The rebellious child is often quite talented and well coordinated. A demanding physical activity takes their brain off of any obsessive path temporarily, thus lowering their stress level.

Water polo, tennis, rowing or just about any non-contact sport (he should be competing against himself, not others)  might prove to open the door to more of a compliant relationship between the child and you in regard to valuing your experience and advice.

May God Bless your efforts.
 
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