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Montana Court Agrees Yellowstone Gateway More Valuable Than Gold

Thanks to Earthjustice litigation, a district court judge has ruled that state regulators illegally ignored impacts to water quality and wildlife when approving the exploratory drilling project.

By Jessica A. Knoblauch | May 30, 2018

Jessica is a former award-winning journalist. She enjoys wild places and dispensing justice, so she considers her job here to be a pretty amazing fit.

An access road for drilling rigs and heavy equipment would run through this landscape if two proposed mines are constructed near Yellowstone’s northern entrance. PHOTO COURTESY OF WILLIAM CAMPBELL

Sleeping bag, check. Bug spray, check. Backpack, check.

As people across the country eagerly prepare for their summer vacations, residents and businesses of Park County, Montana, are gearing up to greet them. As the northern gateway to Yellowstone National Park, the aptly named Paradise Valley is itself a destination.

Enjoyed by locals throughout the year, tourists flock to this area to enjoy the full array of the Yellowstone region’s iconic wildlife and magnificent landscapes and to catch a native cutthroat trout in the Yellowstone River’s blue-ribbon fishery. With a lot riding on the tourist season, one thing Park County locals shouldn’t have to worry about is a massive new gold mine driving away tourists. The likelihood of that happening is much less now that a district court has ordered Montana’s regulators to reconsider allowing intensive mineral exploration in the area.

Double Your Impact — Fund Critical Courtroom Fights!

Proposed in 2015 by Canada-based Lucky Minerals, mineral exploration is just the first step in the company’s plans to develop a large-scale gold mine in Paradise Valley that would cause irreversible environmental harm to the park and fray the economic fabric of the region. Travelers gazing at the majestic Emigrant Peak jutting up from the Absaroka Mountains—a refuge for bighorn sheep, elk, grizzly bears, wolverines, and other creatures—would be confronted with the destruction of an industrial mining operation.

But a blemished view of the cinematic Yellowstone landscape is just one of the problems anticipated with this proposal. At full scale, the Emigrant mine would threaten to send acid runoff flowing into tributaries of the Yellowstone River, while nearly 100,000 tons of waste rock containing elevated levels of arsenic would be dumped near tributary headwaters. Even mineral exploration alone threatens to pollute these waters with heavy metals and acid runoff.

Emigrant Gulch aerial view looking east from Emigrant Peak. Lucky Minerials has mine claims on both sides of the gulch on both private and public land. PHOTO COURTESY OF WILLIAM CAMPBELL

Mining and mineral exploration would also carve up precious habitat for endangered grizzly bears, which are already in peril after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife delisted the species in June 2017. (Earthjustice is challenging the agency’s decision.) Wolverines, lynx, elk and other species would also be harmed, as would the local community, which relies on large swaths of connected wildland to support sustainable recreation and a healthy tourist economy. Barreling ahead with gold mining and exploration for short-term financial gain could come at the expense of the primary driver of economic growth in the Yellowstone area: an intact landscape that attracts millions of visitors from around the globe and supports a diverse business community and highly skilled workforce.

Earthjustice, together with local and regional groups, challenged the gold exploration proposal in September 2017 under the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), arguing that state regulators 😈 downplayed and dismissed some very serious environmental risks posed by the project. Those include potentially long-term harm to the iconic wildlife of the Yellowstone region, particularly grizzly bears and wolverines, and threats to clean water 💧 in Yellowstone River tributaries. We also argued that the state didn’t seriously consider the potential that this exploration could lead to much larger-scale development. The court agreed with us on all of our claims.

Subscribe to Earthjustice emails, to learn more ways we’re working to defend public lands.

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“The court’s ruling recognized that exploratory drilling is the leading edge of a much larger threat to these sensitive lands in Yellowstone’s gateway,” says Earthjustice attorney Jenny Harbine, who represented the groups. “We will continue our fight to stop Lucky’s plans to profit by placing our water, wildlife, and magnificent natural landscapes at risk.”  

Though this latest decision is a substantial victory, the fight is far from over. Lucky Minerals could insist on proceeding with gold exploration this summer while regulators conduct a new environmental analysis. If that happens, Earthjustice will go back to court to defend the park and all of its beauty from this short-sighted proposal.

An earlier version of this blog post was published in November 2016.

https://earthjustice.org/blog/2018-may/montana-court-agrees-yellowstone-gateway-more-valuable-than-gold

Driving south into Yellowstone along the river is one of the more picturesque routes I've ever hd the pleasure of experiencing. And....it's on the Hot Spring Tour. I'm only sorry the pine beetles got there before I got to see it. The Yellowstone River flows due north. If you're from Texas, something doesn't seem right about that.


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Market Flambe / Re: Big Slide v2.0 Begins
« Last post by agelbert on Today at 10:04:18 AM »
Yep. Here's a bit of background to explain our current trajectory.


June 14, 2018

Is the Fed Repeating the Mistake of 1936–37?

Jerome Powell has the situation in hand.

Quote
“The economy is doing very well,” the Federal Reserve chairman assured reporters after yesterday’s 0.25% rate hike.


There was more:

Quote
Most people who want to find jobs are finding them, and unemployment and inflation are low…

We think that gradually returning interest rates to a more normal level as the economy strengthens is the best way the Fed can help sustain an environment in which American households and businesses can thrive.


We could lift an objection or three to the chairman’s testimony… but refrain on advice of counsel.  ;D

For instance, that nearly 102 million working-age adults are out of the labor force — a number that hasn’t changed in four years.

Or that median wages have gone nowhere for decades.

Or that the current 108-month “expansion” is the second longest in history… and recession is long overdue.

The Fed nonetheless expects to impose two additional rate hikes this year… for a total of four.

Additional hikes are on tap next year.

And so we wonder… is the Fed repeating “the mistake of 1936–37?”

Six years into the Depression, the American economy was climbing from its sickbed.

Annual GDP growth — real GDP growth — was on the jump.

Unemployment was falling, from its 25% high… to 14%.

The Federal Reserve feared any additional loosening could start an inflationary fever.

And it believed the economic patient strong enough to go on his own steam.

It was time to return to “normal”… as Jerome Powell presently believes.

Christina Romer, former chair of the Council of Economic Advisers, in The Economist:

In 1936 the Federal Reserve began to worry about its “exit strategy.” After several years of relatively loose monetary policy, American banks were holding large quantities of reserves in excess of their legislated requirements. Monetary policymakers feared these excess reserves would make it difficult to tighten if inflation developed or if “speculative excess” began again on Wall Street.

We cannot help but ponder… do not some of these conditions suggest something of today’s?

The Fed decided to tighten in 1936–37.

But the patient wasn’t as hale as the medical men assumed.

It was soon horizontal again … laid up with a wasting disease.

Real GDP dropped 10% between May 1937 and June 1938.

Unemployment spiked from 14% to 20%.

The “recession within a depression” was America’s third-largest downturn of the 20th century.

The Fed reopened its medical bag of easy money in 1938… and the recession ultimately ended.

But Romer warns that the 1936–37 example “provides a cautionary tale.”

The Fed wanted to return to “normal” — just as today’s Fed.

“The urge to declare victory and get back to normal policy after an economic crisis is strong,” affirms Romer.

The economy was too wobbly to stand on its own in 1936.

Is today’s economy too wobbly to stand additional rate hikes?

First-quarter GDP expanded a glass-half-empty 2.2%.

Annual GDP growth has eked out a mere 2.16% average since 2010.

But comes your objection…

Unlike 1936, the economy is not sunk in depression. The comparison is off.

But here we resort to John Maynard Keynes’ definition of depression:

A chronic condition of sub-normal activity for a considerable period without any marked tendency towards recovery or towards complete collapse.

The long-term U.S. growth rate is roughly 3%.

But it has not grown at 3% since the financial crisis.

Here you have your depression… as defined by Lord Keynes himself.

Regardless, at 2.2% growth, “overheating” would not seem to apply today.

But Jim Rickards argues the Fed isn’t raising rates to break a fever.

It’s restocking its medicine chest for the next recession.

History says rates must climb to 3% or more to tackle the next recession.

The Fed won’t reach its 3% destination until mid-2019 at the going rate — if it arrives at all.

Bank of America has canvassed the entire history of tightening cycles going back over 100 years.

Its conclusion:

Whenever the Fed tightens aggressively… America falls ill:


Sixteen of the past 19 rate hike cycles have ended in recession — 84% of the time.

Be it a financial “event” or general economic malaise, the evidence is overwhelming…

Aggressive rate hikes are followed by trouble.

Will the Fed cause another 1937-like recession… or some financial “event”?

Jim Rickards believes it could.

The Fed is “raising into weakness,” says Jim.

And that it will have to turn around later this year once the business becomes clear.

We hope Jim is wrong… but fear he is not.

We learn one lesson from history:

That we learn little from history.

It is a lesson we could potentially learn once again — the hard way.

Regards,

Brian Maher
Managing editor, The Daily Reckoning

https://dailyreckoning.com/is-the-fed-repeating-the-mistake-of-1936-37/
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Marathon Man Newz / Re: Che Guevara, From The Historical Evidence.
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 10:00:14 AM »
I have no wish to trade my current repressive government for an even more repressive government so that I personally can live a lower standard of living. Tell me again why that's a good thing?

Oh come on.  Even you acknowledge to develop any kind of society that is remotely "sustainable" we need to Power Down, use less fossil fuels and live closer to the land with more of the population involved in food production.  The Cuban Revolution forced all those things to happen, and today Cuba is far better prepared for SHTF Day than the FSoA.  Voluntarily giving up your vacations to the VI and lowering your standard of living is a way to provide a better chance for your kids to have any kind of future at all.
I've got to second RE on this.  At least with the current government evidence can support or disprove that the government is repressive or not.  It is a matter of opinion but only so far, because facts are facts are facts and repression can be measured.  In contrast any government we 'trade' it for is a total speculative unknown because it has not yet happened.  It is a logical fallacy of some kind.  Maybe this one?


RE

Perhaps expressing two things which can't possibly be traded is not exactly an amphiboly in a strict grammatical sense but the content of Eddie's statement is a claim that this is the best of all possible world by equating knowledge of a future which has not yet transpired.  That violates causality and is impossible.  It is a bourgeois acceptance of the status quo.

If you are confused think of having "repressive government" on both sides of a mathematical equation.  Basic algebra would cancel them out leaving you with the conclusion that we should accept what we have now because it must be the best.  That is Eddie's claim.  Problem is one of Eddies 'repressive governments' is imaginary and in the future and other one is not and is here with us right now.  Two different things which can't be equated can't cancel each other out, be the current government repressive or not.

You don't think Cuba is more repressive than the US?  I suggest you try to move there. You can't. (Unless you marry a Cuban. Interestingly, even if you do marry a Cuban, you have to show "proof of funds". Got that? That means you have to bring money to the table.LOL.)

Or if you live there, try to leave. Anyone who thinks communism is less repressive than the the US should have a short conversation with anyone from South Viet Nam who had to stay after we pulled out. Remember East Berlin?

What? Are you people completely daft? I'm taking off and leaving you guys to dream about your fantasy world. Have fun.

Cuba didn't power down on purpose. They were forced to by circumstance. This makes them an interesting example of what the future is likely to hold. It does NOT make them superior, or a good place to live, or anything particularly positive.

I have no trouble at all recognizing repression, here or elsewhere. I measure it in higher taxes. I measure it in public lands once open to all but now made inaccessible. I measure it by the loss of rights of all kinds. I measure it by confiscated property, and how many people are in jail for bullshit charges.

Your "mathematical" analogy makes no damn sense to me, sorry. Not sure what you were going for there.

Repression is not the future. Repression is here and ongoing, and getting worse all the time. Anyone who thinks our government isn't repressive should do something to make contact with the court system. Guaranteed to make your represso-meter go right off the scale.
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Market Flambe / 📉 Stocks Dive Globally as U.S.-China Trade War Intensifies
« Last post by RE on Today at 07:36:16 AM »
https://www.thestreet.com/markets/global-stocks-retreat-as-u-s-china-trade-war-intensifies-14624186

Stocks Dive Globally as U.S.-China Trade War Intensifies
The escalating U.S.-China trade war has clipped risk sentiment around the world, sending emerging market stocks into a tailspin and lifting the dollar to a six-month high against a basket of its global peers


Martin Baccardax
Updated Jun 18, 2018 7:48 AM EDT
To Think a Trade War's Still Just a Threat Is the Dumbest Thing on Wall Street

The Monday Market Minute

    Global stocks weaken as US/China trade was escalates.
    Emerging market stocks crushed as investors dump shares in the face of surging dollar.
    Wall Street set for weaker open as risk sentiment dims; Treasury yields fall in safe-haven trading flows.
    Euro slump continues following dovish ECB guidance, German government crisis.
    Oil edges lower amid trade concerns, output increase reports ahead of OPEC meeting.

Market Snapshot

Global stocks retreated across the board Monday, with emerging market shares hitting the lowest levels since September, as investors reacted to last week's escalation in the ongoing trade war between Washington and Beijing that targeted $50 billion in China-made goods for fresh tariffs from the White House.

China's vow to hit the U.S. with levies of "the same scale and strength", including on crude oil, and void any previous deals agreed with the Trump administration hit shares in the region hard, with the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index falling 0.51% into the end of the session while Japan's Nikkei 225 gave back 0.78% by the closing bell.

"Following the path of expanding and opening up is China's best response to the trade dispute between China and the United States, and is also the responsibility that major countries should have to the world," said China's state-run Xinhua news agency. "The wise man builds bridges, the fool builds walls."

    Jim Cramer's Investing Rule 11: Don't Own Too Many Stocks

The threat of even deeper tariffs in the tit-for-tat trade war, which is now targeting 800 Chinese goods with around $50 billion from July 6, has also boosted the value of the U.S. dollar as investors retreat to the greenback as risk sentiment fades. That's taken the U.S. dollar index to a six-month high of 96.91 in overnight trading, a move which is also hammering emerging market stocks, which are sensitive to the greenback's rise as governments are forced to spend more money on servicing dollar-denominated debt.

    Not so good emerging market morning! The MSCI Emerging Markets Future is down again, now at the lowest level since September last year and down 15% from its peak early this year. pic.twitter.com/TjW46ymV2n
    — jeroen blokland (@jsblokland) June 18, 2018

U.S. stocks, as well, are set to open on the back foot Monday, according to early indications from U.S. futures prices, with contracts tied to the Dow Jones Industrial Average  pointing to a 204 point decline for the 30-stock average and those linked to the S&P 500  suggesting a 18 point slide for the broader benchmark.

Against the backdrop of ever-increasing protectionism among some of the world's biggest economies, the globe's most-powerful tech firms look to be strengthening ties, with Google closing a $550 million investment with China-based internet giant JD.com (JD) that will both allow parent Alphabet Inc. (GOOGL) to deepen its reach inside the world's second-largest economy and help JD expand into Southeast Asia and Europe by promoting more of its products on Google's shopping platform.

Alphabet is a holding in Jim Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS.

European stocks opened weaker, with oil and gas stocks leading to the downside, although the declines were offset by a sliding euro, which continues to lose ground against the U.S. dollar to trade at 1.1611 following last week's dovish monetary policy meeting from the European Central Bank and an ongoing political crisis in German that has fractured the ruling CDU/CUS coalition over immigration and could threaten the leadership of Chancellor Angela Merkel.

The Stoxx Europe 600 index was marked 0.95% lower by mid-day in Frankfurt with benchmarks in Germany and France falling around 1.15% and 1.21% respectively.

TheStreet's founder Jim Cramer weighs in on tariffs.

Volkswagen AG (VLKAY) shares tumbled in Frankfurt Monday after the world's second-largest carmaker said the CEO of its Audi brand was taken into police custody amid an ongoing probe into Germany's diesel emissions-cheating scandal.

VW shares were marked around 2.4% from Friday's close and changing hands at €157.04 by mid-morning in Frankfurt, extending their year-to-date decline to around 6.35%.

Britain's FTSE 100 fell 0.3% by mid-day in London, although stocks got some support from a weaker pound sterling, which boosts the attractiveness of stocks that earn their revenues outside of the United Kingdom, as it traded at 1.3244.

    Jim Cramer's Investing Rule 10: Bad Buys Won't Become Takeovers

Global oil prices were mixed to start the week, with investors factoring-in both a slowing of global trade, a stronger U.S. dollar and reports that Russia and Saudi Arabia may be prepared to agree to an increase in output later this week when OPEC members are some of their allies meet later this week in Vienna.

Brent crude contracts for August delivery, the global benchmark, were seen 66 cents higher from their Friday close in New York and changing hands at $74.10 at the start of European trading while WTI contracts for July delivery were marked 25 cents lower at $64.81 per barrel.
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Marathon Man Newz / Re: Che Guevara, From The Historical Evidence.
« Last post by K-Dog on Today at 12:20:47 AM »
What Agent Graves was claiming is that a communist 'revolution' never stops but keeps on murdering forever while a rich mans 'revolution' is guaranteed to put poor people in a daylight rambler and give everybody a two car garage and 30K in the bank once the dust settles.  In a rising tide lifting all boats sort of way. 

Attacking the redefinition of 'revolution' was a good way to address that nonsense.

A rich mans revolution is che's. A rich med student who could afford to travel the world on dads dollars. He never would have joined something as a rank and file. The reason comfortable western world communists do not emigrate to communist countries to walk their talk is exactly the same. They do not want to be rank and file or footsoldiers. They always believe they should be in charge. For the true poor they have something to gain by being rank and file, if the rich communists follow through on making everyone equal, but it has never happened.


"Despite atypical political views, the family was in many ways typical of the country's upper-middle class, and it was expected that Guevara would attend college and pursue a career. Influenced by his struggle with chronic asthma and his grandmother's death from cancer, Guevara chose medicine as his profession. After graduating from high school with honors at the age of 19, he enrolled in medical school at the University of Buenos Aires. Restless and adventuresome, Guevara left his studies in 1952 to motorcycle and hitchhike across South America with his friend Alberto Granados, a biochemist.

https://www.encyclopedia.com/people/history/cuban-history-biographies/che-guevara


Quote
What I have said, which u missed, is that I don't believe in using money at all, and it is an extremely corrupted culture which estimates your worth in the most crude measure, meaning money. I think I should be valued for whatever this type of insight is worth, not that I can put on a swiss watch if I have a meeting with fatcats. I said earlier that "they pretend to pay us and we pretend to work" is attractive because we should not have to be so pre-occupied with obtaining money, either just to live or to accomplish more.



"It is confirmed that Che Guevara received at least two different Rolex watches from Castro during the late 1950’s and 1960’s. Precision timepieces were a necessary item of equipment for field commanders, especially in the pre-quartz watch era. An accurate watch was crucial for coordinating and synchronizing military operations, and the reliability and precision of Rolex watches made them an obvious choice.

The first Rolex Guevara received was in 1958 when Castro promoted him to the position of Comandante; however, less than a year later, Che gave that very same watch to his father. In 1966, Castro gave Guevara a second Rolex– right before he left Cuba for Bolivia.

https://www.bobswatches.com/rolex-blog/rolex-fashion/rolex-watches-che-guevara.html

As head of the central bank, it was Che's duty to sign Cuban bank notes, which by custom bore his signature. Instead of using his full name Ernesto Guevara, he signed the notes simply "Che".  This act horrified the Cuban financial sector and signaled Guevara's disgust of money and the class distinctions it brought about.



Che

Presidente Del Banco

In the lower left.
8
Geopolitics / Re: The Russian thread
« Last post by Palloy2 on Today at 12:05:04 AM »
https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/06/16/russian-army-gets-weapons-future-today.html
Russian Army Gets the Weapons of the Future Today
Andrei AKULOV
16.06.2018

The combat experience that Russia’s Terminator-2 tank support combat vehicle (BMPT-72) has gained in Syria has proven to be invaluable. It is being used to develop a new Terminator-3 version that will soon equip the tank support system to do things like attacking unmanned aerial vehicles (drones). Other armored vehicles and dismounted infantry in difficult terrain remain high-priority targets.



Few details are available so far. Like its predecessors, the new vehicle’s armor protection will be equivalent to that of a main battle tank, with armaments allowing it to engage virtually any enemy weapon system or unit and to fire at multiple targets at the same time. Automation makes it possible to reduce the number of crew members from 5 to 3.

The new weapon system is likely to share its chassis, sensors, armor, and active protection system with the new Armata T-14 main battle tank. According to Russian media reports, the main armament will be a 57-mm. gun already used by the Russian Navy. Its rate of fire is 300 rounds per minute, its range — 16 km., and its altitude — over 4 km. The projectile can penetrate armor over 100 mm. thick. Because the firing range of its machine gun and automatic grenade launcher are 60-140% greater than that of the American Bradley IFVs and Stryker wheeled armored vehicles and anti-tank systems, this system can reliably protect tanks and infantry while remaining safely out of reach.

The Zvezda TV channel quoted officials from the weapons manufacturer Techmash who claimed that the Tosochka thermobaric, wheeled-chassis, heavy multiple-rocket launcher is to be delivered to the Russian Army in 2020. Using wheels instead of caterpillar tracks allows it to move faster but also increases the system’s vulnerability when operating on the front lines. One must assume that the MLRS will not be used to fire directly at targets, but will instead shoot at them from protected positions. Wheels make it more effective against terrorist units. It does not need trailers to move rapidly across great distances, which is exactly what is required to forcefully attack militants on different fronts.

Russian officials confirmed in May that the Uran-6 demining robot and the Uran-9 unmanned light battle tank have been tested in Syria. The latter is the first remote-controlled military robot in the world (a miniature tank) with a 30-mm. gun, enabling it to carry out the missions of an armored combat system supporting infantry on the ground.

The Uran-6 is a unique unmanned ground vehicle (UGV), or mine-clearing robotic system, that saves human lives by clearing routes across mine fields. Weighing six tons, it can be transported by truck. With its bulldozer blade and trawls, it can do the work of 20 sappers, neutralizing ordnance with a potential explosive energy of 59 kg. (130 lbs.) of TNT equivalent. Aided by four cameras for 360-degree view, it can be equipped with a large number of tools, such as a robotic arm, a rear forklift, a gripper with a cargo-lifting capacity of one ton, etc. The system can conduct demining operations on any terrain, while remaining at a safe distance of up to one km. away.

Made of steel plates 8 mm-10 mm thick, the vehicle is highly resistant to mine blasts and shrapnel damage. The system can defend itself using 7.62-mm small arms.

Built on the basis of a tracked chassis, the Uran-6 is powered by a 6-cylinder water-cooled, turbo-charged diesel engine, allowing it to move at a speed of up to 15 km., negotiate obstacles 0.8 m. high, cross 1.2-m wide ditches and water obstacles, and operate in swamps 0.45 m. deep. The system is able to work continuously for up to five hours. It did a great job in Palmyra, Syria, defusing bombs and bobby traps. The Russian Army plans to increasingly rely on UGVs as time goes on.

Mainly designed for reconnaissance and patrol purposes, as well as for protecting convoys and supporting infantry, Tigr-M all-terrain infantry mobility vehicles have also seen combat in Syria. With the Arbalet-DM remote module installed, the system becomes robotic. The module consists of a 12.7-mm. caliber Kord machine gun with 150 cartridges or a 7.62-mm caliber PKTM machine gun with 250 cartridges. Laser guidance is used. The Arbalet-DM can lock on and automatically track stationary and moving targets identified by a TV camera from a distance of 2.5 km. or 1.5 km. if thermal-imaging equipment is used. A laser range finder has a range of 100 m.-3,000 m. This new version of Tigr is funded by the 2018-2025 state procurement program.

The Tigr-M has outstanding off-road capabilities. With an operational range of 1.000 km, the vehicle can reach speeds of up to 155 km. per hour. It can climb 31-degree slopes and cross water obstacles that are 1.2 m wide.

The famous, combat-proven BMP-3 heavily armed infantry combat vehicles are to become unmanned too, as soon as the AU-220 combat module armed with a 57-mm. automatic cannon is installed. It will enable the system to strike aerial targets. The gun’s rate of fire is 80 rounds per minute and its range is 14.5 km. Any type of rounds can be used. An armor-piercing round can penetrate 130 mm. of steel from one km. away A coaxial 7.62-mm machine gun can hold 1,000 rounds of ammunition. The module can fully rotate 360 degrees.

The trend is clearly evident — the Russian Army is making great strides in its introduction of new, more highly automated technologies. New weapons that are unlike anything owned by any other country, such as tank support vehicles, are currently either being added to the Russian arsenal or are being developed. The army is also gradually moving away from soldier-to-soldier warfare, turning instead toward combat that is fought by remote-controlled machines driven by artificial intelligence. In March, Defense Minister Army General Sergei Shoigu said that a number of military robotic systems were nearing the completion of their trials before going into serial production this year. He was telling the truth. Many nations are working hard to put unmanned systems onto the battlefields, but Russia appears to be leading this race, fielding its military robotics more quickly than anyone else. The very pace of the updates to these armored vehicles captures the imagination.
9
Marathon Man Newz / Re: Che Guevara, From The Historical Evidence.
« Last post by K-Dog on June 17, 2018, 09:46:06 PM »
I have no wish to trade my current repressive government for an even more repressive government so that I personally can live a lower standard of living. Tell me again why that's a good thing?

Oh come on.  Even you acknowledge to develop any kind of society that is remotely "sustainable" we need to Power Down, use less fossil fuels and live closer to the land with more of the population involved in food production.  The Cuban Revolution forced all those things to happen, and today Cuba is far better prepared for SHTF Day than the FSoA.  Voluntarily giving up your vacations to the VI and lowering your standard of living is a way to provide a better chance for your kids to have any kind of future at all.
I've got to second RE on this.  At least with the current government evidence can support or disprove that the government is repressive or not.  It is a matter of opinion but only so far, because facts are facts are facts and repression can be measured.  In contrast any government we 'trade' it for is a total speculative unknown because it has not yet happened.  It is a logical fallacy of some kind.  Maybe this one?


RE

Perhaps expressing two things which can't possibly be traded is not exactly an amphiboly in a strict grammatical sense but the content of Eddie's statement is a claim that this is the best of all possible world by equating knowledge of a future which has not yet transpired.  That violates causality and is impossible.  It is a bourgeois acceptance of the status quo.

If you are confused think of having "repressive government" on both sides of a mathematical equation.  Basic algebra would cancel them out leaving you with the conclusion that we should accept what we have now because it must be the best.  That is Eddie's claim.  Problem is one of Eddies 'repressive governments' is imaginary and in the future and other one is not and is here with us right now.  Two different things which can't be equated can't cancel each other out, be the current government repressive or not.
10
Marathon Man Newz / Re: Che Guevara, From The Historical Evidence.
« Last post by jdwheeler42 on June 17, 2018, 09:36:36 PM »
Quote
And if they follow the rules for an insurrection, and not a revolution, it might even be successful.

OK then, what are the rules for an insurrection?  If everyone gets a trial and an appeal, and is still found guilty and executed, is the head of the appellate court a war criminal?
Wrong kind of rules... think more along the lines of "rules of engagement".

First and foremost rule of running a successful insurrection, make sure you have supplies that can not be cut off by the government you are fighting.  So, for example, don't rely on foreign oil to grow your crops to feed your troops if the oil can be embargoed.
Let me take it a step backwards, by way of analogy, to make the difference between revolutions and insurrections even clearer....

Scientists did a study tracking via radio collar all the mountain lions in a given area.  They found that, except for mating, whenever two adult mountain lions came together, it was always a fight to the death.

So, if you are a mountain lion, and you are going to fight another mountain lion, you have to be prepared for a fight to the death.  That is like having a revolution.

If you are a deer, however, and you encounter a mountain lion, your goal is not to kill the mountain lion.  It is to run away and keep from getting killed until the mountain lion decides you're not worth pursuing anymore and gives up.  That is like having an insurrection.
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