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1
The Kitchen Sink / Re: The wedding
« Last post by David B. on Today at 07:54:04 AM »
The leader of the republicans campaign is now the Australian Prime Minister.  They are going to wait for the Queen to die, and she is 92.  Prince Charles knows he is not wanted in Australia.
The last one in Australia came pretty close. I know in Canada this generation of political leaders has no stomach for that kind of fight. Winning the referendum would probably be easy its the next part that is a problem here. Since we repatriated our constitution in the eighties the government has tried twice to do constitutional amendments Meech lake and charlottetown. Both of those resulted in catastrophic failures. the conservative government of the day fractured into a party of western alienation a centrist core and a party of succession in Quebec. A pro independence party came to power in quebec and came within a percentage point of separation. So to say that there is little appetite to reopen the constitution is an understatement. Most Canadians that I know feel having true legislative freedom from the UK is more important then a symbolic fight over a 19th century political dinosaur. So its not black and white, royalty has no real role here. Let the people of the UK throw them to the curb since they foot the bills...
2
The Kitchen Sink / Re: The wedding
« Last post by Palloy2 on Today at 06:56:11 AM »
The leader of the republicans campaign is now the Australian Prime Minister.  They are going to wait for the Queen to die, and she is 92.  Prince Charles knows he is not wanted in Australia.
3
"The weapons fetish is just a symptom of a country for whom war is the most important export."  And bingo, just what I was really getting at but you did it better, Surly. It's necessary to get a load of the whole picture. A seething violent hateful hating nation. A sicko paranoid nation of Now No diplomacy meaning shoot to kill first talk later, not the other way around. Interesting how people here on this forum barely mention the supported Palestinan Genocide, too busy promoting and fantasizing more violence at home. Owning a gun means accepting the possibility of using it, thinking of how it might be necessary, thinking of retaliation for what hasn't even happened, looking forward to it. No surprise that such personalities and psychological make up have produced and harbored the hard core dyed in the wool neocons and mic milking the fantasy. It's no wonder that we are now so hated and despised, having forever fostered and projected this inner fantasy of violence outward upon the whole world. America is sick with paranoia spewing violence and angry aggression upon the entire rest of the world. What has made us so sick and unable to heal our society? Please tell me.

https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/britsinthephilippines.top/philippines-genocide-3-million-filipinos-killed/%3famp

https://www.thenation.com/article/why-cant-americans-remember-anyones-deaths-other-than-their-own/

The ongoing Palestinan genocide is one of my pet peves.  I posted pictures of the crowds camped behind burning tires for rock throwing cover only last week.  If you don't see enough about the Palestinian situation to suit you here it is because news on the region is hard to come by because both Palloy and I would be right on that shit if we saw it.  If you would like to see some more info on the Palestinian issue, post some!

"What has made us so sick and unable to heal our society? Please tell me."

Electronic brainwashing is part of it.  Videos wash the retinas of Americans several times a day and they are absorbed without critical reflection because that is the nature of the video experience.  It is a socializing media rather than an informative one, yet people when watching video will feel like they are being informed as they are in fact being absorbed.  Another effect of video is that it has exacerbated class differences and only a unified society can act like it even has the rudiments of a collective brain.  A divided society has the reflective capability of a flatworm.  That is us.  America the flatworm.
4
Surly Newz / Re: Doomstead Diner Daily - Apology to Surly
« Last post by Golden Oxen on Today at 06:00:37 AM »
Hi Surly, just noticed in perusing the latest Diner postings that I featured in my thread one of the articles listed in your daily meme.

Sorry for the oversight, have been away and reappeared upon seeing Karpatok's presence.

Would like to keep it up on my Gold thread if you don't mind. The Article meant an awful lot to me and my personal beliefs about doom and collapse. Forgive my oversight please,           Regards, GO
5
The Kitchen Sink / Re: The wedding
« Last post by Agent Graves on Today at 05:39:35 AM »
Dropping the monarchy and forming a republic is a doable political achievement for Canada and Australia.  So there IS something you can do - get out there and work for a referendum to implement it. The trouble is, everyone is so comfortable already that it's low priority for them, and for YOU.

There were 2 referenda and both failed, pretty predictable when u think about the diversionary value of their Truman Show. Sooo.. if u really want to rid yourself of Royals it must be done the 18th Century American way, forbidden to muslim women. With the right to bare arms.
6
 Dear readers, Buy Gold, some silver, and if you believe in a God; PRAY. It's close, the Financial One.  GO

The Coming Collapse

                                 

   

The Coming Collapse
Chris Hedges


The Trump administration did not rise, prima facie, like Venus on a half shell from the sea. Donald Trump is the result of a long process of political, cultural and social decay. He is a product of our failed democracy. The longer we perpetuate the fiction that we live in a functioning democracy, that Trump and the political mutations around him are somehow an aberrant deviation that can be vanquished in the next election, the more we will hurtle toward tyranny. The problem is not Trump. It is a political system, dominated by corporate power and the mandarins of the two major political parties, in which we don’t count. We will wrest back political control by dismantling the corporate state, and this means massive and sustained civil disobedience, like that demonstrated by teachers around the country this year. If we do not stand up we will enter a new dark age.

The Democratic Party, which helped build our system of inverted totalitarianism, is once again held up by many on the left as the savior. Yet the party steadfastly refuses to address the social inequality that led to the election of Trump and the insurgency by Bernie Sanders. It is deaf, dumb and blind to the very real economic suffering that plagues over half the country. It will not fight to pay workers a living wage. It will not defy the pharmaceutical and insurance industries to provide Medicare for all. It will not curb the voracious appetite of the military that is disemboweling the country and promoting the prosecution of futile and costly foreign wars. It will not restore our lost civil liberties, including the right to privacy, freedom from government surveillance, and due process. It will not get corporate and dark money out of politics. It will not demilitarize our police and reform a prison system that has 25 percent of the world’s prisoners although the United States has only 5 percent of the world’s population. It plays to the margins, especially in election seasons, refusing to address substantive political and social problems and instead focusing on narrow cultural issues like gay rights, abortion and gun control in our peculiar species of anti-politics.

This is a doomed tactic, but one that is understandable. The leadership of the party, the Clintons, Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, Tom Perez, are creations of corporate America. In an open and democratic political process, one not dominated by party elites and corporate money, these people would not hold political power. They know this. They would rather implode the entire system than give up their positions of privilege. And that, I fear, is what will happen. The idea that the Democratic Party is in any way a bulwark against despotism defies the last three decades of its political activity. It is the guarantor of despotism.

Trump has tapped into the hatred that huge segments of the American public have for a political and economic system that has betrayed them. He may be inept, degenerate, dishonest and a narcissist, but he adeptly ridicules the system they despise. His cruel and demeaning taunts directed at government agencies, laws and the established elites resonate with people for whom these agencies, laws and elites have become hostile forces. And for many who see no shift in the political landscape to alleviate their suffering, Trump’s cruelty and invective are at least cathartic.

Trump, like all despots, has no ethical core. He chooses his allies and appointees based on their personal loyalty and fawning obsequiousness to him. He will sell anyone out. He is corrupt, amassing money for himself—he made $40 million from his Washington, D.C., hotel alone last year—and his corporate allies. He is dismantling government institutions that once provided some regulation and oversight. He is an enemy of the open society. This makes him dangerous. His turbocharged assault on the last vestiges of democratic institutions and norms means there will soon be nothing, even in name, to protect us from corporate totalitarianism.

But the warnings from the architects of our failed democracy against creeping fascism, Madeleine Albright among them, are risible. They show how disconnected the elites have become from the zeitgeist. None of these elites have credibility. They built the edifice of lies, deceit and corporate pillage that made Trump possible. And the more Trump demeans these elites, and the more they cry out like Cassandras, the more he salvages his disastrous presidency and enables the kleptocrats pillaging the country as it swiftly disintegrates.

The press is one of the principal pillars of Trump’s despotism. It chatters endlessly like 17th-century courtiers at the court of Versailles about the foibles of the monarch while the peasants lack bread. It drones on and on and on about empty topics such as Russian meddling and a payoff to a porn actress that have nothing to do with the daily hell that, for many, defines life in America. It refuses to critique or investigate the abuses by corporate power, which has destroyed our democracy and economy and orchestrated the largest transfer of wealth upward in American history. The corporate press is a decayed relic that, in exchange for money and access, committed cultural suicide. And when Trump attacks it over “fake news,” he expresses, once again, the deep hatred of all those the press ignores. The press worships the idol of Mammon as slavishly as Trump does. It loves the reality-show presidency. The press, especially the cable news shows, keeps the lights on and the cameras rolling so viewers will be glued to a 21st-century version of “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.” It is good for ratings. It is good for profits. But it accelerates the decline.

All this will soon be compounded by financial collapse. Wall Street banks have been handed $16 trillion in bailouts and other subsidies by the Federal Reserve and Congress at nearly zero percent interest since the 2008 financial collapse. They have used this money, as well as the money saved through the huge tax cuts imposed last year, to buy back their own stock, raising the compensation and bonuses of their managers and thrusting the society deeper into untenable debt peonage. Sheldon Adelson’s casino operations alone got a $670 million tax break under the 2017 legislation. The ratio of CEO to worker pay now averages 339 to 1, with the highest gap approaching 5,000 to 1. This circular use of money to make and hoard money is what Karl Marx called “fictitious capital.” The steady increase in public debt, corporate debt, credit card debt and student loan debt will ultimately lead, as Nomi Prins writes, to “a tipping point—when money coming in to furnish that debt, or available to borrow, simply won’t cover the interest payments. Then debt bubbles will pop, beginning with higher yielding bonds.”

An economy reliant on debt for its growth causes our interest rate to jump to 28 percent when we are late on a credit card payment. It is why our wages are stagnant or have declined in real terms—if we earned a sustainable income we would not have to borrow money to survive. It is why a university education, houses, medical bills and utilities cost so much. The system is designed so we can never free ourselves from debt.

However, the next financial crash, as Prins points out in her book “Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World,” won’t be like the last one. This is because, as she says, “there is no Plan B.” Interest rates can’t go any lower. There has been no growth in the real economy. The next time, there will be no way out. Once the economy crashes and the rage across the country explodes into a firestorm, the political freaks will appear, ones that will make Trump look sagacious and benign.

And so, to quote Vladimir Lenin, what must be done?

We must invest our energy in building parallel, popular institutions to protect ourselves and to pit power against power. These parallel institutions, including unions, community development organizations, local currencies, alternative political parties and food cooperatives, will have to be constructed town by town. The elites in a time of distress will retreat to their gated compounds and leave us to fend for ourselves. Basic services, from garbage collection to public transportation, food distribution and health care, will collapse. Massive unemployment and underemployment, triggering social unrest, will be dealt with not through government job creation but the brutality of militarized police and a complete suspension of civil liberties. Critics of the system, already pushed to the margins, will be silenced and attacked as enemies of the state. The last vestiges of labor unions will be targeted for abolition, a process that will soon be accelerated given the expected ruling in a case before the Supreme Court that will cripple the ability of public-sector unions to represent workers. The dollar will stop being the world’s reserve currency, causing a steep devaluation. Banks will close. Global warming will extract heavier and heavier costs, especially on the coastal populations, farming and the infrastructure, costs that the depleted state will be unable to address. The corporate press, like the ruling elites, will go from burlesque to absurdism, its rhetoric so patently fictitious it will, as in all totalitarian states, be unmoored from reality. The media outlets will all sound as fatuous as Trump. And, to quote W.H. Auden, “the little children will die in the streets.”

As a foreign correspondent I covered collapsed societies, including the former Yugoslavia. It is impossible for any doomed population to grasp how fragile the decayed financial, social and political system is on the eve of implosion. All the harbingers of collapse are visible: crumbling infrastructure; chronic underemployment and unemployment; the indiscriminate use of lethal force by police; political paralysis and stagnation; an economy built on the scaffolding of debt; nihilistic mass shootings in schools, universities, workplaces, malls, concert venues and movie theaters; opioid overdoses that kill some 64,000 people a year; an epidemic of suicides; unsustainable military expansion; gambling as a desperate tool of economic development and government revenue; the capture of power by a tiny, corrupt clique; censorship; the physical diminishing of public institutions ranging from schools and libraries to courts and medical facilities; the incessant bombardment by electronic hallucinations to divert us from the depressing sight that has become America and keep us trapped in illusions. We suffer the usual pathologies of impending death. I would be happy to be wrong. But I have seen this before. I know the warning signs. All I can say is get ready.


https://www.truthdig.com/articles/the-coming-collapse/  :icon_study: :icon_study: :icon_study: :icon_study:


                                   
7
The Kitchen Sink / Re: The wedding
« Last post by Agent Graves on Today at 05:26:10 AM »


I'm sure you are all dying to know how the wedding went.  Well, it was "a match made in heaven", wasn't it?.  My local TV bought the full BBC package, which lasted all evening on all channels.  There weren't any wedding street parties here, but the usual clan street parties continued.  I'd had enough of the BBC pap after 2 minutes, but got 20 minutes on the News anyway.  The BBC got around the clearly uncomfortable fact that she was "of mixed heritage" and no racist royalist protesters were seen or heard of.  The fact that she was a divorcee was compared favourably with Churchill's refusal of Wallace Simpson and Edward 8th's Abdication.  How thoroughly modern royalty has become.

Clearly uncomfortable to who?  His mother died cavorting with an arab and was treated as a saint for it. Maybe there were no protestors? Racism like satan being everywhere and nowhere. These apex predators know which way the wind is blowing because they direct the fan. Shrewd move by James Hewitt jnr, what with the natives growing restless, to marry one. By the time the mixed offspring grow up, native Britons will be an endangered exhibit in a zoo or thursday night support group. So no lily white symbol of colonial opression will be the all important relatable royal that sells unlimited magazines and airtime. In fact it would not be fair for his brothers caucasian children to sit on the throne  when they can be passed over for swarthier princes of the people. Then again, at 37 lets he had  better hope his too dark for blushing brides eggs are aging as slowly as her superior skin. 
8
Art & Photography / 🌏 Category: Images of Uzbekistan
« Last post by RE on Today at 05:25:02 AM »
I got this morning's Breakfast Special Recipe from this Ukrainian dude biking his way across Central Asia on $2/day.  Great Pics and Great Adventure!

RE

http://www.diaconescuradu.com/en/category/uzbekistan

Category Archives: Uzbekistan

DSC_8758

Crossing the Uzkek-Kazah desert, 2000 of kilometers of nothingness.

I had dreaded the Uzbek desert crossing. In the end what can sound less appealing to a cyclist than the monotony of a straight road through the middle of the nothingness, with the almost the same scenery from sunrise until sunset, day in and day out. It is the unknown around the corner that turns my wheels, except that in the case the next corner is just a slight angle variation in the road direction and I’m pretty sure what I will find after it: another stretch of bushy and barren desert.

And then there’s the wind, the constant side wind which has been blowing continuously for the past 5 days from the same direction. I think that there are few things more demoralizing than going to sleep after a hard day of fighting the wind knowing that tomorrow you will have to start over again.

But surprisingly as the days went by I have to admit that the desert became more and more enjoyable and somehow I found a certain tranquility of the monotony of each passing day. Usually when touring you have your mind set on the next destination on the map, the next mountain pass, the next city where you can take a rest but now only the Caspian Sea which the end of desert and it’s more than 1000 kilometers away. It’s impossible to plan anything when such distances are involved and quickly you forget about the destination and you settle in what seems like an endless daily routine.

But then there’s the light and the incredible clear and blue skies of the desert, accompanied by a million stars during the night. Slightly changing but constantly beautiful, coloring each sunset and sunrise in a different way.

And then there’s the peace and the silence which you find either on the bike while cycling or each evening at the chosen camping spot. While on the bike moments when you are completely present alternate with moments when your mind drifts off to an imaginary place following it’s own internal monologue.

Days fly by and your only worry becomes to carry enough food and water to get you to the next small village. The daily agenda consists of 120 kilometers of nothing, followed by a small village and another 140 kilometers of empty desert. Each evening’s goal becomes knowing that I put in a good effort for that day which I usually quantify as time spent in the saddle. Kilometers are completely irrelevant when you factor in the wind and the road quality.

Time seems to lose any kind of meaning. How many days has it been since the last real shower and the last night spent in a bed? Certainly more than a week… How many days until the well deserved swim in the Caspian Sea? No idea but probably also around one week. Probably this is the best test to see if I will ever get bored of myself.

And yet the days go by and finally after almost 1600 kilometers in Uzbekistan I finally cross the border into Kazakhstan, changing countries but unfortunately not the scenery. The welcome sign into Kazakhstan consists of 80 kilometers which could be easily classified as one of the worst roads I’ve ever cycled on.

Three days and 400 kilometers later I finally see the shimmering water of the Caspian sea in the distance. It’s hard to explain in words how you feel when realize that finally the desert is over and that shortly you will sink your dusty self in the cold and clear waters of the Caspian sea. I honestly cannot think of a better way of ending a desert crossing.

Looking back I have to admit that I really enjoyed what I had dreaded at first and that I had grown fond of the desert, of the feeling of being completely disconnected, of losing track of days and of time and of the monotonous peace and serenity of the desert. I would clearly rate it as one of the most interesting bits of the road back to Europe.

And now for some practical considerations.

1. Visas and costs.

It seems that all the people I met along the way were Englishmen and they were all cycling eastwards (or the wrong way as I used to say when I met them) and probably the only reason you would chose this route through Central Asia is that you can’t get a visa for Iran (which seems to difficult if not impossible for people from the UK and the USA). The visas for Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan while not cheap are at least obtainable, and you also avoid the Turkmenistan 5 days fixed entry/exit madness.

2. Road quality.

The tarmac isn’t as bad as I expected and there are construction work still going on both in Uzbekistan and in Kazakhstan so it will get even better the following years. In September 2015 there were plenty of newly opened bits where tragic wasn’t allowed yet but where you could ride your bycicle, perfect conditions. Also the bit between Beyneu and Aktau (once dubbed the worst road in the world) has been repaired. Just take care to choose the northern alternative and not the main road after Shetpe. There are some broken bits along the way though and the 80 kilometers between the border and Beyneu are absolutely horrible.

3. Supplies and distances.

Probably the most challenging bit is between Nukus and the border where for 400 kilometers you only have 3 settlements. And there is literally NOTHING in between (except camels) so depending on the speed you need to plan and have enough food and water for 140 kilometers / 120 kilometers (the greatest distances in between settlements). At the same time if you run out of food or water you probably can wave for help at one of the occasional trucks, the drivers are usually more than helpful. Also depending on the temperature you really need to carry a lot of water, I had temperatures around 30 degrees and I was still drinking around 7-8 liters per day. And Uzbek melons rock.

4. People.

My experiences in Uzbekistan were a bit mixed regarding the people, which is probably due to a real presence of a police state. And even though I had some genuine examples of hospitality something still felt strange. From the overly sanitized like Samarkand and Khiva, to the police checks every 100 kilometers to the monuments portraying Uzbekistan and it’s president in positive light something just didn’t fit in. And perhaps in comparison with other Stans when talking with the people they seemed to have a good opinion about the president and government which also seemed somehow strange. Other than that I had no problems with the police except for the 2 hours spent at the border crossing between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan where the customs officials were simply assholes (it seems that almost everyone passing through this border crossing had the same experience).

5. Money.

Be prepared to carry bags of money, or “Sum” – the local currency. With the biggest note having the equivalent value of 2 euro and with plenty of smaller notes worth as little as 0.05 euros be prepared to have a special place to store all the cash. A plastic bag worked fine for me though. As a side note cash machines exist only in the big cities (Samarkand and Bukhara should have one but they could be out of service). Also it’s worth asking around to find out which is the black marked rate, as the difference between the official rate and the black market rate can be as high as 30-40%. A good place to change money at the black market rate is the local bazaar, just as for the money changers corner.

6. Temperatures and the best time to cross Uzbekistan.

I spent most of September crossing Uzbekistan and the temperatures were almost perfect for cycling (between 25 and 35 degrees, but mostly around 30) but I heard horror stories from cyclists which crossed Uzbekistan in July and August and which had to deal with constant 40 degree temperatures. Weirdly enough while you are cycling and the wind is blowing around you temperatures above 35 degrees are tolerable, but the moment you stop sweet covers you instantly. There were many moments where I was thinking if how much extra water I need to drink each stop just to make up for the water lost through sweat in the same time span.

The bright future of the Tadjick people, on a mural before the border with Tadjikistan.

The bright future of the Tadjick people, on a mural before the border with Tadjikistan.

A tipical roadside meal in Uzbekistan (for about 2 dollars). Enjoying sheep meet really helps in Central Asia.

A tipical roadside meal in Uzbekistan (for about 2 dollars). Enjoying sheep meet really helps in Central Asia.

Igor from Ucraine, travelling with less than 2 dollars per day.

Igor from Ucraine, travelling with less than 2 dollars per day.

Hot air, hot asfalt and no shade in the Uzbek desert. Stoping is not an option as without the wind you're instantly covered in sweat.

Hot air, hot asfalt and no shade in the Uzbek desert. Stoping is not an option as without the wind you're instantly covered in sweat.

The standing minaret from Bukhara. One of the oldest in Central Asia.

The standing minaret from Bukhara. One of the oldest in Central Asia.

Hiting the 12.000 kilometer mark somewhere in the middle of the desert.

Hiting the 12.000 kilometer mark somewhere in the middle of the desert.

Up, up, and away! On a new stretch of road between Bukhara and Khiva.

Up, up, and away! On a new stretch of road between Bukhara and Khiva.

Uzbek road workers, as friendly as ever.

Uzbek road workers, as friendly as ever.

Desert skies.

Desert skies.

Geometrical patters in Khiva, the last surviving khanate of the Mongol Empire.

Geometrical patters in Khiva, the last surviving khanate of the Mongol Empire.

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DSC_8554.jpg

Uzbek melons make the perfect roadside snack.

Uzbek melons make the perfect roadside snack.

Coffe brewing in the middle of the road. Also on a newly constructed stretch of road.

Coffe brewing in the middle of the road. Also on a newly constructed stretch of road.

It seems that the only people on this road are people from Great Britain or from the US, for whom the Iran visa is still unfortunately nearly impossible.

It seems that the only people on this road are people from Great Britain or from the US, for whom the Iran visa is still unfortunately nearly impossible.

The cyclists tan after 2 weeks in the desert. And the cyclist's legs after a couple of months on the road.

The cyclists tan after 2 weeks in the desert. And the cyclist's legs after a couple of months on the road.

Desert glamping.

Desert glamping.

Dancing in the middle of road in the middle of nowhere, what better way to celebrate a birthday.

Dancing in the middle of road in the middle of nowhere, what better way to celebrate a birthday.

Improvised karakapak sheep herding

Improvised karakapak sheep herding

The road can't get much worse than this. The 80 kilometer bit between the border and Beyneu were horrific.

The road can't get much worse than this. The 80 kilometer bit between the border and Beyneu were horrific.

Somewhere at the end of this railroad, 500 kilometers away was the Caspian sea.

Somewhere at the end of this railroad, 500 kilometers away was the Caspian sea.

A good book, coffee and some proteins make the perfect lunch break for the dusty cyclist.

A good book, coffee and some proteins make the perfect lunch break for the dusty cyclist.

Roadside smelly companions (somehow you can sense the smell of cammels from a great distance)

Roadside smelly companions (somehow you can sense the smell of cammels from a great distance)

Desert glamping take 2, this tame with a scenery which seems taken from Mars.

Desert glamping take 2, this tame with a scenery which seems taken from Mars.

The end of the journey, and an incredibly well deserved swim in the Caspian Sea.

The end of the journey, and an incredibly well deserved swim in the Caspian Sea.

The end.

The end.

 

DSC_4216

Samarkand, poppy fields and snowy mountains, and some practical considerations about Uzbekistan

Probably the strongest impression I have from Uzbekistan is seeing the mountains after leaving Samarkand, the first mountains I’ve encountered after almost 3000 kilometers through flat high plateaus and deserts. Somehow I really missed the mountains and even if I knew that tough times (and tough roads) are ahead I was really happy with the change.

Uzbekistan at the end of April looks almost magical in some places, with high mountains in the background, immense green pastures dotted by an infinite number of poppy flowers. It seems one of the best times to cross the country before the scorching temperatures of mid-supper, with more that two months with temperatures above 40 degrees.

From all the countries which I’ve crossed I think that the mixture of peoples and races is incredible in Uzbekistan, especially near Buchara and Samarkand. You see almost everything from blue eyed persians, to children with mongol looks, to Turkic faces and the blond hair and round faces of the Russians.

Also there is a huge difference between how travelers are perceived in the touristic cities and in the countryside. The human contact which you encounter on the least traveled cannot be compared with the way tourists are seen in major touristic site like Samarkand. There you one of many, while a hundred kilometers away on a dusty mountain road you might be the first guy riding a bike which they’ve seen this year.

This being said in the short time I’ve spent in Uzbekistan I did encounter some incredible examples of hospitality, and being invited to spend the night at locals happened quite a few times in the countryside, with the only mention that a little bit of Russian can really help up getting some information across. And it’s incredible how much you can express with a small vocabulary. I clearly remember an evening somewhere in the south of Uzbekistan, when the Maqsud was politely set the TV to a Russian channel thinking that I would probably understand something from it. I somehow got the impression that his Russian was not much better than mine.

And now for the practical considerations:

1. Visas and Money

Uzbekistan is a place where you literally carry with you a bag of money as large amounts of small and almost worthless bills make a wallet a complete joke. Samarkand was also the first place after Turkey where I managed to withdraw money from an ATM which was more than welcome as my cash reserves where dwindling. On the other hand it’s really important to try and change money at money changers using the black market rate which is usually 20-30% better than what you normally get in a bank,

Visa-wise the Uzbek visa has been the most expensive visa for me, cosing in total 150 dollars, 75 for the visa and 70 for the letter of invitation. If you have  an embassy in Tehran which can issue a letter of recommendation for you can skip the letter of invitation but on the plus side if you do pay for a letter of invitation you get the visa on the spot in Teheran.

2. Roads and food

The roads are really bad sometimes, with long stretches under construction and a lot of gravel in some places. On the plus side most of the cars are Ladas or small Chevrolets and generally the traffic isn’t disturbing.

The food can be summed up in Plov, the rice dish popular in the entire Central Asia, Laghman, a very consisten noodle soup, and Samsa, tasty baked pastry with bits of sheep meat and onions inside. Samsa on the other hand can be a bit dodgy if you have a sensitive stomach and I did meet at least two travelers which got food poisoning from it.

3. Bureaucracy and rules.

Theoretically in Uzbekistan a tourist should spent each night in a government approved hotels, where you receive a small note saying that you’ve spent the night there. Also theoretically police can check you for these notes and police stops (and there is one going from each county the the next) or when you leave the country. While biking following these rule is next to impossible and my experience was that the police officers were ok when I explained this at police stops. At the same time you can always meet the bribe awaiting policeman. 

4. Scenery and sites.

Bukhara, Samarkand and Shahrizabz are amazing well preserved medieval silk road jewels and probably if you want to travel a bit back in time and if you want to get an idea what the silk road meant to the region they are a must see. I did like Bukhara much more than Samarkand which seems overly sanitized. When you add the variety of the landscape in the south-eastern part of the country and the relatively empty roads you end up with a place which is really enjoyable to cycle through.

5. People.

As I’ve said before the people are incredibly hospitable and also really diverse. Near Samarkand you encounter Uzbek villages and you almost always see people working in the fields, maintaining  an incredible network of irrigation canals and perfectly aligned fields. Then you have the city dwelling tadjik and the shepherd villages of the relatively nomadic Kyrgyz, all in just a few hundred kilometers. And they are all generally hospitable and friendly, but a bit of basic Russian will really get you a long way.

A bag of money worth around 100 dollars.

A bag of money worth around 100 dollars.

The 3 wheeled tractor, always popular in Uzbekistan.

The 3 wheeled tractor, always popular in Uzbekistan.

Curiosity and the chance of practicing a bit of russian.

Curiosity and the chance of practicing a bit of russian.

Work begins with the first hour after sunrise.

Work beggins with the first hour after sunrise.

 

Blue overdose.

Blue overdose.

Sanitized.

Sanitized.

Searching for the shadow.

Searching for the shadow.

Shahrizabz and the imense gate of the Timur's summer palace of Timur.

Shahrizabz and the imense gate of the summer palace of Timur.

The entrance to a 600 year old mausoleum.

The entrance to a 600 year old mausoleum.

Geometry.

Geometry.

The typical breakfast, yogurt and bread.

The typical breakfast, yogurt and bread.

School crossing with slanted eyes.

School crossing with slanted eyes.

Finding shelter from the heat.

Finding shelter from the heat.

Details.

Details.

Following the road.

Following the road.

Inside one typical uzbek home.

Inside one typical uzbek home.

Red, yellow, green and blue.

Red, yellow, green and blue.

Heading towards the Pamirs.

Heading towards the Pamirs.

Uzbek.

Uzbek.

 

9
Golden Oxen Newz / Re: Golden Oxen's News Channel - Hi Karpatok
« Last post by Golden Oxen on Today at 05:05:42 AM »
 Just wonderful to know you are well and have found a new home where you feel secure and at peace.

 Your prose is as sharp, poignant, and sincere as ever.  Missed You.                    Regards, GO
10
"The weapons fetish is just a symptom of a country for whom war is the most important export."  And bingo, just what I was really getting at but you did it better, Surly. It's necessary to get a load of the whole picture. A seething violent hateful hating nation. A sicko paranoid nation of Now No diplomacy meaning shoot to kill first talk later, not the other way around. Interesting how people here on this forum barely mention the supported Palestinan Genocide, too busy promoting and fantasizing more violence at home. Owning a gun means accepting the possibility of using it, thinking of how it might be necessary, thinking of retaliation for what hasn't even happened, looking forward to it. No surprise that such personalities and psychological make up have produced and harbored the hard core dyed in the wool neocons and mic milking the fantasy. It's no wonder that we are now so hated and despised, having forever fostered and projected this inner fantasy of violence outward upon the whole world. America is sick with paranoia spewing violence and angry aggression upon the entire rest of the world. What has made us so sick and unable to heal our society? Please tell me.

https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/britsinthephilippines.top/philippines-genocide-3-million-filipinos-killed/%3famp

https://www.thenation.com/article/why-cant-americans-remember-anyones-deaths-other-than-their-own/
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