Doomstead Diner Menu => Science, Inventions & Techology => Topic started by: RE on November 06, 2017, 05:29:50 AM

Title: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: RE on November 06, 2017, 05:29:50 AM
And so it begins.

RE

http://www.youtube.com/v/6SsnBmRt4i4
Title: 🛬 Death of Aviation: The rise and fall of the Airbus A380 superjumbo
Post by: RE on February 14, 2019, 08:19:28 AM
Following closely on the heels of the recent death of the Boeing 747 Jumbo Jet, the Airbus A380 is now history also.  The death of the aviation industry has begun.

RE

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/14/airbus-a380-superjumbo-the-rise-and-fall.html (https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/14/airbus-a380-superjumbo-the-rise-and-fall.html)

The rise and fall of the Airbus A380 superjumbo

(https://fm.cnbc.com/applications/cnbc.com/resources/img/editorial/2013/12/09/101258043-82917571.530x298.jpg?v=1386607172)

    Airbus has ended its A380 superjumbo program.
    Due to a lack of orders, the future of the plane had long been in doubt.
    The very first commercial A380 journey flew under a Singapore Airlines livery in 2007.

David Reid   | @cnbcdavy
Published 6 Hours Ago CNBC.com
   
      
An A380 aircraft under construction at an EADS factory in Toulouse, France
Pascal Parrot | Getty Images
An A380 aircraft under construction at an EADS factory in Toulouse, France

The European plane maker Airbus announced an end to its A380 superjumbo program, just 12 years after it first took to the skies.

The future of the world's largest commercial jet-liner had long been in doubt after it became clear that it was heavily reliant on just one customer, the Middle East airline Emirates.

CNBC takes a look at the plane that was built to revolutionize air travel, but found that the skies had already moved on.
The business case

Built as a direct response to Boeing's 747, the A380 program was officially launched in June 1994. The European plane was seen as a big bet that air travel would become "hub and spoke," where large planes would carry out the first long leg to big airports before passengers would splinter off to their final destination in smaller jets.

While Boeing's 747-8 can carry around 470 passengers, the A380 holds at least 500 and has been configured by Emirates to carry as many as 600.

The plane's huge number of seats was seen as key in helping to free up the air traffic overcrowding at several big airports such as London's Heathrow, New York's JFK and Chicago's O'Hare.

Each plane is priced publicly at around $445 million although airlines negotiate steep discounts.

(https://fm.cnbc.com/applications/cnbc.com/resources/img/editorial/2014/02/06/101397606-466879797.530x298.jpg?v=1391732473)
The plane takes to the skies
This photograph taken on January 7, 2014 shows a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380 approaching for landing at Changi International Airport in Singapore.
Roslan Rahman | AFP | Getty Images

The A380 is mainly built in a 1.6-million-square-foot assembly plant at Airbus' headquarters in Toulouse.

The very first version to fly took off from Toulouse in April 2005 and was first used commercially by Singapore Airlines in October 2007, flying between Singapore and Sydney.

British Airways, Air France, Emirates and Air China have all been among the A380's 13 different carriers although no U.S., South American or African airline has ever placed an order.

Customer feedback was positive as additional space, walk-up bars, and a quiet ride all pleased flyers. Airlines found they could charge a small premium on tickets as customers hunted for routes using the superjumbo.
What went wrong?

(https://fm.cnbc.com/applications/cnbc.com/resources/img/editorial/2018/01/18/104952456-Capture.530x298.JPG?v=1516272303)
An Airbus A380 in Emirates livery.
Airbus

Airbus' Global Market Forecast from the year 2000 predicted that 1,235 "very large aircraft" would be delivered to customers between 2000 and 2019. But as of January 2019, Airbus had received 313 firm orders and delivered just 234 aircraft.

The firm's lofty target was swiftly undermined by the arrival of more fuel-friendly offerings such as Airbus's own A350 or Boeing's 787 Dreamliner.

The smaller aircraft were lighter and could be run more efficiently as the expectation of a steep rise in passenger travel failed to materialize. It was also found that very few routes could operate the A380 at full capacity.

Timing does seem to have been a problem. As the A380 hit the world's runways, a worldwide liberalization of flight routes known as "Open Skies" was underway. This allowed airlines to downsize their planes and fly more regularly.

Added to that is the rise of the ultra long-haul flight. Airlines have asked both Boeing and Airbus to come up with planes that can haul passengers from one side of the world without stopping.
Freighter future?

Boeing's 747 has just celebrated 50 years in the air. Demand for that plane has also dipped sharply but it has found a new role as a freighter.

But a cargo version of the A380 is seen as unworkable for one reason — it is too big. The plane would reach maximum payload long before it's actually full. One estimate is that an A380 could carry 60 percent more volume than a 747 but only 28 percent more weight, thereby making it inefficient.
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: Surly1 on February 14, 2019, 09:28:44 AM
As a followup to this--

For some reason I came across this article and read it, mostly because I am as likely to ride about such an aircraft as I am to take up pole vaulting. You might get a kick out of it.

I flew 13 hours nonstop on the world's biggest passenger plane, the $446 million Airbus superjumbo jet, and it's about as good as economy can get (https://www.businessinsider.com/emirates-airline-airbus-a380-economy-class-review-new-york-dubai-2018-11)

(https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5bed7668da27f826007fc578-1536-1152.jpg)
The A380 superjumbo jet is supposed to be a game-changer. I had to find out for myself. Harrison Jacobs/Business Insider; REUTERS/Eric Gaillard

While I'm sure there are planty of wealthy and business types to fill up first class and business, there's probably not enough money sloshing around to fill up economy class.

(https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5bed7622beb6700db21b5868-960-720.jpg)
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: RE on February 14, 2019, 09:55:23 AM
As a followup to this--

For some reason I came across this article and read it, mostly because I am as likely to ride about such an aircraft as I am to take up pole vaulting. You might get a kick out of it.

Looks a lot like the interior of a 747 in Economy, although I recall that as having 5 seats across in the center.  I only rode economy on a 747 once though, on my Honeymoon with the ex-wife.  All the rest of the trips were First Class down to Oz to visit with Dad the Pigman after the divorce.

RE
Title: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Airbus’s A380 failure ripples through its rivalry with Bo
Post by: RE on February 15, 2019, 02:00:00 AM
https://www.seattletimes.com/business/boeing-aerospace/airbus-a380-failure-highlights-the-higher-risk-boeing-must-take-to-develop-a-new-jet/ (https://www.seattletimes.com/business/boeing-aerospace/airbus-a380-failure-highlights-the-higher-risk-boeing-must-take-to-develop-a-new-jet/)

 Airbus’s A380 failure ripples through its rivalry with Boeing in complex ways
Originally published February 14, 2019 at 6:20 pm Updated February 14, 2019 at 8:48 pm

(https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/8752ea1f-abfa-435a-b6c6-66c00b3b7147-768x512.jpg)
FILE — An Emirates Airline Airbus A380 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York on June 12, 2014. Demand for the enormous A380 has fallen as traffic began to shift to smaller, more regional airports. (Michael Nagle/The New York Times)

Airbus's decision to terminate its A380 superjumbo jet program as of early 2021 may amount to good news for the company's future. For rival Boeing, while there is a silver lining for its large 777X jet some years out, near-term it could face loss of a big order.
Share story
Dominic Gates By Dominic Gates
Seattle Times aerospace reporter

The Airbus A380 superjumbo jet is the largest airliner ever built, the pride of Europe, a majestic double-decker that thrills onlookers as it flies past and offers passengers unprecedented space and comfort. Now it’s also the biggest jet-program failure in Airbus history.

Thursday’s decision to end the program came after Gulf carrier Emirates canceled orders for 39 of the giant airplanes, leaving a backlog too small to sustain production beyond early 2021. Strangely though, it may amount to good news for Airbus’ future.

And for rival Boeing, while there is a silver lining some years out, near-term there could be negative impacts.

The blow to Airbus has complex implications for both manufacturers

    It comes with an accounting write-off of 463 million euros, or $523 million, marking at least an endpoint to years of losses for Airbus. However, the financial damage is limited because billions of dollars in European government launch aid will now be forgiven.
    The sting of the A380 blow will also be soothed by compensatory orders from Emirates for Airbus’ smaller A350 and A330neo widebody jets.
    Those new orders could have a secondary effect that damages Boeing, with those Airbus jets replacing an Emirates commitment for 40 similarly sized 787-10 Dreamliners that was never finalized.
    And counter-intuitively, Airbus believes that the forgiveness of the government launch aid loans that comes with the termination could give it a get-out-of-jail-free card in the case against it at the World Trade Organization (WTO)

Most Read Business Stories

    Amazon: Canceled New York jobs likely to go elsewhere; company will 'continue to evaluate' growth in Seattle
    Record 7 million Americans are 3 months behind on car payments, a red flag for economy
    Airbus's A380 failure ripples through its rivalry with Boeing in complex ways
    REI CEO Jerry Stritzke resigns, saying he failed to disclose a 'personal' relationship
    Bezos probe concludes mistress' brother was Enquirer source

Boeing may have to content itself with the promise that the 777-9X will win new orders three or four years out after it displaces the A380 as the biggest plane in the sky.

Contrasting histories

The A380 failure is Airbus’ second jet-program disaster after the smaller widebody A340 program ended prematurely in 2012. In contrast, Boeing, despite enormous troubles with many of its airplane programs, in each case has struggled through to commercial success.

Airbus delivered just 377 of the four-engine A340s before it terminated that program. And after it delivers the final 14 A380s to Emirates by early 2021, the superjumbo program will end with just 251 deliveries.

In contrast, not counting the failed 717 inherited from McDonnell Douglas, none of Boeing’s first seven legacy jet programs, from the 707 to the 777, has sold less than 1,000 planes. (For the small, single-aisle 737s, make that 10,500 and counting.)

And Boeing’s eighth legacy jet program, the 787 Dreamliner, has already delivered almost 800 jets, with firm orders that will take it past 1,400 deliveries.
ADVERTISING

The starkest A380 comparison is with the venerable Boeing 747 jumbo jet, which just turned 50 years old and has survived through multiple improved iterations to the latest 747-8 model. At the end of January, Boeing had delivered 1,548 of these Queen of the Skies aircraft.

The 747 first flew in 1969 and the A380 in 2005. Astonishingly, Boeing should still be building the 747 when the A380 is gone.

Airplanes of the future

In an interview at the Farnborough Air Show in July, Emirates Chief Executive Tim Clark was still hoping to persuade Airbus and Rolls-Royce to upgrade the A380 with new, more efficient engines and improved aerodynamics including winglets.

He characterized the A380 as integral to “the bold and brave business model” of his airline, which flies huge numbers of passengers long-haul from its hub in Dubai. But he conceded that aerospace-efficiency improvements since the A380 was designed in the 1990s were “step changes that left the A380 behind.”

When he couldn’t get Rolls and Airbus to invest the money in improvements, Clark finally decided to drastically pare back his order. With Emirates effectively the sole customer left, Airbus pulled the plug.

“We have no substantial A380 backlog and hence no basis to sustain production, despite all our sales efforts with other airlines in recent years,” said Airbus chief Tom Enders.

Some 3,000 to 3,500 Airbus employees across Europe work on the A380. On Thursday, management offered the hope that job losses will be limited by increases in production on other programs, including the A320, the A330neo and the A350.

The agreement with Emirates replaces the 39 A380s it canceled with new orders for 40 A330-900neo and 30 A350-900 aircraft. The order for the slow-selling A330neo will be particularly welcome.

And these two orders may be bad news for Boeing, because it’s now widely expected that Emirates will pull out of a fall 2017 nonbinding commitment to buy the 40 Dreamliners.

The only potential silver lining for Boeing is that the demise of the A380 will stimulate orders for the forthcoming 777-9X, due to roll out of the Everett factory for the first time this month, and seating 400 to 425 passengers.

Emirates may compensate Boeing for nixing the 787-10 order by adding more to its current order for 150 of the big 777Xs. Boeing could certainly use a sales boost for the 777X, which have been stalled since its launch in 2013.

Doug Harned, an analyst with Bernstein Research, wrote in a note to investors Thursday that “with the decline of the A380 and no other 400+ seat airplanes on the horizon, the 777X will be the principal aircraft for large, long range routes.”

However, for now, this market for very large airplanes is slumped.

Emirates neighbor Etihad, the troubled carrier of Abu Dhabi, just cut its Airbus order by 42 A350-900s as part of a financial restructuring, and it is expected to defer or cancel part of its Boeing order for 25 777Xs.

“Nobody seems to want a bigger airplane right now,” said aviation analyst Richard Aboulafia of the Teal Group.

He said he expects that eventually the death of the A380 will be good for the 777X, as it becomes the largest airliner available.

“But it looks like the 777X will have to get through some thin times before it inherits that mantle,” Aboulafia said.

Subsidies and risk

The A380 failure also points to a large imbalance in the risk borne by the two airplane giants when they launch new jet programs.

The financial blow to Airbus of the A380 failure, while severe, is cushioned by not having to fully repay the government loans it used to help develop the A380. In contrast, a commercial failure of similar magnitude could potentially bring Boeing down.

It’s an argument Boeing has cited repeatedly in the U.S.’s case against Airbus at the WTO.

The U.S. claimed in its WTO filings that Airbus received a total of about $4 billion in launch aid for the A380.

According to the European Commission, between 1992 and 2010 the governments of France, Germany, the U.K. and Spain provided launch funding to Airbus covering three jet programs — the A330-200, the A340-500 and -600 and the A380 — amounting in total to 3.7 billion euros, or $4.2 billion.

The vast majority of that was for the A380 and in theory it should all be paid back with interest.

Last May, the WTO ruled in a final decision that Airbus had failed to fix the harm to Boeing from both the A380 and subsequent A350 launch aid. Since then, Boeing’s lawyers have filed motions to impose sanctions on Airbus.

The crux of the WTO ruling is that the government loans to Airbus for those two jet programs were not granted on standard commercial terms.

For Boeing, it’s always been a key point that since the repayments are a fraction of the profit on each delivery, once deliveries end, no more repayments are due and the rest of the loan is forgiven.

Excluding the enormous costs of development, Airbus says it “broke even” on production costs of the A380 in 2015, which means it would have begun then, as it booked a small profit for each airplane, to make the initial, small repayments on the launch aid loans.

However, when lack of demand forced Airbus to cut the planned production rate for this year from 12 to just six airplanes, CEO Enders conceded that “at six per year, we are losing money. That is very clear.”

So A380 repayments have stopped and there won’t be any more.

Aboulafia, speaking Wednesday on the sidelines of the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance annual conference in Lynnwood said, “You can’t talk about a loan being on commercial terms if you are indemnified against failure.”

The termination of the A380 “gives Boeing a strong moral argument,” he added.

However, because the WTO lacks any teeth to enforce its rulings, Aboulafia said he’s pessimistic about any impact on the case against Airbus that has already dragged on more than 14 years.

“I don’t see anything enforceable coming out of this,” Aboulafia said.

Going further, the European Union is expected to file a formal motion declaring that the A380 cancellation satisfies its duty to comply with the WTO panel’s ruling.

That’s because when Airbus’ A340 loans were forgiven after that program was canceled, the WTO panel ruled that the A340 subsidies were ended and no longer relevant to the case.

A person close to the WTO case on the European side who spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of formal motions being filed, said that almost all of the sanctions against Airbus that Boeing’s trade lawyers have called for “hinge on future sales of the A380,” sales campaigns that are now dead.

“The WTO is interested only in future market effect,” the person said. “The market effect of a stopped program is zero. What remains of their sanctions case ended this morning.”

Boeing declined to make anyone available to discuss the impact on its WTO case.
Title: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Private cabins, flying bars—farewell A380
Post by: RE on February 17, 2019, 12:34:56 AM
This story is generating a phenomenal number of articles  Airplane Nostalgia is rampant.

RE

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2019/02/private-cabins-flying-bars-and-hundreds-of-seats-farewell-airbus-a380/

carbon fiber skywhale —
Private cabins, flying bars, and hundreds of seats—farewell, Airbus A380

(https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/GettyImages-52007187-1440x878.jpg)
Enjoy this photo gallery in memory of the now-cancelled airliner.

Jonathan M. Gitlin - 2/16/2019, 5:30 AM

On Valentine's Day, Airbus confirmed that production of the massive A380 airliner will come to an end, breaking some plane nerds' hearts. When it was unveiled to the world in 2005, Airbus touted its efficiency over twin-engined long-haul planes, but this mighty carbon-fiber double-decker never lived up to expectations. Not all airports could accommodate its physical size, and getting the self-loading cargo on and off could take a while.
Further Reading
Citing lack of demand, Airbus cancels A380 superjumbo aircraft

Unlike the 747, it doesn't appear set to have a continued career carrying cargo, either. You'd expect the biggest passenger plane of the skies to make a pretty decent freighter. But there's no folding nose variant, so you can't take full advantage of its commodious interior to carry really big stuff. In 2021, the last A380 will depart final assembly in Toulouse, France. By then, more than 300 of these carbon composite skywhales should have been delivered, and so we expect they'll remain a regular sight at airports they already service.

The Airbus superjumbo never really captured the public's heart the way the 747 has, and there's no denying the decision to put the cockpit on the lower deck gives the plane a hydrocephalic appearance. But the complex curvature of the wing is a thing of beauty, and it's always wonderful to see something so large land so gracefully. (If you time your visit to the Smithsonian Udvar-Hazy annex for the right time of day, you can watch them come in up on the observation deck.)

Flying long-distance in an A380 can be an opulent affair. Both Singapore Airlines and Emirates have private first class suites on board, and the flying bar—first seen on the original jumbo jet—has made something of a comeback, too. The promo shots have a certain air of "crew quarters on NCC-1701D," although you'll see from the gallery (or on YouTube) that they're a little smaller than that. Further aft things are more spartan, and pick the upper deck because the 2-4-2 layout is less cramped than downstairs' 3-4-3.

I've only been fortunate enough to fly an A380 once (of late 747s appear to be the preferred type for Dulles to Heathrow). But that one trip made me fall for the big plastic bird. It was a quiet and smooth ride, and the bathrooms at the front of the upper deck were bigger than the bathrooms of some houses I've lived in. Here's to you, you majestic flying cruise liner.

Listing image by Airbus
Title: 🛬 Death of Aviation: The Plane That Never Should Have Been Built: The A380 Was
Post by: RE on February 17, 2019, 12:47:50 AM
https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielreed/2019/02/15/the-plane-that-never-should-have-been-built-the-a380-was-designed-for-marketplace-failure/#2f79ea403c59 (https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielreed/2019/02/15/the-plane-that-never-should-have-been-built-the-a380-was-designed-for-marketplace-failure/#2f79ea403c59)

The Plane That Never Should Have Been Built: The A380 Was Designed For Failure

Dan Reed
Contributor

Aerospace & Defense
I write about airlines, the travel biz, and related industries

(https://thumbor.forbes.com/thumbor/960x0/https%3A%2F%2Fspecials-images.forbesimg.com%2Fdam%2Fimageserve%2F12de1d8b30a44d9bbaeb3f54594dcc4c%2F960x0.jpg%3Ffit%3Dscale)
An Emirates Airbus A380, with nearly 500 seats, was showered by water canons as it mad it's inaugural arrival at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in 2014, in Grapevine, Texas.  (Tony Gutierrez/Associated Press)

Blame it on testosterone, of which there’s always been an over-abundance in aircraft design and manufacturing. Or blame it on national pride (or continental, in the case of the multi-nation European company Airbus) and political grandstanding. Blame it on out-sized executive or corporate egos – another thing that is never lacking in aviation.

But whatever you choose to blame it on – and there are plenty more options to pick from  – Airbus' announcement Thursday that it will stop making the A380 superjumbo airplane amounts to a giant “I told you so” moment.  Only the “I” in that phrase does not refer to just any one person.

Many, many aircraft manufacturing experts, airline executives, industry consultants, airport planners, travel marketing and planning executives, tourism promoters and chamber of commerce-type officials around the globe, and yes, a whole bunch of reporters and pundits did, in fact, advise Airbus leaders in the 1990s not to do it as they were considering whether to build a mega-jet even bigger than Boeing’s 747.

Even Boeing’s brass – who, if their intent had been ill would have encouraged their Airbus counterparts to build the 600-plus seat, double-decked behemoth -- told  their rivals in the 1990s that building a superjumbo was a bad idea, and that even their own 747 was probably too big for the market. In fact, when they dropped out of talks about a possible joint venture to build a huge airplane, Boeing's leaders were quite open about their reasons. Maybe they didn't say it quite so explicitly, but in effect Boeing's leaders made it clear that they thought that it would be impossible to make a profit on such a plane. But Airbus executives, laboring under pressure from their political masters in France and Germany primarily and whatever other unwise motivations that drove them, plowed ahead.

The A380 turned out to be an impressive technical achievement, and passengers loved flying on the roomy beast. But Thursday’s announcement that production would end in 2021 was no surprise to anyone who was paying attention back when Airbus was considering building it. Nor was it a surprise to anyone who has been even sporadically following the saga of the plane’s slow-motion failure in the market and Airbus’ current leadership’s dilemma over how to kill off its politically popular but commercially disastrous signature program.
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Tom Enders, a German, became CEO of what is now Airbus Group in 2012, following the reign of Frenchman Louis Gallois, per the traditional Airbus pattern of alternating CEOs from the two countries in order to keep politicians on all sides at least partly satisfied. Enders’ goal at Airbus has been from the start to finish the job that Gallois proved incapable of achieving: converting into a real, honest-to-goodness, share-holder focused, profits-driven company the multi-national, politically-steered, pool of aviation assets and interests created to advance national and European pride plus lots of high-paying jobs.

Now Enders’ time at the helm is coming to an end – less than harmoniously – after seven years of fighting the rival national and political interests that have resisted giving up control of the aircraft maker to mere profit-focused investors. He’s set to retire in April. And he clearly had been searching for a way and a time to pull the plug on the A380 program before leaving. Doing so should give his well-regarded French successor, Guillaume Faury, something closer to a clean ledger, financially and politically, to work from going forward. It also should protect Faury from being saddled with the political blame for the potential loss of 3,500 European jobs because of the A380 program’s demise.

Emirates Airlines, the fast-growing global powerhouse based in Dubai, UAE, had been the A380's most important customer from the beginning. It placed the first order for the plane back in 2000 and took the first delivery in 2008. It has used the A380 as its primary tool in turning what used to be a “where’s that?” outpost on the south end of the sparsely populated Arabian Peninsula into one of the world’s busiest and best-operating connecting hubs. Dubai is just about perfectly situated geographically to serve as a connecting point for travel from both Europe and the Americas to India, Southeast Asia and the Australia/Oceania region. It and other airlines based in the Persian Gulf region have diverted huge amounts of passenger traffic from Japan and other connecting points, and created lots more traffic on those routes (and on routes to central and southern Africa) by pouring tons of capacity (via the A380s massive number of seats) at low prices into the market. Currently Emirates serves 50 global destinations with A380s, of which it currently operates 108. Not only has it stolen market share from global rivals, it has created lots of new demand, and captured most of that for itself. And Emirates has undermined western carriers’ pricing strategies and profitability on those routes with its abundance of cheap seats on offer.

It's unclear, maybe even doubtful, that Emirates could have done all that without the A380.

But no other carrier in the world has been able to use the A380 as effectively. Not Qantas, whose homeland is so far from the rest of the world that Airbus’ leaders thought Australia would become a huge A380 market. Not Singapore Air, one of the world’s best airlines and Asia’s leading carrier. Not Japan’s All Nippon Airways. Not British Airways. Not Air France. Nobody.

Those are among the most notable of the 15 other airlines that ever placed orders for the A380. (Two of those “carriers” were actually leasing firms ordering A380s in hopes of being able to lease them to carriers, but they couldn’t, so the 23 planes ordered between them were never built). And most of the others on the list of carriers that ordered A380s already have canceled some of their orders and/or sold or retired some of the ones they did fly.

(https://thumbor.forbes.com/thumbor/960x0/https%3A%2F%2Fspecials-images.forbesimg.com%2Fdam%2Fimageserve%2F41657174%2F960x0.jpg%3Ffit%3Dscale)
Much was written about the spacious - and expensive - private suites that some airlines installed for first class passengers on their A380s. But relatively few travelers ever got to experience the opulent accommodations. Here a visitor looks at two adjoining mock-up Suites, n display during the unveiling of Singapore Airlines A380 first class makeover in 2017. Singapore Air, the first carrier to put a double bed in its cabins spent $850 million to refit all its A380 jets to take airborne luxury up another notch. (Nicky Loh/Bloomberg)© 2017 Bloomberg Finance LP

Now even Emirates is losing some interest in the plane. It still flies those 108 in its fleet. But in announcing the A380’s production end on Thursday, Enders also disclosed that Emirates cancelled 35 of the 55 A380s it still had on order. In place of those 35 A380s Emirates said it would take 70 smaller, mid-size wide bodies from Airbus; A330s and A350s, mainly. At list prices those 70 other planes are worth about $21.4 billion. At a list price of $445.6 million each, those 35 cancelled A380s would be worth about $15.6 billion. That compares with the $24.5 billion (at list prices) that it would have paid for all 55 A380s that Emirates still had on order before Thursday.  Since Emirates, as Airbus’s best customer, likely pays nowhere near list price for any of its Airbus jets, it’s hard to tell whether Airbus or Emirates is getting the best end, financially, out this. But it’s likely somewhat close to being a wash in a financial sense.

It’s also very likely that Enders and his team at Airbus are happy with the arrangement – and may have even initiated it – as a way of creating a natural and graceful opportunity to put the A380 program out of its misery.

But it should have happened much earlier. In fact, the A380 should never have been built.

In the immediate aftermath of Thursday’s announcement most news reports followed the company line that the A380 was designed to disrupt the airline industry’s hub-and-spoke model of airline operations but was made vulnerable by the airlines’ shift point-to-point operations even before the first A380 was delivered 11 years ago.

In international hub-and-spoke operations airlines seek to collect travelers from many cities at a central collecting point, or hub, to fill large planes for flights to international destinations (hub-and-spoke does the same thing domestically, but using planes half or a third the size of a 747). Point-to-point international operations, as the name implies, focus of non-stop flights between international cities aboard mid-size wide body planes, often by-passing hubs.

But that, to put it kindly, is a gloss of what really caused the A380 to perform poorly in the market. With a program development cost of more than $17 billion upfront (some analysts suggest that number actually is as high as $25 billion), high European labor costs, persistent manufacturing cost overrun problems and widely suspected steep discounting of the A380’s price just to achieve the 396 firm orders it eventually did get (119 of those orders subsequently were cancelled) it is abundantly clear that the A380 program will be remembered as a massive money loser. It did, however, achieve its political masters’ goal of employing lots of European aerospace workers and keeping the Continent relevant in the high tech aviation manufacturing world.

What really happened is simple. From Day One Airbus’s superjumbo was too big; way too big. And Airbus should have known that from its two sets of talks with Boeing in the 1990s about teaming up to build a jointly-produced superjumbo. Careful, dispassionate analysis of the global travel market also would have shown Airbus leaders why Boeing and most airlines and travel companies thought building a superjumbo was a really dumb idea.

(https://thumbor.forbes.com/thumbor/960x0/https%3A%2F%2Fspecials-images.forbesimg.com%2Fdam%2Fimageserve%2F616007960%2F960x0.jpg%3Ffit%3Dscale)
While passengers reported that economy seating aboard A380s to be reasonably comfortable, economy cabins aboard the superjumbo aircraft are vast, as this photo inside a Lufthansa A380 illustrates. (Getty Images)Getty

Boeing’s iconic 747 had held the crown as the world’s largest passenger jet since its service entry in 1970. But by the ‘90s demand for later versions of the 747 had fallen way off from the peak demand era of the 1970s. It, too, was too big and too costly to operate profitably year-round on all but a handful of international routes. U.S. carriers, none of which ever seriously considered buying the A380, had begun removing the four-engine 747 and its smaller rivals, the Lockheed L1011 and McDonnell Douglas DC-10/MD-11 tri-jets, from domestic operations by the early ‘90s. Those planes’ large capacity and the low fare-oriented competitive marketplace driven by deregulation in this country made those wide bodies automatic money losers on domestic flights. And even internationally, the 747 had proved itself to be an inconsistent profits producer.

Boeing engineers, market analysts, financial planners and top leadership all told their Airbus counterparts during their talks about building a jointly-produced superjumbo plane that the market just wouldn’t support a 500- or 600-seater, and likely wouldn’t any time in the foreseeable future.  But Airbus’ leaders at the time did not listen. They were certain of the correctness of their view that hub airports were becoming too crowded to accommodate lots of flights each day on the same international routes, and that congestion would force airlines to switch to once-daily flights on such routes using superjumbos.

But those airport congestion worries were never well-founded. Yes, some airports were – and continue to be – heavily congested. But given the power of hubs to collect hundreds and hundreds of travelers a day to funnel into multiple profit-making hubs, airlines weren’t about to abandon that successful operating style. So they found other ways to make time and space available to keep on flying mid-size planes on key international routes like New York-London s many as 12 times a day. High frequency service aboard multiple mid-size planes was the model that they believed would continue to produce the most revenue and profits because it better fit what travelers actually wanted – lots of access and relatively low prices – than limited access service on one big plane each day in each market. The economic power of the hub was too obvious for airlines to throw it all away in pursuit of Airbus’ grand vision of a mega-plane flying once a day on major international routes.

Yes, as some have noted, some airlines did begin, as Airbus leaders had predicted, bypassing their own hubs, or big foreign hubs to operate some point-to-point flights using mid-size wide bodies. But relatively little of that kind of flying has ever been undertaken, and only on routes where significant point-to-point demand - especially business travel demand - already existed. Additionally, a small number of carriers – just 15 in total – ordered some A380s either because they operated in isolated but large markets where a bigger plane potentially might make  economic sense. Others, like British Airways, ordered a few A380s because they so thoroughly dominated a few routes with heavy existing demand that they thought a superjumbo had a realistic chance at becoming a profit maker in limited deployment. But no carrier, except for Emirates, pushed all their chips to the middle of table in a bet on the A380. In fact, even Emirates continued to order mid-size planes, mostly Boeing 777s, to hedge its bet on the A380 and to cover markets that even it knew an A380 was too big to serve.

The fact of the matter is that most international travel today continues to be aboard mid-size wide body planes, not the jumbo 747 or superjumbo A380. Indeed, the 747 has been fading gradually from the market for more than 20 years now. After delivering more than 1,500 747s in various versions over the last 49 years, Boeing is down to just 24 747-800s still on order. And nearly all of those are freighters. In fact, there are no more orders from airlines for the 747-800I, the current passenger version. However, two are being built now – to very special specifications - to replace the two 747s-200s that began serving in the role Air Force One way back in 1991. Now the wide-spread assumption in the aviation community is that Boeing will shut down its 747 production line entirely once those two highly specialized aircraft are delivered to the U.S. Air Force sometime in the middle of the next decade.

Thus, instead of the 747 and the A380, the future of international air travel over the next 30 years is likely to depend on mid-size wide body planes. Boeing’s and Airbus’ mid-size planes carry just half to two-thirds as many travelers as the 400-seat 747. That makes them consistent money makers on the routes where the 747 typically has struggled to be profitable on a year-round basis - and where the A380 simply cannot compete profitably. When in the mid-90s Boeing added its 777 with more than 300 seats to fit into the market between the 230-seat 767 and the 400-seat 747, it became the optimal Boeing plane for serving most high-demand long-haul international routes profitably. That further undercut the 747’s market opportunities. Now the 787, which entered service in 2012 featuring big operating cost savings, is taking the place of the out-of-production and slightly smaller 767 in Boeing’s lineup. Meanwhile Airbus has significantly updated its older 300-seat A330 and last year introduced its brand new, highly efficient A350 with similar seating capacity to compete effectively against Boeing’s two primary long-haul planes, the 787 and the 777.

Airbus, however, stubbornly pressed on with its A380, which is capable of carrying more than 600 seats but typically flies with closer 500 unusually spacious seats on board because airlines know another 100 seats on board would be superfluous and pointless. With the possible exception of Emirates, no airline has come close to wringing an acceptable return on its investment out of the A380. And most have struggled to even cover their direct operating costs on that plane on a full year-round basis.

So despite the quick and easy excuse being tossed around that the market changed on the A380 after it was designed and built, the reality is that the plane, as impressive and even beautiful as it is, was built for all the wrong reasons. It knowingly was aimed at a market that did not exist at the time of its design and, speaking generously, barely exists today even after 11 years of service. Simply put, the A380 was from the day it first flew designed to be a marketplace loser.

Dan Reed
Contributor

I wrote my first airline-related news story in May 1982 – about the first bankruptcy filing of Braniff International Airways. That led to 26 years covering airlines and related subjects at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and USA TODAY. I followed the industry through the entir...
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: The Plane That Never Should Have Been Built: The A380 Was
Post by: Surly1 on February 17, 2019, 01:55:22 AM
https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielreed/2019/02/15/the-plane-that-never-should-have-been-built-the-a380-was-designed-for-marketplace-failure/#2f79ea403c59 (https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielreed/2019/02/15/the-plane-that-never-should-have-been-built-the-a380-was-designed-for-marketplace-failure/#2f79ea403c59)

The Plane That Never Should Have Been Built: The A380 Was Designed For Failure

Excellent story.

Last week I read a review some review a traveler wrote for Emirates' economy class. As I looked at the pix of the interior, I wondered where they would find the asses to fill those seats.

Answer: they can't. You don't need to be a weatherman to know which way the wind is blowin'.

Quote
Airbus, however, stubbornly pressed on with its A380, which is capable of carrying more than 600 seats but typically flies with closer 500 unusually spacious seats on board because airlines know another 100 seats on board would be superfluous and pointless. With the possible exception of Emirates, no airline has come close to wringing an acceptable return on its investment out of the A380.

QED.
Title: 🛬 Death of Aviation:The A380 Operators that Weren’t: The Airlines that Never Go
Post by: RE on February 20, 2019, 02:15:16 AM
https://simpleflying.com/the-a380-operators-that-werent-the-airlines-that-never-got-the-a380/ (https://simpleflying.com/the-a380-operators-that-werent-the-airlines-that-never-got-the-a380/)

The A380 Operators that Weren’t: The Airlines that Never Got the A380

The A380 Operators that Weren’t: The Airlines that Never Got the A380 0

When A380 deliveries cease in 2021, over 200 superjumbos will have been operated by 13 airlines all over the world. The operators of the A380 are some of the highest-profile airlines in the world: Singapore Airlines, Emirates and British Airways, just to name a few. But often lesser-known are those airlines that ordered the A380 yet, for a variety of reasons, never took delivery. These are those airlines.

ANA A380ANA’s A380s only came into being because of Skymark’s cancelled orders. Photo: Airbus.

Transaero (Air Accord)

Russian airline Transaero ordered four A380s in 2012, making them the first airline in Russia and Eastern Europe to order the aircraft. The aircraft were to have been in a 3-class configuration seating around 700 passengers. Transaero initially planned to take delivery of their first A380 in late 2015, with reports suggesting that the aircraft would fly from Moscow to Vladivostok and New York. However, the worsening economic situation in Russia severely hurt Transaero’s business, leading to them delaying their first A380 delivery, before ceasing operations in October 2015. Three of Transaero’s orders remain on the Airbus order book, under the label of Air Accord.

An A380 in Transaero livery An A380 in Transaero livery (Airbus)

Virgin Atlantic

All the way back in 2001, Virgin Atlantic ordered six A380s, originally due for delivery in 2006. Yet Virgin Atlantic consistently delayed their order, before it finally disappeared from Airbus’ order total last February. It’s thought that Virgin simply lacked the high-density route network needed to support A380 operations, and instead prefers smaller twinjets. The A350-1000 has replaced the A380 as the flagship of Virgin Atlantic’s fleet.

Rendering of a Virgin Atlantic A380Rendering of a Virgin Atlantic A380 (Airbus)

Kingfisher Airlines

Kingfisher Airlines ordered 5 A380s soon after starting operations in 2005, making them the first (and likely only) airline in India to order the superjumbo. In 2008 they doubled their order to 10 aircraft and asked for Airbus to advance the delivery date on their existing orders to 2009 from 2010/2011. This was an ambitious move for an airline which at that time was not yet allowed to operate internationally. Yet throughout its short history as an airline Kingfisher was never able to make money and in 2012 high debts caught up with the airline and they ceased operations. By 2014, the order was removed from Airbus’ order books.

Air Austral

Air Austral ordered two A380s back in 2009, planning to operate them in an 840-seat all-economy configuration to shuttle passengers on the 11-hour flight between Paris-CDG and its base on Réunion island. However, this plan never came to fruition as they cancelled their order in 2016. However, Air Austral did end up operating the A380 (in a sense) as just last year they leased HiFly’s A380 to fill in for one of their 787s which was having engine issues.

HiFly A380One of Hi Fly’s A380s. Photo: HiFly

Skymark Airlines

Skymark Airlines, then a major Japanese low-cost carrier, ordered six A380s back in 2011, representing a major success for Airbus in the Japanese market that was then highly dominated by Boeing. Despite being a low-cost carrier, Skymark planned to operate the A380 in a low-density, all-premium configuration of only 394 seats (114 business and 280 premium economy). Yet over the next few years Skymark’s financial situation degraded quickly. Skymark wasn’t able to pay for the A380s they had ordered. In 2014, even though Skymark’s first two A380s were already at an advanced stage of production, Airbus cancelled Skymark’s order. Soon afterwards, the airline filed for bankruptcy. The resulting legal drama saw Delta and ANA compete for creditor approval to restructure Skymark. ANA’s proposal succeeded only by them wooing the support for Airbus, one of Skymark’s largest creditors. In exchange, ANA placed an order for three A380s, which will soon enter service.

The first A380 for Skymark in productionThe first A380 for Skymark in production (Airbus)

Hong Kong Airlines

In 2011, Hong Kong Airlines ordered 10 A380s, with the intent of using these aircraft to drive their expansion into Europe. However, this order faced challenges from the beginning. In 2012 HX almost cancelled their order following the European Union’s adoption of a new tax framework for international carriers. Later, the decision by another HNA Group firm, Hong Kong Aviation Capital, to order 70 A320neos and A321neos also put the order into doubt. By March 2014, HX’s orders were listed as being from an “unidentified customer,” and this January they were finally removed from the order book.

International Lease Finance Corporation (ILFC)

ILFC was the first lessor to order the A380, booking 10 airframes in 2001. Yet as seems to be a recurring trend here, ILFC soured on their A380 order. In 2006 ILFC CEO Steven Udvar-Hazy suggested that ILFC could canel their order after Airbus announced major delays in the program. But the order limped along until 2011, when ILFC swapped out their 10 A380s for an order of 75 A320neos and 25 A321neos.

Amedeo

Doric Lease, a predecessor to the Amedeo brand, originally placed this order in 2013. Like ILFC, Amedeo had trouble finding airlines to lease the A380. In 2017, Amedeo proposed creating its own all-A380 airline, to offer the aircraft to traditional airlines, as well as possibly disruptive entrants such as Airbnb. This unusual business plan never came to fruition, and on February 14 Amedeo formally scrapped their order.

The firming of Amedeo's order at the 2014 Singapore Airshow The firming of Amedeo’s order at the 2014 Singapore Airshow (Airbus)

Kingdom Holding Company

Perhaps the most unique A380 order ever placed was Kingdom Holding Company’s order for one VIP variant of the A380 in 2007. The A380 “flying palace” was destined for HRH Prince Alaweed bin Talal, one of the world’s richest individuals. This aircraft continually made headlines for its opulent interior, including a grand staircase and steam room. Nevertheless, in 2013 Prince Alaweed transferred the order to an undisclosed buyer. In 2014, Airbus removed it from the order book for good.

An Airbus rendering of the ACJ380, the A380's VIP variant An Airbus rendering of the ACJ380, the A380’s VIP variant (Airbus)

The A380F: FedEx and UPS

The final two cancelled A380 orders are the two orders for the A380F, the A380’s cancelled cargo variant. FedEx Express was the first to commit to the A380F, ordering 10 aircraft in 2002. UPS Airlines ordered an additional 10 in 2005. But by 2006, production delays and doubts about the aircraft’s usefulness as a cargo carrier doomed the A380’s cargo variant. In November 2006, FedEx cancelled their A380F orders, and instead placed an order for 15 777Fs. In March 2007, UPS followed suit and cancelled their order. Smaller A380F orders from ILFC and Emirates met the same fate. No other airlines ever ordered the A380F.

A FedEx A380FA FedEx A380F (Airbus)

Title: 🛬 British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Post by: RE on February 21, 2019, 12:02:25 AM
The 747 didn't get nearly this much coverage when it croaked.

RE

https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-may-buy-second-hand-a380s-to-replace-their-747s/

British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s

Nicholas
February 20, 2019 5:00 pm

With the Airbus A380 set to retire in 2021, many have been saddened by the upcoming end of both the 747 and the A380 in passenger use around the world.

But in an ironic twist of fate, it seems British Airways plans on snapping up as many A380s as possible to fuel their 747 replacement.
BOAC 747

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DSC0411-700x467.jpg)
Two British Airways 747 aircraft, one with special BOAC retro livery. The aircraft will stay in its retro livery until it is retired in 2023. Photo: Tom Boon/Simple Flying

What are the details?

Whilst the last A380 will roll off the production line in 2021, the very first A380s are starting to be retired right now. Singapore recently retired four back to their leaseholder, one of which ended up as the new Hi Fly A380, two for spare parts (their engines are worth a fortune) and the last one vanished.

This means there is coming oversupply of second-hand A380 aircraft entering the market (Six Air France A380s are expected to be retired late this year).

News that could be a real boon for British Airways, who are in the midst of retiring their 747 fleet. By replacing their 747 aircraft with A380 aircraft until their newer jets come online in 2022 (18 Airbus A350-1000s, and 12 Boeing 787-10 Dreamliners) British Airways can ensure a smooth transition. And you can bet that these A380 aircraft will be way cheaper than renting/wet-leasing or extending the lifespan of the 747s.

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/british-airways-a380-700x344.png)
A British Airways A380 takes off.

Why the A380?

But why would British Airways want the A380 over say, a Boeing 777-300ER? What unique challenges does British Airways have that an A380 would useful?

The first is British Airways’ hub airport, London Heathrow. Heathrow is one of the busiest airports in the world, and as such, has no free slots for aircraft to land. The only way for an airline to increase capacity or maintain their capacity is a bigger aircraft like the A380. By using an A380 over a smaller aircraft, British Airways has more tickets to sell and their cost per seat would not go down.

Additionally, British Airways already has 12 A380s in the fleet in service and has plenty of experience in utilizing the aircraft. They would not have to train new pilots, acquire new logistics or even find a new food supplier. Their current A380 infrastructure network could be expanded as each A380 is delivered.

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/British-Airways-A380-Business-class-700x451.png)
British Airways A380 Business class

Plus, if British Airways starts to fight more competitively on routes against their rival Virgin Atlantic, the A380 might be their secret weapon. They might even acquire the extra capacity to simply deprive Virgin of the chance, who originally had the plane on order years ago.

Lastly, if British Airways were to acquire some of the more premium versions of the A380, say for example the ones with the shower on board, that could be a killer advantage over any competition.
Title: Re: 🛬 British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Post by: Surly1 on February 21, 2019, 02:19:36 AM
The 747 didn't get nearly this much coverage when it croaked.

RE

https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-may-buy-second-hand-a380s-to-replace-their-747s/

British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Lastly, if British Airways were to acquire some of the more premium versions of the A380, say for example the ones with the shower on board, that could be a killer advantage over any competition.

I know you that you're following the story as close, if not closer, then I. So it makes me wonder,"How are they get to fill the seats?" Isn't this why the airplane manufacturers are getting out of the business? For lack of demand? I'm just a barely interestied observer, but this article reads as if the British Airways guys Capex don't talk to their operations guys.
Title: Re: 🛬 British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Post by: RE on February 21, 2019, 02:36:24 AM
The 747 didn't get nearly this much coverage when it croaked.

RE

https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-may-buy-second-hand-a380s-to-replace-their-747s/

British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Lastly, if British Airways were to acquire some of the more premium versions of the A380, say for example the ones with the shower on board, that could be a killer advantage over any competition.

I know you that you're following the story as close, if not closer, then I. So it makes me wonder,"How are they get to fill the seats?" Isn't this why the airplane manufacturers are getting out of the business? For lack of demand? I'm just a barely interestied observer, but this article reads as if the British Airways guys Capex don't talk to their operations guys.

The routes out of Heathrow that the Jumbos fly on are PACKED.  Like London to Berlin for instance.  They can't get any more flight departure times, so they have to increase their seat availibility by using bigger planes.  Will this be economically justified long term?  Likely not of course, but for now they want to increase their numbers.

RE
Title: Re: 🛬 British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Post by: Surly1 on February 21, 2019, 04:14:27 AM
The 747 didn't get nearly this much coverage when it croaked.

RE

https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-may-buy-second-hand-a380s-to-replace-their-747s/

British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Lastly, if British Airways were to acquire some of the more premium versions of the A380, say for example the ones with the shower on board, that could be a killer advantage over any competition.

I know you that you're following the story as close, if not closer, then I. So it makes me wonder,"How are they get to fill the seats?" Isn't this why the airplane manufacturers are getting out of the business? For lack of demand? I'm just a barely interestied observer, but this article reads as if the British Airways guys Capex don't talk to their operations guys.

The routes out of Heathrow that the Jumbos fly on are PACKED.  Like London to Berlin for instance.  They can't get any more flight departure times, so they have to increase their seat availibility by using bigger planes.  Will this be economically justified long term?  Likely not of course, but for now they want to increase their numbers.

RE

That may well be so. But I remember reading the BI review of economy travel on an A380 and he described it as excellent/ As for the other seats, the price runs as follows:

Quote
The estimated average ticket cost for first-class private suites in Emirates A380 is around $14, 635 whereas, $9,571 for business class and $1,477 for economy class. Usually, the price of tickets in an Emirates A380 flight depends upon the route or varies from place to place.

That's a lot of buckage for First Class. Are there enough asses for those seats?
Or perhaps the better question is at what capacity and pricing model can they run these planes efficiently? I guess they've run those numbers, and I guess we'll see.
Title: Re: 🛬 British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Post by: RE on February 21, 2019, 06:07:35 AM
The 747 didn't get nearly this much coverage when it croaked.

RE

https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-may-buy-second-hand-a380s-to-replace-their-747s/

British Airways May Buy Second Hand A380’s To Replace Their 747’s
Lastly, if British Airways were to acquire some of the more premium versions of the A380, say for example the ones with the shower on board, that could be a killer advantage over any competition.

I know you that you're following the story as close, if not closer, then I. So it makes me wonder,"How are they get to fill the seats?" Isn't this why the airplane manufacturers are getting out of the business? For lack of demand? I'm just a barely interestied observer, but this article reads as if the British Airways guys Capex don't talk to their operations guys.

The routes out of Heathrow that the Jumbos fly on are PACKED.  Like London to Berlin for instance.  They can't get any more flight departure times, so they have to increase their seat availibility by using bigger planes.  Will this be economically justified long term?  Likely not of course, but for now they want to increase their numbers.

RE

That may well be so. But I remember reading the BI review of economy travel on an A380 and he described it as excellent/ As for the other seats, the price runs as follows:

Quote
The estimated average ticket cost for first-class private suites in Emirates A380 is around $14, 635 whereas, $9,571 for business class and $1,477 for economy class. Usually, the price of tickets in an Emirates A380 flight depends upon the route or varies from place to place.

That's a lot of buckage for First Class. Are there enough asses for those seats?
Or perhaps the better question is at what capacity and pricing model can they run these planes efficiently? I guess they've run those numbers, and I guess we'll see.

This is one that Brexit will impact on significantly.  Assuming the Brexit goes through, it will vastly reduce bizness travel out of the City of London.  Those are the people who pay the big bucks for First Class.

RE
Title: 🛬 Death of Aviation: The Airbus A380 vs Boeing 747 – What Plane Is Best?
Post by: RE on February 23, 2019, 12:21:10 AM
I agree with the conclusion here.  I won't spoil it for you though.

RE

https://simpleflying.com/a380-vs-747/

The Airbus A380 vs Boeing 747 – What Plane Is Best?

The Airbus A380 vs Boeing 747 – What Plane Is Best? 4

Many had believed that the A380 was to be the killer of the famous Jumbo Jet, the Boeing 747. But the retirement of the A380 program and freight sales of the Boeing 747 continuing to climb has shown otherwise.

But when both aircraft were at their peak, which was best? The fully loaded 800 seater A380 (in a terrifying all economy configuration) or the long-range 747 with a private cabin on board?

One airline is actually choosing between these two aircraft right now, as a stopgap measure before the next generation aircraft come online.

United OrderUnited retired the B747 in 2017. Photo: United

How will we be comparing the two aircraft?

First, we will be looking at official statistics from both Boeing’s and Airbus’s websites. We will be comparing the latest version of each, the Boeing 747-8 and the latest version of the Airbus A380-800.

Additionally, we will pretend that we are an airline looking for a large capacity aircraft for both passengers AND cargo. Whilst it goes without saying that a Boeing 747 freight variant would easily beat an A380 (as an Airbus cargo variant was never built) we will try to remain fair and imagine that we are primarily a passenger airline first.

We will be looking for the best flexibility and the most cost-effective. Whilst some aircraft might make a better customer experience (quieter engines, better cabins etc) we will try to focus just on the statistics on paper. Additionally, we will assume that both are just as easy to fly as each other.

Airbus vs BoeingAirbus vs Boeing superimposed on top.

Let’s begin!

Airbus A380 vs Boeing 747

Variant 747-8 A380-800
Cockpit crew Two Two
Capacity 410 in 3-class 555. 22F + 96J + 437Y
Exit limit 605 853
Cargo Volume 6,225 cu ft (176 m3) 6,190 cu ft (175.2 m3)
Length 250 ft 2 in / 76.3 m 238 ft 7 in / 72.72 m
Height 63 ft 6 in / 19.4 m 79 ft 0 in / 24.09 m
Wingspan 224 ft 7 in / 68.4 m 261 ft 8 in / 79.75 m
Wing 554 m2 (5,960 sq ft), sweep 37.5°, 8.45 AR 845 m2 (9,100 sq ft), AR 7.53,
 sweep 33.5°
Cabin width 20 ft (6.1 m) 21 ft 4 in (6.5 m)
MTOW 987,000 lb / 447,700 kg 1,268,000 lb / 575 t
OEW 485,300 lb / 220,128 kg 611,000 lb / 277 t
Max. payload 167,700 lb / 76,067 kg 185,000 lb / 84 t
Fuel capacity 63,034 US gal / 238,610 litres 85,472 US gal / 323,546 litres
  426,109 lb / 193,280 kg  559,937 lb / 253,983 kg
Cruise Mach 0.86 (493 kn; 914 km/h) Mach 0.85 (903 km/h; 488 kn)
MMo Mach 0.9 (516 kn; 956 km/h) Mach 0.89 (945 km/h; 511 kn)
Range 8,000 nmi (15,000 km)  8,000 nmi (14,800 km)
Ceiling 43,100 ft (13,100 m) 13,100 m (43,000 ft)
Engines (4×) 66,500 lbf (296 kN) GEnx-2B67 332.44–356.81 kN (74,740–80,210 lbf) GP7200 / Trent 900

For the sake of simplicity, we have not discussed the width of the upper cabins on both aircraft.

Airbus vs BoeingThe upper deck widths of both the Airbus and Boeing aircraft side by side.

Passengers

Without a doubt, the Airbus A380 smokes the 747 right out the gate with passenger capacity. But that’s because it was designed nearly 35-40 years after the Boeing 747 took flight and Airbus knew exactly on what metric to beat them. The addition of so much extra cabin space on board can also mean the A380 has room for bars, showers, lounges, and full private suites. Plus, in a full economy configuration, the A380 can handle 250 more passengers than the 747.

Winner: Airbus A380

Emirates was well known for their lavish A380s, including an onboard bar! Photo: Emirates

Cargo

Cargo is actually a very lucrative source of revenue for airlines, and our airline is no exception. Looking at cargo capacity, the Boeing 747 actually has more capacity on board despite having less powerful engines and less thrust. Airbus has leaned hard into serving passengers and let Boeing slip ahead. Plus we do have to admit that there exists a cargo version of the Boeing 747 that is very popular.

Winner: Boeing 747

Airbus A380FThe Airbus A380F was supposed to carry 150 tons of cargo with a range of 5,600 nm. Photo: Airbus.

Range and fuel capacity

In a shocking first for Simple Flying, both aircraft have almost the same range. Let’s look at fuel capacity instead. Straight away you can see that the Airbus A380 burns through just over 20,000 more US gal’s than the Boeing 747. This is due to the extra 150 or so passengers on board. Logically, these passengers would actually offset the extra fuel cost to fly the same distance and allow the Airbus to be more profitable.

Winner: Airbus A380

Airbus A380 in flightAirbus A380 in flight via Unsplash.

Wait what about fuel efficiency?

Ah yes, just because the Airbus has more fuel doesn’t mean that its any cheaper to run. Let’s look at the below graph.

FuelThis graph keeps on giving. Seriously, I’ve used it every time I’ve done a VS article.

As you can see, the Airbus is better than the Boeing 747-400 (the aircraft it was designed to beat) but further iterations of the Boeing 747 actually are far more efficient (and cost less money per passenger). Thus…

Winner: Boeing 747

Boeing 747The 747-8 looks great on paper!

Which aircraft is more popular?

Let’s look at how the market reacted to both of these aircraft and see if a pattern emerges. We will look at the lifetime of both aircraft.

Boeing 747 orders: 1,548 (Since first flight in 1968, 30 per year)

Airbus A380 orders: 313 (Since first flight in 2007, 26 per year)

…Oh right, and the A380 was canceled. Thus it’s pretty clear that even from a popularity point of view the Boeing 747 was more popular. But that may have been from it being a proven aircraft with nearly 40 years experience on the A380.

Winner: Boeing 747

QantasQantas 747 comes in to land in Perth Airport.

What about the cost?

Here is the list price for each aircraft:

Airbus A380 – $445.6 million

Boeing 747-8 – $402.9 million

The Boeing 747 is actually cheaper to buy and cheaper to operate. It might be smaller in terms of passenger capacity, but in a world where passengers want smaller aircraft that fly point to point, is that $45 million extra really worth it (that’s almost $300,000 per extra passenger, which you will need to make over the lifetime).

Granted if the A380 had been popular enough to reach higher production capacity, the price might have fallen. But we don’t live in that world.

Lastly, it’s likely that Airbus would have price matched the 747 for any customer (as they are known to do).

Winner: Boeing 747

British Airways 747British Airways 747

Which is best?

To this author, the A380 was the realization of a dream. A giant floating village that could fly across continents with entertainment, lounges and more. But the world moved on. Passengers today look for smaller airlines that can fly from their regional airport to another regional airport, and giant flying laputas just don’t have a place anymore. If an airline can fill up an entire A380, then it can be a huge profit driver but that is becoming increasingly rare.

Winner: Boeing 747

It’s for this reason that the smaller capacity 747 just seems to win out. But it is a hollow victory, as night is setting on the Jumbo Jet. The new aircraft (The Boeing 777x and the Airbus A350) almost match capacity but with massive improvements in design, cost, and fuel efficiency.

Title: 🛬 How Boeing’s first 747 took off — and changed the world forever
Post by: RE on February 24, 2019, 01:37:53 AM
I didn't realize it actually launched before the 70s.

RE

https://nypost.com/2019/02/23/how-the-first-747-took-off-and-changed-aviation-forever/

How Boeing’s first 747 took off — and changed the world forever

By Eric Spitznagel
February 23, 2019 | 12:49pm | Updated

(https://thenypost.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/rollout.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1236&h=820&crop=1)
The first 747 is rolled out of Boeing's plant in Washington state for display in 1968. The plane finally took off in February 1969. Courtesy of Boeing

Fifty years ago this month, on Feb. 9, 1969, the Boeing 747 was officially introduced to the world. But as the wide-bodied jumbo jet taxied down the runway for its inaugural flight from Paine Field, just north of Seattle, not everybody in the crowd was convinced it would be a success.

The plane, which would soon be dubbed “Queen of the Skies,” was big — maybe too big. At twice the size of the Boeing 707, it was by far the largest civilian passenger jet ever conceived: 231 feet long with a 196-foot wingspan — enough room to play regulation basketball on each wing — and a tail as tall as a six-story building. Impressive to look at, but would it fly?

Even Joe Sutter, the engineering mastermind who dreamed up the 747 (he passed away in 2016) was apprehensive. “The real concern was landing something this large,” Sutter said at the time. “That was the challenge.”

One person who never had any doubt was Brien Wygle, the co-pilot on that historic flight — along with pilot-in-command Jack Waddell and engineer Jess Wallick.

“A few thousand people showed up to watch,” Wygle, now 94 years old, told The Post. “We knew some of them were wondering if we were going to pull it off.”

(https://thenypost.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/flight_crew_1.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1280)
The original 747 team of co-pilot Jack Waddell, pilot Brien Wygle and engineer Jess Wallick (l-r).Courtesy of Boeing.

Even when they encountered a minor problem in the air — one of the plane’s wing flaps slipped off its track and wouldn’t retract — “we weren’t worried,” Wygle says. “It flew like a dream. We didn’t have hundreds and hundreds of engineers on the job for nothing. We knew ‘The Incredibles’ wouldn’t let us down.”

The Incredibles was the nickname Boeing President William Allen gave his team of 50,000 mechanics, engineers and administrators tasked with designing and building the 747 in just 28 months. (The usual time frame for building a new aircraft was 42 months.)

Why the rush?

Boeing had signed a $550 million contract with Pan American World Airways in 1966, promising that 25 of the ambitious jumbo jets — which, at the time, were little more than hypothetical sketches — would be delivered by the end of the decade.

When the deal was made, Boeing didn’t even have a production plant to build the new planes.

They bought 750 acres in Washington state and quickly cleared away the forest to make room.

By 1968, Boeing had $1.5 billion worth of contracts with 26 airlines for the 747, and the plane was being built in a factory so new it didn’t have a roof yet.

“They went into a lot of debt,” says Michael Lombardi, Boeing’s resident historian. “There were six or seven banks funding Boeing at the time, and if the 747 didn’t deliver as promised, it would’ve [bankrupted] the company.”

But after that 85-minute inaugural flight — not a minute more, according to Wygle’s detailed flight logbook, which he still has — even the naysayers were convinced. “All my worries evaporated,” Sutter wrote in his autobiography. “I knew we had a good airplane.”

It was far from just a “good” airplane. The Boeing 747 would come to redefine air travel in the late 20th century. With its four engines, it could travel farther and faster than other jets and, with a seating capacity of 550, carry three times as many passengers. The extra seats meant prices for international travel came down, and a golden age of global tourism for the masses was born.

(https://thenypost.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/flight_attendants.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1280)
The flight attendants on the luxurious planes were known for their beauty.Courtesy of Boeing.

Between 1970 and 2017, more than 3.5 billion people have flown on a 747, more than half the world’s population, according to the Smithsonian. 747s have carried Space Shuttles for NASA, been the choice for Air Force One since 1990 and was Richard Branson’s first plane when he launched Virgin Atlantic in 1984. There has never been a more iconic passenger plane, one that even casual travelers can recognize by sight, thanks to its teardrop-shaped “hump” above the main deck.

Its success is a little ironic, given that the 747 was created with the assumption of failure. In the late ’60s, supersonic airplanes like the Concorde, capable of cruising at more than twice the speed of sound, were widely predicted to be the future of commercial air travel.

“The thought was 747s would eventually be converted into cargo planes,” says Lombardi. “They would become freighters.”

So they designed it with cargo in mind, not passengers. By placing the cockpit above the fuselage on a second deck, creating that distinctive hump, the nose of the plane could become a front-loading door. The wide body design allowed for even more cargo room.

When the Concorde failed to take over — carriers like Pan Am and TWA weren’t interested in a plane that used 11 times more fuel while carrying a fraction of the passengers — the 747 became the jumbo jet of choice.

“Every airline had to have one,” says Bob van der Linden, a curator at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. “It became a status symbol.”

Pan Am was the first airline to offer flights on the 747 — First Lady Pat Nixon helped christen the plane in January of 1970 with red, white and blue champagne — but soon every major carrier was clamoring to add at least one of the iconic jets to their fleet.

And with good reason. Passengers loved them. As Boeing promised in magazine ads in the early ’70s, “Welcome to the Spacious Age.” The 747’s twin aisles didn’t just come with extra legroom but also vertical sidewalls and high ceilings that made it easy to forget you were on a plane at 35,000 feet. “Boeing extensively studied the psychological effects of a cabin’s layout,” says Lombardi. “Just having the feeling of space and openness makes passengers feel instantly more relaxed.”

The upper deck, an extra area of space that had no real purpose in the initial design, turned into a first-class lounge, where first-class passengers walked up a spiral suitcase to be wined and dined. Jeffrey Ruthizer, 77, a former New Yorker (he now lives in Delray Beach, Fla.), remembers taking a 747 for a honeymoon trip to Paris with wife Monica in 1976. “It was all about caviar and foie gras and the finest filet mignons,” he says. “The stewardesses were beautiful and every single guy, and half the married guys, would be trying to grab one of them.”

Carriers went above and beyond to make their lounge area special. Continental had a fully stocked pub, including arcade games. United’s “Red Carpet Room” featured swivel chairs, wide-screen movies and over a dozen baby bassinets. American Airlines had a grand piano to keep passengers entertained. Frank Sinatra Jr. played a surprise show with his nine-piece band during a red-eye flight on American from Los Angeles to New York in 1971.

(https://thenypost.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/plane.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1280)
From the beginning, stewardesses loved the 747. That’s true even for Laura Brentlinger (inset), who was almost killed in 1989 when a hole tore open in the side of her jet. She survived by clinging to the spiral staircase.

The flight attendants talk about the 747 like they were mansions in the sky. “We had a formal dining room,” says Christa Keppel, who became a Pan Am stewardess in 1970. “Maxim’s of Paris did a lot of our catering. Dom Perignon was our Champagne of choice.”

Carole Tye, who flew with United during the ’70s and ’80s, says stewardesses would “put orchids throughout the cabin. We even dabbled in aircraft-approved ‘pyrotechnics,’ creating tiny volcanoes with dry ice and crème de menthe. It was all part of the pomp and circumstance that went along with flying the premier airplane of its day.”

Even Laura Brentlinger, a retired stewardess who nearly lost her life on a 747, has nothing but praise for the plane. In 1989, Brentlinger was working on United Flight 811 out of Honolulu, and the cargo door ripped open at 22,000 feet, pulling nine passengers out of the plane to their deaths. As Brentlinger was being sucked towards the aircraft’s hole, she grabbed onto the spiral staircase and says her feet “were flailing in the wind like a flag. Had it been any other airplane, I’m not sure I would have survived. She [the 747] saved my life. I cried when she was retired.”

Devastating accidents like Flight 811 have been the exception. Just 4 percent of the more than 1,500 Boeing 747s built since 1970 have been involved in crashes, and more than half of those had no loss of life. But as with all things 747, even their tragedies had to be the biggest. In 1977, two Boeing 747s collided on a foggy runway in Spain, killing 583 passengers. It remains the deadliest air disaster of all time.
see also
Say goodbye to the Boeing 747
Say goodbye to the Boeing 747

The 747 began to fall out of favor over the last few decades. “Carriers have started to turn to twin-engine jets like the Boeing 777 and Airbus 330 for transatlantic travel,” says Linden. Both burn less fuel and have substantially lower operating costs than a 747.

“A modern jet engine is more efficient and unbelievably reliable,” Linden says. “You just don’t need four of them anymore to get across an ocean.”

The last 747 commercial flight by a US airline happened in January 2018. It was Delta Flight 9771 carrying just 48 people from Atlanta to Arizona, and two of the passengers got married mid-flight. Today, there are more than 500 Boeing 747 jumbos in use around the world, on airlines like Korean Air, British Airways and Lufthansa, among others, but they’re slowly being phased out. Qantas, Australia’s biggest airline, plans to retire its six remaining 747s by 2020.

Even the White House may be joining the anti-747 tide. President Trump isn’t a fan of the jet’s “out of control” costs and in 2016 tweeted that he intends to “cancel order” for a “brand-new 747 Air Force One.”

But even as they disappear, the 747 remains a gold standard. Mark Vanhoenacker, a pilot for British Airways and author of the memoir “Skyfaring,” says the 747 is the reason he and many other young pilots wanted to fly at all.

He remembers one of his first (and last) trips on the famous jumbo jet with an equally enamored co-pilot. “We looked out those enormous 747 flight-deck windows,” Vanhoenacker says, “and one of us said to the other, ‘This is it. It doesn’t get any better than this.’ 
Title: 🛬 When Will British Airways Retire Its Last 747 Now The Boeing 777X Is On Orde
Post by: RE on February 28, 2019, 01:13:05 PM
https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-747-retirement-plans/

When Will British Airways Retire Its Last 747 Now The Boeing 777X Is On Order?


Tom
February 28, 2019 2:21 pm


After speculation that British Airways would order the Boeing 777X amid the 747 retirement, today the news broke that it had gone ahead. The airline has placed an exceptional order of 18 B777-9 aircraft, with 24 more options. The list price per aircraft of the order is US$442.2 million. This equates to a list price of US$7.96bn for the entire 18 aircraft in the firm order.

The B777x order comes at a time when British Airways is looking to retired its fleet of B747 aircraft. The four-engined aircraft are seen as inefficient by many in a market where two-engined aircraft are thriving. In fact, the oldest of BA’s B747s, G-BNLN, was delivered to the airline 29 years ago back in 1990.

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/britishairways_21686374557469-700x467.jpg)
14 B747s will be replaced by the new B777-9s. Photo: British Airways
B747 Replacement

Simple Flying had previously reported that British Airways was due to replace its 35 Boeing 747 aircraft with new widebody aircraft. This was set to be made of 18 Airbus A350 aircraft, 12 Boeing 787-10 aircraft, and new B777-300 aircraft. This has, however, now changed such that the B777X order is predominately replacing the B747 fleet.

IAG, the owners of British Airways, told Simple Flying that 14 B777-9s will replace 14 B747s. The remaining 4 B777-9s in the firm order will replace four of the airline’s ageing B777-200 aircraft. The parent group confirmed that deliveries would take place between 2022 and 2025.
B747 Retirement
(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/BA-777-9-Graphic-HIGH-RES-1-700x467.jpg)
The B777-9s are due to be delivered between 2022 and 2025. Photo: IAG
Aircraft Surplus

With 14 of the new B777-9 order directly set to replace the B747 fleet, there will be a surplus of long haul aircraft in the British Airways fleet. Simple Flying was unable to confirm which of the 30 aircraft previously slated to replace the B747 will still be used to directly replace the remaining 21 aircraft in the fleet. IAG told us this would comprise of a mix of A350 and B787 aircraft, but declined to mention the exact ratio.
Amended Retirement Date?

Today’s B777-9 order came after the retirement plan for the B747 was previously announced. This was supposed to take place over the next 5 years, finishing in 2024. However, Today’s announcement from the IAG group mentioned that the B777-9s would be delivered between 2022 and 2025. As such, it is possible that one or two B747s could be kept around for slightly longer than originally planned.
B747 retirement

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/britishairways_21686906368207-1-700x467.jpg)
BA’s retro painted B747s will keep their livery until they are retired. Photo: Stuart Bailey/British Airways

Additionally, the last B777-9s to be delivered could be the ones allocated to replacing the four B777-200 aircraft. Finally, the surplus of widebody aircraft could fill any gap between the currently scheduled retirement of the B747 and the delivery of the new B777s.

Speaking of the new order IAG Cheif Executive, Willie Walsh, said: “The new B777-9 is the world’s most fuel efficient longhaul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal
replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the
airline’s existing network.”
Title: 🛬 British Airways To Paint Boeing 747 In Their Iconic Landor Livery 2
Post by: RE on March 02, 2019, 01:32:05 AM
https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-747-landor-livery/

British Airways To Paint Boeing 747 In Their Iconic Landor Livery 2
Tom

March 1, 2019 12:50 pm


Great news for Heathrow aviation spotters today, as British Airways announces the latest in their series of retro repaints. Today the airline announced that the latest repaint will consist of a Boeing 747 sporting the Landor livery. This was last seen on an aircraft back in 1997, preceding the current Livery.

This comes as British Airways celebrate their centenary year this year. Along with a number of events, the airline is recognising its heritage by recreating a number of liveries not seen for many years. In February, the first retro livery landed at British Airways’s main hub, Heathrow.

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/britishairways_216862122777853-700x494.jpg)
The next British Airways B747 to be repainted will receive the Landor livery. Photo: British Airways

4 Special Liveries

BA is set to repaint a total of four aircraft in retro liveries as part of the centenary celebrations. This started with a B747, registered G-BYGC, which received a BOAC livery. This landed in Heathrow for the first time sporting the new livery on February 18th.

The next aircraft set to receive the retro treatment is an A319, registered as G-EUPJ. That aircraft entered the paint shop back on 23rd February to recieve a BEA livery. British Airways is yet to reveal a date for the aircraft’s return.

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/DSC0411-700x467.jpg)
A B747 wearing a special BOAC livery returned to service on 18th of February. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying

Landor Next

The next aircraft to be repainted in a retro British Airways livery is another B747, this time registered as G-BNLY. This aircraft entered the paint shop in Dublin on Monday (25th February. It took two weeks to repaint the BOAC B747. As such, we are unlikely to see G-BNLY emerge before 11th March.

What makes the repaint of G-BNLY more significant than the other retro repaints is that this particular aircraft has previously worn the livery it is to be repainted in! When it previously wore the Landor livery, it was known as the “City of Swansea”, and as such will regain that name. G-BNLY will wear the Landor livery until it is retired in 2023. Yesterday British Airways purchased a number of B777-9 aircraft to replace the B747 fleet.

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Boeing_747-2B4BM_British_Airways_AN0541447-700x470.jpg)
The Landor livery was last seen on a British Airways aircraft in 1997. Photo: Pedro Aragão / Wikimedia

Alex Cruz, the current chairman of British Airways, said: “We’re really thrilled to announce Landor as the latest iconic scheme to join the fleet as part of our centenary celebrations and we’re sure this excitement will be reflected around the world.”
What’s next?

While British Airways has confirmed that one more aircraft will receive a heritage livery, they haven’t confirmed anything beyond this. However, this hasn’t stopped rumours spreading on the internet. Many believe that the next and final livery to be painted will be the Negus livery. This was in service between 1974-1985, before the Landor livery. Again, it is expected that this will be applied to a B747. British Airways has confirmed that all new aircraft will be delivered in the current Chatham Dockyard livery.
Title: 🛬 When Will The Airbus A380 Actually Retire From All Airlines?
Post by: RE on March 04, 2019, 12:26:57 AM
https://simpleflying.com/airbus-a380-retirement/

When Will The Airbus A380 Actually Retire From All Airlines?
Andrea

March 4, 2019 3:34 am

As we all know, Airbus ended its A380 program last month. The last Airbus A380 is expected to leave the assembly line in 2021. Singapore Airlines has already started retiring some of its A380s, while a couple of airlines are still awaiting the delivery of the aircraft. With that being said, when will the Airbus A380 actually retire from all airlines?
ANA Airbus A380

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/ANA-Airbus-A380-700x389.jpg)
ANA’s inaugural A380 flight is scheduled to take place on May 24th, 2019. Photo: Airbus.

Current Airbus A380 Operators

Let’s take a look at all airlines currently operating the Airbus A380. Here is the list:

    Air France
    ANA (to start service between Tokyo – Narita (NRT) and Honolulu (HNL) in May)
    Asiana Airlines
    British Airways
    China Southern Airlines
    Emirates
    Etihad Airways
    Hi Fly
    Korean Air
    Lufthansa
    Malaysia Airlines
    Qantas
    Qatar Airways
    Singapore Airlines
    Thai Airways

ANA and Emirates still have A380s on order. Additionally, Simple Flying reported last month that British Airways may buy used A380 aircraft to replace its aging fleet of Boeing 747s. Accordingly, even though some airlines are considering the retirement of their A380s, there is still demand from other airlines.
What are the A380 operators’ plans for their aircraft?

Most of the current A380 operators have not clearly communicated their plans for the aircraft. Singapore Airlines has retired four A380s so far; however, one of them is still in service for Hi Fly. The other two are being used for spare parts, and the fate of the fourth one is unknown.

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Singapore-Airlines-A380-1-700x335.jpg)
Singapore Airlines was the first airline to retire one of its A380s. Photo: Wikipedia.

Qatar Airways has announced that it will start retiring its aircraft once they hit the 10-year mark. Accordingly, the airline will start the retirement of its 10 aircraft in 2024.

Air France will retire half of its 10 A380s beginning at the end of this year. The other five aircraft, however, will be upgraded to the tune of 45 million Euro per aircraft starting next year. It appears that Air France has plans to operate the five aircraft for several years to come; otherwise, the airline would most likely not invest this much money in them.
Air France A380-800
Air France had originally ordered 12 A380s. It converted two of the orders to orders for the A350 though. Photo: Wikimedia.

Emirates was originally planning on retiring its A380s after 12 years in service. The first aircraft entered service in 2008, so its retirement would be just around the corner. Nonetheless, the airline still has 14 A380s on order. It will most likely use these aircraft to replace the A380s it is retiring. The airline is scheduled to receive its last A380 aircraft in 2021. If it will also operate this aircraft for 12 years, it looks like the airline will fly the A380 until 2033.
Overall

At this time it is impossible to predict when the Airbus A380 will actually retire from all airlines. I would assume that the A380 will remain in service for at least another decade. There are most likely several factors that will influence this date, however. A sharp rise in the cost of fuel would almost certainly accelerate the retirement of the aircraft. Additionally, a lack of replacement parts and support for the aircraft would also lead to a faster retirement.

With that being said, I believe that we will see the Airbus A380 on some routes for years to come.

When do you think the Airbus A380 will actually retire from all airlines?
Title: 🛬 Boeing to roll out 777X on March 13
Post by: RE on March 06, 2019, 01:08:45 AM
A NEW White Elephant!  ::)

RE

https://www.airlineratings.com/news/boeing-roll-777x-march-13/ (https://www.airlineratings.com/news/boeing-roll-777x-march-13/)

Boeing to roll out 777X on March 13
By
Geoffrey Thomas
March 05, 2019

(https://www.airlineratings.com/wp-content/uploads/uploads/K66735-1.jpg)
Rendering 777-9X; 777-8X

One of the most anticipated roll-outs in recent aviation history will take place on March 13 when Boeing unveils its giant twin – the 777X.

In a tweet, Boeing has just announced the date.

Boeing is building two models of the 777X family: the 400-seat -9, which will be the first to roll out and the longer range -8, which can seat 350 passengers and has a range capability of more than 17,220 km.

SEE Video 777X takes to the sky in Germany

SEE Greenpoint’s luxury 777X interior.

The driving force behind the 777X is Emirates’ President Sir Tim Clark, whose airline is the lead buyer with an order for 150.

Sir Tim describes the 777X as “an absolute peach”.

Key to his enthusiasm is the aircraft’s economics and greater space — it is 20 percent more efficient per seat than the industry’s long-time benchmark the 777-300ER and its cabin is wider with bigger windows.

The Boeing 777X combines the best features of the current 777 with a longer fuselage, new engine and the composite wing design from the Boeing 787.

The photo below shows three 777X aircraft in the main production bay and the first rollout aircraft in the adjacent bay.

(https://www.airlineratings.com/wp-content/uploads/uploads/file-3.jpeg)

Other airlines that have ordered the 777X are Lufthansa, Etihad Airways, Qatar Airways, Singapore Airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways, All Nippon Airlines and last week British Airways.

Downunder Qantas and Air New Zealand are also evaluating the 777X along with its arch-rival the A350-1000.

Qantas’s competition, called “Project Sunrise” demands Sydney to London non-stop capability with 300 passengers.

Both Airbus and Boeing say they can meet the airline’s demands or “close to it.”

Qantas plans to add underfloor bunks to the winner of its competition because on ultra-long-haul flights the aircraft will carry virtually no cargo, just passenger’s bags.

Air New Zealand is going to accelerate the redesign of its interior offering at its Hangar 22 seating project after it decides on either the  Boeing 777X or A350 in April.

(https://www.airlineratings.com/wp-content/uploads/uploads/file-5.jpeg)

Air NZ chief executive Christopher Luxon told AirlineRatings.com at the inaugural of the airline’s first service to Chicago last year that the airline had been bringing customers through to experience mock-up cabin spaces in an attempt to learn their thinking about space, storage, and privacy.

“We’ve been running customers through a number of mock-ups that at this stage are quite primitive and quite conceptual but are giving them a feel about what they want to play back to us around that,” he said
Title: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche
Post by: RE on March 09, 2019, 02:15:30 PM
The number of articles on this topic and how long it has lasted is just amazing!  :o

RE

https://simpleflying.com/lufthansas-first-777x-is-nearing-completion-in-the-boeing-factory/

Lufthansa’s First 777X Is Nearing Completion In The Boeing Factory
By Nicholas
March 8, 2019

For those that are eagerly awaiting updates on the new Boeing 777X, you will be pleased to know that final structure is in place and only the engines need to be joined.

This first 777X-9 is on track to be delivered to Lufthansa in 2020 and will be the first to fly of Boeing’s new flagship aircraft.
Lufthansa 777x

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/190215_SEATTLE_00463-466x700.jpg)

The Boeing 777Xs wingtip. Photo: Lufthansa
What is the story so far?

The Boeing 777x has been designed to replace the current generation of 777 aircraft as well as the retiring 747 aircraft.

But to be such a versatile aircraft, it would require new technologies (such as the folding wingtips to fit in the same airports as current aircraft) and utilizing engineering principles developed for the very success Boeing 787.

The program launched back in 2012, with Lufthansa originally booking in 34 of the 777X aircraft to replace its older 747 fleet. They would later roll back their order to only 20, with a decision to buy several more A350s instead.

Production of the first 777x test model started in 2017, to understand the best ways to build the design, and see if the aircraft can operate correctly on the ground. Then, in 2018, Boeing began construction of their flight test models (specifically number 7 and 8). The first of these has been earmarked to go to Lufthansa once testing is complete.

In late November 2018, the electrical systems were installed and tested, turning the assembling into an actual active machine.

On February 15th this year, the final structural joining was complete, with the wing, midsection and main structure all joined together (so it finally looked like an actual plane).

From here, we can confirm that in the last two weeks the first 777x-9 has begun its paint job, ahead of flight tests in the near future.
777X

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/gallery-full-blue-0-700x467.jpg)

Boeing 777X in flight (Computer Generated). Source: Boeing
What has Lufthansa’s reaction been?

Lufthansa, of course, has been monitoring the progress of their new aircraft closely. This will be the first of 20 777X series aircraft in their future fleet.

The 777x series is based on the proven 777, which is already being flown by Lufthansa Cargo as a cargo version and by Austrian Airlines and Swiss as a passenger version. With a length of 76.6 meters and a width of 71.8 meters, the 777-9 far surpasses its predecessor and is currently the longest passenger aircraft in the world. – Markus Löhn, Lufthansa Group Representative at Boeing

Lufthansa will have an all-new interior for the 777X, including a new business class cabin.
Lufthansa

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Lufthansa1-700x438.jpg)

The new Lufthansa B777X business cabin. Photo: Lufthansa

Boeing has addressed concerns about any delays in the 777x construction and eventual delivery, saying that they are very confident that they will deliver the aircraft and guarantee its entry into service in 2020.

What do you think? Will the 777x come together successfully for Lufthansa? Let us know in the comments.
Title: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 2
Post by: RE on March 09, 2019, 02:24:02 PM
https://www.businessinsider.com/best-part-of-emirates-business-class-airbus-a380-cocktail-lounge-2019-3 (https://www.businessinsider.com/best-part-of-emirates-business-class-airbus-a380-cocktail-lounge-2019-3)

The best part of my 14-hour, $5,400 Emirates business-class flight was a perk I originally thought was a gimmick
Harrison Jacobs
18h

(https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5c6da2060d15f56b2c599c77-1536-1152.jpg)
a380 airbus emirates The bar aboard an Airbus A380 during a delivery ceremony of Emirates' 100th Airbus A380. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

    I recently flew in business class for the first time in my life.
    It was on a 14-hour flight from Dubai to New York operated by Emirates on the Airbus A380 superjumbo, the largest and most expensive commercial airliner in history.
    While there were a lot of perks that blew me away — including the chauffeur service and the extravagant preflight lounge— the A380's in-flight cocktail bar gave the flight a feel entirely unlike what I've experienced.
    Rather than be stuck alone in my seat, I opted to hang out at the bar for a few hours, getting to know other passengers and flight attendants — and getting a drink or snack at my leisure.

For many travel junkies, flying in business class on an Airbus A380 operated by Emirates is considered the crème de la crème of flight experiences.

Until last month, I'd never flown in business class before; it never made sense for my budget.

But then, thanks to Airbus' announcement that in 2021 it will stop producing the A380, the world's largest and most expensive passenger plane, my editors thought I had to try flying back to New York in business class on an Emirates A380, for $5,400.

Read more: I flew 14 hours in business class on the soon-to-be-extinct Emirates A380, the world's largest airliner — and it was more luxurious than I could have imagined

I didn't know what to expect. I'd had an excellent experience flying Emirates in economy class to Dubai in November, but I'd heard mixed reviews about business class. I was worried that all it would mean was a slightly bigger seat and better airplane food.

I was very wrong. While Emirates' business class blew my mind for many reasons — the food, the lounge, and the pod-like seats among them — my favorite part was the plane's famous walk-up cocktail lounge.

(https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5c7ee4b426289837de6df1a7-960-720.jpg)
Best_Business_Class_Flight_Emirates_Airbus_A380 (154 of 198)The onboard cocktail lounge. Harrison Jacobs/Business Insider

I had heard about the lounge, as many travel experts and frequent fliers consider it the centerpiece of the Emirates business-class experience. But I was skeptical.

I kept wondering: Does anyone actually use it, or is it a gimmick that looks better in a travel magazine?

I got my first taste of the cocktail lounge a few hours after takeoff. Dinner was over, and I was looking for a sweet snack to eat while I watched a TV show.

One of the best parts about the lounge is that it's stocked with fresh fruits, sandwiches, pastries, chips, and other goodies you can grab at your leisure. I took a bag of cherries and a bottle of water and went back to my seat.

(https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5c7ee3ff26289834a14bbb72-960-720.jpg)
Best_Business_Class_Flight_Emirates_Airbus_A380 (156 of 198)The snacks area of the cocktail lounge. Harrison Jacobs/Business Insider

The convenience was great, but it was how much fun the lounge was that showed me what a game-changer it is for travel.

Throughout the flight — and I was on a red-eye — there were always a few passengers there chatting or, more often, talking with the staff.

After sleeping for a few hours, I went into the lounge to stretch my legs and found a group of passengers drinking at the bar and having a conversation with the flight attendant/bartender. I had intended to grab a water bottle and head back to my seat. Instead, I spent three hours hanging out there with passengers and flight attendants.

The flight attendants told us about the worst passengers they've had to deal with, wild things that have happened on board, and what they like to do in their free time. The other passengers and I shared stories from our travels and recommendations for New York and Dubai, and got to know one another.

Halfway through, the bartender mixed an experimental drink at my request, turning the cucumber-fizz mocktail into an alcoholic drink. It was delicious.

(https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5c7ee4ed2628986f0f028fe2-960-720.jpg)
Best_Business_Class_Flight_Emirates_Airbus_A380 (196 of 198)My experimental gin cucumber fizz. Harrison Jacobs/Business Insider

A passenger I met told me about how on his flight to Dubai a few weeks before, he and a half-dozen others hung out in the lounge during the Super Bowl, cheering on their team as they used the airplane WiFi to get updates on the score. It sounded like a blast.

As I left the plane the following morning, I was still amazed at how much fun my flight had been. An open social space creates a totally different atmosphere for the passengers and, I imagine, the staff.

The next time you think about splurging on a business-class flight, look for an airline with an onboard lounge — Emirates is far from the only one.
Title: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 3
Post by: RE on March 09, 2019, 02:29:47 PM
https://simpleflying.com/why-the-boeing-777x-is-the-perfect-747-replacement/

Why The Boeing 777X Is The Perfect 747 Replacement
By Nicholas
March 7, 2019

EDIT: A slight mistake was made in the below claim of fuel efficiency, it has been corrected from per mile to per hour of flight time.

As the world holds it’s breath in collective anticipation of the upcoming 777X factory rollout, we are reminded that the world is also saying goodbye to the queen of the skies, the Boeing 747.

The 777 series will soon become Boeing’s largest aircraft and carry the mantle of Boeing’s flagship plane… but does it really hold a candle to the older 747?
British Airways B777

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DSC0375-1-700x467.jpg)

British Airways has 34 B747 aircraft in its fleet at present. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying
Is the 777x a replacement for the 747?

British Airways recently placed a huge order of 18 777X-9 aircraft to replace their fleet of retiring 747 aircraft.  During the press release, Willie Walsh (The CEO of IAG who owns British Airways) had this to say:

“The new B777X-9 is the world’s most fuel-efficient long-haul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the airline’s existing network. This aircraft will provide further cost efficiencies and environmental benefits with  fuel cost per seat improvements of 30 per cent compared to the Boeing 747.”

Even Boeing has been quick to point out that even they consider the 777x a replacement for the 747:

“The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9X, It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today.” – Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth

But how does it actually rank up to the 747? You can read in this detailed 777 vs 747 article here.

The critical point, however, is the question “is the 777x really a good replacement for the 747?”

The demand for the 777X should add stability to Boeing’s future performance.
Photo courtesy – The Boeing Company/Facebook

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/12278675_1158250504203485_24241800874002505_n-700x525.jpg)

The 777X can transport a large number of passengers (349) but not as many as the 747 (410). The 777x can also fly far (7,525 nmi / 13,940 km) but not as far as the 747 (8,000 nmi (15,000 km). In fact, the Boeing 747 seems to trump the 777x in everything apart from fuel efficiency… so why replace it?

The 747 is simply not designed for this modern climate. Apart from just being cheaper to run (by about 1-2 dollars per seat per hour of flight time) the 777X also features modern technologies (such as the largest engines ever placed on a passenger aircraft) and engineering principles for today’s world. Whilst it would be wonderful to keep using the same design (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), the 747 was initially designed many decades ago and is simply outdated.

The 777X is a modern reimagining of a 747, with the requirements of point to point travel, passengers tasted and corporate belt-tightening.

The Boeing 747 factory. Source: Boeing

(https://cdn.shortpixel.ai/client/q_glossy,ret_img,w_700/https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/In-the-factory-1024x996-700x681.jpg)

What do you think? Is the 777x a good replacement for the 747? Let us know in the comments!
Title: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 4
Post by: RE on March 09, 2019, 02:37:31 PM
http://www.thedrive.com/news/26805/virgin-atlantic-boeing-747-full-of-cruise-ship-passengers-quarantined-due-to-widespread-sickness (http://www.thedrive.com/news/26805/virgin-atlantic-boeing-747-full-of-cruise-ship-passengers-quarantined-due-to-widespread-sickness)

Virgin Atlantic Boeing 747 Full of Cruise Ship Passengers Quarantined Due to Widespread Sickness
The jumbo jet was isolated at London's Gatwick Airport after landing.
By Will Sabel CourtneyMarch 6, 2019

    News

(https://imagesvc.timeincapp.com/v3/foundry/image/?q=70&w=1440&url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.thedrive.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2019%2F03%2Fvirgin-hero.jpg%3Fquality%3D85)

virgin atlantic boeing 747 emergency sickness
Gareth Fuller/PA Wire


Will Sabel CourtneyView Will Sabel Courtney's Articles
twitter.com/willscourtneyinstagram.com/willsabelcourtney

A Virgin Atlantic Boeing 747 was forced into quarantine at Great Britain's Gatwick Airport after landing on Wednesday morning, thanks to the outbreak of a nasty illness that waylaid a number of passengers and crew during the flight. And the fault behind the sickness, it seems, may have been tied to another form of transportation: the dreaded cruise ship.

Everything no doubt seemed fine from the ground, at least at first: Virgin Atlantic Fight 610 completed the eight-hour journey from Bridgetown, Barbados to London, England on time, with the Boeing 747-400 touching down at 5:20am. Upon hitting the tarmac. however, the four-engined jetliner was met by emergency services personnel, the Sussex Police told CNN. A spokesperson for the South East Coast ambulance service elaborated, telling The Guardian that help had been called for about half an hour before the plane landed, after reports had come down that the Boeing contained numerous passengers and crew who weren't feeling particularly well. 

Roughly 30 people were checked out at a special screening center, The Guardian reported. Two were taken to the hospital, according to the BBC. All the other passengers deplaned as normal after the period of quarantine, and "all passengers have since continued their onward journeys," the police said in a statement.

"A number of customers onboard [Virgin Atlantic Flight 610], which landed at London Gatwick this morning from Barbados, reported feeling unwell. As a precaution the plane was met by the relevant authorities who made the decision to screen everyone onboard, in line with standard health and safety procedures," a Virgin Atlantic spokesperson said. “The wellbeing of our customers and crew is always our priority, and we are supporting those affected.”

According to passenger Trevor Wilson, who corresponded with representatives of the media from aboard the plane and the subsequent holding center via Twitter, the Virgin plane was a charter flight, with customer load was made up exclusively of people who had previously been aboard the cruise ship MSC Preziosa—a 139,000-ton Fantasia-class vessel capable of carrying more than 4,000 passengers. And, apparently, a whole lot of viruses, as Wilson claimed the bug—which he described as "mainly a bad chesty cough possibly chest infection"—appears to have originated on the floating vessel, not the flying one. 

"The illness seems to have originated on board ship not the plane," Wilson told Sky News's Joe O'Brien via Twitter. "5 members of cabin crew became sick on flight."

MSC Cruises confirmed to the BBC that the Virgin flight's 448 passengers had indeed been on the cruise ship before the flight.

"We are still investigating what may have caused the illness and we are currently waiting for further updates from Gatwick Airport medical services," the spokesperson said. "What we do know is that on MSC Preziosa, no cases of acute gastroenteritis have been reported in the past 14 days."
Wikipedia / CeeGee

The MSC Preziosa.

Seriously. Why do people still go on cruise ships?

(https://imagesvc.timeincapp.com/v3/foundry/image/?q=60&url=https%3A%2F%2Fs3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com%2Fthe-drive-cms-content-staging%2Fmessage-editor%252F1551894994182-istanbulport3.jpg)
Title: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 5
Post by: RE on March 09, 2019, 02:47:31 PM
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-03-06/japan-s-largest-airline-bets-big-on-the-newly-axed-airbus-a380 (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-03-06/japan-s-largest-airline-bets-big-on-the-newly-axed-airbus-a380)

Japan's Largest Airline Bets Big on Newly Axed Airbus A380
By Dave McCombs
and Kiyotaka Matsuda
March 6, 2019, 11:00 AM AKST Updated on March 6, 2019, 8:04 PM AKST

(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/ijJJ27AE9kLY/v1/800x-1.jpg)

    Carrier says demand strong enough to fill 520-seat planes
    ANA to challenge rival JAL on flights to islands, CEO says

0:10
Airbus Grounds the A380 Program After 11 Years

Just as a tide of canceled orders has prompted Airbus SE to halt production of the A380 superjumbo, Japan’s biggest airline is betting it can succeed where others have failed -- by filling the luxurious double-deckers with tourists flying to Hawaii.

Starting May 24, ANA Holdings Inc. has scheduled three flights a week from Tokyo to Honolulu on the 520-seat behemoths, painted in a special sea-turtle theme. The carrier will bring on one more A380 for the Hawaii service in July and a third next year, ANA President Yuji Hirako said, adding that reservations for the route are already more than 40 percent higher than a year ago.

The plan leaves ANA as the only passenger line with A380s on order, other than Dubai-based Emirates, which has been the plane’s mainstay airline. The aircraft -- which wowed travelers with in-flight showers, bedrooms and bars but was too big to win over most carriers -- may help ANA close the Hawaii market-share gap with arch-rival Japan Airlines Co. Still, some question whether the carrier can keep filling the plane once the novelty wears off.

“ANA is spending a lot on advertising, so they will initially be able to fill the planes, but in coming years, it may get harder to consistently sell all the seats,” said Yasuo Hashimoto, chief researcher at Japan Aviation Management Research.

Read: What Went Wrong for the A380 Superjumbo

Japan Airlines has counted on Hawaii and the route has become one of the few where it surpasses ANA. JAL, as the airline is known, replaced ANA in a code-share partnership with Hawaiian Airlines in March last year and controls about 33 percent of the Japan-Hawaii air travel market, compared with about 14 percent for ANA, according to JAL.

“This is one of the few major routes where JAL dominates ANA,” said Hashimoto. “If ANA can reverse that, that would be big. Their aim is to take at least part of JAL’s market share.”
Destination Hawaii

More Japanese flying to holidays on the islands

Source: Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism

Even with the added capacity, ANA won’t directly challenge JAL on some Hawaii routes. JAL offers Japan’s only direct flights to Kona, a hotspot on Hawaii’s largest island, and schedules service to Honolulu from the Japanese capital and cities including Osaka and Nagoya.

“We welcome the competition because it will expand the overall market for travel to Hawaii,” JAL President Yuji Akasaka said of ANA’s decision to use the A380. “Our strength is that we fly to more than one city in Hawaii, including Kona.”

ANA said adding the plane will help it compete.

JAL shares gained 0.7 percent as of 2:01 p.m. in Tokyo trading Thursday, while ANA was little changed.

“We are introducing all three of our A380s on the Hawaii route because we want to dominate that in terms of market share,” ANA Chief Executive Officer Shinya Katanozaka told reporters last week.

Read: Airbus Axes A380 Flagship, Drawing Curtain on Jumbo-Jet Era
All Nippon Airways?initial A380

The first A380 for All Nippon Airways.
Source: Airbus

After a dozen years in service, Airbus last month decided it will stop making the A380 in 2021, burying a prestige project that faded as airlines grew to prefer smaller, more fuel-efficient aircraft. Fuel-efficient, twin-engine planes that use lighter material such as carbon fiber have undermined demand for the world’s largest passenger airliner, a guzzler powered by four turbines.

By 2021, there will be about 250 A380s flying with 15 airlines, Airbus said in an email. “The A380 will continue to fly, with A380 operators to be supported by Airbus.”

ANA allocated the super-jumbos to the Honolulu route in 2016 with a plan to start flying two of them this year. The A380s will gradually replace the 787s it currently flies to the mid-Pacific islands in a bet that first- and business-class seating on the massive planes can help draw more and higher-paying fliers.

“That kind of customer drops a lot of money at the destination,” ANA’s Hirako said. Local officials in Hawaii welcome that trend, he added, because they want to boost the islands’ image as a high-end vacation option.

— With assistance by Kyunghee Park
(Updates with share prices in 10th paragraph. A previous version of this story corrected the second paragraph to show a third A380 will be introduced next year.)
Title: Re: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 3
Post by: azozeo on March 09, 2019, 04:12:18 PM
https://simpleflying.com/why-the-boeing-777x-is-the-perfect-747-replacement/

Why The Boeing 777X Is The Perfect 747 Replacement
By Nicholas
March 7, 2019

EDIT: A slight mistake was made in the below claim of fuel efficiency, it has been corrected from per mile to per hour of flight time.

As the world holds it’s breath in collective anticipation of the upcoming 777X factory rollout, we are reminded that the world is also saying goodbye to the queen of the skies, the Boeing 747.

The 777 series will soon become Boeing’s largest aircraft and carry the mantle of Boeing’s flagship plane… but does it really hold a candle to the older 747?
British Airways B777

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DSC0375-1-700x467.jpg)

British Airways has 34 B747 aircraft in its fleet at present. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying
Is the 777x a replacement for the 747?

British Airways recently placed a huge order of 18 777X-9 aircraft to replace their fleet of retiring 747 aircraft.  During the press release, Willie Walsh (The CEO of IAG who owns British Airways) had this to say:

“The new B777X-9 is the world’s most fuel-efficient long-haul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the airline’s existing network. This aircraft will provide further cost efficiencies and environmental benefits with  fuel cost per seat improvements of 30 per cent compared to the Boeing 747.”

Even Boeing has been quick to point out that even they consider the 777x a replacement for the 747:

“The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9X, It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today.” – Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth

But how does it actually rank up to the 747? You can read in this detailed 777 vs 747 article here.

The critical point, however, is the question “is the 777x really a good replacement for the 747?”

The demand for the 777X should add stability to Boeing’s future performance.
Photo courtesy – The Boeing Company/Facebook

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/12278675_1158250504203485_24241800874002505_n-700x525.jpg)

The 777X can transport a large number of passengers (349) but not as many as the 747 (410). The 777x can also fly far (7,525 nmi / 13,940 km) but not as far as the 747 (8,000 nmi (15,000 km). In fact, the Boeing 747 seems to trump the 777x in everything apart from fuel efficiency… so why replace it?

The 747 is simply not designed for this modern climate. Apart from just being cheaper to run (by about 1-2 dollars per seat per hour of flight time) the 777X also features modern technologies (such as the largest engines ever placed on a passenger aircraft) and engineering principles for today’s world. Whilst it would be wonderful to keep using the same design (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), the 747 was initially designed many decades ago and is simply outdated.

The 777X is a modern reimagining of a 747, with the requirements of point to point travel, passengers tasted and corporate belt-tightening.

The Boeing 747 factory. Source: Boeing

(https://cdn.shortpixel.ai/client/q_glossy,ret_img,w_700/https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/In-the-factory-1024x996-700x681.jpg)

What do you think? Is the 777x a good replacement for the 747? Let us know in the comments!

No good....

BAD BAD BAD !  :emthdown:

The 2 longest flights on the planet are L.A. to Tel Aviv & L.A. to Sydney (that I know of)

With only 2 engines & ones goes south on L.A. to Sydney, that's askin' for it ......

L.A. to Tel Aviv not so bad except for the 1/2 way point in the Atlantic.
Title: Re: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 3
Post by: azozeo on March 09, 2019, 04:15:45 PM
https://simpleflying.com/why-the-boeing-777x-is-the-perfect-747-replacement/

Why The Boeing 777X Is The Perfect 747 Replacement
By Nicholas
March 7, 2019

EDIT: A slight mistake was made in the below claim of fuel efficiency, it has been corrected from per mile to per hour of flight time.

As the world holds it’s breath in collective anticipation of the upcoming 777X factory rollout, we are reminded that the world is also saying goodbye to the queen of the skies, the Boeing 747.

The 777 series will soon become Boeing’s largest aircraft and carry the mantle of Boeing’s flagship plane… but does it really hold a candle to the older 747?
British Airways B777

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DSC0375-1-700x467.jpg)

British Airways has 34 B747 aircraft in its fleet at present. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying
Is the 777x a replacement for the 747?

British Airways recently placed a huge order of 18 777X-9 aircraft to replace their fleet of retiring 747 aircraft.  During the press release, Willie Walsh (The CEO of IAG who owns British Airways) had this to say:

“The new B777X-9 is the world’s most fuel-efficient long-haul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the airline’s existing network. This aircraft will provide further cost efficiencies and environmental benefits with  fuel cost per seat improvements of 30 per cent compared to the Boeing 747.”

Even Boeing has been quick to point out that even they consider the 777x a replacement for the 747:

“The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9X, It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today.” – Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth

But how does it actually rank up to the 747? You can read in this detailed 777 vs 747 article here.

The critical point, however, is the question “is the 777x really a good replacement for the 747?”

The demand for the 777X should add stability to Boeing’s future performance.
Photo courtesy – The Boeing Company/Facebook

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/12278675_1158250504203485_24241800874002505_n-700x525.jpg)

The 777X can transport a large number of passengers (349) but not as many as the 747 (410). The 777x can also fly far (7,525 nmi / 13,940 km) but not as far as the 747 (8,000 nmi (15,000 km). In fact, the Boeing 747 seems to trump the 777x in everything apart from fuel efficiency… so why replace it?

The 747 is simply not designed for this modern climate. Apart from just being cheaper to run (by about 1-2 dollars per seat per hour of flight time) the 777X also features modern technologies (such as the largest engines ever placed on a passenger aircraft) and engineering principles for today’s world. Whilst it would be wonderful to keep using the same design (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), the 747 was initially designed many decades ago and is simply outdated.

The 777X is a modern reimagining of a 747, with the requirements of point to point travel, passengers tasted and corporate belt-tightening.

The Boeing 747 factory. Source: Boeing

(https://cdn.shortpixel.ai/client/q_glossy,ret_img,w_700/https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/In-the-factory-1024x996-700x681.jpg)

What do you think? Is the 777x a good replacement for the 747? Let us know in the comments!

No good....

BAD BAD BAD !  :emthdown:

The 2 longest flights on the planet are L.A. to Tel Aviv & L.A. to Sydney (that I know of)

With only 2 engines & ones goes south on L.A. to Sydney, that's askin' for it ......

L.A. to Tel Aviv not so bad except for the 1/2 way point in the Atlantic.

Another ship that hasn't been recognized is the SP model of the '47....
That lil' gal was the long range workhorse of the fleet.

She was the vessel used in the 2 longest flights aforementioned.
Title: Re: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 3
Post by: RE on March 09, 2019, 05:08:13 PM
https://simpleflying.com/why-the-boeing-777x-is-the-perfect-747-replacement/

Why The Boeing 777X Is The Perfect 747 Replacement
By Nicholas
March 7, 2019

EDIT: A slight mistake was made in the below claim of fuel efficiency, it has been corrected from per mile to per hour of flight time.

As the world holds it’s breath in collective anticipation of the upcoming 777X factory rollout, we are reminded that the world is also saying goodbye to the queen of the skies, the Boeing 747.

The 777 series will soon become Boeing’s largest aircraft and carry the mantle of Boeing’s flagship plane… but does it really hold a candle to the older 747?
British Airways B777

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DSC0375-1-700x467.jpg)

British Airways has 34 B747 aircraft in its fleet at present. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying
Is the 777x a replacement for the 747?

British Airways recently placed a huge order of 18 777X-9 aircraft to replace their fleet of retiring 747 aircraft.  During the press release, Willie Walsh (The CEO of IAG who owns British Airways) had this to say:

“The new B777X-9 is the world’s most fuel-efficient long-haul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the airline’s existing network. This aircraft will provide further cost efficiencies and environmental benefits with  fuel cost per seat improvements of 30 per cent compared to the Boeing 747.”

Even Boeing has been quick to point out that even they consider the 777x a replacement for the 747:

“The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9X, It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today.” – Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth

But how does it actually rank up to the 747? You can read in this detailed 777 vs 747 article here.

The critical point, however, is the question “is the 777x really a good replacement for the 747?”

The demand for the 777X should add stability to Boeing’s future performance.
Photo courtesy – The Boeing Company/Facebook

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/12278675_1158250504203485_24241800874002505_n-700x525.jpg)

The 777X can transport a large number of passengers (349) but not as many as the 747 (410). The 777x can also fly far (7,525 nmi / 13,940 km) but not as far as the 747 (8,000 nmi (15,000 km). In fact, the Boeing 747 seems to trump the 777x in everything apart from fuel efficiency… so why replace it?

The 747 is simply not designed for this modern climate. Apart from just being cheaper to run (by about 1-2 dollars per seat per hour of flight time) the 777X also features modern technologies (such as the largest engines ever placed on a passenger aircraft) and engineering principles for today’s world. Whilst it would be wonderful to keep using the same design (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), the 747 was initially designed many decades ago and is simply outdated.

The 777X is a modern reimagining of a 747, with the requirements of point to point travel, passengers tasted and corporate belt-tightening.

The Boeing 747 factory. Source: Boeing

(https://cdn.shortpixel.ai/client/q_glossy,ret_img,w_700/https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/In-the-factory-1024x996-700x681.jpg)

What do you think? Is the 777x a good replacement for the 747? Let us know in the comments!

No good....

BAD BAD BAD !  :emthdown:

The 2 longest flights on the planet are L.A. to Tel Aviv & L.A. to Sydney (that I know of)

With only 2 engines & ones goes south on L.A. to Sydney, that's askin' for it ......

L.A. to Tel Aviv not so bad except for the 1/2 way point in the Atlantic.

Another ship that hasn't been recognized is the SP model of the '47....
That lil' gal was the long range workhorse of the fleet.

She was the vessel used in the 2 longest flights aforementioned.

I flew many times LA to Sydney.  Once on a nearly empty Qantas 747 where I half a dozen stewardesses fawning all over me.  ;D  That was in the days they still had the upstairs lounge for 1st Class and the stews were HOT!

Most of the time though they don't fly this route non-stop.  You stop in Honolulu and Fiji.  You don't really need to fly non-stop, and the stops don't add that much time, percentage wise on such a long flight.

RE
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: azozeo on March 10, 2019, 05:20:31 PM
The true point I'm trying to make is this.

Back in the day (1980's) the FAA didn't allow commercial aviation aircraft to travel across vast distances of ocean
with only 2 jet engines.

This included L.A. to Honolulu which is 5 hours flight time roughly. Hono to Tokyo etc. Lockheed & Douglas filled the bill with 3 holers.

Has the law changed ? I don't know... I wouldn't personally travel over that much water with just a 2 engine jet, no matter how modern it is.
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: RE on March 10, 2019, 05:33:36 PM
The true point I'm trying to make is this.

Back in the day (1980's) the FAA didn't allow commercial aviation aircraft to travel across vast distances of ocean
with only 2 jet engines.

This included L.A. to Honolulu which is 5 hours flight time roughly. Hono to Tokyo etc. Lockheed & Douglas filled the bill with 3 holers.

Has the law changed ? I don't know... I wouldn't personally travel over that much water with just a 2 engine jet, no matter how modern it is.

Well, these days just about all jets on all routes are 2 engines, and the safety record hasn't been too bad.

RE
Title: 🛬 Routes: Delta at OAK + A380, Alaska, Southwest, United, Qatar, El Al, Virgin
Post by: RE on March 11, 2019, 12:44:27 AM
I guess a few Airlines can't read the Writing on the Wall.  ::)

RE

https://www.sfgate.com/travel/article/Routes-Delta-at-OAK-Alaska-Southwest-United-13674113.php (https://www.sfgate.com/travel/article/Routes-Delta-at-OAK-Alaska-Southwest-United-13674113.php)

Routes: Delta at OAK + A380, Alaska, Southwest, United, Qatar, El Al, Virgin Atlantic, more
This week's most important airline routes news

(https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/01/01/04/17043775/3/1024x1024.jpg)

Chris McGinnis Updated 7:33 am PST, Saturday, March 9, 2019

    This year ANA will use a special sea turtle livery on its A380s flying between Japan and Hawaii Photo: ANA

Photo: ANA
Image 1 of 25

This year ANA will use a special sea turtle livery on its A380s flying between Japan and Hawaii
TravelSkills on SFGate is brought to you by Visa

In airline route news, Delta will go year-round on a key route out of Oakland; Three A380s head to Hawaii; Alaska adds a spoke to its Seattle hub and finally launches Paine Field service; Southwest's Hawaii flights begin in one week; United kicks off new domestic routes; Qatar is coy about its planned SFO service; Denver welcomes a Caribbean carrier; Virgin Atlantic, Air France-KLM and Delta expand their code-sharing; JetBlue transatlantic speculation picks up; Ethiopian expands Dulles service; and El Al plans O'Hare service.

Delta will revive service June 9 between Oakland and its Atlanta hub, but this time the route will operate year-round instead of seasonally. From June through September, Delta will offer daily service (except Saturdays) with a 737-900, departing Oakland at 10:30 p.m. and arriving at ATL at 6:06 a.m. Effective October 1, the airline will switch to a 737-800 and operate four days a week – Sunday, Monday, Thursday and Friday – and instead of a red-eye, the eastbound segment will depart OAK at noon. Southwest Airlines also flies nonstop between Atlanta and Oakland with one flight daily in each direction.
Recommended Video

The Airbus A380 isn't dead yet. And is Hawaii reaching tourist saturation? This week ANA announced that it will take delivery of three new double-decker behemoths this month to fly between Tokyo and Honolulu starting May 24. The colorful 3-class planes have 520 seats and are painted in special sea turtle livery (one green, one blue, one orange) you can see above or in the slideshow at the top. That's fabulous, fun route news, but how many more airline passengers can Hawaii handle? With the influx coming from the mainland due to the Southwest Effect fare wars combined with this, it's going to get a little crazy in Waikiki and elsewhere where traffic is already a big problem, and hotel demand (and rates) are on the rise. Airbus announced last month that it would stop making the A380 in 2021.

Alaska Airlines this week introduced new service from its Seattle hub to Columbus, Ohio – the only non-stop service in the market. The airline will offer daily roundtrips with an Airbus A320 departing SEA at 9:45 a.m. and departing Columbus at 6:15 p.m. Columbus is Alaska's 91st non-stop destination from Seattle. In other Seattle news, Delta is planning to discontinue its service between SEA and Victoria, B.C. on September 2, although Alaska will continue to fly that route; two months ago, United axed its San Francisco-Victoria flights.

Meanwhile, Alaska this week finally launched commercial service from Washington State's Paine Field, a facility 23 miles north of downtown Seattle that had previously been used only by general aviation flights and the adjacent Boeing plant. The advent of commercial airline service at Paine will make life a lot easier for travelers in Seattle's northern suburbs, saving them a drive of up to 37 miles to Seattle-Tacoma International south of the city. Alaska's new Paine service, operated by its Horizon Air affiliate with three-class Embraer 175s, started with flights to Portland and Las Vegas. By mid-March, Alaska's full schedule of 18 flights a day to eight cities should be in operation, as it phases in service to Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose, Orange County, Phoenix and San Diego. United is due to start service from Paine to San Francisco and Denver at the end of March.

Picturesque Victoria, on the southwestern edge of British Columbia is getting a lot harder to fly to. This week, Delta announced that it will cut its Seattle-Victoria flights in September. After 10 years of service, United stopped flying nonstop between San Francisco and Victoria in January. Alaska Air will continue to fly there from Seattle. Or you can take a Kenmore Air float plane from downtown Vancouver.

Unless you've been living under a rock for the past week, you probably have heard that Southwest Airlines finally announced details of its new Hawaii service from the Bay Area. It begins March 17 with daily flights from Oakland to Honolulu, increasing to twice-daily on March 24. Oakland-Maui starts April 8, with daily flights increasing to twice a day April 10. Daily San Jose-Honolulu flights are due to start May 5, followed by daily SJC-Maui service May 26. Southwest will also begin four interisland flights a day between Honolulu and Maui on April 28, and four a day between Honolulu and Kona on the Big Island as of May 12.

United Airlines kicks off several new domestic routes this weekend, mostly from its Denver hub. New United spokes from that hub include Santa Rosa, California; Brownsville, Texas; West Palm Beach, Pensacola, Sarasota, and Destin/Ft. Walton Beach, Florida. Other new United routes that kicked off this weekend include Los Angeles to Redding, California and Cleveland to Tampa, Florida.

Qatar Airways announced some new routes last week, but none of them were to North America. The airline once said it expected to launch Doha-San Francisco flights in 2018, but that didn't happen. What about 2019? "No update as of now when we will start flying to San Francisco," a spokesperson told us via Twitter. "We will announce via our social media channels in case we do. Stay tuned." Meanwhile, after a long-running feud with its Oneworld partner American Airlines, Qatar is expected to decide in the next two months whether it will stay in the alliance or drop out.

Don't miss a shred of important travel news! Sign up for our FREE bi-weekly email updates!
Cayman Airways' 737 MAX 8 arrives at Denver International. Photo: Denver International Airport
Photo: Denver International Airport

Cayman Airways' 737 MAX 8 arrives at Denver International.

Denver has another international destination with the addition of new Cayman Airways non-stop service to Grand Cayman. The carrier is using a brand-new 160-seat 737 MAX 8 on the route, which will operate twice a week (Wednesdays and Saturdays) through mid-August, returning again in December. Previously, Denver was the second-largest U.S. market that had no non-stop flights to the Caribbean.

Delta and Air France-KLM are already joint venture partners, and they are working to bring Virgin Atlantic into that close-knit family this year. To that end, the airlines have announced a big expansion of code-sharing, providing one-stop check-in and seamless connections for Air France and KLM passengers who connect to or from Delta or Virgin transatlantic flights at London or Manchester, and for Virgin travelers from the U.K. who connect to Air France/KLM transatlantic flights at Amsterdam or Paris.

Related: Why your Virgin Atlantic flight attendant might be wearing makeup
Related Stories

    It's time to warm up to Spring Break!
    Robotic coffee baristas elbowing in at SFO
    Alaska Airlines reveals plans for striking SFO lounge

That longstanding speculation about JetBlue beginning transatlantic service bubbled up again this week thanks to an interview that chief executive Robin Hayes gave to the British newspaper The Independent. Hayes told the paper "we're actively looking at it (transatlantic service) now," stirring some Internet rumors that JetBlue will make an announcement as soon as next month. Hayes said JetBlue is looking at flights from Boston and New York JFK to London, probably targeting Gatwick or Stansted airports instead of Heathrow, and using new long-range Airbus A321s equipped with the airline's signature Mint front cabin service to attract the business travel market.

In other international route news, Israel's El Al is reportedly planning to revive non-stop service from Tel Aviv to Chicago O'Hare in 2020 – a route that it abandoned in 2007 – although no details are available. Ethiopian Airlines is targeting June 9 for the launch of 787-8 flights between Addis Ababa and Washington Dulles via a stop in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, boosting the airline's Washington schedule to 10 flights a week.
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: azozeo on March 11, 2019, 11:01:15 AM
The true point I'm trying to make is this.

Back in the day (1980's) the FAA didn't allow commercial aviation aircraft to travel across vast distances of ocean
with only 2 jet engines.

This included L.A. to Honolulu which is 5 hours flight time roughly. Hono to Tokyo etc. Lockheed & Douglas filled the bill with 3 holers.

Has the law changed ? I don't know... I wouldn't personally travel over that much water with just a 2 engine jet, no matter how modern it is.

Well, these days just about all jets on all routes are 2 engines, and the safety record hasn't been too bad.

RE


China has ordered all domestic carriers to ground their Boeing 737 MAX 8s after one of the jets seemingly dropped from the sky southeast of Addis Ababa just six minutes after taking off on Sunday. That accident – which killed all 157 people on board – was the second involving one of the jets in five months, and has led to speculation that Boeing might order all of the jets to be grounded pending further inspection.

Chinese media outlet Caijing was the first to report the decision, citing sources within China’s domestic airline industry. Thee 737 MAX, the fourth generation of Boeing’s narrow-body 737 line, was first flown in 2016, making the string of crashes – two in five months – unprecedented and, according to some analysts, extremely suspect.


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-10/it-begins-china-orders-carriers-ground-boeing-737s-after-ethiopian-airlines-crash (https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-10/it-begins-china-orders-carriers-ground-boeing-737s-after-ethiopian-airlines-crash)
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: RE on March 11, 2019, 11:32:12 AM
Chinese media outlet Caijing was the first to report the decision, citing sources within China’s domestic airline industry. Thee 737 MAX, the fourth generation of Boeing’s narrow-body 737 line, was first flown in 2016, making the string of crashes – two in five months – unprecedented and, according to some analysts, extremely suspect.

Terrorist sabotage by Mexicans in retaliation for the Wall.

RE
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: azozeo on March 11, 2019, 12:48:04 PM
Chinese media outlet Caijing was the first to report the decision, citing sources within China’s domestic airline industry. Thee 737 MAX, the fourth generation of Boeing’s narrow-body 737 line, was first flown in 2016, making the string of crashes – two in five months – unprecedented and, according to some analysts, extremely suspect.

Terrorist sabotage by Mexicans in retaliation for the Wall.

RE


How will we manage when you go to the great beyond ?
Title: 🛬 Boeing’s Problems, Tragically, Are Mounting
Post by: RE on March 12, 2019, 02:14:35 AM
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-11/ethiopian-airlines-flight-302-crash-boeing-737-worries-mount (https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-11/ethiopian-airlines-flight-302-crash-boeing-737-worries-mount)

Business
Boeing’s Problems, Tragically, Are Mounting

Two 737 Max 8 crashes in less than five months is unusual – and a cause for worry.
By Mark Gongloff

March 11, 2019, 12:36 PM AKDT

(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/i3SDZUX3yB4M/v1/1000x-1.jpg)
A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on December 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington.

A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on December 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington. Photographer: Stephen Brashear/Getty Images North America
Mark Gongloff is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. He previously was a managing editor of Fortune.com, ran the Huffington Post's business and technology coverage, and was a columnist, reporter and editor for the Wall Street Journal.

Follow @markgongloff on Twitter
LISTEN TO ARTICLE
6:13

    Ethiopia’s air tragedy raises new questions.
    Maybe China will never have the world’s biggest economy.
    We’ve tried something like MMT before.
    Slapping tariffs on European cars would be a huge mistake.

ETHIOPIA-AIR ACCIDENT
Debris from the Ethiopia Airlines crash on March 11.
Photographer: MICHAEL TEWELDE/AFP/Getty Images
Tragedy in Ethiopia

(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/i46iLLmbWjXs/v1/-1x-1.jpg)

In less than five months, 346 people have died in two plane crashes, first in the Java Sea in October and then in Ethiopia Sunday morning. Both disasters involved Boeing Co.’s 737 Max 8.

Flying may still be the safest way to travel, but when two overwhelming tragedies like these involve the same kind of aircraft in such a short time, it’s natural for people to worry the issue is the equipment, writes Chris Bryant. It’s still too soon to say the 737 Max is the problem, but markets went ahead and punished Boeing stock with the biggest percentage drop in almost two decades. Ironically, Boeing stock had recently ridden to nearly a record high on the 737 Max’s early sales, Chris notes.
Safety First

These crashes will haunt survivors and air travelers for a long time. How long they affect Boeing’s reputation (not the primary consideration, of course) depends on what we learn about their causes in the days ahead. China and other countries grounded the 737 Max after the Ethiopian crash, but the FAA said it still considers the 737 Max airworthy. A key question for Boeing, writes David Fickling, is whether the 737 Max ends up like the DC-10, forever shadowed by safety issues, or the 787, which had some early problems but was a stalwart aircraft in the long run.
Title: Re: 🛬 Boeing’s Problems, Tragically, Are Mounting
Post by: azozeo on March 12, 2019, 10:58:17 AM
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-11/ethiopian-airlines-flight-302-crash-boeing-737-worries-mount (https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-11/ethiopian-airlines-flight-302-crash-boeing-737-worries-mount)

Business
Boeing’s Problems, Tragically, Are Mounting

Two 737 Max 8 crashes in less than five months is unusual – and a cause for worry.
By Mark Gongloff

March 11, 2019, 12:36 PM AKDT

(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/i3SDZUX3yB4M/v1/1000x-1.jpg)
A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on December 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington.

A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on December 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington. Photographer: Stephen Brashear/Getty Images North America
Mark Gongloff is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. He previously was a managing editor of Fortune.com, ran the Huffington Post's business and technology coverage, and was a columnist, reporter and editor for the Wall Street Journal.

Follow @markgongloff on Twitter
LISTEN TO ARTICLE
6:13

    Ethiopia’s air tragedy raises new questions.
    Maybe China will never have the world’s biggest economy.
    We’ve tried something like MMT before.
    Slapping tariffs on European cars would be a huge mistake.

ETHIOPIA-AIR ACCIDENT
Debris from the Ethiopia Airlines crash on March 11.
Photographer: MICHAEL TEWELDE/AFP/Getty Images
Tragedy in Ethiopia

(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/i46iLLmbWjXs/v1/-1x-1.jpg)

In less than five months, 346 people have died in two plane crashes, first in the Java Sea in October and then in Ethiopia Sunday morning. Both disasters involved Boeing Co.’s 737 Max 8.

Flying may still be the safest way to travel, but when two overwhelming tragedies like these involve the same kind of aircraft in such a short time, it’s natural for people to worry the issue is the equipment, writes Chris Bryant. It’s still too soon to say the 737 Max is the problem, but markets went ahead and punished Boeing stock with the biggest percentage drop in almost two decades. Ironically, Boeing stock had recently ridden to nearly a record high on the 737 Max’s early sales, Chris notes.
Safety First

These crashes will haunt survivors and air travelers for a long time. How long they affect Boeing’s reputation (not the primary consideration, of course) depends on what we learn about their causes in the days ahead. China and other countries grounded the 737 Max after the Ethiopian crash, but the FAA said it still considers the 737 Max airworthy. A key question for Boeing, writes David Fickling, is whether the 737 Max ends up like the DC-10, forever shadowed by safety issues, or the 787, which had some early problems but was a stalwart aircraft in the long run.



Sputnik News

The UK, Norway, Germany, Singapore, Australia, Malaysia, and Oman are the latest countries to temporarily ban the Boeing 737 Max from entering and leaving their countries after the model was involved in the Ethiopian Airlines and Indonesian Lion Airlines plane crashes – two in less than five months.

United Kingdom

The UK Civil Aviation Authority (UK CAA) said in a press release that it was closely monitoring the situation and will ground all 737 MAXs until further notice.


https://sputniknews.com/asia/201903121073159257-Singapore-Australia-737-Max/ (https://sputniknews.com/asia/201903121073159257-Singapore-Australia-737-Max/)
Title: 🛬 Boeing's stock continues steep slide as more nations ban 737 MAX 8 planes
Post by: RE on March 14, 2019, 01:51:41 AM
I smell a Corporation Killing Lawsuit on the Horizon.

RE

http://www.youtube.com/v/V5K0S0VcJtc

https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/12/investing/boeing-stock-update/index.html (https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/12/investing/boeing-stock-update/index.html)

Boeing's stock continues steep slide as more nations ban 737 MAX 8 planes
Paul Lamonica-Profile-Image

By Paul R. La Monica, CNN Business

Updated 4:29 PM ET, Tue March 12, 2019

Current Time 0:39
/
Duration Time 6:07
 
Now Playing Ethiopian Airlines CEO:...
World's largest private jet set for 2018 debut
Delta is introducing a jet with a totally new design
Flight attendant details perks of the A350-900ULR
India's airlines are struggling
airBaltic chief pilot Gerhard Ramcke in the cockpit of an Airbus A220-300
Airbus A220: A cockpit tour
Now Playing
Ethiopian Airlines CEO: Pilot reported flight control problems
RENTON, WA - MARCH 16: A Boeing 737 MAX 7 lifts off for first flight at Renton Municipal Airport, on March 16, 2018 in Renton, Washington. The aircraft is the shortest variant of fuel efficient MAX family. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
Two crashes, 6 months: What to know about the Boeing 737 MAX
A Qantas Airbus A380 takes off from the airport in Sydney on August 25, 2017. - Australia's Qantas unveiled plans for the world's longest non-stop commercial flight on August 25, 2017 calling it the "last frontier of global aviation", as it posted healthy annual net profits on the back of a strong domestic market. (Photo by PETER PARKS / AFP) (Photo credit should read PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images)
Airbus to stop making superjumbo A380
See Boeing's autonomous flying car take flight
Airbus and Boeing strengthen their duopoly
World's largest private jet set for 2018 debut
Delta is introducing a jet with a totally new design
Flight attendant details perks of the A350-900ULR
India's airlines are struggling
airBaltic chief pilot Gerhard Ramcke in the cockpit of an Airbus A220-300
Airbus A220: A cockpit tour
Now Playing
Ethiopian Airlines CEO: Pilot reported flight control problems
RENTON, WA - MARCH 16: A Boeing 737 MAX 7 lifts off for first flight at Renton Municipal Airport, on March 16, 2018 in Renton, Washington. The aircraft is the shortest variant of fuel efficient MAX family. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
Two crashes, 6 months: What to know about the Boeing 737 MAX
A Qantas Airbus A380 takes off from the airport in Sydney on August 25, 2017. - Australia's Qantas unveiled plans for the world's longest non-stop commercial flight on August 25, 2017 calling it the "last frontier of global aviation", as it posted healthy annual net profits on the back of a strong domestic market. (Photo by PETER PARKS / AFP) (Photo credit should read PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images)
Airbus to stop making superjumbo A380
See Boeing's autonomous flying car take flight
Airbus and Boeing strengthen their duopoly

New York (CNN Business)Boeing's stock fell sharply for a second straight day as more nations and airlines grounded the company's 737 MAX 8 planes.
Shares of Boeing (BA) fell more than 11% over the past two days: The stock fell 6% Tuesday following a 5% drop on Monday.
The stock's slide follows the tragic Ethiopian Airlines plane crash on Sunday that killed all 157 passengers and crew on board.
The European Union Aviation Safety Agency announced Tuesday that it was suspending all Boeing 737 Max 8 flights in Europe as a "precautionary measure." The EU joins China, Australia, the UK and several other nations in deciding to halt Boeing 737 MAX 8 flights. The United States has yet to do so.

The FAA said in a statement late Monday that is "collecting data and keeping in contact with international civil aviation authorities" as more information about the crash becomes available.
Boeing said that it has "full confidence in the safety of the 737 MAX."
"We understand that regulatory agencies and customers have made decisions that they believe are most appropriate for their home markets. We'll continue to engage with them to ensure they have the information needed to have confidence in operating their fleets," Boeing added.
The company also noted that the FAA "is not mandating any further action at this time, and based on the information currently available, we do not have any basis to issue new guidance to operators."
But Utah Senator Mitt Romney urged the FAA to follow the lead of other international agencies.
He wrote in a tweet Tuesday that "out of an abundance of caution for the flying public, the [FAA] should ground the 737 MAX 8 until we investigate the causes of recent crashes and ensure the plane's airworthiness."
Senator Ted Cruz added in a tweet later Tuesday that "in light of the decisions of regulatory agencies across the world to ground the Model 737 Max, I believe it would be prudent for the United States likewise to temporarily ground 737 Max aircraft until the FAA confirms the safety of these aircraft & their passengers."
And the influential magazine Consumer Reports also weighed in, saying Tuesday that major airlines that have Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes in their fleets, including American Airlines (AAL) and Southwest Airlines (LUV), should ground the planes even if the FAA does not ask them to do so.
"If the airlines will not ground the planes, CR says the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) should," the magazine said.
American said it would monitor the investigation of Sunday's crash but it has "full confidence in the aircraft and our crew members."

Southwest said, "We remain confident in the safety and airworthiness of the MAX 8. We don't have any changes planned to our MAX 8 operating plans."
Wall Street is still backing Boeing as well. As of Tuesday afternoon, 19 of the 24 analysts that were following the company had it rated a buy. The consensus earnings estimates for Boeing for this quarter and the full year hadn't changed in the past week either.
Title: 🛬 Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative
Post by: RE on March 14, 2019, 01:29:13 PM
Not a good week for a Boeing Executive to stop sniffing glue.

http://www.youtube.com/v/hd1ciPnTGKg

RE

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-13/boeing-and-the-faa-737-max-grounding-damage-is-already (https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-13/boeing-and-the-faa-737-max-grounding-damage-is-already)

Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative

They had a responsibility to err on the side of safety by grounding the 737 Max sooner.
By Brooke Sutherland

(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/igho0URLDPzk/v1/1000x-1.jpg)

Boeing Co.’s “proactive” grounding of its top-selling, and troubled, 737 Max plane is too little, too late. It already lost control of the narrative.

On Wednesday afternoon, the planemaker said it recommended to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration that all 371 of the aircraft currently in operation globally be temporarily grounded as a “proactive step out of an abundance of caution” following the second fatal crash in just five months. Indeed, President Donald Trump had announced moments before that the FAA would prohibit U.S. airlines from continuing to fly the planes, abandoning a defense of their airworthiness that was becoming an increasingly isolated proposition after Canada joined regulators across the world in deciding precautionary measures were justified. A more conservative approach by Boeing and the FAA was long overdue, but their new-found appreciation for putting safety first doesn’t excuse their previous reluctance.

We still don’t know for sure what caused the most recent crash of an Ethiopian Airlines flight Sunday that killed 157 people, although the CEO of that airline told CNN there were “substantial” similarities to the deadly incident involving a Lion Air flight in Indonesia in October. Canada’s Transport Minister Marc Garneau backed up that stance Wednesday, noting that new satellite data suggested a link and while inconclusive, it was enough to justify safeguards. The FAA, a key regulator of the aviation industry in America, will have to explain why it was so late to do its job. But Boeing also had a responsibility to err on the side of safety and an opportunity to control the story by advocating conservatism earlier. It chose not to, and it will have to wrestle with the reputational damage wrought by that decision.
Clipped Wings

Boeing shares have declined following the second crash involving its 737 Max, but they remain up for the year

Source: Bloomberg

My colleague David Fickling made the comparison to Johnson & Johnson’s handling of the crisis spurred by the death of seven people after a criminal lacing of its Tylenol painkiller. The incident is a PR case study for a reason: J&J got out in front of the issue, recalled all its Tylenol products, and replaced them free of charge; today, households everywhere buy the drug regularly, without concern. Boeing should have mimicked this strategy and recommended that airlines ground its planes until it had more information and could get more answers on the causes of the crash. Or it could have recommended that the FAA put limits on the operation of the plane or require the temporary disabling of the flight-control system that’s being highlighted as a possible cause of the crashes. Instead, CEO Dennis Muilenburg reportedly called Trump personally to express his confidence in the plane, which risks only further deepening the perception that the FAA and Boeing are too closely entwined for either’s own good. Trump said the U.S. worked with Canada on the plane grounding. Maybe; I am personally skeptical that the U.S. would have allowed Canada to go first if that was the case.

Again, we still don’t know what caused the Ethiopian Airlines crash, and Boeing maintains that it has full confidence in the safety of the plane — but we do know that a combined 346 people have died on board brand new 737 Max aircraft at a time when fatal commercial-jet incidents are rare. I think it could have been anticipated that passengers and governments alike would be concerned, and that repeated assurances of confidence might not be enough on their own. 1 The 737 Max program is likely to be perfectly safe over the long term, and Boeing is finalizing a software fix for the flight-control system that’s being tied to the Lion Air crash. It would have been in Boeing’s best interest to vow from the start to remove even the slightest shadow of a doubt before putting these planes back in the sky.
Top Seller

The 737 Max accounts for a substantial portion of Boeing's backlog

Source: Bloomberg Intelligence

There’s undeniably a cost to this: a global grounding will likely lead to a pause in deliveries until a fix is installed and certified, which Vertical Research Partners analyst Rob Stallard estimates would require Boeing to house an additional $1.8 billion a month in inventory. Norwegian Air has already said it expects to be remunerated by Boeing for the cost of sidelining 1 percent of its overall seat capacity. But Boeing now has to take on those expenses and cash flow hits without any PR benefit. Whether it’s true or not, by deflecting, the company now comes across as trying to hold on to every last dollar of profit that it can.

Boeing’s miscalculation may have stemmed from faith in the FAA as the global arbiter of flight safety. That perception has been upended by foreign governments’ decision to decide for themselves whether or not they feel comfortable boarding their citizens on Boeing’s planes. In another snub, Ethiopia plans to send data and voice recorders collected from the crash site to European authorities, rather than to the U.S., which the carrier’s public relations director called “a strategic decision.” 2  Playing follow the leader — in this case, China — on grounding the plane has damaged both Boeing and the FAA’s credibility and put them on the defensive in dealing with this crisis.

    The Financial Times reports that large U.S. companies are asking travel agencies to avoid booking their staff on 737 Max 8 planes.

    Ethiopia reportedly wanted to send the black boxes to Germany, but regulators there declined to receive them because they lack the necessary software.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the author of this story:
Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.net
Title: Re: 🛬 Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative
Post by: Surly1 on March 14, 2019, 01:51:54 PM

Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative


Boeing Co.’s “proactive” grounding of its top-selling, and troubled, 737 Max plane is too little, too late. It already lost control of the narrative.

On Wednesday afternoon, the planemaker said it recommended to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration that all 371 of the aircraft currently in operation globally be temporarily grounded as a “proactive step out of an abundance of caution” following the second fatal crash in just five months.

You "lose control of the narrative" when you are caught lying through your teeth. If Boeing's was "proactive grounding," then I am King of France. There is also the contemporaneous log of pilot reported episodes of nose-dipping from a number of pilots which Boeing studiously ignored.

Too little, too late. Boeing's PR position is as full of shit as Kellyanne Conway. The citation about J&J's response to the Tylenol episode is right on the money.
Title: Re: 🛬 Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative
Post by: RE on March 14, 2019, 02:31:21 PM

Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative


Boeing Co.’s “proactive” grounding of its top-selling, and troubled, 737 Max plane is too little, too late. It already lost control of the narrative.

On Wednesday afternoon, the planemaker said it recommended to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration that all 371 of the aircraft currently in operation globally be temporarily grounded as a “proactive step out of an abundance of caution” following the second fatal crash in just five months.

You "lose control of the narrative" when you are caught lying through your teeth. If Boeing's was "proactive grounding," then I am King of France. There is also the contemporaneous log of pilot reported episodes of nose-dipping from a number of pilots which Boeing studiously ignored.

Too little, too late. Boeing's PR position is as full of shit as Kellyanne Conway. The citation about J&J's response to the Tylenol episode is right on the money.

Looks like they should have hung on to the 747.  That one at least worked.

This looks like a serious design flaw.  Not something that can be fixed with a recall.  With as many planes of this type as they have sold, they're on the hook for $Billions in returned merchandise, besides the lawsuits.  Bye, bye Boeing.

RE
Title: 🛬 Boeing 737 Max Hit Trouble Right Away, Pilot’s Tense Radio Messages Show
Post by: RE on March 15, 2019, 01:52:07 AM
Design flaw, without doubt.  Boeing is a goner.

Stick a fork in them, they're done.

http://www.youtube.com/v/3r9YlB1a5EI

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/14/world/boeing-737-max-ethiopian-airlines.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/14/world/boeing-737-max-ethiopian-airlines.html)

Boeing 737 Max Hit Trouble Right Away, Pilot’s Tense Radio Messages Show

(https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/03/14/business/14boeing3/merlin_152065434_33572a0b-6187-4937-91b4-26f1c7ac6fe3-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp)
A memorial arch on Thursday at the site of the jet crash in Ethiopia.CreditCreditJemal Countess/Getty Images

By Selam Gebrekidan and James Glanz

    March 14, 2019

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — The captain of a doomed Ethiopian Airlines jetliner faced an emergency almost immediately after takeoff from Addis Ababa, requesting permission in a panicky voice to return after three minutes as the aircraft accelerated to abnormal speed, a person who reviewed air traffic communications said Thursday.

“Break break, request back to home,” the captain told air traffic controllers as they scrambled to divert two other flights approaching the airport. “Request vector for landing.”

Controllers also observed that the aircraft, a new Boeing 737 Max 8, was oscillating up and down by hundreds of feet — a sign that something was extraordinarily wrong.

All contact between air controllers and the aircraft, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 to Nairobi, was lost five minutes after it took off on Sunday, the person said.

Advertisement

The person who shared the information, speaking on the condition of anonymity because the communications have not been publicly released, said the controllers had concluded even before the captain’s message that he had an emergency.

8:41 a.m.

Addis Ababa

Data for last half

of the flight was not

publicly released

Path of Flight 302

Based on publicly

available radar data

8:38 a.m.

Takeoff

5 miles

ETHIOPIA

Area of crash

Source: Flightradar24

By Scott Reinhard

The account of the cockpit communications shed chilling new detail about the final minutes before the plane crashed, killing all 157 people aboard. The crash, which has led to a worldwide grounding of Max 8s, was the second for the best-selling Boeing aircraft in less than five months.

Regulatory authorities in the United States and Canada say similar patterns in the trajectories of both planes may point to a common cause for the two crashes. But they cautioned that no explanation had been ruled out yet, and said the planes might have crashed for different reasons.

The new disclosures about the last moments of Flight 302 came as pilots were discussing what they described as the dangerously high speed of the aircraft after it took off from Addis Ababa’s Bole International Airport.
Sign Up for the Morning Briefing

Get what you need to know to start your day in the United States, Canada and the Americas, delivered to your inbox.

Advertisement

Pilots were abuzz over publicly available radar data that showed the aircraft had accelerated far beyond what is considered standard practice, for reasons that remain unclear.

“The thing that is most abnormal is the speed,” said John Cox, an aviation safety consultant and former 737 pilot.

“The speed is very high,” said Mr. Cox, a former executive air safety chairman of the Air Line Pilots Association in the United States. “The question is why. The plane accelerates far faster than it should.”
Why Investigators Fear the Two Boeing 737s Crashed for Similar Reasons

The planes flew in similar erratic patterns, suggesting to experts that an automated system might have malfunctioned on both flights.

Ethiopian Airlines officials have said the crew of Flight 302 reported “flight control” problems to air traffic controllers a few minutes before contact was lost. The new account of communications between air traffic controllers and the pilot, Yared Getachew, who had 8,000 hours of flying experience, provides much more information about what was happening in the cockpit.

Within one minute of Flight 302’s departure, the person who reviewed communications said, Captain Getachew reported a “flight control” problem in a calm voice. At that point, radar showed the aircraft’s altitude as being well below what is known as the minimum safe height from the ground during a climb.

Within two minutes, the person said, the plane had climbed to a safer altitude, and the pilot said he wanted to stay on a straight course to 14,000 feet.

Advertisement

Then the controllers observed the plane going up and down by hundreds of feet, and it appeared to be moving unusually fast, the person said. The controllers, the person said, “started wondering out loud what the flight was doing.”

Two other Ethiopian flights, 613 and 629, were approaching from the east, and the controllers, sensing an emergency on Flight 302, ordered them to remain at higher altitudes. It was during that exchange with the other planes, the person said, that Captain Getachew, with panic in his voice, interrupted with his request to turn back.

Flight 302 was just three minutes into its flight, the person said, and appeared to have accelerated to even higher speeds, well beyond its safety limits.
The wreckage of Flight 302.CreditEPA, via Shutterstock
Image
The wreckage of Flight 302.CreditEPA, via Shutterstock

Cleared by the controllers to turn back, Flight 302 turned right as it climbed further. A minute later, it disappeared from the radar over a restricted military zone.

The disaster drew immediate comparisons to the October crash of another Boeing 737 Max 8, operated by Lion Air, in Indonesia. Both took place soon after takeoff, and the crews of both planes had sought to return to the airport.

The possibility that the two crashes had a similar cause was central to regulators’ decision to ground all 737 Maxes, a family of planes that entered passenger service less than two years ago.

Advertisement

After the Indonesia crash, a new flight-control system meant to keep the jet from stalling was suspected as a cause. In both cases, pilots struggled to control their aircraft.

[Why investigators fear the two Boeing 737s crashed for the same reason.]

The investigation of the Ethiopian crash is still in its early stages, and safety regulators have noted that it is too soon to draw conclusions about the cause. The so-called black boxes, voice and flight data recorders that contain more detailed information about the Ethiopian flight’s final moments, arrived in France on Thursday for analysis.

Since the Indonesia crash, Boeing has been working on a software update for the 737 Max jets, expected by April. But the company and the Federal Aviation Administration face new questions over whether there should have been more pilot training as airlines added the new models to their fleets.

On Wednesday, the chairman of the transportation committee in the House of Representatives said he would investigate the F.A.A.’s certification of the 737 Max, including why the regulator did not require more extensive training.
Editors’ Picks
‘Project Runway’ Is Back on Bravo. Here’s What to Expect.
Amy Schumer Doesn’t Care What You Think (That Much)
‘Tell Your Husband to Leave Me Alone’

Selam Gebrekidan reported from Addis Ababa, and James Glanz from New York. Thomas Kaplan contributed reporting from Washington.
A version of this article appears in print on March 14, 2019, on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Pilot in Crisis From the Start, Review Shows. Order Reprints
Title: 🛬 Boeing, The FAA, And Why Two 737 MAX Planes Crashed
Post by: RE on March 15, 2019, 11:35:41 AM
Yup, Regulatory Capture + Design Flaw = Dead People.  Which they now will try to "fix" by layering a new level of complexity on a plane that wants to point downward all the time. What could possibly go wrong?  ::)

RE

https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/03/14/boeing-the-faa-and-why-two-737-max-planes-crashed/ (https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/03/14/boeing-the-faa-and-why-two-737-max-planes-crashed/)

Boeing, The FAA, And Why Two 737 MAX Planes Crashed
Print Friendly, PDF & EmailPrint this post.

DISPATCHES FROM MOON OF ALABAMA, BY “B”
HELP ENLIGHTEN YOUR FELLOWS. BE SURE TO PASS THIS ON. SURVIVAL DEPENDS ON IT.

(https://www.greanvillepost.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Boeing-737Max-an-aerolineas-argentinas-boeing-737-max-8-is-seen-on-the-tarmac-of-ezeiza-airport-on-the-outskirts-of-buenos-aires-1.jpg)
Flying the unfriendly skies of capitalism, to sure disaster.

On Sunday an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed, killing all on board. Five month earlier an Indonesian Lion Air jet crashed near Jakarta. All crew and passengers died. Both airplanes were Boeing 737-8 MAX. Both incidents happened shortly after take off.

Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are now grounded about everywhere except in the United States. [The US finally grounded its 737 MAX fleet only 24 hrs. ago; as Churchill once said, “The US always does teh right thing after tryimng everything else.”] That this move follows only now is sad. After the first crash it was already obvious that the plane is not safe to fly.

The Boeing 737 and the Airbus 320 types are single aisle planes with some 150 seats. Both are bread and butter planes sold by the hundreds with a good profit. In 2010 Airbus decided to offer its A-320 with a New Engine Option (NEO) which uses less fuel. To counter the Airbus move Boeing had to follow up. The 737 would also get new engines for a more efficient flight and longer range. The new engines on the 737 MAX are bigger and needed to be placed a bit different than on the older version. That again changed the flight characteristics of the plane by giving it a nose up attitude.

The new flight characteristic of the 737 MAX would have required a retraining of the pilots. But Boeing’s marketing people had told their customers all along that the 737 MAX would not require extensive new training. Instead of expensive simulator training for the new type, experienced 737 pilots would only have to read some documentation about the changes between the old and the new versions.

To make that viable Boeing’s engineers had to use a little trick. They added a ‘maneuver characteristics augmentation system’ (MCAS) that pitches the nose of the plane down if a sensor detects a too high angle of attack (AoA) that might lead to a stall. That made the flight characteristic of the new 737 version similar to the old one.

But the engineers screwed up.

The 737 MAX has two flight control computers. Each is connected to only one of the two angle of attack sensors. During a flight only one of two computers runs the MCAS control. If it detects a too high angle of attack it trims the horizontal stabilizer down for some 10 seconds. It then waits for 5 seconds and reads the sensor again. If the sensor continues to show a too high angle of attack it again trims the stabilizer to pitch the plane’s nose done.

MCSA is independent of the autopilot. It is even active in manual flight. There is a procedure to deactivate it but it takes some time.

One of the angle of attack sensors on the Indonesian flight was faulty. Unfortunately it was the one connected to the computer that ran the MCAS on that flight. Shortly after take off the sensor signaled a too high angle of attack even as the plane was flying in a normal climb. The MCAS engaged and put the planes nose down. The pilots reacted by disabling the autopilot and pulling the control stick back. The MCAS engaged again pitching the plane further down. The pilots again pulled the stick. This happened some 12 times in a row before the plane crashed into the sea.

To implement a security relevant automatism that depends on only one sensor is extremely bad design. To have a flight control automatism engaged even when the pilot flies manually is also a bad choice. But the real criminality was that Boeing hid the feature.

Neither the airlines that bought the planes nor the pilots who flew it were told about MCAS. They did not know that it exists. They were not aware of an automatic system that controlled the stabilizer even when the autopilot was off. They had no idea how it could be deactivated.

Nine days after the Indonesian Lion Air Flight 610 ended in a deadly crash, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive.

The 737 MAX pilots were aghast. The APA pilot union sent a letter to its members:

    “This is the first description you, as 737 pilots, have seen. It is not in the AA 737 Flight Manual Part 2, nor is there a description in the Boeing FCOM (flight crew operations manual),” says the letter from the pilots’ union safety committee. “Awareness is the key with all safety issues.”

The Ethiopian Airlines plane that crashed went down in a similar flight profile as the Indonesian plane. It is highly likely that MCAS is the cause of both incidents. While the pilots of the Ethiopian plane were aware of the MCAS system they might have had too little time to turn it off. The flight recorders have been recovered and will tell the full story.

Boeing has sold nearly 5,000 of the 737 MAX. So far some 380 have been delivered. Most of these are now grounded. Some family members of people who died on the Indonesian flight are suing Boeing. Others will follow. But Boeing is not the only one who is at fault.

The FAA certifies all new planes and their documentation. I was for some time marginally involved in Airbus certification issues. It is an extremely detailed process that has to be followed by the letter. Hundreds of people are full time engaged for years to certify a modern jet. Every tiny screw and even the smallest design details of the hardware and software have to be documented and certified.

How or why did the FAA agree to accept the 737 MAX with the badly designed MCAS? How could the FAA allow that MCAS was left out of the documentation? What steps were taken after the Indonesian flight crashed into the sea?

Up to now the FAA was a highly regarded certification agency. Other countries followed its judgment and accepted the certifications the FAA issued. That most of the world now grounded the 737 MAX while it still flew in the States is a sign that this view is changing. The FAA’s certifications of Boeing airplanes are now in doubt.

Today Boeing’s share price dropped some 7.5%. I doubt that it is enough to reflect the liability issues at hand. Every airline that now had to ground its planes will ask for compensation. More than 330 people died and their families deserve redress. Orders for 737 MAX will be canceled as passengers will avoid that type.

Boeing will fix the MCAS problem by using more sensors or by otherwise changing the procedures. But the bigger issue for the U.S. aircraft industry might be the damage done to the FAA’s reputation. If the FAA is internationally seen as a lobbying agency for the U.S. airline industry it will no longer be trusted and the industry will suffer from it. It will have to run future certification processes through a jungle of foreign agencies.

Congress should take up the FAA issue and ask why it failed.

Posted by b on March 12, 2019 at 04:39 PM | Permalink
A selected comment we endorse—
@ b who wrote

” But the engineers screwed up. “

I call BS on this pointing of fingers at the wrong folk

Engineers get paid to build things that accountants influence. The West is a world in which the accountants have more sway than engineers.

It is all about the money b and to lead folks in some other direction is not like what I think of you.

The elite that own global private finance and everything else killed those people in the planes because they set the standards that the accountants follow and then force the engineers to operate within

The profit narrative is bad for humanity.

Posted by: psychohistorian | Mar 12, 2019 4:55:32 PM | 1

About the Author
“b” is MoA’s founding and chief editor.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
Title: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Airbus Supports A Second Hand A380 Market
Post by: RE on March 16, 2019, 03:02:41 AM
Airbus fer Sale!  Get yer Airbus here!

Remember, it is not a "Used Plane".  It is a "Certified Pre-Owned" Plane!

"High Prices? WE BLOW THE LIVING SHIT out of High Prices!

http://www.youtube.com/v/zqHZWdFVyyQ

RE

https://simpleflying.com/airbus-a380-second-hand-market/ (https://simpleflying.com/airbus-a380-second-hand-market/)

Airbus Supports A Second Hand A380 Market
By Jo
March 15, 2019

With the production of the A380 coming to an end in 2021, many are concerned that we’ll no longer get to fly the giant of the skies. But with Airbus confirming to Simple Flying that they ‘support and promote’ the second hand market for the A380, the short term future for the plane, at least, is looking pretty bright.

(https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/download-12-700x485.jpg)
Airbus are keen to see the second hand A380 market take off. Photo: Airbus

When we reported on the forthcoming fleet shake up at Lufthansa, we were surprised to hear that the airline was planning to sell six of its A380s back to Airbus. With the A380 project for the chop, it was surprising to hear the manufacturer was willing to take back these planes.

Airbus told us at the time:

    “Airbus supports and promotes the A380 second-hand market.”

But how do they support it, and who are they promoting it to?
Who wants a second hand A380?

The Airbus A380 is still fairly young, with the first aircraft only entering into service 12 years ago. They are well away from the end of their useful life, but even so we’ve already seen A380s sent for scrap, as it’s not a well-loved model by the majority of the world’s carriers.

However, not all A380s are unwanted, as even British Airways have said they could be interested in second hand models. With their iconic 747s coming to the end of their lifespan, the A380 could fill the gap very nicely indeed.
British Airways A380

British Airways have indicated they might be interested in second hand A380s. Photo: Airbus

The first operator of a second hand A380 was Hi Fly. The wet leasing company took delivery of MSN006 in July last year, after it came to the end of its 10 year lease with Singapore Airlines. They have since indicated they would be keen to buy more too.

Their decision to make use of the Airbus A380 was well timed, as it was able to step in and fill gaps in the schedules when the 787 was grounded due to turbine blade problems.
Hi Fly A380

Hi Fly are the first airline to operate a second hand A380. Photo: Airbus

When Hi Fly bought their A380 last year, they received full support from Airbus. This included a package of measures to help them bring it into service effectively. Among other things, Airbus included onsite field service and a flight hour services for components offer.

That’s a pretty valuable offer for any airline, and a clear demonstration of Airbus’s commitment to getting second hand A380s back in the air.
Why do Airbus support the second hand market?

Airbus have been clear for some time that they’re keen to support the second hand market for the A380. Commenting on the Hi Fly purchase, Catherine Bras, Airbus’ A380 business development platform leader, said:

“From the beginning we knew it would be good for us to help build a market for second-hand aircraft. We think this is a great opportunity to show what the aircraft can do. There may be some airlines that were hesitant to commit long-term who can now try out an A380 and see what it can do for them. This could help create new routes and expand the market base.”

The manufacturer has also said they see wet leasing as a lucrative area in which the A380 can be used. Wet leasing often provides a solution where seasonality is the problem, and if a route requires substantial capacity for a short while, the A380 is the aircraft that can deliver the maximum seats.
Airbus A380 cabin

The Airbus is an ideal solution when more seats are needed due to seasonality. Photo: Airbus

Whether other wet lessors or even direct carriers will step up and take second hand A380s remains to be seen. However, we suspect that Airbus probably already have a buyer in mind. We’re looking forward to finding out who it is.
Title: 🛬 As Boeing faces scrutiny over the 737 Max 8, it can draw on influence
Post by: RE on March 17, 2019, 01:24:32 AM
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/03/16/boeing-737-max-8-catastrophic-crashes-test-companys-clout-d-c/3146037002/ (https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/03/16/boeing-737-max-8-catastrophic-crashes-test-companys-clout-d-c/3146037002/)

As Boeing faces scrutiny over the 737 Max 8, it can draw on high-flying influence campaign

Bart Jansen and John Fritze, USA TODAY Published 6:56 a.m. ET March 16, 2019 | Updated 8:55 a.m. ET March 16, 2019


President Donald Trump visits a Boeing facility in South Carolina, praises company for its aircraft innovations and being an example for keeping jobs in the U.S. (Feb. 17) AP


WASHINGTON –As lawmakers begin to scrutinize Boeing's grounded 737 Max 8, they will be probing one of the nation's most powerful corporate political players, backed with a multi-million-dollar lobbying budget and a direct line to the White House.

Chicago-based Boeing, the second-largest U.S. government contractor, suffered a setback this week when the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) followed its counterparts around the world in grounding the 737 Max 8 after two catastrophic crashes raised new questions about the plane's software.

Now Boeing faces a test of its influence as congressional investigators look into how the plane was approved, what caused the crashes and why the FAA delayed its grounding order. The Senate Commerce Committee is scheduling a hearing and key House Democrats have vowed "rigorous oversight."
Boeing influence

Like other large U.S. employers, Boeing spends millions of dollars each year on lobbying the administration and making campaign contributions. The company spent $15 million lobbying in 2018, according to disclosure reports, more than household brands like Amazon and Facebook.

Boeing ranked 11th in a Center for Responsive Politics list of the nation's top spenders on lobbying in 2018. 

The company contributed $1 million to Trump's inaugural committee, Federal Election Commission records show. Boeing's employees, meanwhile, pumped about $5 million into campaigns and political committees in last year's midterm election, according to a USA TODAY analysis of FEC data.

"This does not bode well for Americans who fly," Walter Shaub, senior adviser to the Washington-based Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics wrote in a post on Twitter. "Boeing donates $1 million to Trump's sketchy inaugural fund and the U.S. breaks with other nations that have grounded the Boeing 737."
Trump and Muilenburg

Large companies regularly contribute money to political candidates and spend heavily on lobbying. But what sets Boeing apart from most others is the care CEO Dennis Muilenburg has taken to cultivate a relationship with Trump, who owns one of the company's planes, a 757.

That relationship wasn't always so strong. During the 2016 campaign, Trump repeatedly slammed Boeing for the cost of its Air Force One design, suggesting it was "out of control." Candidate Trump criticized the company for setting up a plant in China to finish its 737s, saying it would take "a tremendous number of jobs" out of the country.

Shortly after the election, Muilenburg sought to smooth things over with the president during a visit to Trump's Florida estate, Mar-a-Lago. A month later, and days before Trump became president, Muilenburg appeared at Trump Tower, praising Trump's "engagement."

When it came time for Trump to make his first trip out of Washington in early 2017 he went to a Boeing plant in South Carolina to tout U.S. economic growth. The company was later awarded a contract to build two Air Force One planes for $3.9 billion.

"We've got a whole wave of policy issues, topics we're working on," Muilenburg told analysts on a call last year, "but we have a voice at the table, which is encouraging."

A member of Trump's Cabinet, acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan, spent more three decades with Boeing as an executive before joining the administration in 2017.

Trump has continued to praise the company even as he announced the grounding.

"It's a great, great company with a track record that is so phenomenal," Trump told reporters at the White House on Wednesday. "And they want this solved; they want it solved quickly."
Mixed record

Still, the company has had a mixed track record meeting its policy ambitions in Washington. Muilenburg personally spoke with Trump to lobby for the safety of the 737 Max 8. And the FAA initially stood by the plane as Britain, France and Germany joined a growing list of countries suspended its use in their airspace.

U.S. regulators relented Wednesday, citing new information from the crash site and satellite data that the agency said suggested similarities between the Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday that killed 157 people and the crash in October of a Lion Air Flight off the coast of Indonesia that killed 189 passengers and crew.

"Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT," Trump posted on Twitter days after the crash, a missive that preceded Muilenburg's call to the White House. "I see it all the time in many products. Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better."

FAA: 'No basis' to order grounding of Boeing 737 MAX 8 despite calls worldwide

Experts said Boeing has long been a major player in Washington's influence game, but noted there was no evidence that effort had anything to do with the FAA's delay in grounding the latest 737 model. The federal government spent $23 billion with Boeing in 2017, a U.S. General Services Administration report on federal contracting shows.

"They're really good at capturing defense contracts," said Richard Aboulafia, vice president for analysis at Teal Group and an aviation consultant. "But there's absolutely no evidence that there's anything untoward with the the FAA's decision here."

A Boeing spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.
Aviation oversight

Like many other agencies in the Trump administration, the Federal Aviation Administration isn't working at full capacity. Daniel Elwell, a former Air Force lieutenant general and American Airlines pilot, has been serving as the agency's acting administrator for more than year.

Trump floated the idea of nominating his personal pilot for the top FAA job last year, but backed down following resistance from lawmakers.

The National Transportation Safety Board, by contrast, is a five-member board that investigates crashes and makes non-binding recommendations on how to avoid future mishaps. Trump appointed two of its five members and elevated a third – originally a Bush appointee – to chairman. The board has one vacancy. 

The NTSB is not investigating either the Ethiopian crash or the Lion Air crash. Foreign countries must request NTSB or similar European agencies to investigate.

Mike Slack, a pilot and lawyer who has represented passengers and family members in crash cases, said Trump had little choice but to ground the Max 8 and Max 9 planes. Allowing the aircraft to fly would have gambled jobs – and American lives – and raised even more questions for the administration and Boeing. 

“Is this about protecting Boeing competitively against Airbus, its primary competitor? And why would Boeing’s CEO be calling the president of the United States?” said Slack, a former NASA engineer. “That’s not good form when the background story is already that the FAA is not acting.”
Boeing's success

Boeing has had a mixed record scoring policy wins in Washington.

The company fought hard to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, an independent agency that provides loans to foreign companies so they can buy high-priced U.S. goods such as aircraft. Congress reauthorized the bank in 2015, despite concern from many Republicans that it used taxpayer money to benefit huge companies like Boeing that didn't need the help.

But while Congress reauthorized the bank, Senate Republicans have declined to confirm all of the board's members. That has left the bank unable to sign deals valued at more than $10 million, far less than the price of the 737 MAX 8 and other Boeing planes. 

Boeing also benefited from a fight to give foreign carriers, including airlines based in Persian Gulf countries, better access to the U.S. market – an outcome that would help them sell more airplanes to their overseas customers. Domestic airlines mostly opposed the idea, arguing that state-owned air carriers brought unfair competition to U.S. skies.

Ultimately, the U.S. Department of Transportation allowed the Gulf carriers to serve the U.S., but required more public reporting of their finances.

Boeing lost another major fight last year. When Delta Airlines sought to import jets from Montreal-based manufacturer Bombardier, Boeing objected to the International Trade Commission. The company argued that the Bombardier planes were subsidized by the Canadian government and, because of that,  represented unfair competition to their own planes.

The Commerce Department threatened to impose tariffs that would have quadrupled the cost of the Bombardier jets. 

The Trade Commission found Bombardier planes should have cost about three times more than the ticket price because of those subsidies but also declined to rule that the planes would harm the U.S. industry, blocking the tariffs in a loss for Boeing.
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: Surly1 on March 17, 2019, 02:17:28 AM
Quote
Now Boeing faces a test of its influence as congressional investigators look into how the plane was approved, what caused the crashes and why the FAA delayed its grounding order.

This should be as far-reaching and effective a probe as those police investigations that look into the execution of young black men, which almost never turn up anything actionable or suspicious.

(https://media.giphy.com/media/Yl5aO3gdVfsQ0/giphy.gif)
Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
Post by: RE on March 17, 2019, 03:04:00 AM
Quote
Now Boeing faces a test of its influence as congressional investigators look into how the plane was approved, what caused the crashes and why the FAA delayed its grounding order.

This should be as far-reaching and effective a probe as those police investigations that look into the execution of young black men, which almost never turn up anything actionable or suspicious.

(https://media.giphy.com/media/Yl5aO3gdVfsQ0/giphy.gif)

My Morning Collapse Wake-Up Call this morning is a Special Aviation Edition.  :icon_sunny:  Should have it up in an hour or so.

RE
Title: Death of Aviation & Alaskan Collapse Wedding Soup
Post by: RE on March 17, 2019, 04:00:22 AM


youtube-Logo-4gc2reddit-logoOff the keyboard, microphone & camera of RE



Follow us on Twitter @doomstead666

Friend us on Facebook



Published on The Doomstead Diner March 16, 2019



 






(Note:  In the Video, I got my Model Number wrong for the Airbus, the big one is the A380, not the A320.  I didn't catch this error until re-watching the video this morning.  Apologies to the viewers)



 






 



Discuss this Article & Videos at the Cooking Zone Inside the Diner



 



Collapse Wake-Up Call 3/10/2019



 



This was not a good week for Boeing Executives or Stockholders.  In fact, it wasn't a good week for anyone in the Aviation Industry to stop Sniffing Glue.






I've been following the Collapsing Aviation Industry since it began accelerating with the cancellation of the Boeing 747 last year.  That plane was one of the most recognizable ones ever produced, and Boeing's Signature Flagship Jumbo Jet Aircraft, for decades by far the largest passenger plane in the world.



Fairly recently, the European Consortium Airbus built their own Jumbo, the A380.  Even bigger than the 747, but only in production for the last 11 years before Airbus gave up on this White Elephant also and cancelled further orders.  The 747 was first launched from the Boeing plant in Seattle in 1969, lasting a full half century in production.  Now Airbus is promoting a"Used Planes" resale market for various airlines and Saudi Sheiks to sell these behemoths to each other.  Or they just trade them around over the Poker Table or Backgammon Board between beheadings.



Sadly, the demise of these two airplanes is nothing compared to the disaster that befell Boeing over the last couple of months, the HUGELY Faltal Crashes of two of it's Spanking New 737 Max jet, first in Ethiopia and then another one with the Lion Air plane that crashed into the Java Sea immediately after take-off.  An even bigger tragedy of course for the victims of these crashes.



It is fairly obvious at this point that the problem is the result of a combination of a Design Flaw and Regulatory Capture of the FAA by Boeing.  The negligence and liability here is beyond measure, and this in a just world would put Boeing Outta Biz in a heartbeat.  But this culture and system are neither Just nor Fair, and it remains to be seen how it plays out.  Much more on this topic in today's Morning Collapse Wake-Up Call video, at the top of the page.  Also much more in the Death of Aviation thread Inside the Diner.



To accompany your Collapse Brunch brain food this St. Paddy's Day morning, you can have the Alaska Collapse Wedding Soup, along with your Corned Beef & Cabbage.  The Corned Beef & Cabbage recipe went up yesterday so you have time to get it ready before you start drinking Mass Quantities today.



 










Title: 🛬 Trump's Right. Keep Flying Simple for Pilots
Post by: RE on March 18, 2019, 12:13:12 AM
A good start would be designing the plane so it doesn't need a bazillion sensors running to stay flying level.  ::)

RE

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-17/boeing-737-crash-renews-debate-on-complexity-of-planes (https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-17/boeing-737-crash-renews-debate-on-complexity-of-planes)

Business
Trump's Right. Keep Flying Simple for Pilots


Cockpit crew need enough information to make split-second decisions without being overwhelmed. It’s not an intractable challenge.

By David Fickling
March 16, 2019, 4:00 PM AKDT

(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/iNzwx.q9eLNM/v1/1000x-1.jpg)
They shouldn’t need to be Einstein.

Photographer: Steven E. Frischling/Bloomberg
David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.
Read more opinion
Follow @davidfickling on Twitter


President Donald Trump was widely mocked last week for his response to the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Group Flight 302, warning that “airplanes are becoming far too complex to fly”:

In fact, he made a good point, which 737 Max manufacturer Boeing Co., airlines and pilots would do well to heed.

Modern passenger airplanes are by their nature complex – but in most cases, that’s a good thing. The mental attention of air crews is a precious resource, and automated systems allow this to be conserved for when it’s most needed. On top of that, the fly-by-wire systems pioneered by the Airbus SE A320 mean that most planes these days self-correct when pilots move the controls too aggressively – one reason why fatal loss-of-control accidents have fallen by three-quarters over the past three decades.

The problem comes with split-second decisions. Using autopilot to preserve a crew’s mental energy is all very well. Over time, though, mental muscles that go unused end up atrophying. That’s a problem because most air accidents occur in odd, unexpected situations where pilots are having to diagnose a baffling problem under high pressure. One 2014 study of highly experienced Boeing 747 pilots found that 15 out of 16 failed to react properly to misreadings of airspeed in simulator tests, to the extent that the “aircraft” started to stall.

Boeing should be worried about that, because a recurring comment of pilots who’ve flown the 737 Max and predecessor versions is that changes to the basic design and flight control systems make it feel like a different aircraft. Such differences risk breeding confusion.

One of the bedrocks of aviation safety is type classification. A brand-new aircraft must go through type certification, a laborious procedure where a regulator checks that the plane and every one of its component parts is safe. In the case of the Boeing 787, that took eight years and thousands of hours at the Federal Aviation Administration alone. Costs for the process can run into the hundreds of millions of dollars: Though Boeing produces new commercial aircraft no more than once a decade or so, the regulator spends about $230 million every year on certifying new aircraft and parts.

On top of that there’s type rating, which ensures pilots are familiar with the aircraft in question and fully qualified to fly it. This, again, can be phenomenally expensive. Pilots, who typically spend about $70,000 just getting a commercial license, will have to fork out another $30,000 or so each time they’re trained to fly a new aircraft – one reason why most stick to a single model.

The desire to minimize these costs is understandable, especially when there’s a global pilot shortage and a cutthroat aircraft market that typically leaves both Boeing and Airbus with single-digit profit margins.
Low Flying Aircraft

Profit margins at the big aircraft manufacturers rarely crack double figures

Source: Bloomberg

Hence the attraction of the 737 Max. As an updated version of the existing 737 NG models, it’s managed to avoid both those hurdles. Pilots with a 737 type rating are allowed to transition across after a cursory classroom training course, while the common type certificate with the 737 NG means the FAA didn’t have to crawl over every detail of the new design with quite the rigor it would have to devote to a brand-new plane.

That’s attractive both to Boeing and its airline customers, but following these two crashes it’s worth asking: at what cost?

One automated feature that’s been named in relation to the crash of Lion Air 610 last October and could credibly explain some of the in-flight behavior leading up to the Ethiopian Airlines crash is the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which helps correct for some of the changed aerodynamics created by the 737 Max’s larger engines.

There’s a detailed debate about whether Boeing gave pilots enough information about this feature in advance. On one hand, it’s possible that the paucity of references to the system in training materials blindsided the air crew and contributed to the Lion Air crash. On the other, it’s equally possible that deluging pilots with too much data could have led to confusion.

These problems seem intractable, but in truth they’re not. While it’s unlikely any plane will ever have a perfect safety record, a few more days of training and simulator flights ought to be enough to alert pilots to the differences between the 737 Max and its earlier variants. Likewise, a suitably tough regulator ought to be able to ensure that problems with new technologies are fully ironed out before a new plane is allowed in the air, regardless of its type certificate.

That will raise costs for manufacturers, airlines, and pilots, which will ultimately get passed on to the flying public. If we want planes to maintain the near-spotless safety record we’ve come to expect, that should be a small price to pay.
Title: 🛬 British Airways Reveals Stunning New Business Class Suites
Post by: RE on March 19, 2019, 01:30:32 AM
I wonder how much it costs to fly NY-London in one of these new Biz Class configurations?

RE

https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-new-club-suite/

British Airways Reveals Stunning New Business Class Suites

 

British Airways Reveals Stunning New Business Class Suites

British Airways this morning has revealed their brand new Club business class suite. The new Club Suite is set to debut on British Airways brand new Airbus A350-1000 fleet, with deliveries starting in July 2019. This new suite will also replace the current, and somewhat dated, Club World business class seat on all British Airways long haul aircraft by 2023.

British Airways Club World Suite. Photo: British Airways

This new Club Suite cabin will be in a 1-2-1 layout and will have a total of 56 suites. The new Club Suite comes as part of British Airways’ £6.5 billion($8.6 billion) investment to improve the airline.

British Airways Club Suite. Photo: British Airways

New Club Suite features:

The new Club Suite features everything a business class traveler could want. The Club Suite completely trumps British Airways’ current first class offering, and offers the following features:

New Club Suite cabin video

British Airways Club Suite Bed. Photo: British Airways

Seat dimensions:

The new Club Suite bed dimensions are 6 ft 6 long and 21 inches wide. By far not the most spacious airline business class offering, but it’s on par with most other airlines.

British Airways Club Suite Bed. Photo: British Airways

How to fly British Airways’ new Club Suite and the A350

During phase one, the first A350 aircraft will start some short-haul flying between London and Madrid for crew training. In phase two, from October 1st, 2019, the aircraft will begin long-haul operations. During this period, another three A350 aircraft will join the British Airways fleet and two Boeing 777 aircraft will also be retrofitted with the new cabin.

British Airways A350 Business Class Cabin. Photo: Simple Flying/British Airways.

The A350’s are expected to be equipped with the latest in-flight wifi, large windows and a lower cabin altitude to reduce the effects of jet lag.

British Airways A350 Club Suite map. Photo: British Airways

British Airways Club World history:

British Airways were the pioneer for lie flat business class seats. In 2006, the airline launched the ‘next generation Club World’, which offered lie flat seats with lots of space. But, since the launch of these seats over 13 years ago, other airlines have quickly caught up to British Airways and surpassed their Club World offering.

The Club World business class seats we see today are in an extremely dense and narrow 2-4-2 configuration, and not every seat has directly aisle access. This means that if you sit by the window or in the middle two seats in the cabin, you literally have to climb over another passenger to leave your seat during the flight.

Current British Airways Club World cabin. Photo: British Airways

We are very excited by the new Club Suite. All the current issues should be mitigated by this huge hard product upgrade.

Why British Airways took so long to upgrade their business class cabin

As a reader you may be thinking why on Earth British Airways allowed its business class offering to become so uncompetitive.  Whilst most legacy carriers have been installing business class seats with tons of storage and direct aisle access, British Airways has left Club World alone. There are number of key reasons for this.

British Airways’ London Heathrow hub is unlike any other airport in the world. Heathrow is the busiest two runway airport in the world, and slots are very valuable and limited. The airline offers more direct flights to and from worldwide business hubs than any other airline. In the world of corporate travel, time is money and many passengers they would prefer to fly direct without a stop to maximise sleep. This is especially true when flying from the US to the UK.

Due to running direct flights, large corporations are able to negotiate good discounts directly with British Airways. This is far more convenient than trying to negotiate with every airline that might be used on a less direct route. In a nutshell, companies and passengers are willing to pay for the convenience of British Airways, despite a relatively poor business class product.

What will happen to British Airways’ first class?

This new Club Suite seat is going to appear first on British Airways’ brand new A350-1000 aircraft.

British Airways A350 Club Suite Cabin. Photo: British Airways

The plane is not going to have a first class cabin at all, although British Airways may offer a new first class seat on later A350 deliveries in the 2020’s.

New economy class and premium economy

British Airways is expected to enhance their current economy class and premium economy offering on their new A350 aircraft too. We’ll be expecting to see a larger premium economy cabin and a smaller economy cabin.

Overall, this is a very exciting time for British Airways and we can’t wait to try out their new Club Suite!

What do you think of their new seat? Let us know in the comments!

Title: 🛬 First ANA “Flying Honu” A380 Delivered!
Post by: RE on March 21, 2019, 02:42:16 AM
Isn't it Ironic?  People from an overpopulated Doomed Island pack into an over-sized Doomed airplane to fly to an undersized Doomed Island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.  Isn't it Ironic, dontchya think?

http://www.youtube.com/v/Jne9t8sHpUc

RE

https://samchui.com/2019/03/20/first-ana-flying-honu-a380-delivered/ (https://samchui.com/2019/03/20/first-ana-flying-honu-a380-delivered/)

First ANA “Flying Honu” A380 Delivered!

[html]
 

ANA took delivery of the first A380 today in a stunning livery called "Flying Honu" and will operate the aircraft on the popular leisure Narita-Honolulu route from May 24th.

ANA A380 Delivery Ceremony with Airbus CEO Tom Enders, ANA President & CEO Shinya Katanozaka, Chris Cholerton, Rolls Royce President for civil aerospace

ANA A380 Delivery Ceremony with Airbus CEO Tom Enders, ANA President & CEO Shinya Katanozaka, Chris Cholerton, Rolls Royce President for civil aerospace

"The introduction of the Airbus A380 into our lineup is something the entire team at ANA is very excited about,"

said Yutaka Ito, Executive Vice President of ANA. "The A380 is one of the most advanced commercial airliners in the world, and we will hold events to mark its departure in Toulouse as well as when it lands at Narita airport."

ANA's first Airbus A380 sports bold Hawaiian Sky Blue Flying Honu-inspired livery.

ANA has selected special Hawaiian themed liveries for its three A380s, symbolizing the sky, ocean and sunset.

ANA A380 Delivery Ceremony

ANA A380 Delivery Ceremony

The second A380 plane will boast Hawaiian Ocean Emerald Green livery and is expected to roll out of the Airbus Paintshop in Hamburg on March 25, 2019.

The aircraft, MSN 262, registration JA381A, is the first of three Rolls-Royce Trent 900 powered A380s

The three ANA A380s will be painted in a special livery depicting sea turtles which are native to Hawaii. The first aircraft is blue, the second will be green and the third orange. The ANA A380 livery is one of the most elaborate ever painted by Airbus. It took 21 days for the Airbus team to paint a surface of 3,600m2 using 16 different shades of color.

ANA A380 JA381A "Flying Honu"

ANA A380 JA381A "Flying Honu"

The aircraft is set to fly from Japan to Hawaii 3x a week starting on May 24, 2019 with service on Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. The service will increase 10x weekly as of July 1, 2019 when the second A380 enters service.

The aircraft will feature four cabins with five different seating options spread out in the following configuration:

Cabin Number of Seats
First 8
Business 56
Premium Economy 73
Economy 383
Total 520

The 5th seating style comes in the form of what ANA is calling COUCHii. These seats feature an extendable leg rests that convert the seats into a "bed". COUCHii passengers will also receive a dedicated bed sheet, pillow and blanket set amenities.

All passengers will have access to some form of onboard bar and the plane will also feature a "multi-purpose room where new mothers will be able to tend to their babies and passengers will be able to change before arriving at their destination."

First Class

The first class suites look like a modernized version of the existing ANA suite found aboard all 777 products aircraft which are essentially composed of a lay-z-boy in a cubicle and will feature a massive 32" personal TV. The suites will also include sliding doors. 

ANA A380 First Class Suite

ANA A380 First Class Suite

Business class

All business class seats will offer direct aisle access, are fully flat and feature 18" Entertainment screens.

ANA A380 Business Class seat

ANA A380 Business Class seat

Premium Economy

All premium economy seats will feature a 38" pitch and most seats will have a 15.6" entertainment screen. The tray tables will also swivel 90 degrees so customers can still maneuver even when the tray table is open.

ANA A380 Premium Economy

ANA A380 Premium Economy

Economy and ANA COUCHii

All seats will feature 34" pitch and 13.3" entertainment monitors. Each seat comes with power and USB outlets as well. COUCHii seats will only have 32" of pitch.

ANA A380 Economy Class

ANA A380 COUCHii seats

ANA A380 COUCHii seats

ANA A380 COUCHii seats

ANA A380 COUCHii seats

Hawaii Service Upgrades

On top of the new plane, ANA has plans for a special A380 lounge at Honolulu airport featuring separate entrances for premium passengers that connect directly to the upper deck of the aircraft, which will bypass the terminal completely. Other special features include a unique turtle livery for all 3 aircraft, referred to as Honu, and customized food and beverage in each cabin.

ANA A380 Honolulu Lounge

ANA A380 Honolulu Lounge

ANA has noted that First Class passengers will be dining on food from Michelin Start Restaurant,  Noe at the Four Seasons Resort Oahu.  Economy Class passengers will not be left behind on the gastronomic delights as they have a menu designed by Australian Celebrity Chef Bill Granger, famous for his amazing ricotta pancakes. All passengers will also have an “exclusive blue Hawaii cocktail” too.

ANA A380 In-flight meal services

ANA A380 In-flight meal services

Amenity Kits are on the specialty item list as well with business class kits designed by Fred Segal and First class amenity kits from Globe Trotter, which is an English luggage manufacturer.

ANA A380 special amenity kits designed by Globe Trotter

ANA A380 special amenity kits designed by Globe Trotter

If you wanted to use United miles to redeem for free flights on this route expect to pay between 27,500 miles for a one-way economy award up to 55,000 miles for a Business Class award. Virgin Atlantic frequent flyer program is always a sweet spot for flights on ANA and looks like this route should only cost 90,000 miles for a first class round trip ticket.

I will be covering more news shortly with the delivery under way.

 
 

  • Air Belgium for British Airways review
  • Concorde Flight in 1980
  • Title: 🛬 Boeing quietly unveiled the $442 million airliner that will replace the 747 j
    Post by: RE on March 22, 2019, 01:02:26 AM
    https://www.businessinsider.com/boeing-quietly-unveiled-777x-replace-747-jumbo-jet-2019-3 (https://www.businessinsider.com/boeing-quietly-unveiled-777x-replace-747-jumbo-jet-2019-3)

    Boeing quietly unveiled the $442 million airliner that will replace the 747 jumbo jet
    Benjamin Zhang

    (https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5c92962b6123ca5a2d43e95d-1920-1278.jpg)
    Boeing 777x

        The Boeing 777X was unveiled on March 13 in a private, employees-only event.
        The 777X is destined to serve as Boeing's new flagship and replace the iconic 747 jumbo jet.
        The 777X comes in two variants: the $410.2 million 777-8, and the $442.2 million 777-9.
        The jet is expected to enter service in 2020 with its launch customer, Emirates.

    March 13 was supposed to be a media bonanza for Boeing. The aviation giant was set to unveil its next great wide-body jetliner — one that's destined to serve as its flagship for decades to come and finally replace the legendary 747 jumbo jet.

    That day, the attention of the world's news outlets was indeed trained upon Boeing. But not for that reason.

    Three days earlier, Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 crashed shortly after taking off from Addis Ababa Bole International Airport, killing all 157 passengers and crew on board the Boeing 737 Max 8. It was the second nearly brand-new 737 Max 8 to crash under strikingly similar circumstances.

    By the morning of March 13, more than 50 regulatory agencies and airlines around the world had grounded or even outright banned the plane. That afternoon, the Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency order that grounded the 737 Max in the US as well.

    Read more: 2 Boeing 737 Max airliners have crashed since October — here are the airlines that fly the plane

    What was supposed to be a day of celebration for Boeing instead became one of the darkest days in the company's history.

    The media junket was scrapped, and the first 777X prototype was introduced in a private ceremony reserved for employees.

    That said, the unfortunate circumstances surrounding its unveiling does not diminish the importance of the new 777X to Boeing. Here's a closer look.
    On March 13, Boeing unveiled the first prototype of its upcoming 777X airliner before a crowd of employees.
    Boeing
    The Boeing 777X will be available in two variants: the $410.2 million 777-8, and the $442.2 million 777-9.
    Boeing
    The first prototype was of a 777-9, which will have some massive shoes to fill.
    Boeinghttp://www.doomsteaddiner.net/forum/index.php/topic,10371.0.html
    The 777X will replace not only the original 777 ...
    Boeing
    ... but Boeing's iconic 747 jumbo jet.
    Boeing unveiled its 747-8 jumbo passenger jet to thousands of employees and guests in Everett, Washington. Boeing
    It will be Boeing's new flagship.
    Boeing

    "The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9," Randy Tinseth, Boeing's vice president of marketing, told Business Insider in an interview at the Farnborough Air Show last year. "It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today."

    Tinseth added: "The twin-engine, twin-aisle economics of that airplane just beats the big four-engine aircraft, and it's just the reality of the market."
    At 252 feet long, the 777-9 is the longest airliner in the world.
    Title: 🛬 The Boeing disasters: 346 more victims of capitalism
    Post by: RE on March 22, 2019, 03:27:11 AM
    https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/03/21/the-boeing-disasters-346-more-victims-of-capitalism/ (https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/03/21/the-boeing-disasters-346-more-victims-of-capitalism/)

    The Boeing disasters: 346 more victims of capitalism
    Print Friendly, PDF & EmailPrint this post.

    HELP ENLIGHTEN YOUR FELLOWS. BE SURE TO PASS THIS ON. SURVIVAL DEPENDS ON IT.

    Plane crashes, climate change storms, crumbling infrastructure, gouging drug companies, a repugnantly mercenary political system…All of these disasters are directly attributtable to capitalism, especially as it exists in the US in its most savage and unregulated form. Corporations write their own rules—from Big Pharma to big aerospace firms like Boeing— and in the meantime, while we dump trillions into criminal wars, our infrastructure goes begging, accidents and unnecessary suffering take place all over the place, as these images also prove. Below a short video we prepared of this ghastly inherent feature of capitalism.

    http://www.youtube.com/v/klYRGFXH9GA
    A limited-circulation video prepared by TGP.

        The Boeing disasters: 346 more victims of capitalism
        The tragic and preventable deaths of nearly 350 people demonstrate certain realities of contemporary social and political life. The capitalist system is based on the maximization of shareholder profit, not the satisfaction of the needs of society. If endangering the lives of hundreds of people will lead to higher profits, such a risk is justified.

    By Brian Dyne • 21 March 2019
    In the wake of two deadly airplane crashes that have killed 346 people, it has become clear that executives at aerospace giant Boeing repeatedly subordinated basic considerations of safety to profit, aided and abetted by the federal government.

    The first disaster occurred on October 29, when a Boeing 737 Max 8 operated by Lion Air crashed thirteen minutes after leaving Jakarta, Indonesia, killing 189 people. That same plane only narrowly averted disaster a day earlier, Bloomberg reported this week, when a third, off-duty pilot who happened to be on the flight, intervened under similar conditions that ultimately caused the crash.

    Less than five months later, on March 10, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed about six minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing a further 157 men, women and children.

    Beginning on March 11, every country in the world grounded the 737 Max 8, citing overwhelming safety concerns. The United States was the final holdout, but it grounded the aircraft on March 13.

    “Boeing, in developing the 737 Max 8, obviously felt intense competitive pressure to get the new aircraft to market as quickly as possible,” wrote Captain ‘Sully’ Sullenberger in a column in MarketWatch this week. Sullenberger is the pilot who safely landed an Airbus A320 on the Hudson River in 2009 and a leading air safety expert.

    (https://www.greanvillepost.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/BoeingCEODennis-Muilenburg-suckingAshtonCarter-ass-520x347.jpeg)
    Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg (r) with then
    Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter—bosom buddies,
    of course. Muilenburg and his ilk belong in jail,
    with their wealth confiscated.


    “When flight testing revealed an issue with meeting the certification standards, the company developed a fix… but did not tell airline pilots about it. In mitigating one risk, Boeing seems to have created another, greater risk,” he wrote.

    Sullenberger added, “After the crash of Lion Air 610 last October, it was apparent that this new risk needed to be effectively addressed.” But instead of grounding the aircraft and immediately fixing the problem, Boeing did everything it could to conceal the deadly defect and keep the aircraft flying.

    In other words, Boeing executives evidently acted in a reckless, negligent manner, contributing to the deaths of 346 people.

    Sullenberger concluded, “It has been reported that Boeing pushed back in discussions with the FAA [Federal Aviation Administration] about the extent of changes that would be required, and after the second crash, of Ethiopian 302, the Boeing CEO reached out to the US President to try to keep the 737 Max 8 from being grounded in the US.”

    Both the FAA and the Trump administration, for their part, were more than willing to run interference for the company.

    The close integration between the airline industry and the agency nominally tasked with regulating it is well documented. In 2005, the FAA introduced a new program whereby aircraft manufacturers could choose their own employees to serve as FAA “designees,” charged with certifying the safety of their commercial planes. Since then, there has been virtually no independent oversight of the safety of any new civilian planes, those produced at Boeing or elsewhere.

    During the 737 Max 8 rollout, Boeing told its pilots that they could learn all they needed to know about flying a new type of airplane from a 56-minute presentation on an iPad and a 13-page manual. Both were approved by the FAA and the pilots’ union, and neither included any information about the system likely responsible for the crashes, the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmenting System, or MCAS.

        Fact is, Boeing and other aerospace firms have been able to eviscerate and take over the duties of the FAA, leaving the fox in charge of the chicken coop.—Editor

    US officials, moreover, have deep connections to the airline industry. FAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell was an American Airlines executive. US President Donald Trump’s new nominee to head the administration, Stephen Dickson, is a former Delta head.

    (https://www.greanvillepost.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/BoeingLionAir-hittingGround.jpg)

    Boeing is a top defense contractor with extensive ties to the military-intelligence apparatus. Patrick Shanahan, the deputy secretary of defense, has worked for Boeing for three decades. Moreover, the current secretary of transportation, Elaine Chao, is the wife of Mitch McConnell, who has received hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign financing from Boeing.

    Moreover, Boeing is a key part of the US financial elite’s war for control of markets. Since the 737 Max 8 series was released in 2017, the sales of just 350 of the 5,011 orders Boeing has received have accounted for 50 percent of the company’s profits. Boeing itself has maintained its status as the world’s fifth-largest defense contractor and is currently the largest US exporter.

    Shares of Boeing have more than tripled since the election of Donald Trump and his promises of further deregulation, making it the highest- priced stock in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The company has accounted for more than 30 percent of the increase of the Dow since November 2016.

    The tragic and preventable deaths of nearly 350 people demonstrate certain realities of contemporary social and political life. The capitalist system is based on the maximization of shareholder profit, not the satisfaction of the needs of society. If endangering the lives of hundreds of people will lead to higher profits, such a risk is justified.

    Governments, in their turn, serve to protect the interests of the corporations, a reality demonstrated by the Trump White House’s efforts to protect the largest US exporter, and the repeated actions of the FAA to cover up the series of disastrous shortcuts taken by Boeing.

    These disasters highlight the need to take the airline industry out of the hands of Wall Street so that air travel can be brought into harmony with human and social needs.

    The technological advances that have been made in air travel over the past decades are indisputable. For the first time in world history, travelers can move from any two points in the world within a single day. This technology must be freed from the restraints of giant corporations and of the capitalist system as a whole. This requires the nationalization of the major airlines and aerospace companies, their transformation into publicly owned and democratically controlled utilities to provide for social need, not private profit.

    —Bryan Dyne

    Select Original Comments we totally agree with
    Avatar
    Sebouh80 • 6 hours ago

    The striking picture of disaster Capitalism is that Boeing corporation through negligence and deceit has caused the death of more then 346 people. However Dennis Muilenburg the CEO of this infamous company was allowed to take home an exorbitant sum of 23.8 million dollars.
    Ol’ Hippy Sebouh80 • 5 hours ago

    Even more striking is the fact that these murderers will never see the walls of a prison cell.
    Avatar
    Carolyn Zaremba Sebouh80 • 5 hours ago

    That money should be confiscated and paid to the families of the people killed.
    ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    The author writes for wsws.org, a Marxian publication.
    Title: Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
    Post by: K-Dog on March 22, 2019, 06:11:08 AM
    Quote
    The Boeing disasters: 346 more victims of capitalism

    Seems to me there has been three times the news coverage a double plane crash normally gets.  What's up.  Who turned the memo crank and why?  How come all across the land journalists have suddenly become crack software engineers?

    Who pissed off who and why?  Does anybody but me notice the 'extra' attention?  There seems to be a fresh 'Max 8 death plane' installment every two days; like clockwork.

    (https://qphl.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-10a3b4bbb3fba4c0f9915f90d0c015c0-c)

    Look at this, the chance of being struck by lightning is 25 five times or so less than a plane crash.  Both happen regularly.  They may not be common but Jesus Christ has not descended from a mountaintop and declared the second coming because two planes crashed.  The death toll was big this is true, but these were little people and you could cram a lot of them in those big soda cans.  There is really nothing remarkable about the numbers.  Every single death was the same tragedy replayed.  All deaths were equally horrible but the total numbers were about the same numbers as those who die in.  Drum roll please.  Airline crashes.

    Unregulated capitalism or the regulation of the journalistic herd.  I say regulation of the journalistic herd by people who don't give two fucks what they plant in everyone's silly little head.

    (http://cfile7.uf.tistory.com/image/23795A4F53CFCB1D1EB399)

    Seriously.  Do any of the people writing any of these articles know what happened?  Do any of them know what a Reynolds number is?  How many have been to Ethiopia?  What was the technology used in the software systems?  Can they tell you?  Do a search on google and you'll find a list of articles on the Boeing crashes that have more to do with the crash of random chance than the crash of any airplanes.  The echo chamber roars.

    Journalists, how many kiss ass and do whatever their boss tells them to do in and industry where empty chairs can be filled at the drop of a deadline.

    Software or smoke up your ass-ware?  Why is the FBI getting involved in plane crashes when the chance of two planes crashing five months apart is about the same as most people reading this comment taking a dump in the next 24 hours?

    Power is fucking with us.
    Title: 🛬 Russia’s Answer To The Airbus A380: The Sukhoi KR-860
    Post by: RE on March 23, 2019, 01:25:11 AM
    800-1000 Pssengers?  THAT'S BIG!  I wonder how long Boarding and Debrking would take?

    1 Crash would be real bad newz.

    On the upside, it uses 4 engines if GE or Rolls-Royce, and 8 (mounted in pairs) if they use cheaper Ruskie Engines.

    RE


    Russia’s Answer To The Airbus A380: The Sukhoi KR-860
    By Nicholas
    March 22, 2019

    (https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/kr860_6-578x700.jpg)

    Many people have heard the tale of how the Airbus A380 came to be. Airbus believed that the future in air travel was hub to hub, and that the plane of the future would be large capacity, with enough room for hundreds of passengers. Boeing, on the other hand, believed in direct routes between destinations (point to point) and therefore focused on smaller, more fuel-efficient aircraft. We, of course, know how this turned out for both companies.

    But did you know that there was a third option?

    Introducing the Sukhoi KR-860, the gigantic Russian answer to the A380 and the equivalent of doubling down on red. This aircraft took the hub to hub model to the extreme.
    KR-860

    (https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/42662bc9249f6afcc287861c03187cb1-591x700.jpg)
    The KR-860 in flight (model). Source: Tails Through Time

    What is the story?

    Revealed at the 2001 Paris Airshow, the Sukhoi KR-860 is a four-engine double-decker aircraft (similar to the A380). A direct translation of its name, Kryl’ya Rossii, means the ‘Wings of Russia’, with the 860 referring to how many passengers it could carry. It was under development from Sukhoi, a Russian aerospace firm that also builds a multitude of fighter jets for the military. The aircraft was never actually built, but a 1/24 scale model was created to showcase their future concept.

    Three variants were initially proposed.

        A passenger variant (below)
        A cargo variant that could hold railcars/cargo containers (so normal modular shipping containers would not have to be de-loaded for transport).
        A liquid gas variant used to transport products from oil fields. The liquid gas could have been used to power the plane instead of jet fuel, meaning the flight would have been free for the airline.

    KR-860

    A cross section of the aircraft. Source: Tails Through Time

    Let’s have a look at the statistics:

    General characteristics

        Capacity: 860-1000 passengers
        Length: 80 m (262 ft 6 in)
        Wingspan: 88 m (288 ft 9 in) with the wings unfolded or 64 m (210 ft) span with wings folded
        Wing area: 700 m2 (7,500 sq ft)
        Max takeoff weight: 650,000 kg (1,433,005 lb)
        Powerplant: 4 × General Electric CF6-80E1A4B turbofan, 320 kN (72,000 lbf) thrust each or
        Powerplant: 4 × Pratt & Whitney PW4168A turbofan, 305 kN (69,000 lbf) thrust each

    Performance

        Cruising speed: 1,000 km/h (621 mph; 540 kn)
        Range: 15,000 km (9,321 mi; 8,099 nmi)

    Whilst the above suggests either a GE or Pratt engine, there was also the possibility of using eight Kuznetsov NK-93 engines (in pairs) as the cheapest possible solution.
    How many passengers could it carry?

    The typical A380 can carry around 550 passengers, with an all-economy variant carrying 800. The KR-860 far outstrips this, accommodating 860 passengers and up to 1,000 in an all-economy configuration. To put this in perspective, the designers intended for the lower deck to be 12-abreast seating with three aisles (a first for commercial travel) and the upper deck to have 9-abreast seating with two aisles.
    KR-860

    The rear escalator of the KR-860. Source: Tails Through Time

    To help passengers get on and off rapidly, the aircraft came with three escalators built into the hull. That’s right! Under the plane were escalators to ferry passengers from the ground quickly up to their respective deck.
    Boeing copied the wings

    This plane had such a large wingspan that the wings themselves had to fold up to arrive at 747 airport gates. Sound familiar? The new Boeing 777x actually uses the same system (although not as extreme as the KR-860).
    russian jet

    The folding wing of the KR-860. Source: Tails Through Time
    Why did it never fly?

    The program originally predicted there would be a market for 300 aircraft. As we now know, Airbus only sold 290 A380s over the course of its entire program, so a Russian made super A380 claiming to sell more is highly unrealistic. Possible markets would have been Russia, China, India, Vietnam, and Africa. Western countries were still wary of Russian made aircraft at the time, and would have gone with Airbus or Boeing in preference.

    The program itself was estimated to cost around $10bn in 2000. To help with this cost, Sukhoi turned to China and India to create a joint venture. This made the Russian government uneasy about funding an aircraft that ultimately would see little use in Russia. As a result, they diverted funds to other projects in 2001.

    Whilst we can agree that Russia (and the world) would never have seen a use for this aircraft, it would have been quite a sight to see.

    What do you think? Would you have flown on this aircraft?
    Title: 🛬 The Boeing 737 Max crisis goes way beyond software
    Post by: RE on March 23, 2019, 10:57:03 AM
    https://qz.com/1577986/the-boeing-737-max-crisis-goes-way-beyond-software/

    (https://cms.qz.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/boeing-737-max-airplanes-e1553294592276.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1600&h=900)
    An aerial photo shows Boeing 737 MAX airplanes parked on the tarmac at the Boeing Factory in Renton, Washington, U.S. March 21, 2019.
    REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson

    CUTTING CORNERS
    The Boeing 737 Max crisis goes way beyond software
    By Tim Fernholz7 hours ago

    There is no small complexity in the task of carrying hundreds of people through the sky at hundreds of miles an hour. More than 100,000 airliners take off and land each day, but two deadly air crashes in six months have shocked passengers, regulators, and industry alike.

    Crashes of Boeing’s 737 Max in Indonesia and Ethiopia offer a window into all that complexity. Boeing and its CEO Dennis Muilenburg want the story to be simple: a software problem that can be fixed with a quick patch. But that doesn’t capture the mistakes made by Boeing and American aviation regulators in certifying the plane to carry passengers.

    By now, you may well have heard of MCAS, software that automatically pitches 737 Maxes downward to avoid stalling in mid-air. It exists only because Boeing wanted to upgrade its 737 without changing it fundamentally—so it added new engines that made the aircraft more likely to stall, rather than starting from scratch. In the emerging picture of the two accidents, the software only failed because the mechanical sensor it depended on also malfunctioned.

    But all that pales next to what will likely be the highlight of investigations into the incident: the training and user experience of the people in the cockpits. Pilots did not have sufficient training to understand how MCAS worked, and two vital safety features—a display showing what the sensor detected, and a light warning if other sensors disagreed—were optional extras (paywall).

    Minimizing training and cockpit changes was an economic decision: The upgraded plane would be more attractive to potential purchasers if they did not have to spend expensive hours retraining their pilots. The Federal Aviation Administration determined Boeing’s training and safety plans were fine. Now, investigators want to know why. The answers could be costly for Boeing, and for America’s reputation as a leader in the safe deployment of aviation technology.

    Software is easy to blame, because for many people computer science is a mystery. But these crashes emerged from an experience we’re all familiar with: the pressure to deliver on a tight timetable, the temptation to cut corners, and the hope that in a big, complex world, one little kludge won’t mess up the whole program.
    Title: 🛬 Cathay Pacific Prepares For Their Boeing 777X Launch
    Post by: RE on March 25, 2019, 01:19:42 AM
    https://simpleflying.com/cathay-pacific-boeing-777x/

    Cathay Pacific Prepares For Their Boeing 777X Launch

    What will the interior look like on Cathay’s 777X?

    Cathay Pacific’s 777-9 will feature a four-class configuration. Unlike, the Airbus A350s in Cathay’s long-haul fleet, the 777-9 will feature a first class cabin. The 777-9 will receive a substantial upgrade to the soft product delivered to the existing first class seats, which are already undergoing a hard product refresh.

    Cathay is working closely with the airframer, seat supplier, inflight entertainment provider, and its own industrial designer, to avoid the problems the airline encountered with its last premium product, introduced on the Airbus A350.

    Cathay Pacific’s current first class. Photo: Cathay Pacific

    Vivian Lo, general manager of customer experience and design at Cathay Pacific, talked about the upgraded first class, saying “we have always taken pride whenever we launch a product that it is flagship and industry-leading, and that’s where we aspire to be. We’re committed to be best in class. We’re working towards a new product that will come in 2021. Meanwhile, we’re also looking at how we want to enhance the first class experience before we add the new product.”

    Vivian Lo continued, explaining the enhancements in more detail, saying “Part of that is refreshing the hard product, but my team and I are also working towards looking at the soft product, whether that’s food and beverage, the amenities, the duvets, so that you also enhance that overall experience for our most premium and special customers,”.

    Do we know what routes the 777-9X will fly on?

    With the capabilities that the 777X offers, it’s certain that Cathay would want to maximize the aircraft by putting the aircraft on a route with a high volume of passengers and cargo each day.

    John Slosar, chief executive of Cathay Pacific, talked about the potential routes of the 777X, saying “We think it will be an ideal fit for long-haul destinations in North America and Europe, in particular those routes where we carry high volumes of passengers and cargo each day. Cathay Pacific is committed to modernizing its fleet to provide a superior experience to passengers.”

    Cathay Pacific Cargo B747-8F landing in Toronto. The 747-8F operates twice weekly into Toronto. Photo: Andrew Eastwood

    In my opinion, I think Toronto, New York (JFK) and London would be the most likely routes for Cathay’s 777-9X. Each route receives several 777-300ER passenger flights a day, as well Cathay operates the 747F to these cities throughout the week.

    Overall

    With the 777-9X offering high seat capacity and range capability, I’m interested to see what routes the aircraft will fly. Also, its exciting to hear that Cathay will be putting an upgraded first class product onboard.

    What route do you think the 777-9X will fly for Cathay? Let us know in the comments!

     

     

    Title: 🛬 What’s the real difference between flying economy and FIRST CLASS?
    Post by: RE on March 25, 2019, 01:51:10 AM
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-6805131/Inside-British-Airways-2-8k-A380-CLASS-suite-flying-ECONOMY.html (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-6805131/Inside-British-Airways-2-8k-A380-CLASS-suite-flying-ECONOMY.html)



    [html]

    What’s the real difference between flying economy and FIRST CLASS? Inside British Airways’ £2.8k A380 suite featuring a personal wardrobe, bone china plates and a 7ft 6in bed (but they do serve wine worth just £10 a bottle)

    • Ted Thornhill flies from Heathrow to Johannesburg and back. Outbound in First, and economy on the return
    • The first-class suite on the A380 is the biggest that BA offers, so this is the No1 seat in the carrier's fleet
    • Passengers in First board on their very own jet bridge - and there are only 14 seats in the entire cabin
    • On the way back Ted sits in the upper deck economy cabin - and is shocked at the standard of the wine 

    The Queen has her throne. Trump has his Oval Office chair. I have seat 2A in first class on a British Airways A380.

    Yes, it feels that epic. And so it should. This is, after all, BA's top offering. The biggest and poshest suite in its fleet.

    Before sitting down in it on a flight from London Heathrow Airport's Terminal 5 to Johannesburg, I had thought the golden age of flying was over. But as I sip my welcome glass of Laurent-Perrier Grand Siecle Champagne I wonder if it’s actually still with us.

    Ted flies from London Heathrow Airport's Terminal 5 first class with British Airways to Johannesburg. Pictured is an official picture of a suite identical to the one he puts to the test
     

    Ted flies from London Heathrow Airport's Terminal 5 first class with British Airways to Johannesburg. Pictured is an official picture of a suite identical to the one he puts to the test

    Ted enjoys a glass of Laurent-Perrier Grand Siecle Champagne in first class before take-off
     

    Ted enjoys a glass of Laurent-Perrier Grand Siecle Champagne in first class before take-off

    It certainly seems so if you’re able to splash out thousands on a first-class ticket with BA on the A380.

    ADVERTISING

    It’s a flying experience like no other.

    And taking to the skies in this magnificent monster jet with the British flag carrier in economy on the return leg isn’t bad, either.

    But before getting on to that allow me to divulge the first class experience, which is more or less glorious from start to finish – though there are some minor shocks along the way.

    THE CHECK-IN AND LOUNGE

    The experience begins at a dedicated check-in area in T5 that BA calls ‘The First Wing’.

    Here a series of check-in desks lie hidden from the proletariat behind a gold-coloured scalloped steel and glass enclosure.

    There’s a huge amount of floor space, a small lounge area with flowers, armchairs and leather banquettes and lightly flavoured glasses of water and cold towels on offer.

    Is this a check-in area or a spa?

    I’m travelling with my partner and 19-month-old daughter and we’re guided to one of the desks by a perky BA host where our luggage is checked in by another member of staff whose bonhomie levels are equally high.

    Then it’s onwards through an exclusive security lane, where the bonhomie levels drop.

     
    First class passengers check in at T5 in The First Wing, which even has its own dedicated security lanes (pictured)
     

    First class passengers check in at T5 in The First Wing, which even has its own dedicated security lanes (pictured)

    One of the bonuses first class passengers get is access to the extremely swanky T5 Concorde Room (pictured). It's like the inside of a five-star hotel
     

    One of the bonuses first class passengers get is access to the extremely swanky T5 Concorde Room (pictured). It's like the inside of a five-star hotel

     
    Ted's Concorde Room sea bass
     

    Ted's Concorde Room sea bass

    No special treatment from the security staff, just staccato instructions.

    I don’t mind. I find gruff security staff reassuring.

    Next, it’s time to waft on through to BA's swanky Concorde Room, past the riff-raff in the business lounge to a lounge that’s exclusive to first class ticket holders.

    To be frank, it’s more like a five-star hotel lobby, bar and restaurant than an airport lounge.

    There are chandeliers, waiting staff buzzing around, eager to dispense Champagne (we adults waste no time accepting a flute each) and private dining booths.

    We ensconce ourselves in one of these and avail ourselves of the free treats on offer from the a la carte menu.

    I opt for seared sea bass on a bed of Provençale vegetables and a glass of white Burgundy (Pernand-Vergelesses Combottes, Domaine Jean Fery, 2015).

    So far, so first-class-ish.

    THE FIRST CLASS CABIN

    Next, the big moment. Setting foot on an A380 for the first time. Right at the very front.

    The first thrill is that rows one to four - i.e the mere 14 passengers in the first class cabin on the bottom deck at the front - get their very own jet bridge.

    I walk down it all on my own as two BA crew members beam at me from the doorway of the aircraft.

    BA's first class seats are the biggest in the fleet, with 30 per cent more personal space and 60 per cent more personal stowage than the first suites on 747s and Dreamliners
     

    BA's first class seats are the biggest in the fleet, with 30 per cent more personal space and 60 per cent more personal stowage than the first suites on 747s and Dreamliners

    First class passengers sitting in the middle of the cabin can easily chat as the seats are angled towards each other. A privacy screen can be raised at the touch of a button
     

    First class passengers sitting in the middle of the cabin can easily chat as the seats are angled towards each other. A privacy screen can be raised at the touch of a button

     

    I’m giddy with excitement.

    Upon entering I actually turn right, not left, as is the tradition for swanky cabins, because the jet bridge connects at the nose.

    The seats are arranged in a reverse Herringbone layout, with five window/aisle seats on each side and four in the middle.

    The ambience is one of hushed English elegance. I feel underdressed in my casual-wear.

    Plenty of room for manoeuvre: This picture Ted takes on his mobile phone shows just how big the First suites are
     

    Plenty of room for manoeuvre: This picture Ted takes on his mobile phone shows just how big the First suites are

    In First, the toilets are decorated with a fresh flower
     

    In First, the toilets are decorated with a fresh flower

    I’m offered the aforementioned Laurent-Perrier fizz within seconds.

    It’s a fine tipple. And so it should be – you'll be lucky to find a bottle retailing for less than £100.

    BA also offers a Gusbourne Limited Release Twenty Fifteen glass of bubbles – made in Kent, the ‘garden of England’ - which retails for £40 a bottle.

    So far, so reassuringly expensive.

    But there are some shocks in store on the retail-price front.

    At the front of the menu booklet is a message that says ‘our sommeliers have created a signature experience to be savoured’.

    But turning over to the white and red section of my First Class menu, I find a Marco Zunino Malbec Reserve 2017 from Mendoza. The 2016 vintage is worth £10. 

    That’s a shockingly low value for a cabin experience costing thousands and surely not terribly ‘signature’, despite the fact that this wine has received critical acclaim

    Indeed, a wine merchant friend of mine, who’s been in the business for 20-odd years, tells me later: ‘That’s nothing very special for first class.’

    (BA works with a master of wine on its list so I’d be keen to know what the thinking is here.)

    After the seat belt signs come off I opt for a glass of Ritual Pinot Noir 2015 from the Casablanca Valley in Chile, which is delicious. And, in pleasing fine-dining-style, I'm shown the bottle and poured a sample so I can c

    Title: 🛬 A Southwest Boeing 737 Max headed for storage in the desert just made an emer
    Post by: RE on March 27, 2019, 04:28:11 AM
    Can U Spell L-E-M-O-N?

    (http://www.autoguide.com/blog/wp-content/uploads//2016/03/Lemon-Car-copy.jpg)

    RE

    https://www.businessinsider.com/southwest-airlines-boeing-737-max-makes-emergency-landing-florida-2019-3 (https://www.businessinsider.com/southwest-airlines-boeing-737-max-makes-emergency-landing-florida-2019-3)

    A Southwest Boeing 737 Max headed for storage in the desert just made an emergency landing in Florida
    Benjamin Zhang

    (https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5c9a9d5816c95873cc7eff38-1920-1440.jpg)
    FILE PHOTO: A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft is pictured in front of United Airlines planes, including Boeing 737 MAX 9 models, at William P. Hobby Airport in Houston, Texas, U.S., March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Loren Elliott A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 8. Reuters

        A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max airliner made an emergency landing in Orlando, Florida, on Tuesday.
        "The aircraft returned and landed safely in Orlando. No passengers were aboard the aircraft," the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement to Business Insider.
        The pilots reported an engine issue that appears to be unrelated to the control-software problems that grounded the Boeing jet.
        The plane was being ferried to Victorville, California, for desert storage.

    A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max airliner made an emergency landing in Orlando, Florida, on Tuesday.

    Southwest Airlines Flight 8701, a Boeing 737 Max 8, was en route from Orlando to Victorville, California, when its pilots declared an emergency minutes after takeoff, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said in a statement to Business Insider.

    Southwest Airlines told Business Insider that its pilots "reported a performance issue with one of the engines."

    The engine issue reported by the pilots appears to be unrelated to the control-software issues that have plagued the 737 Max and may have contributed to the crashes of both Lion Air Flight JT610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302.

    Neither of the two ongoing crash investigations have indicated any performance issues with the plane's CFM International Leap-1B engines.

    The FAA said it is investigating the flight that lasted just 11 minutes.

    Southwest Airlines, which is based in Dallas, is the single largest operator of the Boeing 737 Max.

    Read more: Here are the airlines that fly the Boeing 737 Max

    The plane involved in the incident is one of 34 Boeing 737 Max aircraft in the Southwest fleet that were grounded by an FAA emergency order earlier this month after the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302.

    Flight 8701 was headed for the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, where the plane will be kept in short-term desert storage. As a result, there were no passengers on board the flight.

    "The Boeing 737 MAX 8 will be moved to our Orlando maintenance facility for a review," Southwest said in a statement.

    Read more: The Boeing 737 Max is likely to be the last version of the best-selling airliner of all time

    At the heart of the controversy surrounding the 737 Max is MCAS, the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System. To fit the Max's larger, more fuel-efficient engines, Boeing had to position the engine farther forward and up. This change disrupted the plane's center of gravity and caused the Max to have a tendency to tip its nose upward during flight, increasing the likelihood of a stall. MCAS is designed to automatically counteract that tendency and point the nose of the plane downward.

    Initial reports from the Lion Air investigation, however, indicate that a faulty sensor reading may have triggered MCAS shortly after the flight took off. Observers fear Ethiopian Airlines flight may have experienced a similar issue.

    Read more: 53% American adults say they don't want to fly on a Boeing 737 Max

    Boeing is working on a software update for MCAS along with hardware improvements to get its plane flying again.

    Here is the FAA's statement in its entirety:

    "The crew of Southwest Airlines Flight 8701, a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, declared an emergency after the aircraft experienced a reported engine problem while departing from Orlando International Airport in Florida about 2:50 p.m. today. The aircraft returned and landed safely in Orlando. No passengers were aboard the aircraft, which was being ferried to Victorville, Calif., for storage. The FAA is investigating."
    Title: 🛬 How The Boeing 777X Is Replacing The 747 And Airbus A380
    Post by: RE on March 28, 2019, 01:39:21 AM
    https://simpleflying.com/how-the-boeing-777x-is-replacing-the-747-and-airbus-a380s/

    How The Boeing 777X Is Replacing The 747 And Airbus A380

    How The Boeing 777X Is Replacing The 747 And Airbus A380

     

    The Boeing 777X has found an unpredicted new source of customers: airlines who are looking to replace their 747 and A380 fleets.

    The upcoming aircraft from Boeing has won popularity as the next must-have ‘big’ aircraft on the market, as Airbus and Boeing phase out their Jumbo jets.

    777X

    Boeing 777X-8 in flight (Computer Generated). Source: Boeing

    How popular is the 777X?

    The Boeing 777X was originally designed and marketed to replace previous models of the 777 series. Recent sales from Boeing show that the 777X is quickly becoming the most popular in the series.

    According to the manufacturer, the order book for the new 777X has far exceeded previous versions of the 777 series even before their respective launches. The 777-200 only had 147 orders before launch and the 777-300ER had 160. By comparison, the 777X has 358 orders and the plane is not expected to fly for an airline until late this year. To double down on this fact, the 777X already has half of the 800 total orders that the 777-300ER made over its entire lifetime.

    I would make the argument that we’re doing pretty well,” – Boeing VP-marketing, Randy Tinseth.

    Some of these orders come from airlines like British Airways, who recently signed an 18-order and 24-option deal for 777X-9 aircraft. Or Emirates, who have a whopping 150 of the aircraft on order (115 777X-9s and 35 777X-8s) to replace their fleet of 777-300ERs.

    What about as a replacement for 747s and A350s?

    In previous articles, we have discussed how the Boeing 777X is designed to replace the 747 and the Airbus A350 to replace the A380. Boeing has made great strides in marketing their new 777X-9 as the perfect wide-body replacement for both the Boeing 747 and the Airbus A380.

    “I believe [the 777-9] will be the next 747 or the next [Airbus] A380 in the market, but it’s going to do those things much more efficiently than those big, four-engine airplanes could”, said Tinseth.

    United 747

    United 747 Aircraft. Photo courtesy United Airlines

    You can see how the 777X compares to the 747 here and the A380 here.

    Boeing also believes that many airlines will soon be replacing their widebody fleets, as their stock 747s and A380s ‘age out’ of use. This will push up 777X sales even higher, as carriers seek out a suitable replacement.

    “In the 2022-2023 time frame, we’re really going to step into a significant replacement cycle on widebodies, We should start to see [the 777X] take off faster.”

    What about Airbus A350 sales?

    But let’s not just take Boeing’s word on how well they are doing, but look at the raw numbers ourselves. Previously, we discussed the sales of the Airbus A350 vs the Boeing 777X, but that was before this latest influx of new orders.

    The Airbus A350 had 780 orders before its first flight in 2014, whilst the Boeing 777X series only has 344 orders, not even half of what Airbus had before launch.

    Airbus A350-941 (reg. F-WWCF, MSN 002) in Airbus promotional CFRP livery at ILA Berlin Air Show 2016. Source: Wikicommons

    Boeing seems to be confident that they will get new orders from existing 777X customers over the lifetime of the aircraft, based off historic successes with their 787 Dreamliner program.

    “If you look at the 787, of the 73 customers we have, 41 have come back and repurchased the airplane, I think that … has shown a change in the market over the last several years. [It’s] a better-balanced market, more diverse business models, higher replacement demand. … [T]he buying habits of our customers have changed,” concluded Tinseth.

    Whether the 777X or the A350 will succeed the 747 and A380 seems to be still up for debate. We will have to wait and see.

    What do you think? Is the 777X the future of widebody travel? Or will the A350 continue it’s head start? Let us know in the comments below.

    Title: 🛬 The Rise and Fall of the A380
    Post by: RE on March 29, 2019, 03:46:13 AM
    http://www.youtube.com/v/HmHjI9Z_vbI
    Title: 🛬 Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 - Crash Animation [X-Plane 11]
    Post by: RE on March 29, 2019, 03:49:26 AM
    http://www.youtube.com/v/fIunpQQpzs0
    Title: 🛬 NEW Virgin Atlantic A350 LOFT Upper Class
    Post by: RE on April 09, 2019, 11:51:00 AM
    Dick Branson sells to the "Upper Class" wannabees. 🤑

    http://www.youtube.com/v/r_IiYcBadAc

    RE
    Title: 🛬 Almost Perfect: Singapore Airlines A350 Business Class from Singapore to Joh
    Post by: RE on April 13, 2019, 04:08:58 AM
    This isn't your grandaddy's Pan Am.

    Gotta attract the rich clients.  J6P is outta cash for Happy Flying.

    RE

    https://simpleflying.com/almost-perfect-singapore-airlines-a350-business-class-from-singapore-to-johannesburg/

    Almost Perfect: Singapore Airlines A350 Business Class from Singapore to Johannesburg

    Almost Perfect: Singapore Airlines A350 Business Class from Singapore to Johannesburg

     

    As my round-the-world adventure continued, I flew Singapore Airlines’ A350 from Singapore to Johannesburg. After flying Singapore Airlines on a short-haul flight in business class, I was excited to see what their long-haul experience was like. In the end, the flight was almost perfect.

    Singapore Airlines’ A350 Business Class was almost perfect.

    Booking

    One-way flights from Singapore to Johannesburg are quite expensive. You can usually find a business class flight for around $4,000. However, you can usually reduce that cost by flying out of a Southeast Asian gateway like Ho Chi Minh City or Phnom Penh. Since I was flying to Cape Town, I booked this flight as a one-way from Ho Chi Minh City to Cape Town with a few days stopover in Singapore. With the help of a travel agent, I was able to reduce the cost of this leg in business-class to around $1,985 – over a 50% discount!

    You could book this flight through KrisFlyer, which is Singapore Airlines’ frequent flyer program. One way Advantage awards can cost up to 90,000 KrisFlyer miles in business class. Meanwhile, saver awards can get you business class for 49,000 KrisFlyer miles.

    Airport experience

    Since my flight departed at 1:30 AM and my hotel check-out time was 2:00 PM, I arrived at the airport around 2:30 PM. Singapore Airlines had a dedicated business class check-in point in Terminal 3, where their flights to Africa depart. It took me about 15 minutes to check my bags and clear immigration. At Singapore’s Changi Airport, security screening is at each gate or cluster of gates. All you need is a valid boarding pass and passport to enter the departure areas.

    I made my way to the SilverKris lounge. The lounge was gigantic. There were tons of seating spaces, which soon became necessary. However, one major drawback was a lack of outlets. I had to hunt around the room for a solid 30 minutes before I found a seat that had power access. Singapore Airlines could really work on introducing more power outlets in their lounge.

    Singapore Airlines’ SilverKris lounge had a lot of seating, but limited power access.

    Unfortunately, this was the only business class lounge in T3. Consequently, the lounge itself was quite crowded. Singapore Airlines offered a large buffet area, however, there were only about 10 different hot food options. Furthermore, the dishes were quite small, meaning staff were constantly replacing the dishes. I settled for some beef stew, mashed potatoes, rice, and a Coca Cola.

    SilverKris Lounge food.

    The food itself was tasty. Over the nine hours that I spent in the lounge, a few different items were served and the self-serve drink selection was always full. The staff worked constantly to maintain the lounge. Every so often, they would come around with a cart to collect used service items or offer additional tea, coffee, or some light snacks.

    There were also showers available in the SilverKris Lounge. No appointment was necessary. Instead, a shower attendant would put your name down on a list. If you didn’t want to wait in the bathroom for your turn, they would hand you a little buzzer.

    Once Jewel opens, you might find a better pre-flight experience outside the lounge.

    I left the lounge for my gate at 12:00AM. Boarding started at 12:55AM for our 1:30 departure. Amazingly, boarding for this fully-loaded A350 was complete in 20 minutes. Wow!

    Onboard

    Business class passengers boarded through the forward door. There, I was greeted by a smiling team of flight attendants. I turned right into the cabin and made my way to seat 16K!

    16K on Singapore Airlines’ A350

    Singapore Airlines arranges their business class in a 1-2-1 configuration. The seats aren’t reverse herringbone. Instead, Singapore Airlines offers a forward-facing configuration with lie-flat seats. 16K was a window seat in the penultimate row of business class in the forward cabin. A smaller business class cabin was located behind the second set of doors.

    There are no overhead bins over the center rows. As a result, overhead bin space can fill up quickly. Be sure to board early! We did end up running out of space in the overhead compartments in business class by the end of the boarding process.

    Reading light, power outlet, and storage nook

    To the right of the seat was a reading light, power outlet, and storage nook. During the flight, laptops, iPads, books, or newspapers could be stored there. Below the reading light was the universal power outlet in addition to a USB outlet. The power was only active after takeoff.

    Below that was the handset entertainment controller. Singapore Airlines’ business class monitors are not touch screen so it was necessary to use the remote.

    Singapore Airlines remote control

    Below that was the tray table and a storage area for water bottles. Headphones were also stored there.

    Storage by the remote control

    On the left side of the seat were the seat controls.

    Singapore Airlines business class seat controls

    There was also another set of lights in the partition.

    Additional lighting

    The footwell in this configuration is tucked underneath the armrest of the seat in front. As a result, the footwell is angled away from the seat and is a bit on the small side. Below the footwell was an area to store your shoes or larger bags.

    Singapore Airlines business class footwell and shoe storage

     

    Above the footwell, was the only real place to hold a glass, a mirror, and additional storage for smaller items like a wallet, passport, phone, or glasses.

    Additional storage and a mirror

    Waiting at my seat upon boarding was a pair of slippers, eye mask, and socks. Singapore Airlines doesn’t offer amenity kits. Rather, additional items such as a toothbrush, razor, comb, etc. are found in the lavatory.

    Additional amenities were in the lavatory

    Also in the lavatory, one could find mouthwash, facial mist, and some hand lotion.

    Additional amenities

    There was even a nice little flower in the lavatory.

    Flower in the lavatory

    Back to the seat. In order to convert the seat in bed mode, you have to flip down the back of the seat. This is a bit cumbersome. However, flight attendants were proactive and offered to make my bed for me. In addition, when the back is lowered, additional bedding and a heavier pillow were revealed.

    The seat in bed mode

    I did like how there was a little mattress pad on the seat. It wasn’t much in terms of padding, but it did add a little aspect of hygiene since I wasn’t sleeping directly on the seat surface.

    The one slight downside to this seat is that you have to sleep angled. By this point, I was exhausted so was able to get some sleep. However, I did end up with some aches that awoke me as a result of the awkward sleeping position. On this 10-hour flight, I ended up getting about six hours of sleep. It wasn’t bad and I was able to get an additional two hours of sleep on the short leg between Johannesburg and Cape Town.

    The angled footwell.

    The bedding itself was solid, however. The pillow and blanket were perfect for a long-haul flight.

    In addition, the seat itself was very private. The partition extends quite far which encloses your space. Though not a suite, this was nevertheless an excellent seat for privacy.

    Onboard experience

    Singapore Airlines offered a fantastic entertainment selection on this flight. There were over 100 movies in addition to a large number of TV shows and audio options. If you’re flying the world’s longest route, you’ll definitely have plenty of content to keep you occupied.

    Singapore Airlines offers excellent in-flight entertainment

    It isn’t a touchscreen. However, the remote control worked just fine and I was able to scroll through and view what I needed to.

    Singapore Airlines provided noise-canceling headphones. They were identical to the ones offered on my previous flight and did the job.

    If you were in the mood to read, flight attendants passed out various options for newspapers prior to departure.

    Business class passengers received 30 mb of free wifi. In addition, paid for wifi was also available. Do note, however, that Singapore Airlines’ charges for wifi based on data usage. It can be quite easy, as I discovered, to blow through your package! Make sure that no background apps are running and you pause your session when you’re not using it. These are some easy ways to save some of that precious data.

    Meals

    After settling in, I was offered some pre-departure champagne. Singapore Airlines served Charles Heidsieck Brut Reserve.

    Pre-departure champagne

    The menu was already at my seat. Food and drink options were as follows:

    About 20 minutes after takeoff, the initial service started. First, I ordered a Coke and it came with some nuts.

    Coke and nuts

    About 30 minutes after takeoff, I was offered the refreshment. I selected the toasted walnut bread with roasted beef, coleslaw, and salad. Really, it was a light sandwich.

    Singapore Airlines refreshment

    The sandwich tasted like a normal sandwich. Granted, it is hard to make a sandwich unique. I did appreciate that Singapore Airlines served it warm and well made. Overall, though, it wasn’t terribly special.

    About an hour after takeoff, flight attendants cleared the refreshment and made my bed. I got about six hours of sleep. When I woke up, I ordered a Coke with some trail mix.

    Coke and trail mix

    Minor detail, but I would have liked to see the trail mix served in a little bowl. It wasn’t a huge deal since flight attendants were proactive with clearing trash, however, it was a slightly awkward presentation.

    About two-and-a-half hours out, flight attendants commenced the breakfast service. This was the main meal on this flight. I first received the starter.

    Fresh fruit starter

    Despite about eight hours in the air, the fruit still tasted very fresh. Much to my liking, the pineapple was also quite sweet. In comparison to other inflight fruit I’ve had, this was pretty good.

    After the fruit, flight attendants came around and offered cereal.

    Singapore Airlines breakfast cereal

    The cereal was standard and it was nice to see they had something more substantive than cornflakes. Flight attendants also offered passengers skim or whole milk to go with the cereal.

    After the cereal was cleared, flight attendants served the main meal about one-and-a-half hours prior to arrival. I used the iconic “Book the Cook” option from Singapore Airlines. I pre-ordered the chicken curry.

    Singapore Airlines Book the Cook Chicken Curry

    The chicken curry was fantastic! Singapore Airlines is known for their excellent catering. This meal was no exception. I was pleasantly surprised as the dish was rich in flavor. The rice also didn’t taste like typical airplane rice. It was fluffy and fresh. I would have liked some garlic bread, since Singapore Airlines serves an excellent garlic bread, but the roll was just right with this meal.

    Above all, this was the best breakfast I’ve had on a plane.

    Cabin Crew

    From the time I boarded until I deplaned, flight attendants constantly addressed me as “Mr. Singh”. I like when flight attendants put the effort in to memorize a passenger’s name since it elevates the entire experience. Every experience I had with flight attendants were exceptional.

    Singapore Airlines has a tough cabin crew certification process. It really showed in how immaculately put together the flight attendants were. They constantly maintained their appearance and never once looked even remotely tired. They all seemed glad to be onboard the flight and enjoyed providing excellent service.

    Well done to this crew!

    Arrival

    On top of it all, Singapore Airlines excels in terms of priority baggage. I only had to wait for about five minutes after clearing immigration for my bags to arrive at the carousel in Cape Town. The business class and priority tagged bags all came out first.

    Overall

    This flight was almost perfect. There was excellent content, attentive service, and fantastic catering. I did find that the angled footwell was a bit uncomfortable. However, I was still able to get six hours of sleep. I’d really want to see how the angled footwell does on one of their ultra long haul flights, since they use the same seat in business class across their long-haul A350s.

    Would I fly Singapore Airlines again in long-haul business class? Absolutely. In fact, I hope to one day fly on their longest route to New York!

    Would you fly Singapore Airlines? Have you flown Singapore Airlines before? Let us know in the comments below!

    Title: 🛬 Stratolaunch, the world's largest airplane and built to launch rockets, takes
    Post by: RE on April 14, 2019, 12:25:07 AM
    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/13/stratolaunch-first-flight-worlds-biggest-airplane-built-for-rockets.html (https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/13/stratolaunch-first-flight-worlds-biggest-airplane-built-for-rockets.html)

    Stratolaunch, the world's largest airplane and built to launch rockets, takes first flight
    Published 37 min ago
    Michael Sheetz
    @thesheetztweetz
    Key Points

        Stratolaunch became the largest airplane in the world to fly on Saturday, people familiar with the test flight told CNBC.
        With a wingspan measuring 385 feet, the airplane is built to launch rockets from the air.
        Late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen founded Stratolaunch in 2011.
    (https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/104503550-Sratolaunch_1.PNG?v=1529475260&w=740&h=404)
    For the first time ever, the Stratolaunch aircraft moved out of the hangar to conduct aircraft fueling tests.

    Aviation has a new number one in size, as a one-of-a-kind airplane completed its first test flight on Saturday morning above California's Mojave desert, people familiar with the flight told CNBC.

    The test makes the immense Stratolaunch the largest airplane in the world to fly, with a wingspan measuring 385 feet -- wider than a football field is long. With two fuselages and six Boeing 747 engines. Stratolaunch is built to launch rockets from the air.

    Stratolaunch is an "air launch" system, meaning that the aircraft will carry rockets up to about 35,000 feet and then drop the rocket. One of the advantages of such a system, touted by Stratolaunch as well as Richard Branson's Virgin Orbit, is that flying in and out of a traditional runway gives greater flexibility and, eventually, will allow for quick turnaround between launches.

    The company has had various partnerships, as well as internal plans, for the rockets that Stratolaunch will carry. SpaceX was one of the company's earliest partners but Stratolaunch later switched to a contract with Northrop Grumman-owned Orbital ATK to fly the Pegeasus XL rocket. Stratolaunch's plan to develop its own fleet of rockets was scrapped in January.
    VIDEO01:14
    Stratolaunch rolls out of the hangar for fueling tests

    Stratolaunch Systems is owned by Vulcan, which manages the estate of late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. The billionaire entrepreneur founded Stratolaunch in 2011, in partnership with specialty aircraft builder Scaled Composites. Allen died in October, following complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Allen's passing is cited as one of the main reasons for the shift in Stratolaunch's plans at the beginning of this year. When the company announced in January that it was ending development of its own rocket engines and vehicles, Stratolaunch reportedly laid off more than 50 of its 80 employees.
    Title: 🛬 JAL cleared to receive Airbus A350XWB later in 2019
    Post by: RE on April 14, 2019, 12:32:57 AM
    https://www.aerotime.aero/aerotime.team/22554-jal-cleared-to-receive-airbus-a350xwb-later-in-2019 (https://www.aerotime.aero/aerotime.team/22554-jal-cleared-to-receive-airbus-a350xwb-later-in-2019)

    JAL cleared to receive Airbus A350XWB later in 2019
    Source : Airbus

    (https://www.aerotime.aero/upload/files/1140x420/1133px-a350xwb-demo_crop.jpg)
    Image : FlugKerl2, CC BY-SA 4.0

    Japanese authorities have issued type certification for the Airbus A350 XWB, opening doors for Japan Airlines (JAL) to receive first deliveries of the airliner later in 2019.

    The type certification was issued by Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transportation, and Tourism (MLITT) and covers the aircraft powered by Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engines, Airbus announced on April 11, 2019.

    While about a third of all A350XWB orders (a total of 890 as of March 31, 2019) come from Asia Pacific, the only Japanese airline planning to introduce the airliner to its fleet is Japan Airlines (JAL). The airline placed 18 A350-900s and 13 A350-1000s firm order with Airbus in 2013.

    JAL is now expecting the first deliveries “in the middle of 2019”, according to Airbus, which also adds that JAL’s A350 XWB fleet will enter service on major domestic routes starting with its Haneda - Fukuoka route from September.

    A350XWB are due to replace older widebody aircraft within the Japanese carrier fleet - a position currently strongly occupied by Boeing aircraft. JAL operates an all-Boeing fleet of 167 aircraft, 117 of which are widebodies: Dreamliners, 777s and 767s.
    Title: Re: 🛬 Stratolaunch, the world's largest airplane and built to launch rockets, takes
    Post by: K-Dog on April 14, 2019, 01:07:50 AM
    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/13/stratolaunch-first-flight-worlds-biggest-airplane-built-for-rockets.html (https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/13/stratolaunch-first-flight-worlds-biggest-airplane-built-for-rockets.html)

    Stratolaunch, the world's largest airplane and built to launch rockets, takes first flight
    Published 37 min ago
    Michael Sheetz
    @thesheetztweetz
    Key Points

        Stratolaunch became the largest airplane in the world to fly on Saturday, people familiar with the test flight told CNBC.
        With a wingspan measuring 385 feet, the airplane is built to launch rockets from the air.
        Late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen founded Stratolaunch in 2011.
    (https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/104503550-Sratolaunch_1.PNG?v=1529475260&w=740&h=404)
    For the first time ever, the Stratolaunch aircraft moved out of the hangar to conduct aircraft fueling tests.

    Aviation has a new number one in size, as a one-of-a-kind airplane completed its first test flight on Saturday morning above California's Mojave desert, people familiar with the flight told CNBC.

    The test makes the immense Stratolaunch the largest airplane in the world to fly, with a wingspan measuring 385 feet -- wider than a football field is long. With two fuselages and six Boeing 747 engines. Stratolaunch is built to launch rockets from the air.

    Stratolaunch is an "air launch" system, meaning that the aircraft will carry rockets up to about 35,000 feet and then drop the rocket. One of the advantages of such a system, touted by Stratolaunch as well as Richard Branson's Virgin Orbit, is that flying in and out of a traditional runway gives greater flexibility and, eventually, will allow for quick turnaround between launches.

    The company has had various partnerships, as well as internal plans, for the rockets that Stratolaunch will carry. SpaceX was one of the company's earliest partners but Stratolaunch later switched to a contract with Northrop Grumman-owned Orbital ATK to fly the Pegeasus XL rocket. Stratolaunch's plan to develop its own fleet of rockets was scrapped in January.
    VIDEO01:14
    Stratolaunch rolls out of the hangar for fueling tests

    Stratolaunch Systems is owned by Vulcan, which manages the estate of late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. The billionaire entrepreneur founded Stratolaunch in 2011, in partnership with specialty aircraft builder Scaled Composites. Allen died in October, following complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Allen's passing is cited as one of the main reasons for the shift in Stratolaunch's plans at the beginning of this year. When the company announced in January that it was ending development of its own rocket engines and vehicles, Stratolaunch reportedly laid off more than 50 of its 80 employees.

    Probably a good move to circle the wagons and concentrate on the platform.  Field of dreams comes to mind and this was his dream.  Rockets others can build.

    (https://blog.frogslayer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/ifyoubuildittheywillcome.png)
    Title: 🛬 American Airlines extends cancellations through Aug. 19
    Post by: RE on April 14, 2019, 01:28:06 PM
    Count on AA suing the beejeezus out of Boeing.  ;D

    RE

    https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/04/14/american-airlines-extends-cancellations-through-aug-19/23711527/ (https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/04/14/american-airlines-extends-cancellations-through-aug-19/23711527/)

    American Airlines extends cancellations through Aug. 19

    (https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/1546/production/_106364450_planes.jpg)

    Thomson Reuters
    Apr 14th 2019 12:14PM

    CHICAGO, April 14 (Reuters) - American Airlines Group Inc said on Sunday it is extending Boeing Co 737 MAX cancellations through Aug. 19, leading to about 115 daily canceled flights, or 1.5 percent of its daily summer flying schedule.

    In a letter to employees and customers, Chief Executive Doug Parker and President Robert Isom said they believe the 737 MAX will be recertified before Aug. 19, but they want to ensure reliability "for the peak travel season and provide confidence to our customers and team members when it comes to their travel plans."

    Boeing's 737 MAX aircraft was grounded worldwide in March following a fatal crash on Ethiopian Airlines that killed all 157 aboard, just five months after a similar crash on Lion Air that killed all 189 passengers and crew.
    Title: 🛬 Boeing can't deliver the 737 Max to customers, and now the planes are cloggin
    Post by: RE on April 16, 2019, 01:37:39 AM
    Next stop: The Airplane Graveyard.

    (https://i.pinimg.com/originals/64/c5/25/64c525380cde4672e76737c9530555aa.jpg)

    RE

    https://www.businessinsider.com/boeing-737-max-fills-storage-lots-2019-4 (https://www.businessinsider.com/boeing-737-max-fills-storage-lots-2019-4)

    Boeing can't deliver the 737 Max to customers, and now the planes are clogging up its storage lots
    Benjamin Zhang

    (https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5cb4d49daefeef22201f4ee6-1920-1326.jpg)
    Boeing 737 Max factory Renton Unpainted Boeing 737 airliners at the company's Renton, Washington, factory. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
    BA Boeing Co

        The global Boeing 737 Max fleet has been grounded since March 13 in response to the crashes of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 and Lion Air Flight JT610.
        Boeing has suspended customer deliveries of the 737 Max, but production of the plane has continued at a pace of 42 aircraft a month.
        As a result, Boeing's storage lots are packed with undelivered 737 Max aircraft.
        Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    The global Boeing 737 Max fleet has been grounded since March 13 in response to the crashes of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 and Lion Air Flight JT610.

    Along with the grounding, Boeing also suspended customer deliveries of the 737 Max. However, the company did not shut down the Renton, Washington, factory where the 737 is assembled.

    Read more: Boeing's problems are mounting and things are going to get worse before they get better.

    Before the March 10 crash in Ethiopia, Boeing had been producing the 737 at a rate of 52 aircraft a month with plans to ratchet production up to 57 planes by the end of the year.

    In fact, production continued unabated for nearly a month after the crash, until Boeing announced plans to slash the rate from 52 planes a month to 42 planes a month.
    Boeing airplanes at Boeing Field in Seattle. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
    As a result, Boeing is storing the undelivered in various locations around the Puget Sound, a company spokesman told Business Insider.

    Even with the production slowdown, the number of undelivered aircraft sitting in and around Boeing's production facilities is beginning to swell.

    The planes are sitting in storage lots at the Renton factory; at the Paine Field next to Boeing's Everett, Washington, factory; and at the company's Seattle Delivery Center at Boeing Field.

    Aerial photos of the facilities appear to show that space is filling up.
    Boeing 737 Max aircraft parked at the airport adjacent to the Renton factory. AP Photo/Elaine Thompson
    It's unclear when the 737 Max will be able to resume service. American Airlines and Southwest Airlines have both pulled the plane from its schedule until mid-August, and United has pulled the plane from flights through early July.

    Boeing is working on a software update to fix the 737 Max's troubled flight-control system. According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the agency is expecting Boeing's final proposed fix in the coming weeks.
    Title: 🛬 The Airbus A330 vs The Boeing 777 – What Plane Is Better?
    Post by: RE on April 17, 2019, 01:45:01 AM
    https://simpleflying.com/airbus-a330-vs-boeing-777/



    The Airbus A330 vs The Boeing 777 – What Plane Is Better?

     

    The Airbus A330 program was developed back in the late 80s as a new way to transport passengers long distances on only two engines. Boeing, sensing a change in the wind, wanted to get in on the action and develop their own two-engine long-haul aircraft.

    Both were released within two years of each other, and are practically the same size. But which is better? Let’s find out. We will be looking at passengers, range, and how much an airline would expect to pay (and wether it would be worth the money!).

    A330

    Airbus A330 vs Boeing 777. Source: Simple Flying

    As we are looking a historic leapfrog type situation with Boeing trying to out do Airbus and so on and so forth, we should stress that Boeing was behind Airbus when it came to the launch of their aircraft, and thus would have had a few years more to beat the competition.

    Again, it pains us to say this, but Simple Flying is not owned by Boeing or Airbus or any other aircraft manafacture. If you spot bias, do let us know and we will correct it.

    The Airbus A330 vs The Boeing 777

    Below is a outline of all the different types of Boeing 777 aircraft from our ‘777X vs 777-300ER‘ article:

    Type Length Span Passengers (3 class) Max passengers Range List price
    777-200 63.73 m 60.93 m 305 440 5,240 nmi US$261.5 M
    777-200ER 63.73 m 60.93 m 305 440 7,065 nmi US$306.6M
    777-200LR 63.73 m 64.80 m 301 440 8,555 nmi US$346.9M
    777-300 73.86 60.93 m 368 550 6,030 nmi US$361.5M
    777-300ER 73.86 64.80 m 365 550 7,370 nmi US$375.5M
    777F 63.73 m 64.80 m n/a n/a 4,970 nmi US$352.3M

    And here is a brand new table highlighting the differences in the Airbus A330 family (and just for fun, like above, we have included the freight variant):

    Type Length Span Passengers (3 Class) Max Pax Range List Price
    A330-200 58.82 m (192.98 ft) 60.3 m (197.83 ft) 246 406 7,250
     nmi
    US$238.5M
    A330-200F 58.82 m (192.98 ft) 60.3 m (197.83 ft) 70,000 kg (154,324 lb) N/A 4,000
     nmi
    US$241.7M
    A330-300 63.67 m (208.89 ft) 60.3 m (197.83 ft) 300 440 6,350
     nmi
    US$264.2M

    As we can clearly see from the above charts, in terms of passengers the A330 family is the equivalent of the Boeing 777-200 series. In fact, this writer is awfully suspect of the fact that the Airbus A330-300 is listed as having an almost similar length as the Boeing 777-200. Thus it is easy to answer that the Boeing 777 series wins in the passenger department.

    777-200

    A United 777-200 comes in to land. United was the launch customer of this aircraft. Source: Wikimedia

    Looking at range, the A330 family actually does very well against the Boeing 777 family. The A330-200 beats any first generation 777 series, and the A330-300 beats the Boeing 777-300. Its only when the extended range 777 versions come out that Airbus is left in the dust.

    A330

    Air China Airbus A330-200. Source: Wikimedia

    The real kicker is the price. Look at the price of the A330-300 ($264 million USD) vs the Boeing 777-300 ($361.5 million USD). Whilst we know that airlines don’t pay list value for aircraft, you have to wonder why airlines would pay $97 million more. After all, how much is an extra 68 passengers worth over a long run?

    Fuel

    For those who want to know which aircraft was more fuel efficient. Source: Wikimedia

    It’s tough to say which aircraft is better. The A330 family is smaller than the Boeing 777 series, but can almost compete on a level playing field. Beyond the first generation, the A330 no longer remains competitive and the tourch is handed over to Boeing.

    Bonus: What about the A330neo vs The Boeing 777X?

    Whilst these two aircraft are not strictly comparable (that would be best left for the Airbus A350 vs Boeing 777X which you can read about here), many readers have asked us to put them to the Simple Flying test. Let’s start with some statistics to outline the basics.

      Airbus A330neo Boeing 777X
    Type A330-800neo A330-900neo 777-8 777-9
    Cockpit crew 2 2 2 2
    Seating 257 287 365 414
    Exit Limit (Total possible passengers) 406 440 Unknown 475*
    Length 58.82 m (193.0 ft) 63.66 m (208.9 ft) 229 ft 0 in (69.8 m) 251 ft 9 in (76.7 m)
    Height 17.39 m (57.1 ft) 16.79 m (55.1 ft) 64 ft 0 in (19.5 m) 64 ft 7 in (19.7 m)
    Width, cabin 5.26m / 17ft 3in 19.6 ft (5.96 m)
    Cargo capacity 136.0 m3 (4,800 cu ft) 162.8 m3 (5,750 cu ft) Unknown 8,131 cu ft (230.2 m3)
    Fuel Capacity 139,090 l (36,740 US gal), 111,272 kg (245,313 lb) 350,410 lb (158,940 kg), 52,300 US gal (197,977 L)
    Range 8,150nmi / 15,094km 7,200nmi / 13,334km 8,690 nmi / 16,090 km 7,525 nmi / 13,940 km

    Now its important to understand that the 777X is simply a bigger plane. This means that the Boeing has better passenger capacity (coming close to double for the 777-9 vs -800neo), better cargo space (which can be very lucrative for these airlines) and they are far longer.

    Airbus A330neo

    TAP Portugal seat layout on the Airbus A330neo. Source: TAP Portugal

    When it comes to range, we can see that the A330neo quickly jumps up. The A330neo-800 does a better range the 777-9 but is just beaten by the 777-8. Both versions of the A330neo seem to be just behind the Boeing 777X. This means that they could technically perform the same routes as these aircraft but lack the passenger capacity to make it worthwhile… or do they?

    There is a common idea that a smaller aircraft is easier to make profitable; as the fewer seats you have to sell, the easier it is to break even. If the A330neo can provenly operate more effectively than the 777x on the same route, then that would be very interesting for airlines.

    We will leave it up to you in the comments to decide which is your favorite.

    Title: 🛬 Virgin Atlantic’s A350 cabins pose fascinating PaxEx questions
    Post by: RE on April 18, 2019, 12:17:39 AM
    https://runwaygirlnetwork.com/2019/04/17/virgin-atlantics-a350-cabins-pose-fascinating-paxex-questions/

    Virgin Atlantic’s A350 cabins pose fascinating PaxEx questions

     

    Virgin Atlantic’s A350 cabins pose fascinating PaxEx questions

     

    While the majority of the attention around Virgin Atlantic’s new Airbus A350 aircraft is perhaps understandably on its doorless but nonetheless improved Upper Class seats, there are also positive passenger experience improvements in the premium economy and economy sections, with customization of Collins Aerospace’s widely used MiQ seat in Virgin’s Premium Economy cabin, and Recaro’s increasingly popular CL3710 seat in economy.

    The Premium cabin is Virgin’s largest ever non-leisure cabin with 56 seats: while the Gatwick-based Boeing 747 fleet used for holiday destinations has 66 seats, the Airbus A340-600 which the A350 is set to replace offers 38. “In comparison to the aircraft it’s replacing, certainly on the New York route, the premium cabin is 30 percent bigger now,” Gareth Salt, A350 programme director, explained to Runway Girl Network. “Premium economy is one of our most popular cabins.”

    Daniel Kerzner, vice president for customer experience, highlighted that Premium is not just popular: it’s profitable. “It’s our highest-performing cabin when it comes to a customer satisfaction standpoint, and so for us there’s more of a demand for the premium product that we put out there, not less of a demand for that.”

     

    Rotation
    Yet Virgin Atlantic will be installing eight-abreast, not seven-abreast, Collins MiQ seats on its A350, in the tighter 2-4-2 configuration. Crucially, the question of comparison with arch-rival British Airways is yet to be answered: BA, too, will offer 56 seats, but that means either seven rows of eight seats or eight rows of seven.

    RGN asked Kerzner and Salt about whether 2-4-2 premium economy was a large enough “comfort canyon” between the A350’s wide 3-3-3 economy seats, and the 34-inch pitch with which Virgin plans to outfit its extra-legroom economy in particular, and Premium, but the line taken separately by both executives referred back to the existing fleet, which is 2-3-2 on board the A330/A340 and 787 cabins.

    “For us, the aircraft is a different fuselage to the rest of the fleet,” Kerzner explained. “The A350 is a wider aircraft, which actually means that you can put more seats in the aircraft without sacrificing comfort for our customers. What we’ve tried to do is put one of the best premium seats on board the aircraft. For a lot of people traveling in premium, that is their business class or their Upper Class experience.”

    2-4-2 means these are Virgin’s narrowest premium economy seats. Image: John Walton

    Virgin Atlantic has focussed on refining the color, materials and finish of the hard product, said Mark Croucher, head of customer experience and CRM at Virgin Holidays, recently moved over from the A350 program. “We did redesign the rear shield of the MiQ, actually, working with Collins, both to get the level of quality that we want, the coloring, and the monitor arm. It’s a pretty standard seat, and they’re somewhat less inflexible than others in terms of what opportunities we have.”

    But will a well-designed seat make up for width, even with the clever drop-arm of the MiQ platform?

    Virgin Atlantic redesigned the MiQ seatback shroud. Image: John Walton

    Croucher thought it will, “both from a seat and a service perspective. I think — I will be biased! — but I wholly believe it’s true that we lead in the premium economy market. We have the best seat out there, we have the best service, we have the best food, the Wander Wall, the added snacks that you get on those aircraft. It’s a really good product, and I think the A350 is going to be no exception even with a 2-4-2.”

    The styling rather unfortunately makes the seats look much narrower than they are. Image: John Walton

    A crucial question is the differentiation from economy, where at the rear of the aircraft is the relatively small 235-seat cabin, of which 36 seats are 34” extra-legroom “Economy Delight”, with the rest pitched at 31”: the Virgin standard. The seats are the latest Recaro CL3710 fully-featured space-saving slimline, and the amount of space that the engineering behind these new-generation seats creates was truly remarkable in Virgin’s demo room, and the effort put into the fabric design and conception was equally visible.

    The amount of space squeezed out of the seat pitch by CL3710 is truly astounding. Image: John Walton

    It’s a fascinating contrast that at the same time Virgin Atlantic will be offering its widest-ever economy class seat and its narrowest-ever premium economy class seat, on the same aircraft. Observing passengers’ purchasing behavior and relative satisfaction when comparing between cabins on the A350 and across cabins between the Virgin fleet of A330s and 787s will be equally compelling.

    The Recaro CL3710 in its A350 configuration is Virgin’s widest ever economy seat. The RAVE IFE is provided by Safran (former Zii) and the inflight connectivity is Inmarsat GX. Image: John Walton

    Virgin Atlantic provided economy class intra-Europe travel and accommodation in Crawley, UK for this event.

    Title: Death of Aviation: FAA Approves GooG Drones !
    Post by: azozeo on April 24, 2019, 01:03:36 PM

    Google parent Alphabet just beat Amazon to the punch in an incredibly important business: Drone deliveries. Wing, an Alphabet subsidiary focused on commercial drones, has received approval from the FAA to operate as an airline, a certification that will allow it to move ahead with plans to experiment with drone deliveries in the US, a service it has already launched in parts of Australia (the suburbs around North Canberra) to mixed reviews.


    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-04-23/faa-approves-googles-wing-commercial-drone-flights (https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-04-23/faa-approves-googles-wing-commercial-drone-flights)
    Title: Death of Aviation: U.S. Navy Patents anti-gravity craft (no shit)
    Post by: azozeo on April 24, 2019, 01:16:58 PM
    The US Navy has been granted a patent for an advanced aircraft which resembles a flying saucer UFO. Military inventors filed plans for a highly unusual flying machine which uses an ‘inertial mass reduction device’ to travel at ‘extreme speeds’. What that means is that the aircraft uses complex technology to reduce its mass and thereby lessen inertia (an object’s resistance to motion) so it can zoom along at high velocities. The patent is highly complex and describes methods of reducing the mass of an aircraft using various techniques including the generation of gravity waves, which were first detected in 2016 after being produced when two black holes collided.



    https://metro.co.uk/2019/04/18/us-navy-secretly-designed-super-fast-futuristic-aircraft-resembling-ufo-documents-reveal-9246755/?ito=cbshare

    Title: Re: Death of Aviation: FAA Approves GooG Drones !
    Post by: azozeo on April 24, 2019, 01:24:31 PM

    Google parent Alphabet just beat Amazon to the punch in an incredibly important business: Drone deliveries. Wing, an Alphabet subsidiary focused on commercial drones, has received approval from the FAA to operate as an airline, a certification that will allow it to move ahead with plans to experiment with drone deliveries in the US, a service it has already launched in parts of Australia (the suburbs around North Canberra) to mixed reviews.


    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-04-23/faa-approves-googles-wing-commercial-drone-flights (https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-04-23/faa-approves-googles-wing-commercial-drone-flights)



    http://www.youtube.com/v/I6Ffr1U7KMY&fs=1
    Title: Death of Aviation: Why do airplanes look like nightclubs now?
    Post by: azozeo on April 24, 2019, 02:27:33 PM
    (https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/gaCnb7b5EZRlwDvX6HxN5TJgemU=/0x0:1280x720/620x413/filters:focal(538x258:742x462):format(webp)/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/63621787/jetblue1.0.jpg)


    The travel journalist Paula Froelich remembers walking onto her first Virgin America flight and thinking, “What is this, a club?” When the airline launched in the US in 2007, industrial designer Adam Wells decided to avoid the sickly “yellow-green fluorescent lighting” standard on planes in favor of warm, pinkish-purple mood lighting, already a feature in Virgin Atlantic’s first class cabin. The goal was to make the often stressful experience of air travel more welcoming and relaxing — and possibly even pleasant.

    Calming, perhaps, but still clubby. Froelich was skeptical of Virgin America’s apparent intention to make airplanes cool, but says that with its comfortable seats and individual screens, “It was just a nice experience. For a lot of people, flying is not a nice experience.”









    (https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/pQL_uuVjodo7PKsSxMYSyygoiHE=/0x0:3000x2009/520x0/filters:focal(0x0:3000x2009):format(webp):no_upscale()/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/16164376/GettyImages_78148189.jpg)



    https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/4/19/18485015/airplane-blue-lighting-delta-jetblue-united (https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/4/19/18485015/airplane-blue-lighting-delta-jetblue-united)
    Title: 🛬 Boeing announced Wednesday that it was taking an initial $1 billion hit
    Post by: RE on April 25, 2019, 12:37:14 AM
    I'm sure they will make it up with new Military Contracts.  ::)

    RE

    https://abcnews.go.com/Business/boeing-billion-hit-grounding-737-max-jet/story?id=62597627

    Boeing announced Wednesday that it was taking an initial $1 billion hit on the grounding of the 737 Max jet following two fatal plane crashes in five months.


    (https://assets.nst.com.my/images/articles/BoeingHitNK_NSTfield_image_socialmedia.var_1556147495.jpg)

    The company also abandoned its previous full-year financial outlook as it grapples with the aftermath of the 737 Max fallout and works to implement software upgrades to its best-selling plane. Boeing is also halting stock buybacks.

    The crashes of the 737 Max jets operated by Indonesia's Lion Air on Oct. 29 and by Ethiopian Airlines on March 10 killed a total of 346 people (189 and 157 deaths, respectively).
    (MORE: Ethiopian Airlines pilots re-engaged safety system amid chaotic scene in Boeing 737 Max cockpit: Preliminary report)

    Chicago-based Boeing disclosed the information early Wednesday ahead of a call with investors.

    The company reported Q1 earnings of $2.15 billion on revenue of $22.9 billion. Boeing said that losses from the 737 Max were partially offset by higher defense and services revenue.
    (MORE: American Airlines cancellations extend into June amid Boeing 737 Max grounding)

    Boeing also said it is making steady progress on the path to final certification for a software update on the 737 Max, with over 135 test and production flights of the software update complete.

    ABC News’ Christine A.Theodorou contributed to this report.
    Title: 🛬 An American Airlines VP reveals why the Airbus A380 doesn't work
    Post by: RE on April 25, 2019, 02:16:43 AM
    https://www.thisisinsider.com/american-airlines-exec-reveals-why-company-doesnt-use-airbus-a380-2019-4 (https://www.thisisinsider.com/american-airlines-exec-reveals-why-company-doesnt-use-airbus-a380-2019-4)

    An American Airlines VP reveals why the Airbus A380 doesn't work for the world's biggest airline
    Benjamin Zhang

    (https://amp.thisisinsider.com/images/57717d77dd0895001e8b4c64-1536-1152.jpg)
    Airbus A380 Airbus

        The Airbus A380, which can carry more than 800 passengers, is the largest airliner in the world. At $445.6 million, the double-decker is also the world's most expensive passenger jet.
        Airbus announced in February that the A380 would cease production in 2021 because of insufficient demand.
        According to American Airlines' vice president of planning, Vasu Raja, the A380 is too big for the airline's route network.
        With a fleet of more than 950 aircraft, American Airlines is the world's largest airline, but it doesn't use massive central hubs as some other airlines do.
        Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories

    With a capacity for more than 800 passengers, the Airbus A380 is the largest airliner in the world. At $445.6 million, the double-decker is also the world's most expensive passenger jet.

    The gargantuan jet, dubbed the superjumbo, was designed to take on Boeing's iconic 747 and push the limits of modern engineering.

    Unfortunately for Airbus, the superjumbo never developed into the game changer the company had hoped for when the massive jet was conceived more than two decades ago. This is especially the case on the financial front.

    Airbus struggled for years to find airlines willing to buy the jet before finally throwing in the towel earlier this year when it announced that the A380 would cease production in 2021.

    As it turns out, the A380's greatest asset, its gargantuan size, may have made it simply too large for most airlines.

    Read more: The 20 biggest airlines in the world, ranked

    According to American Airlines' vice president of planning, Vasu Raja, the Airbus A380 was even too large for the world's biggest airline. American Airlines operates a fleet of 956 aircraft.

    "The Boeing 777-300 is the biggest-size airplane that fits into our network," Raja told Business Insider.

    American's Boeing 777-300ERs are configured with 304 seats. To put that in perspective, British Airways A380s fly with 165 more seats than that, while some Emirates A380s fly with 300 more seats.
    American Airlines Boeing 777 300ERAn American Airlines Boeing 777-300ER. American Airlines
    Planes like the A380 are designed to feed large numbers of passengers into a central hub where they are connected to destinations around the world. Most of the plane's operators possess this trait. For example, Emirates has Dubai, Singapore Airlines has Changi, Qatar has Doha, and Korean Air has Incheon.

    "Take British Airways for example: For them, they funnel the world into London Heathrow and send them forth," Raja said. "They are probably the only airline where the A380 legitimately makes economic sense. They are also the largest operator of the Boeing 747 for the same reason."

    According to Raja, who is in charge of developing American's global network strategy, the airline's multihub strategy makes the A380 a tough sell.

    Read more: The end is near for the Airbus A380 superjumbo jet. Here's how it went from airline status symbol to reject in just 10 years.

    "The reality is that we don't just funnel all of our traffic into one hub," he said. "We operate out of nine different hubs in the US, and because of that there's no single hub where you can pool 500 people's worth of demand every single day and go make that work."

    Raja added: "If you could do it, you'd do it on a few routes but not enough to go buy the 20 or 30 or 40 airplanes you would need in order to justify having the infrastructure of an airplane like that."
    British Airways Airbus A380A British Airways Airbus A380. British Airways

    And that drills down to the core of the issue.

    When airlines buy planes, the investment reaches far beyond the aircraft itself.

    "The first issue would be whenever we buy airplanes, especially a new airplane type, is the amount of infrastructure it takes to go and support it," Raja said. "You need to have a dedicated pool of pilots, a pilot-training regime, fixed maintenance, a maintenance program around it, a certain amount of spare parts."

    "All of that is a huge degree of fixed cost, so want to have that scale over a number of units," Raja added.

    Read more: An American Airlines executive reveals why its exposure to the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max has been limited.

    At the end of the day, the A380's cost, infrastructure needs, and pressure to generate passenger demand make the plane too much of a risk for American.

    "It's hard to see a place where you're worth it taking that kind of expense with that kind of demand, and even if the yields are all right, you can take a good market and make it negative pretty fast," Raja said.
    Title: 🛬 Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, JetBlue impacted by computer outages
    Post by: RE on April 30, 2019, 02:35:12 AM
    Those computers better not quit when I fly down to the Lower 48 for my annual carbon burning frenzy!

    RE

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/alaska-airlines-american-airlines-jetblue-computer-outages/ (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/alaska-airlines-american-airlines-jetblue-computer-outages/)

    Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, JetBlue impacted by computer outages

    (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D5VhmLYUEA88pVm.jpg)

    By CARRIE MIHALCIK

    Updated on: April 30, 2019 / 12:27 AM / CNET

    A "technical issue" with a booking and reservation system used by several US airlines again caused delays and headaches at airports across the country Monday.

    "Earlier today, Sabre had a brief technical issue that impacted multiple carriers, including American. This technical issue has been resolved," said American Airlines in an emailed statement. "We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience."

    The outage hit the Sabre flight reservation and booking system used by several major airlines, including American Airlines, JetBlue and Alaska Airlines. Sabre said the systems are "back online and customers are reporting normal or close-to-normal operations," but didn't say what caused the problem.

    "We understand how frustrating system outages are and we sincerely apologize for the disruption. No downtime is acceptable," the company said earlier in an emailed statement.

    he same Sabre system experienced an outage in March.

    "Due to a Sabre issue impacting multiple airlines, JetBlue customers may experience issues with booking or check-in on jetblue.com, airport kiosks, or our mobile app," JetBlue said in an emailed statement.

    Travelers and would-be customers took to social media to vent about problems trying to book travel or check in for flights. Passengers reported outages at several major hubs, including San Francisco International, Los Angeles International and O'Hare International in Chicago.

    "Spokesperson for ⁦@AlaskaAir just announced an all systems outage. Planes are ready, computers are down," tweeted Twitter user Alex Williams.

    "@AmericanAir computers are down nationwide. Nobody can check in or board and all flights r grounded. Long lines at Chicago O'Hare #ORD #AA," tweeted user Chris.

    "All JetBlue computers down at LAX —no Boarding passes can be written no luggage can be checked. LAX is bedlam nothing is moving. @JetBlue #jetblue," tweeted user Astrology Zone.

    Alaska Airlines didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.
    Title: 🛬 Qantas Ultra Long Haul Flights – The A350 vs 787 vs 777X
    Post by: RE on May 02, 2019, 12:14:08 AM
    https://simpleflying.com/qantas-ultra-long-haul-flights-the-a350-vs-787-vs-777x/ (https://simpleflying.com/qantas-ultra-long-haul-flights-the-a350-vs-787-vs-777x/)

    Qantas Ultra Long Haul Flights – The A350 vs 787 vs 777X

     

    Title: 🛬 Bizness Travel on Air France
    Post by: RE on May 04, 2019, 01:51:24 AM
    It's BIZNESS!  Tax Deductable!

    This is how average Rich Fucks who can't afford their own Private Jet fly.

    RE

    https://www.businessinsider.com/air-france-airbus-a380-800-business-class-review-2019-5 (https://www.businessinsider.com/air-france-airbus-a380-800-business-class-review-2019-5)

    I flew in business class on Air France's Airbus A380, the world's biggest passenger jet, and the experience is what I imagine the golden age of air travel was like

    [html]
     

    I flew in business class on Air France's Airbus A380, the world's biggest passenger jet, and the experience is what I imagine the golden age of air travel was like

     
     
    I think it's so cool seeing how mammoth the plane is when you board on two jetbridges. Boarding an Air France Airbus A380. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    Review banner

    • Flying in business class on Air France's Airbus A380 round-trip between New York and Paris was a treat.
    • The airline has only five superjumbo jets in operation, and Airbus recently announced it would cease making any new ones.
    • Travel junkies have lauded the A380 for how quiet it is. I couldn't believe how soundproof the mammoth double-decker plane was.
    • Here's what the journey was like, from check-in to the lounge to the flights themselves.
    • Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories.

    I'm rarely excited to get on a plane. These days, flying feels more like a chore. Airlines are packing more and more seats in planes to boost profits, and passengers are crammed in as tight as can be. If you didn't know your neighbor before you got on the plane, you sure do by the time you get off.

    But for a recent trip to Europe, I flew in business class on Air France's Airbus A380-800, the legendary superjumbo jet. I'd never been on a double-decker plane, and I was so excited!

    Read more: The $446 million Airbus A380 superjumbo is the largest and most expensive airliner in the world. Take a look inside.

    From check-in to the airport lounge to the seamless boarding process to the plane ride itself, Air France's attentive service, delicious food, and thoughtful amenities made flying a luxury.

    But the A380 is a dying breed. Airbus announced in February that it would discontinue production of the model, and Air France said last fall that it would get rid of five of its 10 superjumbos and retrofit the other five. As Business Insider's correspondent Benjamin Zhang has written, the plane is simply "too big, expensive, and inefficient for most operators."

    I usually fly Delta, and we booked round-trip tickets between New York and Geneva through it, so I ended up getting almost 14,000 SkyMiles for my flights. Air France and Delta are partners in a transatlantic joint venture that allows them to jointly market their flights and share costs. The highlight of the journey was flying on the superjumbo from New York's John F. Kennedy Airport to Paris' Charles de Gaulle Airport.

    Here's what it was like to fly in business class round-trip on Air France's A380-800.

     

    After I whisked through priority check-in and TSA PreCheck, then waded through the hustle and bustle of JFK's Terminal 1, the Air France lounge beckoned with the promise of exclusivity.

    After I whisked through priority check-in and TSA PreCheck, then waded through the hustle and bustle of JFK's Terminal 1, the Air France lounge beckoned with the promise of exclusivity. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    The Air France employee at check-in asked if I wanted my dinner in the lounge or on the plane. The airline now offers this "night service" option for its two latest overnight flights, AF009 and AF011, so you can go right to sleep once you board.

    The Air France employee at check-in asked if I wanted my dinner in the lounge or on the plane. The airline now offers this Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    Source: Air France

     

    I arrived as the sun was setting over the New York skyline, and the atmosphere felt truly magical. I was surprised by how few people were in the lounge when I arrived, but it filled up as we got closer to takeoff.

    I arrived as the sun was setting over the New York skyline, and the atmosphere felt truly magical. I was surprised by how few people were in the lounge when I arrived, but it filled up as we got closer to takeoff. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    It seemed like upstairs was reserved for those in business or first class who were having dinner, while downstairs was open for other passengers with status, but I couldn't be sure. There was better food upstairs too.

    It seemed like upstairs was reserved for those in business or first class who were having dinner, while downstairs was open for other passengers with status, but I couldn't be sure. There was better food upstairs too. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    A recurring theme of flying Air France was that everything started with Champagne.

    A recurring theme of flying Air France was that everything started with Champagne. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    There was also a full bar available, with liquor, wine, water, soft drinks, and coffee from the Nespresso machine.

    There was also a full bar available, with liquor, wine, water, soft drinks, and coffee from the Nespresso machine. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    The bread selection was divine. New York water plus French proclivity for making bread for the win.

    The bread selection was divine. New York water plus French proclivity for making bread for the win. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    The salad bar was probably the best I've ever seen in an airport lounge, full of fresh ingredients.

    The salad bar was probably the best I've ever seen in an airport lounge, full of fresh ingredients. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    The cheese and dessert bars were equally as impressive. The toffee tart was my favorite thing I ate in the lounge.

    The cheese and dessert bars were equally as impressive. The toffee tart was my favorite thing I ate in the lounge. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    Time for the main course! We opted to have our dinner in the lounge since we were there so early and wanted to eat at a real table. The options were beef brisket, vegetables in tomato sauce, pollock, or chicken.

    Time for the main course! We opted to have our dinner in the lounge since we were there so early and wanted to eat at a real table. The options were beef brisket, vegetables in tomato sauce, pollock, or chicken. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    I chose the pollock and immediately regretted it. It had an overwhelmingly fishy taste, and I abandoned it after two bites. At least the pesto was vibrant and the potatoes were tender. I was also surprised it was simply an airplane meal on a nice plate. I was expecting something more restaurant-quality.

    I chose the pollock and immediately regretted it. It had an overwhelmingly fishy taste, and I abandoned it after two bites. At least the pesto was vibrant and the potatoes were tender. I was also surprised it was simply an airplane meal on a nice plate. I was expecting something more restaurant-quality. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    Luckily, there was enough to fill up on with the salad, cheese, and dessert bars. I also figured I could eat a proper main course on the plane.

    Luckily, there was enough to fill up on with the salad, cheese, and dessert bars. I also figured I could eat a proper main course on the plane. As you can see, I ate nearly all the toffee tart before remembering to take this photo. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    When boarding, passengers on the upper deck went into one gateway, and those on the lower deck went into another. Being in business class, we waltzed right in with no line.

    When boarding, passengers on the upper deck went into one gateway, and those on the lower deck went into another. Being in business class, we waltzed right in with no line. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    Here's what an Air France Airbus A380 looks like in daylight.

    Here's what an Air France Airbus A380 looks like in daylight. DANIEL SLIM/AFP/Getty Images

    Time for the flight! Here were our seats; I was by the window. Air France A380s boasts 80 business-class seats, all on the upper deck. In total, the plane has 516 seats, including nine first-class suites.

    Time for the flight! Here were our seats; I was by the window. Air France A380s boasts 80 business-class seats, all on the upper deck. In total, the plane has 516 seats, including nine first-class suites. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    Source: SeatGuru

     

    The business-class cabin had six seats per row, in a 2-2-2 configuration, so everyone had ample space. I would suggest choosing one of the two window bays if you're traveling with someone, and choosing the middle bay if you're alone. The middle bay has two aisle seats, so you don't have to climb over someone you don't know (or have them climb over you).

    The business-class cabin had six seats per row, in a 2-2-2 configuration, so everyone had ample space. I would suggest choosing one of the two window bays if you're traveling with someone, and choosing the middle bay if you're alone. The middle bay has two aisle seats, so you don't have to climb over someone you don't know (or have them climb over you). Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    Source: SeatGuru

    One of my favorite features was that a labeled hanger was left at every seat. It avoided the awkward moments when you're holding your coat wondering whether a flight attendant will take it.

    One of my favorite features was that a labeled hanger was left at every seat. It avoided the awkward moments when you're holding your coat wondering whether a flight attendant will take it. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    I could not believe that the bin by the window fit my entire giant travel purse, which I originally got for an old 24-inch laptop.

    I could not believe that the bin by the window fit my entire giant travel purse, which I originally got for an old 24-inch laptop. There were two bins under the window: one for the window seat, and one for the aisle seat. However, it would be awkward to use if you were in the aisle seat and didn't know your seatmate. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    In total, each seat had five bins: two between the seats, one under the footrest, one next to/behind the seat, and one by the windows.

    In total, each seat had five bins: two between the seats, one under the footrest, one next to/behind the seat, and one by the windows. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    I was kind of bummed by how small the tray was and that it was the kind that came out of the armrest. But the flight attendants put a tablecloth over each one for meal service, which classed it up.

    I was kind of bummed by how small the tray was and that it was the kind that came out of the armrest. But the flight attendants put a tablecloth over each one for meal service, which classed it up. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    While I remembered the seats being advertised as "lie flat," I found that it was only partially true. We decided that the seats do reach 180 degrees, but they're canted at an angle. Air France's website calls them "angle flat" seats.

    While I remembered the seats being advertised as Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    Source: Air France

     

    You can lie almost flat. During the night, I found myself slipping down toward the footrest a few times. That and the turbulence interrupted my sleep a few times.

    You can lie almost flat. During the night, I found myself slipping down toward the footrest a few times. That and the turbulence interrupted my sleep a few times. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    But I loved the cocoon-style seats. Anything that makes it so the person reclining their seat in front of you doesn't impede your space is a win in my book.

    But I loved the cocoon-style seats. Anything that makes it so the person reclining their seat in front of you doesn't impede your space is a win in my book. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    I always find airplane seat material scratchy. Since Air France doesn't offer sheets, I scored an extra blanket to line the bottom of the seat so I could lie on it for extra softness and cushion. I also got an extra pillow to make it feel more like a bed.

    I always find airplane seat material scratchy. Since Air France doesn't offer sheets, I scored an extra blanket to line the bottom of the seat so I could lie on it for extra softness and cushion. I also got an extra pillow to make it feel more like a bed. This was the next morning, so the seat isn't reclined all the way. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    The amenities were of good quality. Each business-class passenger got a set of socks and slippers for the flight.

    The amenities were of good quality. Each business-class passenger got a set of socks and slippers for the flight. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    The amenity kits had a sleep mask (thank God since I forgot mine!), a pen, earplugs, a floss pick, a mini hairbrush, a toothbrush, toothpaste, and Clarins lotions.

    The amenity kits had a sleep mask (thank God since I forgot mine!), a pen, earplugs, a floss pick, a mini hairbrush, a toothbrush, toothpaste, and Clarins lotions. The amenity kits available this year are celebrating Air France's 85th anniversary. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

    The TV screen was a good size — here's a magazine for scale. While the entertainment options weren't nearly as varied as Delta's, there were still a handful of new releases in English that I wanted to watch.

    The TV screen was a good size — here's a magazine for scale. While the entertainment options weren't nearly as varied as Delta's, there were still a handful of new releases in English that I wanted to watch. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
     

    One cool feature was that you could add shows to your list of favorites before takeoff so your choices were all queued up by the time you were ready to watch them in the air.

    Title: 🛬 ANA’s new-look A380 hints at sophisticated 777-9 design
    Post by: RE on May 06, 2019, 12:17:59 AM
    Virgin Atlantic's "Upper Class" still looks like the best configuration.

    If you look at what's happening here, airlines are downsizing their planes and reconfiguring them to fly more $RICH$ 🤑 people as the middle class tourista bizness dwindles.

    RE

    https://runwaygirlnetwork.com/2019/05/04/all-nippon-airways-new-look-a380-hints-at-sophisticated-777-9-design/ (https://runwaygirlnetwork.com/2019/05/04/all-nippon-airways-new-look-a380-hints-at-sophisticated-777-9-design/)

    ANA’s new-look A380 hints at sophisticated 777-9 design

     

    ANA’s new-look A380 hints at sophisticated 777-9 design

    ANA’s Airbus A380 interior is designed for the leisure Hawaii market but the broader look shows ANA evolving to a more sophisticated brand. ANA is seeking innovation for its forthcoming Boeing 777-9s since its last major cabin design is a decade old and has been adopted by other airlines.

    The A380 for ANA marks a bigger leap in the airline’s design evolution than upping the ante in the still-notable A380 product war. Yet comparisons to other A380s are unequal since ANA’s A380 will exclusively fly to Hawaii. That dictates a more practical cabin (including, in ANA’s case, a multi-functional room which can be used for breastfeeding moms).

    First class gets a big upgrade on the A380, but ANA is conservative. “We could have designed a more gorgeous product,” ANA cabin products & LOPA manager Katsunori Maki tells Runway Girl Network. “This aircraft is not going to New York or Frankfurt. It’s flying 7-8 hours, Tokyo-Honolulu back and forth.”

    Flight time and schedules mean passengers are looking to have a nap, “not deep sleep,” Maki says.

    But other parts of the A380 underscore ANA’s design evolution: first class doors, more premium economy seats, and darker hues as airlines increasingly favor toned-down colors to connote premium (see Lufthansa’s new livery). To wit, ANA’s Boeing 787-10 entering service later this month has the same business class as the A380.

    ANA has again selected Jamco to provide its first class seat, and, as mentioned, is debuting a door with the seat on the A380, albeit one not as high as the old Emirates first or even Qatar’s QSuite.

    Aisle traffic is well visible.

    Passengers can still see traffic over the new doors. Image: Will Horton

    More practical is the wider seat and unobstructed windows – three in row one and two in row two. (Some faulted ANA’s 777 first product for being too narrow and difficult to look out of the windows.)

    ANA A380 first class seat with wider seat and easy access to windows and door. Image: Will Horton

    Ahead of first class in the A380’s dead space, ANA has a galley monument on top of which is a self-service bar featuring a dark blue background, wood slats on either side, and finishes of dark gray and an almost copper-looking metal.

    At worst it is eye-pleasing, and at best it is stunning, the design passengers might expect of a Japanese airline, and a hint of the sophistication ANA is embracing.

    First class bar. Image: Will Horton

    It is tempting to visualize this design elsewhere so more passengers can enjoy it, such as at the entry door galleys. These are given a light wood finish with beige pull-down screens that make the space bright but also dull.

    ANA A380 main deck entry galley is bright but simple. Image: Will Horton

    ANA’s flat-bed business seat is normally staggered so center occupants have privacy. But on the A380, the center seats are together in alternate rows for couples traveling together.

    The business class LOPA helps you to visualize the alternating rows of paired seats for couples. Image: ANA

    There is also a very tall privacy divider for non-couple center seats. Yet ANA did not opt for doors in the A380 business class, with Maki saying, “We want to offer privacy but also offer openness, especially for center seats.”

    Business class seat displaying its tall divider. Image: Will Horton

    Blue in business class is a subdued approach. The hue is darker and used around the shell. The seat cover is gray and the side console has a wood laminate, metal rim and gray lower shell. This more thoughtful design replaces the previous blue-and-white.

     

    Mood lighting is designed to match Hawaii-themed bulkheads like beaches and night stars. This can come across as kitsch, but in person is more abstract.

    ANA notes the A380 design is “totally different” from the rest of its fleet. The bulkhead artwork and green lines on some economy seat covers are different, and Couchii is a family-oriented economy product that ANA does not expect to offer on other aircraft, where leisure and family travel is lower.

    Even so, some key design features, and the overall tone could be adopted on other types. We do know that ANA’s future 777-9 will not have the center couple seats of the A380; ANA wants to maximize privacy.

    Business class doors are in fact a discussion point. “It is a passenger request now,” Maki says. “Maybe we will have it on future aircraft.”

    Meanwhile, ANA is looking to innovate its business class for the 777-9 since its last major business product, the introduction of direct aisle access, “is getting standard”, notes the ANA executive.

    Title: 🛬 Qantas To End Final Transpacific Boeing 747 Route
    Post by: RE on May 09, 2019, 03:22:00 AM
    This story really hits home for me.  The San Francisco-Sydney route on Qantas is the one I took most of my 747 flights on, and the only ones I flew First Class when dad the Pigman was living down under.  The only other 747 I flew was NY-London on my Honeymoon with the ex-wife, that was coach class.  It's tempting to book one of these last flights for nostalgia purposes, but they don't have the upstairs lounge on them they used to have in the 70s.  So I'll take a pass on that one for the Bucket List.

    An era is coming to a close here, it's happening in real time as we keyboard.  The end of the Age of Oil is upon us now.

    RE

    https://simpleflying.com/qantas-boeing-747-us/

    Qantas To End Final Transpacific Boeing 747 Route

    by Nicholas Cummins
        May 8, 2019

    (https://simpleflying.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Qantas_747-400ER_at_LAX._12608653085_2.jpg)
    Qantas 747-400 at LAX. Photo: Qantas.

    Qantas has set a date for its last transpacific Boeing 747 flight in December this year, as reported by Airlinegeeks.com

    The route from Sydney to San Francisco, flown by a Boeing 747-400 for the better part of 50 years, will now see its service replaced by a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner.

    When is the last flight?

    Qantas has locked in December 3rd as the last Boeing 747 flight. QF73 will fly from Sydney to San Francisco, and then onwards without passengers to the Californian desert for retirement.

    This last trip follows the retirement of the craft from the Sydney – Los Angeles route back in 2018. Once a regular appearance at LAX, the Qantas 747 Longreach Jumbo last flew in from Brisbane ending a family of routes that also included Sydney and Melbourne.

    Qantas has two 747-400s and six 747-400ERs still in service in their fleet. Each one carries 364 passengers.
    What will replace the 747?

    Qantas has placed a brand new 787-9 on the route. The Dreamliner, one of six new aircraft that is being delivered to fuel the international expansion of the airline, will afford far better fuel efficiency and, in some opinions, a better passenger experience.

    This is the same aircraft that flies the direct Perth to London route.

    The one major downside is a loss of capacity on the route. With 100 fewer seats now available, Qantas has taken a move that may mean increased prices for passengers as less demand can be filled. It remains to be seen if Qantas will increase the frequency of services to compensate. But for now, there are plenty of transpacific alternatives (Fiji Airways A350 anyone?).
    Qantas 787 Dreamliner
    The 787 Dreamliner has done very well for Qantas so far. Photo: Qantas

    The new 787-9 new aircraft will also feature the new Qantas business class and premium economy.

    The new Qantas business class is a big upgrade from what is currently available on the 747. With 42 true lie flat seats on board, each has a pitch of 46 / 80 inches (seating/bed mode) and is quite wide at 24 inches. Each seat also has direct aisle access and a privacy screen.

    Also onboard are 28 of the new Qantas premium economy seats. These have a pitch of 38 inches, but the best part is better food and a larger entertainment screen. But there are only a few seats onboard and thus tend to sell out quite quickly.

    With only 236 passengers onboard, the density of this aircraft is a far cry from the usual 290+ we see on other carriers (looking at you, KLM, with your 294 passengers).
    Where is the remaining Qantas 747 still flying to the USA?

    But fear not, there is one last Qantas 747 flying over the Pacific. The Sydney to Hawaii route saw an extension back in 2018 for the 2019 summer/winter season, as reported by Australian Business Traveller.

    The route is normally flown by an Airbus A330, and it seems Qantas wanted to upgrade capacity to the island destination.

    As we say goodbye to the 747 around the world, it reminds us of the golden days of aviation, of giant planes that were bigger than anything we had seen before, connecting cities across vast oceans and being a highlight for any first-time flyer.

    This author personally flew on this route back in 1994 and remembers with delight his tour to the cockpit aboard the Qantas 747. You will be missed!

    What do you think? Will you fly on the Qantas 747 one last time?
    Title: 🛬 A380 superjumbos are already being scrapped for parts just months after Airbu
    Post by: RE on May 17, 2019, 02:00:01 AM
    Let the scavenging begin!

    After they get all the still valuable parts off the behemoth, how do they get the rest of it to the Airplane Junkyard?  ???   :icon_scratch:

    RE

    https://www.businessinsider.com/airbus-a380-superjumbo-being-scrapped-for-parts-after-orders-dry-up-2019-5 (https://www.businessinsider.com/airbus-a380-superjumbo-being-scrapped-for-parts-after-orders-dry-up-2019-5)

    A380 superjumbos are already being scrapped for parts just months after Airbus announced their discontinuation

    (https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5cdada60021b4c4baf07d748-1536-1152.jpg)

    Marcin Walków and Ruqayyah Moynihan, Business Insider Polska

    Airbus A380 Airbus announced it would be terminating production of the A380 jet by 2021. Airbus

        According to Reuters, models of the A380— also known as the superjumbo and considered Airbus' flagship passenger carrier — are now being dismantled for parts.
        This move comes just months after Airbus announced they would be discontinuing the aircraft after orders dried up.
        Forbes columnist Michael Goldstein explained that the aircraft is not only costly itself but it's also expensive to run.
        Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    The A380, also known as the superjumbo and considered Airbus' flagship passenger carrier, has been in production since 2007.

    One of the most expensive and lavish jets ever made, the aircraft — originally designed to replace Boeing's 747 — is able to seat up to 800 passengers.

    According to Reuters, however, two models of the world's largest passenger carriers are now being broken down for their valuable components, just months after Airbus announced it would be terminating production of the jet by 2021.

    According to Reuters, the scrapping of the two of the planes started in December 2018, just halfway through their expected lifetime.

    The dismantling of the two double-deckers — which Singapore Airlines returned after using for 10 years — is already underway at the Tarbes Lourdes airport in southern France.

    235 of the passenger carriers have been manufactured and there are currently still 233 of them in use.

    Read more: The $446 million Airbus A380 is the largest and most expensive airliner in the world. Take a look inside.

    Air France also announced last November that it would be returning five of its A380s when their leases expire in 2021, according to Traveller.com.

    Images from social media outlets show engines being dismantled as well as one plane missing its nose cone, where the radar would usually sit. As well as this, doors to the passenger cabin and the hold have also been removed.
    The end of the superjumbo

    Unfortunately, the jet hasn't generated the interest Airbus had hoped it would — the company found that airlines willing to put the A380 into service are in short supply.

    According to Forbes columnist Michael Goldstein, the aircraft is not only pricey in itself but it's also costly to run: "In addition to demanding airport modifications for its huge passenger load and million-pound bulk, economics demand that it be flown full to pay its enormous hourly costs," he said in 2018.

    As well as being inefficient, for a lot of airlines the models are just too large for many routes to make a profit from.
    Emirates Airbus A380For a lot of airlines, the A380 models are just too large for many routes to make a profit from. Airbus

    According to News.com.au, airlines have the option either to buy planes outright or to lease them.

    While buying an A380 leaves airlines with the option of selling them to another airline farther down the line, it can cost anywhere between $300 million to $500 million.

    Leasing them, on the other hand, allows the plane to be taken back once one airline is finished with the plane, to be leased back out to another airline.

    Some airlines, however, are replacing A380 orders with other models from the Airbus range, predominantly the A350 and A33neo. Therein lies the problem — there are few airlines interested in taking on a discounted A380.

    Read more: Ryanair's CEO says we'll see 'pilot-less planes' in the next 40 to 50 years

    Until a few months ago, the number of orders for the aircraft had surpassed 310. As of April 30, 2019, the total number of orders for the A380 was just 290, including those that had already been delivered to airlines.

    This means that just over 50 of the aircraft have been ordered for production.

    However, since hundreds of A380s have already been manufactured and the planes have a lifespan of over 20 years, they won't be entirely disappearing from the skies for a while.
    Title: 🛬 'The Aircraft Lives On:’ How 747s Are Finding New Life in the Arizona Desert
    Post by: RE on June 03, 2019, 03:44:27 AM
    "Planes don’t come here to die, they come here so that other planes may live."

    hahahahahahahahahahahaha! 🤣

    RE

    https://airlinegeeks.com/2019/06/01/single-runway-arizona-airpark-houses-some-of-the-worlds-most-iconic-jets/

    ‘The Aircraft Lives On:’ How 747s Are Finding New Life in the Arizona Desert


    ‘The Aircraft Lives On:’ How 747s Are Finding New Life in the Arizona Desert

    a rare look inside one of the world's largest aircraft boneyards

    A row of 747s at Pinal Airpark (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O'Shea)
     

    The stretch of Interstate 10 between Phoenix and Tucson is filled with its fair share of oddities. Just about halfway between Arizona’s two largest cities lies a ranch where visitors can stop by to feed ostriches and stingrays — in the same visit — smack-dab in the middle of the desert. A bit further down the interstate, it isn’t uncommon to see a large group of practicing paratroopers.

    But, as your eyes gaze to look for anything but highway, you may notice a substantial amount of airliners parked just outside of Tucson — once again, right in the middle of a scorching desert.

    What you’re seeing isn’t Arizona’s newest international airport or a desert mirage, it’s Pinal Airpark. Located in Marana, Ariz., this small, single-runway airfield houses retired aircraft from around the world.

    It’s known as an aircraft boneyard. Though this is believed to be “where airplanes go to die,” as one blog wrote in a headline, it’s actually where the parts that make up the plane will get a second life. While true that a jet will be scrapped, stored, crushed, etc. at one of these facilities, the respective parts that allowed it to fly will live on and serve a key long-term purpose in the maintenance longevity of still-airworthy aircraft.

    A Boeing 747 sits as mechanics work to dismantle the jet (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O’Shea)

    Ascent Aviation Services, formerly known as Marana Aerospace Solutions, is the largest company on-site at the airpark. The company is responsible for working with air carriers to either store, repair or tear-down aircraft, operating facilities at Pinal Airpark and Tucson International Airport.

    While photos are not typically allowed on the property in Marana, Ascent Aviation Services provided AirlineGeeks a rare look at its facilities, including a firsthand look at the tear-down process.

    Tearing Down an Airplane

    Even though the verbiage may be similar, tearing down an airplane is much more complex than demolishing a building. Retired airplanes are filled with plenty of reusable high-dollar items, including avionics, exterior parts and seats. In some cases, it can take months to get an airplane to the “crush-pad,” where it’ll officially be torn apart after being disassembled.

    Mechanics here take their time combing through different parts of the jet to harvest any remaining items that can be re-certified. Any missed item of value can mean potentially lost revenue for the company and one less part for those aircraft still flying.

    The 747 frame is a common sight in Marana (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O’Shea)

    While the loss of an aircraft due to retirement is often a solemn affair for an airline, the mechanics in Marana see it as an opportunity. When a newly-retired airplane lands in Marana, the work begins. If the flight crew that brought the flight in is foreign-based, U.S. Customs will process them while Ascent teams are already working to dump the aircraft’s fuel tanks and lavatories as they will not be used again.

    According to Ascent, the way in which the aircraft is torn down depends mostly on the customer’s needs. Some carriers will leave the cabin mostly intact until they can find a new home, or trash receptacle, for the seats and paneling. Similarly, most airlines want to strip cockpit avionics from the flight deck as soon as possible since they can be easily reused and are of great value.

    The final clipping of its wings, as it were, the power plants are also removed from the aircraft, leaving only the engine struts fixed to the wing. These are some of the most expensive pieces of any aircraft, making them valuable reusable parts.

    Empty engine cells on a 747 frame (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O’Shea)

    “The aircraft lives on,” said Ken Parent while breaking down the reclamation process. Parent is in charge of the company’s reclamation division which works to tear-down an aircraft, re-certify its parts and return them to the customer to be used onboard other aircraft.

    A 737 flight deck stripped of its avionics (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O’Shea)

    This process, which can take anywhere from 30 to 45 days, is a sizable part of Ascent’s entire operation along with standard maintenance and long-term aircraft storage. During this process, it’s common to see airplanes in disarray with detached landing gear and mangled flight control surfaces, though what’s actually occurring is a carefully organized art-form.

    A Boeing 737 being dismantled at Pinal Airpark (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O’Shea)

    Teams of mechanics and workers from Ascent are removing parts one-by-one and logging them to be compliant with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Part 145 mandates. There is a fair amount of paperwork involved with this process, too. It isn’t as easy as taking one part and putting it on another airplane. Instead, each part is individually re-certified for further use in service.

    The dismantled wing of a 737-700 (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O’Shea)

    Once the to-be-reused parts have been removed from the airframe, there’s plenty of aluminum left over. Ascent contracts a recycling firm to remove the excess aluminum from the property after the ‘crush’ process takes place.

    A Common Sight…

    Among the array of metal parts and fuselages that sit throughout the property, there is a very specific theme. What can be seen at a boneyard, particularly in Marana, isn’t just mangled airplanes but, rather, a generational shift within the aviation sector.

    A 747’s rear landing gear (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O’Shea)

    Gone are the days when four-engine aircraft dominated the skies. Now, the industry is widely transitioning to twin-engine jets that prove to be far more efficient on many fronts. The boneyard is scattered with 747s that operated for airlines around the world. Each one tells a story about an industry that has changed immensely in recent years.

    The 747, affectionately referred to as the ‘Queen of the Skies’, is an iconic sight for just about anyone. The quad jet is likely the only aircraft that the everyday passenger can identify and there is no shortage of them within Ascent’s facilities.

    According to the company’s chief commercial officer, Scott Butler, there’s a reason for this vast array of 747s. Since the industry is largely shifting away from this specific design, there are only a few maintenance facilities that specialize in the model nowadays and Ascent is one of them.

    “Typically, in Marana, we have been known as 747 experts in maintenance,” Butler said.

    Crew work to dismantle a 747 at Ascent Aviation Services in Marana, Ariz. (Photo: AirlineGeeks | Connor O’Shea)

    As the world moves on from the so-called ‘golden days’ of aviation in which Boeing’s iconic jumbo jet reigned supreme, Ascent Aviation Services waits to receive them. The airpark’s 6,849-foot asphalt runway is a perfect landing spot for one final touchdown.

    A Desert Full of Stories

    When thinking about a desert landscape, airplanes don’t necessarily come to mind but the environment is extremely conducive to aircraft storage for the airframes themselves and their subsequent parts. Dry climates have less salt in the air meaning that erosion is minimal at best.

    Ascent’s facility encapsulates different times within the airline industry and bears witness to some of the world’s most iconic aircraft. The small airpark in Marana, Ariz. houses tails from around the world — a representation of sorts for the sheer globalization of the airline industry.

    A piece of a 737 fuselage in Marana, Ariz. (Photo: Ascent Aviation Services)

    Even though the airplanes that rest at Pinal Airpark may be considered old and sometimes drab by some, their key parts will live on, furthering industry sustainability. Ascent Aviation Services and other similar companies play a lesser-known, yet critical role in the overall safety and efficiency of the global aviation sector.

    Contrary to popular belief, a so-called airplane boneyard isn’t necessarily a giant soda can production plant. While an aircraft fuselage’s aluminum is recycled, many of the parts live on to serve air carriers for years to come. And though it’s true that aircraft are more than just the sum of their parts, the parts still hold their own value.

    Planes don’t come here to die, they come here so that other planes may live.

    Title: 🛬 Pilots Criticize Boeing, Saying 737 MAX 'Should Never Have Been Approved'
    Post by: RE on June 20, 2019, 01:48:42 AM
    https://www.npr.org/2019/06/19/734248714/pilots-criticize-boeing-saying-737-max-should-never-have-been-approved (https://www.npr.org/2019/06/19/734248714/pilots-criticize-boeing-saying-737-max-should-never-have-been-approved)

    Pilots Criticize Boeing, Saying 737 MAX 'Should Never Have Been Approved'

    June 19, 201911:45 PM ET

    David Schaper

    (https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2019/06/19/ap_19170563212434-sully-boeing-82edc14ad88308d1be4e06f32a5ed8baab3dcdfe-s800-c85.jpg)
    Captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, accompanied by other pilots and former FAA administrator Randy Babbitt, speaks during a House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX on Capitol Hill in Washington.   Andrew Harnik/AP

    One of the nation's best known airline pilots is speaking out on the problems with Boeing's 737 MAX jetliner. Retired Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday that an automated flight control system on the 737 MAX "was fatally flawed and should never have been approved."

    Sullenberger, who safely landed a damaged US Airways jet on the Hudson River in New York in 2009 after a bird strike disabled the engines, says he understands how the pilots of two 737 Max planes that recently crashed would have been confused as they struggled to maintain control of the aircraft, as an automated system erroneously began forcing the planes into nose dives.

    "I can tell you first hand that the startle factor is real and it's huge. It absolutely interferes with one's ability to quickly analyze the crisis and take corrective action," he said.

    The House Aviation Subcommittee is investigating the crashes of Boeing 737 Max jets in Indonesia last fall and in Ethiopia in March that killed a total of 346 people. The panel is also examining what role, if any, Boeing's rush to develop the latest version of it's popular 737 and the FAA's process of certifying the new model as airworthy may have played in the tragedies.
    Sign Up For The NPR Daily Newsletter

    Catch up on the latest headlines and unique NPR stories, sent every weekday.
    E-mail address

    By subscribing, you agree to NPR's terms of use and privacy policy.
    This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

    The planes remain out of service as aviation authorities around the world grounded the planes shortly after the second crash. The three U.S. airlines that flew the MAX —Southwest, American and United— have canceled thousands of flights as they have pulled MAX planes from their schedules through the busy summer months.

    Boeing says it has now completed a software fix for the automated system called MCAS, which investigators say appears to be at least partly to blame in the crashes.

    "These crashes are demonstrable evidence that our current system of aircraft design and certification failed us," Sullenberger told lawmakers. "The accidents should never have happened."

    Daniel Carey, president of the Allied Pilots Association, which represents pilots at American Airlines, noted Boeing's strong safety record generally, but he criticized the aerospace giant for making "many mistakes" in order to reduce costs, while still developing the MAX plane so that it would feel as much like the previous version of the 737.

    "Boeing designs and engineers and manufacturers superb aircraft," Carey testified. "Unfortunately in the case of the MAX, I'll have to agree with the Boeing CEO, they let the traveling public down in a fatal and catastrophic way."

    Carey told the committee that the MCAS flight control system, which was designed to prevent an aerodynamic stall, was flawed in that it had a single point of failure without redundancies. In the case of both the Lion Air flight in Indonesia and the Ethiopian Airlines plane, a single angle of attack sensor provided faulty data to the system, so the MCAS forcefully and repeatedly pointed the nose of the plane down when it shouldn't have.

    "A huge error of omission was the fact that Boeing failed to disclose the existence of the MCAS system to the pilot community around the world," Carey said. "The final fatal mistake was therefore the absence of robust pilot training in the event of an MCAS failure."

    Carey says Boeing's failures have created a "crisis of trust" between the airplane maker and pilots.

    As Boeing prepares to submit it's software fix for the MCAS system to the FAA for the agency to conduct test flights and ultimately re-certify the plane, which could happen within the next couple of weeks, both Carey and Sullenberger called for more robust pilot training as part of the plan for allowing 737 MAX jets to fly passengers again, including experiencing an MCAS system failure while training on a simulator.

    Boeing has suggested such training could be accomplished with a one hour session on a laptop or tablet device. Simulator training was not required for pilots transitioning from the previous "Next Generation" version of the 737 to the MAX.

    Sullenberger says he recently experienced scenarios similar to those facing the pilots of the doomed Ethiopian and Lion Air jetliners in a simulator, and says he understands the difficulties they had trying to maintain control of the planes. "Even knowing what was going to happen, I could see how crews could have run out of time and altitude before they could have solved the problems," he said.

    "We should all want pilots to experience these challenging situations for the first time in a simulator, not in flight with passengers and crew on board," Sullenberger told lawmakers, adding "reading about it on an iPad is not even close to sufficient. Pilots must experience it physically, firsthand."

    But there are few 737 MAX simulators in existence, and providing such training for thousands of pilots around the world would be costly and logistically problematic.

    He and Carey dismissed suggestions that the crashes could not have happened in the U.S., where pilots are required to have a lot of experience and more rigorous training before flying commercial airliners.

    "Some (U.S.) crews would have recognized it in time to recover, but some would not have," Carey testified. Sullenberger agreed, saying it's unlikely that more experienced pilots would have had different outcomes, adding, "we shouldn't have to expect pilots to compensate for flawed designs."

    "These two recent crashes happened in foreign countries," said Sullenberger. "But if we do not address all the important issues and factors, they can and will happen here."
    Title: 🛬 Electric Planes, Flying Taxis, Supersonic Jets
    Post by: RE on June 22, 2019, 12:45:25 PM
    Some very cool technology here.  It's too bad we won't see most of it come to fruition.  A few Billionaires might have some of these things for toys, other than that I highly doubt you will ever be catching a Self-Flying"Air Taxi" to work to avoid the traffic.  ::)

    RE

    http://fortune.com/2019/06/22/2019-paris-air-show-tech/ (http://fortune.com/2019/06/22/2019-paris-air-show-tech/)

    Electric Planes, Flying Taxis, Supersonic Jets: Paris Air Show Gives Us a Peek at the Future of Flight

     
    A computer-generated image of the Boom Supersonic XB1 leaving its hangar. The XB1 featured at the Paris Air Show this week.
    A computer-generated image of the Boom Supersonic XB1 leaving its hangar. The XB1 featured at the Paris Air Show this week.
    Nathan Leach-Proffer Nathan Leach-Proffer [url=http://www.speed-photos.com]www.speed-photos.com[/url]
    By Phil Boucher
    6:30 AM EDT

    The rivalry between Airbus and Boeing may have grabbed most attention at the 2019 Paris Air Show this week, but it was new technology that dominated behind the scenes.

    Aviation currently accounts for around 2.5% of global carbon emissions and with the industry has pledged to halve its 2005-level footprint by 2050 through an offsetting program. Therefore engineering firms were keen to showcase a range of eco-friendly inventions such as hybrid engines, urban mobility vehicles, and autonomous flight systems at the annual event, the largest for the aerospace industry.

    “The Paris Air Show is an exhibition essentially oriented towards the future, which it helps to shape. This is why innovation is one of the main themes of this 53rd edition,” said the Paris organizers.

    It’s not just environmental considerations driving the research: UBS estimates sales of hybrid engines will be worth $178 billion by 2040, while the electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) market will be a $285 billion business by 2030.

    For these reasons, major players such as Airbus, Boeing, Bell, and Embraer are hooking up with tech firms such as Intel, Amazon, and Siemens to explore new possibilities, with much of the focus being directed at hybrid engines that provide an electric boost during take-off and climb. Should the engineers crack hybrid propulsion, then airlines can hope for a 30% fuel saving, making air travel cheaper and more eco-friendly for everyone.

    “We’ve got to make aviation grow and be sustainable,” Rolls-Royce CTO Paul Stein told reporters in Paris, where the British engineering giant announced its takeover of Siemens’ electric aerospace division.

    “The consumer is probably going to demand an acceleration in this space,” added Celine Fornaro, head of industrials research at UBS. “It’s starting to be more present in everyone’s conscience.”

    Here is a brief sampling of the key civilian technology displayed at the Paris Air Show:

    The Eviation Alice, an electric plane

    Billed as the world’s first full-sized, all-electric aircraft, the Israeli-made Alice is designed to fly up to 650 miles at a cruising speed of 240 knots (276 mph) while producing zero emissions, potentially making it the world’s most eco-friendly city-hopper. Eviation Aircraft also claims it will have 70% fewer running costs than conventional jets, thanks to a propulsion system that relies on three electric motors and a 3,500kg battery.

    The Eviation Alice on display at the Paris Air Show.
    The Eviation Alice on display at the Paris Air Show.
    (Photo by Jean-Marie Liot for Eviation Aircraft)

    “This aircraft is not some future maybe. It is there, ready and waiting,” Eviation CEO, Omer Bar-Yohay, told reporters in Paris, before explaining that the aircraft will be test flighted in Arizona later this year. If all goes well, the Alice will be submitted for Federal Aviation Administration certification in 2020, with manufacturing beginning in the U.S. by 2021. Deliveries of the $4 million eco-plane are scheduled to start in 2022, with U.S. regional airline Cape Air already signed up to buy 92 models.

    United Technologies’ Project 804, a hybrid-electric add-on

    The auto industry has made electric and hybrid-electric transport a reality on the ground. Now, United Technologies wants to take it to the skies, through “Project 804,” which adds new battery technology and a 2-megawatt hybrid-electric propulsion system to an existing aircraft.

    A graphic representation of the Project 804 hybrid propulsion system. (Photo c
    A graphic representation of the Project 804 hybrid propulsion system. (Photo c
    ourtesy of United Technologies)

    “We’re basically taking a commuter regional turboprop airplane and we’re making it such that during take-off and climb, about half the energy is supplied electrically and about half of the supply is maintained by the engine,” United Technologies Chief Technology Officer Paul Eremenko told CNBC in Paris. If successful, UT believes Project 804 will reduce fuel costs on a typical one-hour flight by 30% and significantly lower carbon emissions. The firm aims to have a demonstration aircraft flying by 2022.

    The Airbus Vahan, a flying taxi

    Airbus describes its skunkworks Project Vahana as an “electric, self-piloted vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) passenger aircraft.” To everyone else, however, it will always be known as a “flying taxi”.

    The Airbus Vahana on display at the Paris Air Show
    The Airbus Vahana on display at the Paris Air Show
    Airbus

    The 8-engined Vahana first flew in the U.S. in January 2018, and in May 2019 proved it’s tandem tilt-wing can ably transition from vertical take-off to forward flight. With an estimated range of 31 miles and cruise speed is 100 knots (115mph), Airbus estimates the Vahana is up to four times faster than traveling by car. Being all-electric, it’s also far more environmentally-friendly.

    The Vahana might not appeal to nervous fliers: It’s a single-seater and entirely self-piloted, so there’s no pilot pulling a joystick or flight attendant bringing food—or booze. Instead, it relies on a series of highly-sophisticated detect-and-avoid systems to sidestep any birds, drones, or other flight hazards that happen to cross its path. You needn’t lose any sleep though: Airbus—which is also developing a second electric flier called the CityAirbus—doesn’t plan to put the Vahana into production; it is purely an experimental vehicle that Airbus is using to develop its technology.

    Boom Supersonic’s XB-1 and Overture, super-fast jets

    Colorado-based Boom Supersonic (Boom) used Paris to showcase the engineering milestones in the creation of its two-seat supersonic jet, the XB-1, a plane it hopes will lay the foundations for the creation of a supersonic passenger jet called Overture. Thanks to the use of composite materials and new engine technology, Boom believes the Overture will be the fastest, cleanest and cheapest supersonic passenger aircraft in history—although that’s not to say it’s going to be exactly eco-friendly.

    A computer-generated image of the Boom Supersonic 'Overtune' in flight. (Photo courtesy of
    A computer-generated image of the Boom Supersonic 'Overtune' in flight. (Photo courtesy of
    Boom Supersonic)

    “Today, we have the advanced technology to realize faster air travel, and our teams have been working tirelessly over the past few years to build the first civil supersonic plane since Concorde,” Blake Scholl, CEO of Boom told reporters in Paris.

    Boom—which has a strategic partnership with Japan Airlines (JAL)—aims to roll out the XB-1 in December 2019, with supersonic flight planned for 2020. According to the FAA, it is one of four commercial firms seeking to certify supersonic passenger jets in the U.S. To encourage the development of the aircraft, the FAA is altering testing rules to allow for supersonic flight. The agency is working to “enable the return of civil supersonic travel while ensuring the environmental impacts are understood and properly addressed,” Acting FAA Administrator Dan Elwell said in Paris on Monday.

    Title: 🛬 No Joke: Bamboo Airways Has United States Airbus A380 Plans
    Post by: RE on June 29, 2019, 12:00:28 PM
    BAMBOO Airways!  LD should love this set of conflicting paradigms & cognitive dissonance!  ::)

    RE

    No Joke: Bamboo Airways Has United States Airbus A380 Plans

        by Tom Boon
        June 28, 2019

    This week’s bizarre aviation news story sees Bamboo Airways planning to use an Airbus A380 for flights to the US. The Vietnamese startup carrier finally commenced flights earlier this year.

    (https://onemileatatime.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Bamboo-Airways-787.jpg)
    Bamboo Airways reportedly wants to start Airbus A380 flights to the United States.

    Bamboo Airways has become a Simple Flying favourite for its determination to overcome every obstacle in its way. Now, the airline appears to be looking to take things to the next level. Indeed, for a while, we have known that the Vietnamese carrier has planned to fly to the United States of America. However, now One Mile At A Time reports that the company is looking to use the Airbus A380 according to the Financial Times.
    Bamboo Airway’s background

    Bamboo Airways commenced services in January earlier this year. The airline was started up by the FLC group, a Vietnamese company which owns a portfolio of holiday destinations in Vietnam. The primary purpose of Bamboo Airways is to connect passengers to FLC group resorts.

    Bamboo had originally been eyeing commencing services in October, however, a delay in getting a business license put this off. The start date was then pushed to December, however, this was also missed because the airline was waiting on its Air Operators Certificate. On January 16th, the airline finally took flight operating from Ho Chi Minh City to Hanoi.
    Bamboo Airways Airbus A380 US Flights
    Could Bamboo Airways wet-lease HiFly’s Airbus A380? Photo: Hifly
    US flights

    From the beginning, the carrier has been very vocal about wishing to commence flights to the United States. Bamboo’s future route map shows that it wishes to fly to San Francisco in addition to another mystery destination. Simple Flying previously speculated that this could be Las Vegas or Denver.

    Launching flights to the US shouldn’t be too trivial, as earlier this year Vietnam received a Category One safety rating from the FAA. Indeed, Bamboo Airways is currently in the process of acquiring the relevant permissions from the Federal Aviation Administration. It was previously believed that Bamboo would launch US flights with their 20 Boeing 787 aircraft on order.
    What about the A380?

    Several outlets have reported that Bamboo Airways’ CEO told the Financial Times that they wish to launch flights to the United States in the first quarter of 2020. This is based on the assumption that they will receive FAA approval by the end of this year.
    Bamboo Airways Airbus A380 US Flights
    What a Bamboo Airways Airbus A380 could look like. Image: Simple Flying

    Reports suggest that the Vietnamese airline would use a leased Airbus A380. There is currently only one Airbus A380 on the market available to wet-lease, however, with other airlines looking to ditch the plane, some could become available on the second-hand market. Indeed, this is something which Airbus told Simple Flying in March that they were actively trying to support.

    It is currently unknown which avenue Bamboo Airways would pursue to acquire an Airbus A380. While I personally don’t think that it would be the best aircraft for Bamboo Airways’ mission, I’d certainly love to see their livery on the Airbus A380.
    Title: 🛬 Why The US Airlines Retired Their Boeing 747s
    Post by: RE on July 14, 2019, 04:26:21 PM
    The Canary in the Coal Mine for the End of the Beginning of the End of the Age of Oil and Industrial Civilization.

    (https://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-now-this-is-not-the-end-it-is-not-even-the-beginning-of-the-end-but-it-is-perhaps-the-winston-churchill-5-62-99.jpg)

    RE

    https://simpleflying.com/us-airlines-747-retirements/ (https://simpleflying.com/us-airlines-747-retirements/)

    Why The US Airlines Retired Their Boeing 747s

        by Chris Loh
        July 13, 2019

    (https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/56ba790a6e97c686008b6279-750-562.jpg)
    Boeing 747 First Test Flight 1969
    On February 9, 1969, the Boeing 747-100 jumbo jet took to the sky for the very first time.


    In November 2017, United Airlines flew their last flight using a Boeing 747. Just a month later, the final commercial flight of a Delta Air Lines 747 arrived from Seoul as flight 158. It later embarked on a farewell tour, stopping in Atlanta, Minneapolis, and Los Angeles according to Quartz. With a few major airlines still operating the Boeing 747, why were US Airlines among the first to retire their “Queen of the Skies”?
    Delta’s last commercial 747 flight was in December 2017. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

    While major international carriers like British Airways, Lufthansa, and Korean Air are still operating their jumbo jets for passenger flights, you won’t find any US Airlines operating the “Queen of the Skies”. There are a few reasons why this is the case.
    It’s all about age

    When it comes to aircraft, the phrase “age ain’t nothing but a number” doesn’t really apply. The older an aircraft gets, the more costly it becomes to operate.

    Firstly, as technology develops, newer aircraft of similar size and range achieve higher rates of fuel efficiency. According to Investopedia, fuel accounts for 10-12% of operating expenses.
    United’s last flight was November 2017. Photo: Flickr user Bill Abbott

    Secondly, the older an aircraft becomes, the more maintenance it requires. Not only is the actual labor more costly, but time an aircraft is on the ground undergoing maintenance is a time the aircraft is not earning money. This is a significant factor when it comes to the commercial aviation industry and the razor-thin profit margins that airlines have to fight for.

    Finally for the issue of age, when the above two factors combine with an old, tired, and outdated interior, there are enough economical reasons to replace it with a newer aircraft. You’d eventually start losing passengers who prefer to have USB charging ports and touch screens that don’t require excessive force to respond (apologies to the passenger sleeping in the seat in front!).
    According to the Denver Post, American Airlines hasn’t flown a 747 since the late 1990s. Photo: Flickr user Dean Morley
    The triple seven

    All US airlines have now moved to the more fuel-efficient, twin-engine, wide-body Boeing 777.  In fact, the 777 can fly just as far but its operating and maintenance costs are far less. Furthermore, the Boeing 777-200LR is capable of connecting virtually any two cities in the world.

    According to The Denver Post, the 777-300ER (extended range) can carry roughly the same number of passengers as the 747-400 while burning 100,000lb less fuel. Therefore, if 100,000lb of fuel equates to 15,000 gallons and the current price (according to IndexMundi) is $1.87 per gallon, then we are looking at a fuel savings of roughly $28,000. Pair that with the amount of flying these long-haul jets do and the reduction in maintenance and that’s a pretty strong case for a newer aircraft.
    What about the other airlines?

    Looking at numbers at Airfleets.net, it appears that it’s a “first in, first out” scenario. The US Airlines were some of the first to receive their Boeing 747-400s and therefore were among the first to retire them and adopt the 777 as a replacement.

    This seems to be the case for airlines like British Airways and Korean Airlines, which took their oldest 747s in the mid-90s rather than the early 90s. The one exception is KLM – which still seem to be operating their 747s that were made as far back as 1990 (a sign of good maintenance perhaps?). However, even KLM will retire its 747s by 2021.

    And then, of course, there are the newer 747s; The 747-8. Lufthansa and Korean Air opted to continue the 747 legacy by purchasing these newer variants for their passenger services. According to Boeing, the 747-8 reduces carbon emissions by 16% versus the 747-400.
    Lufthansa has a fleet of 19 747-8i aircraft. Photo: Flickr user xingxiyang
    Conclusion

    In the end, it’s all about operating economics and fuel efficiency. Lower operating costs lead to lower airfares or the ability to spend those savings on other important aspects of the product- all of this attracts more passengers.

    It seems like aircraft with four engines just don’t have a place in this competitive space. Are you disappointed that the US carriers chose not to take the newer 747? Let us know by leaving a comment!