Doomstead Diner Menu => Doomsteading => Seasteading => Topic started by: Eddie on January 14, 2018, 05:13:14 PM

Title: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 14, 2018, 05:13:14 PM
I can't find the old thread.

I don''t know why I love these huge old William Garden designed boats so much...maybe because my partner likes the huge salons and the views from the huge pilothouses. But I like big boats too. Harder to sail and especially hard to maneuver in tight quarters....but comfie. Very comfie.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/4/40/5660440_20160303090319807_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/4/40/5660440_20160303090319807_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=600&h=449&t=1457000556000)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 14, 2018, 07:07:00 PM
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/4/40/5660440_20160303090319807_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/4/40/5660440_20160303090319807_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=600&h=449&t=1457000556000)
I can't find the old thread.

I don''t know why I love these huge old William Garden designed boats so much...maybe because my partner likes the huge salons and the views from the huge pilothouses. But I like big boats too. Harder to sail and especially hard to maneuver in tight quarters....but comfie. Very comfie.


That's one of the nicest so far.   :icon_sunny:  I like the big Pilot Houses also.  Who wants to stand out in cold rain manning the tiller if you don't have to? ???  :icon_scratch:

Even in good shape I wouldn't want to sail a boat that size solo though.  Minimum one crew, better 2. Preferably female crew with nice TITS!  :icon_sunny: Maintenance costs also expensive.  However, if you run into one ON SALE for say $50K, I'm IN for half!  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 14, 2018, 09:32:36 PM
Forgot the link. The broker has two that look pretty good. These were poorly built boats...looks like these two have had someone's life savings poured into them, to still look this good at this age.

http://www.yachtworld.com/seakistyachtsales/ (http://www.yachtworld.com/seakistyachtsales/)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 14, 2018, 10:06:34 PM
Forgot the link. The broker has two that look pretty good. These were poorly built boats...looks like these two have had someone's life savings poured into them, to still look this good at this age.

http://www.yachtworld.com/seakistyachtsales/ (http://www.yachtworld.com/seakistyachtsales/)

$99.5K is a bit pricy right now.  I'll need to wait for Amazon to buy Kohls for that one.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 15, 2018, 03:26:59 AM
Given my physical limitations, I don't want to ignore the power boats here.  I know they won't run once you can't get diesel and they are polluters, but I would probably sail/drive it even less than my carz.

There are a lot of variants on these, but this restored Tugboat from 1897   :o is a real winner!

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101031123423_2_0.jpg?f=/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101031123423_2_0.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1403905482000)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101031123423_3_0.jpg?f=/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101031123423_3_0.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1403905482000)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101102151400_1_0.jpg?f=/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101102151400_1_0.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1403905482000)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101102151400_4_0.jpg?f=/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101102151400_4_0.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1403905482000)

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1897/Tacoma-Tugboat-Classic-Tug-2737240/Newport/RI/United-States#.WlyNYjeUuUk (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1897/Tacoma-Tugboat-Classic-Tug-2737240/Newport/RI/United-States#.WlyNYjeUuUk)

Asking $163K though, so currently out of budget.  :(

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 15, 2018, 08:48:16 AM
My old sailing buddy sold his big sailboat and bought a trawler. It was a good decision for him. It makes things easier, but you still have docking to think about...and fuel costs are high, but for a single engine small diesel not too bad as of yet. Tied up in the marina, not that much difference in the lifestyle...and that's where most boats reside most of the time, or on a mooring somewhere.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 15, 2018, 11:47:48 AM
My old sailing buddy sold his big sailboat and bought a trawler. It was a good decision for him. It makes things easier, but you still have docking to think about...and fuel costs are high, but for a single engine small diesel not too bad as of yet. Tied up in the marina, not that much difference in the lifestyle...and that's where most boats reside most of the time, or on a mooring somewhere.

Not worried about the cost of Diesel.  It would be like SaVANnah.  I filled her up at the beginning of winter and the needle is still on full.  I drove her once in Dec just to give her some exercise when the roads were clear of snow and ice.   I use my Explorer all winter because it has 4WD.  SaVANnah stays parked under the carport plugged in to keep the batt topped off and keep the snow off. The Tug would stay parked in the Marina except when Diners came for convocations, then I would have everyone chip in for fuel to go cruising and fishing.  Besides cooking, I could Pilot the boat so I would feel useful.  At the top of that tower, I would feel like King of the Seven Seas!  :icon_sunny:  I would have bow thrusters installed to improve maneuverability in docking.  The best in electronics and navigation, sonar, radar, gps, HAM radio, the WORKS!  My office and the Diner Command & Control center would also be up in the Pilot House.

Marina cost, no different than a sailboat of the same length.  At 62' relatively expensive, but still probably not much more than I pay in rent.  Plus, look at the size of that transom!  What a Back Porch!  :o  Plus no standing rigging or boom in the way to set up a Gazebo or large 10 person tent for lots of Diners if all the berths inside are full up.  What a Party Boat!  ;D

However, at $160K not happening unless Kohl's does a Bitcoin, which is unlikely.  :(  I can still dream though, and use my imagination.  :icon_sunny:

(https://img00.deviantart.net/ede7/i/2017/024/a/4/imagination_by_akiraalion-dawk529.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 15, 2018, 02:21:47 PM
A 62' gin palace, tied up in the marina all the time.  And when the time comes for making  a run for the South Pacific, it is limited to its current tank of fuel, probably less than 100  nautical miles. No hand holds anywhere, on deck or below, but a really neat hexagonal shade house on half of the deck.

But think of the opportunities for spending more money on useless crap!

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101031123423_3_0.jpg?f=/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101031123423_3_0.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1403905482000)

(http://dicknewickboats.com/cheers/cheers_mrb.jpg)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 15, 2018, 04:12:36 PM
Palloy is more of a Blondie Hassler type. I'm sure he will recognize this vessel. This is as minimalist as it gets.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_oVZqV2SAiRY/SQkguh6cl_I/AAAAAAAAAjE/cFQMF7rGPKs/s400/-JAC08Start4.jpg-)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 15, 2018, 04:39:05 PM
A 62' gin palace, tied up in the marina all the time.  And when the time comes for making  a run for the South Pacific, it is limited to its current tank of fuel, probably less than 100  nautical miles. No hand holds anywhere, on deck or below, but a really neat hexagonal shade house on half of the deck.

Obviously, with this type of boat I'm not making a FINAL RUN for the South Pacific.

However, if I had it parked in my Fantasy Marina location in Bar Harbor, Maine, I could make a run for a secluded cove on one of the many islands dotting the coastline there.  I could get my chosen Bugout Location all prepped up with buried caches of food, seeds, etc.

Besides, I am buying the thing (if I actually had enough money for that, which I don't and still have a good reserve) as a nice place to LIVE before SHTF Day arrives!  Even YOU don't live on a shrimpy 20' cat, you have a McHovel in the tropical rainforest, complete with electricity, running water and the occassional sneaky Python who wants to share the place with you.

Besides all that, WTF is wrong with a Gin Palace? ???  :icon_scratch:

RE
Title: Seastead of the Day: NEW Seasteading SHTF Day Bugout Plan!
Post by: RE on January 16, 2018, 07:49:18 AM
I have developed a NEW SHTF Day Bugout Plan around the Tug and the chosen location of Bar Harbor Maine as residence until SHTF Day arrives.

The plan incorporates 2 boats, the 62' Tug and a 24' Folding Trimaran.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101031123423_3_0.jpg?f=/1/68/91/3016891_0_20101031123423_3_0.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1403905482000)  (https://cdn.app.compendium.com/uploads/user/d4b151ee-0c79-48bc-9f47-31b38f1ac7c9/f27dc416-5f73-43d3-b004-7af5f5853cfb/Image/b1fc32e54030decbbbf2dde15d86ca4c/corsair_760_24__trimaran_folding.jpg)

The Tug is the main domicile in the Bar Harbor Marina.  The trimaran is kept safely and cheaply in a storage facility stocked with preps.  It can be ramp launched though for fun day sailing until SHTF Day arrives.  It's a trailerable boat.

Here is the chart for the overall neighborhood around Bar Harbor, including Swans Island which is the Bugout Location for SHTF Day.

Swans Island 4
Swans Island 4

The red circles on Swans Island are where Preps are buried for SHTF Day.  Here is a closeup view of Swans Island

Swans Island 2
Swans Island 2

As of the 2010 Census, Swans Island had a population of 332 people.  Only accessible to the general public by ferry, which won't be running after SHTF Day arrives.  You'll need a boat of some type to get there.

When SHTF Day comes, you pull the Trimaran out of the storage facility and launch at the Marina.  The Tug pulls the trimaran to your Swans Island Doomstead location  It's only around 10 NM, it won't use much Diesel.  You set up your Doomstead location with the tools and materials you have in the buried caches.

The Trimaran is used to commute to the mainland and conserve diesel for the Tug.  If you run into diesel you can barter for, you have a couple of 10 Gal Jerry Cans to bring it back to Swans Island, and a couple of 55 Gal drums besides the tanks on the Tug to store diesel in.  Your barter goods are fish and lobsters mainly, until you get your Greenhouses and Hydroponics set up to barter veggies with.  This will take a while as you will need to scavenge glass from abandoned McMansions and ship it back to Swans Island.

Electric power is supplied by Solar PV and Wind Turbines (plenty of wind there!).  Batts are scavenged automotive batteries.  Plenty of wood available for heat and charcoal gasification.  Water mainly supplied by rainwater catchment, although there is fresh groundwater available also.  You also have your on board desalinator on the Tug, run by solar PV panels.

I think this is my best plan yet that allows you to remain part of BAU until SHTF Day arrives, but also allows you to quickly exit to a *relatively* safe location to ride out the Zombie years.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on January 16, 2018, 08:51:42 AM
Charcoal gasification... Nice touch.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 16, 2018, 09:33:30 AM
I think the best vessel for a SHTF plan would an upgraded cruising liveaboard sailboat with a later model replacement diesel and huge tanks for motoring if that's needed. It isn't uncommon to see boats that are good for 2 thousand nautical miles ( 5 knots/hr @ 1 gallon/hr burn rate X 400 gallon tanks).  You wouldn't have to use diesel much, hopefully, so it could be conserved.

I'd want most of my preps onboard and not at the mercy of 332 island zombies.

Size of boat is debatable. Bigger boat holds more stuff, but are hard to single hand. Two good sailors can handle a properly rigged sailboat of 50 ft in good weather, but in a gale I'd prefer a 36 footer, or even an old Westsail 32. Those are one of the most seaworthy production boats ever built. There are documented cases of sailors who abandoned ship in bad storms, and the boats turning up thousands of miles away months later. Tough little bastards.

I remember reading about the the guy who did that. He said the thing he wished for in that Force 10 gale most of all was a helmet to protect his head as he got thrown around inside the cabin as the ocean tried to smash his little craft to bits.

Might have been this book. It's been a long time.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51nz2E08UOL.jpg)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 16, 2018, 11:24:44 AM
I still say this is the best deal on a cruising boat in the entire country. Too bad it's on the other side of the Panama Canal from me, and lying in an expensive Cali marina. It appears to have everything I want except some better electronics. One of the nicest owner built boats I've ever seen, and for sale at 25% (or less) of its cost to build.

I'm sure there would be some issues related to minor things. The boat appears to have never been sailed much at all. Nearly new, and rigged with all the best stuff. Not a fan of in-mast furling, but it makes it easier if the equipment functions properly.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/67/51/6146751_20170305105216440_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/67/51/6146751_20170305105216440_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1488712218000)

The designer of the hull was John Samson, not "Sampson" as the ad states. He was the best of the ferrocement designer/builders and many of his boats are still afloat.

https://sites.google.com/site/johnsamsonmemorium/Home/samson-marine-and-cruising (https://sites.google.com/site/johnsamsonmemorium/Home/samson-marine-and-cruising)

Probably good for at least 800 miles under power with 200 gallon tanks and the Lehman tractor engine, even though the boat is huge.



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 16, 2018, 11:32:49 AM
That one or this junk, which also appears to still be for sale in Guatemala.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/25/47/3682547_3_20110729094916_0_0.jpg?f=/1/25/47/3682547_3_20110729094916_0_0.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1311936558000)
http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1977/Colvin-steel-adapted-chinese-junk-2379967/Rio-Dulce/Guatemala#.Wl5S3ZM-cWo (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1977/Colvin-steel-adapted-chinese-junk-2379967/Rio-Dulce/Guatemala#.Wl5S3ZM-cWo)


I emailed the broker about the two big Formosas, and he emailed me back. Not that hard to buy a US registered boat in Guatemala. No local taxes, and there are outfits (sort of like a title company for real estate) that handle the funds escrow and title transfer. I am going to continue to investigate Rio Dulce, which wouldn't be the worst place to keep a boat, in terms of cost. It would be a convenient jumping off place for a SHTF scenario, and worst case I could drive there from here as long as fuel is available.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 16, 2018, 11:38:31 AM
I think the best vessel for a SHTF plan would an upgraded cruising liveaboard sailboat with a later model replacement diesel and huge tanks for motoring if that's needed. It isn't uncommon to see boats that are good for 2 thousand nautical miles ( 5 knots/hr @ 1 gallon/hr burn rate X 400 gallon tanks).  You wouldn't have to use diesel much, hopefully, so it could be conserved.

The type of boat you are decribing is a Motorsailer.  They are slow under sail and don't sail well to windward, but they have HUGE tanks and big ass diesel engines and can motor all the way across the Atlantic if necessary.  Very roomy with lots of space to store preps.  You could easily substitute this type of boat for the Tug in my SHTF Bugout Plan.

(https://www.alphayachting.com/images/upload/YachtsSale256/201252313735_1.jpg)

However, my plan doesn't include doing any trans-atlantic crossings.  You have to have a place to bugout TO and be able to get it ready for SHTF Day.  That's why I picked this location in Maine.  I could easily make regular trips before SHTF Day getting the area ready, even planting some trees that bear fruit.  The sail capability isn't necessary for this, and you don't have all the standing rigging and boom in the way.  All that is also extra maintenance cost as well.

Quote
I'd want most of my preps onboard and not at the mercy of 332 island zombies.

The reason I chose Swans Island is BECAUSE there are 332 people living there.  There are plenty of uninhabited islands in the neighborhood also you could set up shop.  However, as we have discussed, for long term survival you need a COMMUNITY.   In a small community like this, everyone knows each other, they're going to pull together when SHTF Day arrives.  They likely all have boats and fish at least recreationally, plus they stock up on food as a matter of course.  Everyone who lives in remote places does this.  So they shouldn't be starving right off the bat.

I would be making regular trips to the island, so I would get to know the locals and wouldn't be a stranger.  I would share my preps when SHTF day comes, which also would get me brownie points.  Then we all set about making the island suitable for some food growing as well as fishing.  Eating just fish all the time gets old.

Quote
Size of boat is debatable. Bigger boat holds more stuff, but are hard to single hand. Two good sailors can handle a properly rigged sailboat of 50 ft in good weather, but in a gale I'd prefer a 36 footer, or even an old Westsail 32.

Again, my plan doesn't involve any Blue Water crossings, and I don't envision sailing in any Force 10 Gales.  The boats stay chained to a really big ass mooring with heavy chain when it gets too windy.

The small trimaran provides all the sailing capability needed to shuttle back and forth to the mainland for trade purposes and not use up diesel.  I probably would not risk this trip for the first year or even two, but after that the population should have decreased enough there wouldn't be so much danger of being attacked by roving bands of Zombies when you arrive.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 16, 2018, 11:51:22 AM
I am going to continue to investigate Rio Dulce, which wouldn't be the worst place to keep a boat, in terms of cost. It would be a convenient jumping off place for a SHTF scenario, and worst case I could drive there from here as long as fuel is available.

Somehow when SHTF Day arrives, I doubt you would be able to drive to Guatemala.  Borders would be locked up tighter than a Catholic School Virgin, and gas availability for you car would be nil.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 16, 2018, 11:54:25 AM
The only production boats that come with huge tankage are motorsailors (that much is true) , but neither boat I just posted is a motorsailor, and both still have excellent range under power.

The junk even has your bow thruster. It has 600 gallons of fuel tankage too. Obviously built by someone who anticipated long trips under power. Also one of the best cruising boats I've even seen. Junks can even be beached. I would only worry about whether the steel hull is sound, and a survey will tell.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 16, 2018, 11:58:55 AM
I am going to continue to investigate Rio Dulce, which wouldn't be the worst place to keep a boat, in terms of cost. It would be a convenient jumping off place for a SHTF scenario, and worst case I could drive there from here as long as fuel is available.

Somehow when SHTF Day arrives, I doubt you would be able to drive to Guatemala.  Borders would be locked up tighter than a Catholic School Virgin, and gas availability for you car would be nil.

RE

Maybe, maybe not. If I had the boat there, there's always a chance the S could HTF on a day when I'm there sailing already. I'm thinking I have about five years still to prep. I'm not going to be ready for sailing away next week anyway. If the SHTF next week, I go pig farmer full time.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 16, 2018, 12:10:20 PM
People do frequently walk from Guatemala to here, so there is some chance of making it going the other way. Or I could steal a boat here and sail there, possibly, leaving it parked on a side street with the keys in the ignition.  :)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 16, 2018, 12:11:05 PM
Charcoal gasification... Nice touch.

I dropped that one in just for you DB.  ;D

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 16, 2018, 12:20:18 PM
People do frequently walk from Guatemala to here, so there is some chance of making it going the other way. Or I could steal a boat here and sail there, possibly, leaving it parked on a side street with the keys in the ignition.  :)

By the time you walked from Austin to Guatemala, somebody would have stolen your Junk, and/or raided it for all the preps.  Your plan to steal a boat to get there faster is better.

Unless you are living on the boat full time, the chances you will be on board when SHTF Day arrives decrease the more days you are away from it.  So your plan basically requires you to be retired and living in Guatemala.

In my plan, you could still be working as a Dentist in Bar Harbor.  Probably not making as much money as you do with your own practice in Austin, but it wouldn't be minimum wage either and your expenses would be way less.  Can you get a license to practice in Maine?

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 16, 2018, 01:28:54 PM
Not sure anybody in Maine even has teeth. I doubt it. :)

The original plan I was kicking around was to just buy a boat in Guatemala and sail it here, which is a do-able trip. Here would probably really be the Corpus Christi marina, which is a first rate floating dock behind a great breakwater. Most boats there did well in the recent Harvey test, while docks in Rockport  (a nicer small town just up the coast) got washed clean away. That's still a 3 hr drive.

But the thing about Rio Dulce is that you'd already be in an area where the native populations wouldn't much notice a collapse of the US credit system.  A Ray Jason kind of place. And convenient to head to the Pacific, if that seemed to be the place to go. Or you could go anywhere in the Caribbean very easily too.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on January 16, 2018, 04:43:05 PM
I have a life goal of taking a multi week sailing course. I had a laser in my teens and did some day sailing later but never anything journey like. It will have to wait until the girls are older I suppose. If It was my SHTF day plan I would want everything aboard and close. Dole it out to helpful locals as you get established in Maine.  I know this little burb would turn inwards in times of trouble and pre existing arrangements with outsiders would be dicey. Your stash would be appropriated "for the common good" in a heart beat if you were not already there. I can't imagine small maritime communities would be any different.
One of my woodgas websites has some postings about woodgas boats. Usually they are eastern european and river boats but really interesting.  Even I would admit maritime gasifiers are not a likely scenario.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 16, 2018, 05:57:07 PM
I took a week-long course once,on the coast here. Long ago now. I got food poisoning from the chicken the "captain" served us the first night and ended up having projectile vomiting and diarrhea at the same time in the wee hours. I had to take a Benadryl and as a result of all that the first day or two I was basically a passenger. I did get my "bareboat certificate".

In the mid nineties I had this very serendipitous  opportunity to sail to the USVI from Florida. It took us nine days. A very fine experience, which I doubt I'll ever get to repeat, although I dream of sailing from Texas back to St John and anchoring out for a while. A year seems about right.

That voyage was on a 63 foot Palmer Johnson schooner that looked kind of like this boat below.

(http://www.oceanvoyages.com/wp-content/images/boat_thumbs/oceanadventure1.jpg)



Since then I looked into sailing in the Pacific on a tall ship for a three week stint. It would have been on that vessel that they used for the Endurance in that great PBS show about Ernest Shackleton. Not sure if you've ever seen that. It's quite good, and a remarkable true adventure story. I really intended to do it, but I got sidetracked and didn't follow through. The real ship is called the Soren Larsen. I tried to get RE to buy it, but he said it was too much. I think they only wanted about 2 million. We shoulda bought bitcoin.

(http://www.coolantarctica.com/images/endurance4.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/v/xLkA8oLwZ3I&fs=1
The Soren Larsen at sea.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 16, 2018, 06:06:53 PM
I have a life goal of taking a multi week sailing course. I had a laser in my teens and did some day sailing later but never anything journey like. It will have to wait until the girls are older I suppose. If It was my SHTF day plan I would want everything aboard and close. Dole it out to helpful locals as you get established in Maine.  I know this little burb would turn inwards in times of trouble and pre existing arrangements with outsiders would be dicey. Your stash would be appropriated "for the common good" in a heart beat if you were not already there. I can't imagine small maritime communities would be any different.
One of my woodgas websites has some postings about woodgas boats. Usually they are eastern european and river boats but really interesting.  Even I would admit maritime gasifiers are not a likely scenario.

Well, I only showed 2 burial locations fo my prep caches, but actually I would have them buried in numerous locations on many of the uninhabited islands in the neighborhood.  The only way the locals could get the locations from me would be to torture me.  Easier just to keep me alive and I dole out the locations as needed.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 16, 2018, 06:45:49 PM
I learned to sail at the ritzy Summer Camp I went to in the late 60s-early 70s.  They had 10 Sunfish sailboats on the lake, along with 2 water ski boats, canoes and rowboats.  I was big into water stuff because I was a good swimmer from my years in Brazil body surfing at Ipanema beach and swimming & diving at the pool in the Country Club Dad the Pigman was a member of, Club Ipica.  So I spent the whole second half of the scheduled day at camp after lunch at the waterfront.

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/snKLjcqKJfg/maxresdefault.jpg)

Most of my bigger boat experience came on my dad's boat when he was down in Oz,  it was a 32' homebuilt wood boat he bought cheap.  We only coastal sailed it locally though.  My biggest adventure  came on a friend of his racing boat, sailing down to Tasmania in the Sydney to Hobart race.  I signed on as crew for that.  Talk about windy!  yeesh!  We didn't do great, back of the pack but we made it.

I got my Bareboat certificate on my trip to the Greek Islands in the 70's, as part of a 2 week vacation on a Flotilla boat. 28' Hunters as I recall. There was one lead boat with the flotilla staff, and about 20 boats in the flotilla.  They tested you the first day to make sure you knew SOMETHING about sailing, and then you sailed the boat yourself for the 2 weeks.  You could always radio the lead boat if you got into trouble and needed help.  My friend Mike who was an intern at the hospital I worked at was with me, he was from New Zealand with lots of sailing experience.  Also 2 nurses.  :icon_sunny:

No idea where that certificate is anymore, but I am not going to be doing any charter sailing myself in the future so it doesn't matter.  I am fit to man the tiller, that's about it.  Only way I put to sea is with some fit crew members, preferably female with nice TITS!  :icon_mrgreen:

(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/1a/c9/3d/1ac93d21e0ec27d4c868b9a4f0854dd9--outdoor-girls-sailing.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 16, 2018, 11:49:44 PM
Quote
WTF is wrong with a Gin Palace?

Only that they can't go to sea, which for a boat is a bit of a problem.  I don't go for Maine at latitude  44° and with severely cold winters.  What do you want to go keep going back and forth to the mainland FOR?  - to buy more electronic gadgets and fuel.

Actually my new electronic gadget arrived today - an ATA box and a cordless phone.  I finally had to give up on my VoIP system - Linux drivers for sound devices are limited.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 17, 2018, 12:09:55 AM
Quote
WTF is wrong with a Gin Palace?

Only that they can't go to sea, which for a boat is a bit of a problem.  I don't go for Maine at latitude  44° and with severely cold winters.  What do you want to go keep going back and forth to the mainland FOR?  - to buy more electronic gadgets and fuel.

Actually my new electronic gadget arrived today - an ATA box and a cordless phone.  I finally had to give up on my VoIP system - Linux drivers for sound devices are limited.

As I said, this plan does not involve, "going to sea".  It is designed to make you mobile among many small islands off the coast of Maine.

The reason to eventually contact surviving mainlanders is trade.  There might be oranges being sailed up from florida to trade for cod or stripers.

RE
Title: Seastead of the Day: Crewing the Good Ship Diner
Post by: RE on January 17, 2018, 06:16:12 AM
I just won the Mega-Millions Jackpot for $1B.    :o :icon_sunny:

I am custom designing a Seastead for Diners and am currently interviewing possible crew members to staff the ship.  It's a BIG BOAT, 120' at the waterline.  We will not need a BIGGER BOAT than this.  I will detail features of the Good Ship Doomstead Diner at a later date.  Diners are invited to suggest features for the new boat, so I can communicate them to the shipyard in China building it.

Since it is such a large boat, it will need a large crew.  I am currently interviewing for the position of Captain and have whittled it down to 2 final candidates.  Diners are invited to help me make a decision on the most qualified candidate.  My rank is Commodore, and I will henceforth be referred to as Cmdr. RE.  :icon_sunny:  I swear I will not abuse my rank and take advantage of the crew.  ::)

I will provide a short Bio & Pic of the final candidates for each position as crew member.  Below are the first two competitors for the position of Captain.  I will base my final decision on recommendations from the Diners.  Please let me know why you chose the candidate you did.

Position: Captain

Janet
(https://ak7.picdn.net/shutterstock/videos/12491747/thumb/1.jpg)

Bio:

Janet was Captain of the sailing team at Florida State University.  As a 16 year old, she solo circumnavigated the globe in a 32' wood boat built by her father, a Dentist in Texas in his spare time.  Janet's hobbies include singing and playing the guitar.

Ludmila
(https://ak1.picdn.net/shutterstock/videos/2750951/thumb/1.jpg?i10c=img.resize(height:160))

Bio:

Ludmila was a Lieutenant in the Ruskie Navy before she emigrated to the FSoA.  She graduated Magna Cum Laude as a Mechanical Engineer from Moscow University, where she also was on the Sailing Team.  She is an expert marksman andcross country skier, and competed in the Olypmics in Biathalon.  Her hobbies include playing Chess and Drawing.



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 17, 2018, 06:29:29 AM
Gotta love Ludmila for her, ah, extensive skill-set. Probably into martial arts too. She would make me feel...safe and secure. I'm pretty sure of that.

No need to get a boat built. The world is awash in excellent boats.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 17, 2018, 06:39:53 AM
Gotta love Ludmila for her, ah, extensive skill-set. Probably into martial arts too. She would make me feel...safe and secure. I'm pretty sure of that.

No need to get a boat built. The world is awash in excellent boats.

My boat is a revolutionary new design.  :icon_sunny:  It's a Sailing Submarine with the electric motors powered by Wind & Solar PV.  While on the surface it operates as a sailboat, submerged it runs electric.  It doesn't descend very deep, only around 100' to keep the hull thickness down and stay more lightweight.  Enough though for Stealth when approaching unknown shores infested with Zombies.  Also impervious to danger from Rogue Waves.

RE
Title: Seastead of the Day: Seeking a Bigger Boat
Post by: RE on January 18, 2018, 06:04:10 AM
If I don't get the REVOLUTIONARY Sailing Submarine built with my Mega-Millions, I am looking at currently available sailing vessels for the Good Ship Doomstead Diner.  In order to house all the Diners comfortably, the main requirement is that they are over 100' at the waterline.

Many of the boats in this size category are Square-Riggers, which have a lot of Nostalgic Appeal.

(https://twistedsifter.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/royal-clipper-the-largest-full-rigged-sailing-ship-in-the-world-2.jpg?w=800&h=533)
Biggest Square-Rigger in the World

However, let's face it, Square-Riggers have a LOT of deficiencies!  They are PIGS and generally quite slow, and they sail like shit to windward.  They also take a large crew of nimble sailing monkeys to climb up and furl the sails when the wind picks up.  Would YOU want this job?  Only a young male overloaded with testosterone would find this appealing.

So I am only looking at boats with more modern triangular rigs.  Here are the Top 5 located so far up for sale:

Sail 100+ Feet

METEOR € 25,000,000
169ft Royal Huisman 2007
Location: Florida, USA

She is described as a 'gaff rigged schooner' with the forward mast being shorter than the main. Three roller furlers serve the forward mast to achieve ease of handling. The deck work is what really makes METEOR stand out from the crowd. Details such as the raised wooden cockpit surrounds and the beautifully crafted superstructures are reminiscent of a bygone era, and provide a really social area to relax in. Her hull is dark blue with a black underwater hull. The two colours are separated with a solid white boot line.

WELLENREITER € 7,500,000
151ft Jongert 2003
Location: Golfe Juan, France

Designed by Andre Hoek, WELLENREITER is the largest yacht ever launched by Jongert. Belowdecks an air of luxury prevails. The full beam owner’s stateroom is located astern and includes an office, sitting room and vast walk-through bathroom, a spectacular feature normally found on large motoryachts. This superyacht accommodates seven guests in a master suite with an adjacent ensuite single, one double and one twin cabin, plus five crew.

THIS IS US € 5,950,000
137ft Holland Jachtbouw 2005
Location: Tarragona, Spain

Produced by a collaboration of the highly regarded Holland Jachtbouw yard and Hoek Design studio, THIS IS US represents the very best of Dutch build quality and design. Her powerful carbon rig, carbon-spectra sails and deep lifting keel allow THIS IS US to perform just as a high performance cruising yacht should. Following an extensive refit in 2013 at Holland Jachtbouw and further work including hull repaint in 2015, THIS IS US is in excellent order.

MANUTARA $ 2,750,000
115ft Valdettaro Custom 1994
Location: Palm Beach, FL, USA

MANUTARA is one of the largest, most comfortable cruising yachts in her class. Her combined upgraded condition, five-stateroom plus crew layout along with an abundance of amenities, private spaces and dining options make her ideal for family cruising. Her four guest staterooms convert from 8 single beds to 4 king-sized beds, plus the full-beam master suite with a centerline king bed provide for incredible versatility. Wide steps on the reverse transom give easy dinghy and water access. With her previous owner she has had an outstanding charter record.

BILLY BUDD II € 3,600,000
112ft Royal Huisman 34m Luxury Sailing Yacht 1994
Location: Genova, Italy

From the legendary Royal Huisman yard with naval architecture designed by Judel Vrolijk, the 34.3m BILLY BUDD II was built for a client who holds high performance as his first criterion. She is designed to be a fast and comfortable cruising yacht with a fully-battened main, with many of the winches from Rondal.


Obviously, since Money is no object here, I would go for the Meteor at 169'.  Even after the IRS takes out the taxes on my $1B winnings, I still have $500M left so this is Pocket Change.  In fact I could buy all 5 of them for a Fleet and still be under $200K.  Maintenance costs, staffing and docking fees though would quickly burn up my winnings, so not gonna do that.

Going for Bang for the Buck and value, I would probably go for the Manutara @ 115' and a $2.75M price tag.  With just a single mast, she doesn't require much in the way of crew either, since there has to be electric assist for raising those sails and reefing them.

Despite my general penurious nature, I'll probably spring for the Meteor anyhow.  The accomodations are just too nice to pass up!  :icon_sunny:

Main Salon for Diner Meetings
(http://www.wellingtonyachts.com/sites/default/files/styles/primary/public/images/meteor%20main%20salon.jpg?itok=o7okYf0q)

RE's Stateroom
(http://www.wellingtonyachts.com/sites/default/files/styles/primary/public/images/Meteor%20master%20sr.jpg?itok=zCa8Mt96)

In order to keep maintenance costs down, the Good Ship Doomstead Diner will mostly be at sea, anchored in remote coves or  if near civilization then on a mooring offshore.  Docking this thing would be a ridiculous problem in most marinas, even if you had a slip big enough and bow thrusters!  It's big enough to carry a substantial size tender on davits for commuting to shore.

(http://www.nickjacksonco.com/images/gallery/500-4%20Tiara%20afttrans.JPG)

Tomorrow I will be interviewing for the position of Pilot/Navigator on the Good Ship Doomstead Diner.  The candidates are HOT! :icon_mrgreen:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 18, 2018, 06:29:41 AM
You have the budget consciousness of a US congressman. You're overspending by a power of ten. Not necessary.

Check out this modest yacht of 100 ft. (Anything much bigger is way too big, imho).

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/61/0/516100_0_310520101353_1.jpg?f=/1/61/0/516100_0_310520101353_1.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1278065209000)

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2003/3-Mast-Schooner-Traditional-Turkish-Gulet-2019550/East-Med/Turkey#.WmCuf5M-cWo (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2003/3-Mast-Schooner-Traditional-Turkish-Gulet-2019550/East-Med/Turkey#.WmCuf5M-cWo)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 18, 2018, 06:41:38 AM
You have the budget consciousness of a US congressman. You're overspending by a power of ten. Not necessary.

Check out this modest yacht of 100 ft. (Anything much bigger is way too big, imho).

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/61/0/516100_0_310520101353_1.jpg?f=/1/61/0/516100_0_310520101353_1.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1278065209000)

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2003/3-Mast-Schooner-Traditional-Turkish-Gulet-2019550/East-Med/Turkey#.WmCuf5M-cWo (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2003/3-Mast-Schooner-Traditional-Turkish-Gulet-2019550/East-Med/Turkey#.WmCuf5M-cWo)

When you have $500M to spend before TSHTF Day arrives, you want to get rid of it before it goes worthless.  ::)

It's got an extra 60' of length, so more room for more amenities than your find.  Remember, we have to fit a full floating dental office on this thing.

I will admit your boat is coming in at a great price.  You do have to go to Turkey to get it though.  Not the safest place to be as a rich Amerikan these days.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 18, 2018, 02:35:44 PM
Quote
[Turkey] - Not the safest place to be as a rich Amerikan these days.

True.  Nowhere is safe for Amerikans these days, let alone in an allied country which is almost at war with US.  However this is only a problem if you can't afford to pay a crew to get the boat for you. They will need feeding as well, and workers' health insurance and transport home bonds. They will of course expect to do their own drug/gun/migrant running while they are in such a prime spot.  I presume you will fly out to join them once they have cleared customs in Greece.  Then the crew will probably all disappear and you will need to hire another lot with better figures.

I can't emphasise enough how much you need hand-holds all over the place if you are going to sea.  Those big cabins with normal king-size beds would be totally unusable at sea - everything would be rolling back and forth on the floor.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 18, 2018, 03:06:14 PM
I'd much rather be an American in Turkey than a Turk whom Erdogan considers disloyal to his despotic regime.

Those Gulets are interesting whore houses. Most of them seem to have two huge cabins. One for the Prince, and one for the wives? There are always some big ones for sale. 100 feet isn't even a big one.

The most important feature seems to be that they are set up for fine dining, for maybe a party of twenty or more. I would guess they do most of their sailing in the Mediterranean, and in good weather. Lots of socializing at dockside, no doubt.

 
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 18, 2018, 04:08:35 PM
Probably best to wait a day or two before flying to Ankara.

https://www.rt.com/news/416316-afrin-turkey-offensive-kurds/ (https://www.rt.com/news/416316-afrin-turkey-offensive-kurds/)
Afrin knot: How the battle for a small Kurdish enclave could be the death knell for US-Turkey ties
18 Jan, 2018

Turkey is gearing up to move troops toward Afrin, a Kurdish-held area of Syria. The battle over the tiny enclave, which many would struggle to find on the map, could put Ankara in open conflict with NATO ally the US – here’s how.

This week, the countdown began for Afrin, a Kurdish-held enclave in the north of Syria which is feverously preparing for a major Turkish offensive. Over the past few days, international media have been reporting about Turkish troops, tanks and armored vehicles rolling towards the Syrian border.

The upcoming intervention in Afrin is said to be an extension of Turkey’s Euphrates Shield Operation, the declared goal of which was to target Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS) and drive Kurdish forces out of their enclaves in northern Syria.

As soldiers on both sides prepare for what is shaping up to be a fierce battle, we look at how the likely siege of a small enclave adds fuel to the fire of already-strained US-Turkey ties, and how America’s policy of developing bonds with groups at odds with one another is leading to failure for Washington in Syria and beyond.
Turkey’s likely military plans

Not much is known about Ankara’s exact strategy of capturing Afrin, but a ground offensive seems to be the backbone of Turkish plans. Over the past week, tanks, infantry fighting vehicles and self-propelled howitzers have been arriving to the border areas inside Turkey, according to Turkish press reports. Notably, the army has deployed signal jammers, which indicates the intervention might also include electronic warfare.

However, it will not be the Turks themselves that lead the fight. In its previous operations on Syrian soil, Ankara heavily relied on pro-Turkish rebels who made up most of the manpower to fight against the Kurds. This time promises to be no different. On Tuesday, when asked if Syrian rebels would be involved in the Afrin operation, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said: “Of course they will, together. This struggle is being conducted for them. Not for us.”

Some Turkish media suggested that the offensive will start with airstrikes on 149 targets of the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), with the air raids involving fighters and drones. Haberturk reported, citing military forces, that Afrin and the adjacent areas have been monitored for several weeks by Turkish special forces, who will also be taking part in the offensive.

‘Capturing Afrin is no easy task’

Meanwhile, experts have expressed doubt that Turkish military’s operation to enter Afrin will be an easy ride. Grigory Lukyanov, professor of the Moscow-based Higher School of Economics, told RT by phone that some of the Turkish Army’s most battle-hardened officers were expelled from the military or persecuted after the failed 2016 coup, and such “cleansing of the ranks” might have weakened the armed forces. “The Euphrates Shield offensive has shown that Turkish military leaders… have little experience in conducting complex operations involving combat aircraft, ground forces and heavy armor,” Lukyanov said.

While the army has no shortage of ammunition and manpower, Lukyanov said it still lacks personnel able to operate systems such as drones and manned aircraft. Previous Euphrates Shield offensives came at a high cost for the Turkish military, Lukyanov added, as large numbers of soldiers were killed or injured, and multiple armored vehicles were destroyed beyond repair.

The Kurds, for their part, have managed to build up a reliable fighting force, having received training and modern weapons from the US, Lukyanov said, adding that the combat experience that Kurdish militias have accumulated during their fight against Islamic State makes them a “near-peer opponent” of the Turkish forces.

Russia quiet, Turkey puzzled

Though a ground offensive seems the safest option for Turkish military planners, it certainly won’t be without air support. The Turks cannot afford a high number of casualties among their troops, which makes airpower a game changer in the Afrin invasion.

In addition, the Kurdish enclave lies close to Russia’s Khmeimim Airbase, and Moscow’s attitude towards the Afrin operation is probably the trickiest question for Ankara. The airbase is protected by sophisticated S-400 air defense systems, and the adjacent province of Idlib, including Afrin itself, is certainly within reach of its surface-to-air missiles.

However, Igor Korotchenko, Russian military expert and editor-in-chief of ‘National Defense’ magazine, says S-400s are deployed to protect the airbase against enemy intrusion, and have nothing to do with covering other parts of Syria. “When it comes to some missions of foreign aircraft in Syria’s airspace, this is the area of responsibility of Syria’s air defense forces, not Russia’s,” he said.

Moscow has generally been wary of Turkish actions in the north of Syria, urging respect for the war-ravaged country’s territorial integrity. But to stay on the safe side this time, Ankara needs to keep the Russian military updated on every step it takes, and do its utmost to avoid dangerous incidents.

In recent days, Russia has been noticeably quiet on Turkey’s plans to invade Afrin. The only official statement was that of Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, who urged on Monday for people to refrain from coercive actions and move to the negotiating table. “Indeed, the Kurds are part of the Syrian nation,” he told a news conference. “Their interests must be taken into account.”

In the meantime, as Turkey amasses troops and armor along the border, the Kurds are far from sitting idle. Kurdish militias, many of them trained by American instructors, have been honing their combat skills and receiving considerable arms supplies from abroad. And this is where the US comes into play.

Friendly foes: America between Turkey & the Kurds

Washington’s Kurdish policy has been ambiguous since the start of the US-led anti-IS operation. On one hand, the US has designated the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), which has been fighting the Turks since the mid-1980s, a terrorist organization – as has the European Union and Turkey itself.
On the other hand, the US cultivated ties with Syria’s Kurdish YPG militia, despised by Ankara. YPG fighters proved effective in the fight against IS and Syrian government forces, and the group – which was set up by the Syrian Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD) – quickly became America’s key ally on Syrian soil.

And here is where it gets even more interesting – the US maintains that Turkey has the right to suppress the “terrorist” PKK, while at the same time siding with the YPG.

To make things worse, the Pentagon has launched a training program for Kurdish and Arab border guards in Syria to prevent the resurgence of IS. Details of the initiative soon came to light, with the US-led coalition unveiling a plan to set up a 30,000-strong “border force” on the basis of Syrian Democratic Force (SDF) veterans, who are set to make up half of the recruits.

The move caused predictable outrage in Ankara, with Erdogan promising “to drown this terrorist force before it is born.” The army of “traitors” that Washington seeks to create will point their guns against US troops at the first threat, Erdogan cautioned. Separately, Turkey raised the issue with NATO, demanding that the military bloc take action against the creation of the “terrorist army.”

Fueling the unfolding spat, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu “bluntly told” US counterpart Rex Tillerson this week that the step“could threaten our bilateral ties and could lead us down an irreversible route.”

Some Turkish politicians have even called to ban the US Air Force from using Incirlik Airbase until the Pentagon ends its alignment with the Syrian Kurds. Dogu Perincek, leader of the left-wing Vatan Party, suggested that the American troops from Incirlik be removed and cooperation with Russia and Iran be forged “to deter the United States.”

Notably, major Turkish media have also followed suit, ramping up rhetoric over the US presence in Syria, with leading newspaper Hurriyet writing in an opinion piece: “Is the US army ready to open fire on the Turks if the Turks open fire on forces that the US also once recognized as terrorists?”“Is this not a move that could lead to a de facto division of Syria and open another Cold War-era style politics, Mr. Trump?”
Afrin operation: Lose-lose for US

The US currently has an estimated 2,000 troops on the ground in Syria which were deployed without an invitation from Damascus or mandate from the UN Security Council. American soldiers were embedded with YPG forces taking part in a major offensive to capture the city of Raqqa from Islamic State last year.

As the outrage mounted, the Pentagon quickly backtracked on its support for the YPG or the Kurdish border force. “We don’t consider them as part of our Defeat ISIS operations which is what we are doing there and we do not support them,” Pentagon spokesman Major Adrian Rankine-Galloway told the Turkish state Anadolu news agency. “We are not involved with them at all,” the military official reiterated, adding: “There is no train, advise and assist program going [on] in Afrin.”

On Wednesday, the Pentagon tried to downplay the significance of the 30,000-strong Kurdish force. “The US continues to train local security forces in Syria,” it said. “This is not a new ‘army’ or conventional ‘border guard’ force.” The US military is “keenly aware of the security concerns of Turkey, our Coalition partner and NATO ally,” the statement added.

Washington’s statements seem to have had little effect on Ankara’s plans. Chairing a four-hour National Security Meeting on Wednesday night, President Erdogan said Turkey will never allow the creation of “a terrorist army” in Syria. “It is regrettable that a state, which is part of NATO and our ally in bilateral relations, declares the terrorists as its partner and provides them with weapons, without any concern for our safety,” the Turkish leader said. He also demanded that weapons and equipment supplied to the YPG “be collected without delay,” adding that Turkey is losing patience.

The troops fully deployed along the Turkish-Syrian border are still awaiting the signal to move, providing a small window of opportunity to find a peaceful solution to the Afrin knot.

But will the Trump administration be able to pacify the Turks, calm down the Kurds and persuade the two to sit down and talk? Given the absence of a clear American strategy for the Middle East, the answer is probably ‘no’.

Indeed, it is chaotic, ambiguous and inarticulate US policy which is causing America to lose on every front in the region. A NATO partner engaging in an all-out war on your regional ally is a clear sign that something has failed in your foreign policy.

Why else would your friends become enemies?  
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 18, 2018, 05:11:51 PM
Damn, another trip spoiled.

I researched those boats. You always see them if you look at brokerage sites and flip through the really big sailboats. For anybody besides me who didn't know, they...the gulets, are mostly used for tourist charters on what is known as the Turkish Riviera. (I didn't even know there was a Turkish Riviera.)

I always thought of Turkey as a little dangerous, but I have no real knowledge. I knew some people who were friends of my kids who went a few years ago and stayed for months. But they were world travelers who spoke multiple languages and could maybe have passed for real Spaniards, instead of Texicans.

Even though they look traditional, they've only been building them (mostly, but not exclusively in Turkey)  since 1970, according to Wiki. I would guess they must cater to rich Arabs with those super luxury accoutrements.

Probably not that seaworthy, even with handholds.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 18, 2018, 06:02:28 PM

I can't emphasise enough how much you need hand-holds all over the place if you are going to sea.  Those big cabins with normal king-size beds would be totally unusable at sea - everything would be rolling back and forth on the floor.

Good point.  I was looking at all those free standing tables and chairs too.  They would be flying missiles.  You would have to stow them and strap them down every time you left port.  I'll have to budget for a complete refit of the interior. 🤑

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Staff Selection for Pilot-Navigator
Post by: RE on January 19, 2018, 05:17:57 AM
Ludmila got the job as Captain.  However, we signed on Janet as First Mate as well.  :icon_sunny:

Our candidates for Pilot-Navigator are:

Pilot-Navigator

Leilani
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6093/6357432263_f98d0b4ed8_b.jpg)

Bio:  Leilani is half Haole and Half Polynesian.  Her Polynesian side comes from a long line of Navigators going back to the Tahitian Migration to Hawaii in 1000 AD.  Her grandfather taught her the navigation techniques as a young girl.  She served as crew on the Hokulea for 3 years.  Her hobbies include spinning, sewing & weaving.

Ingrid

(https://www.theplace2.ru/archive/raina_lawson/img/42(3).jpg)

Bio:  Ingrid is a doctoral candidate in Astrophysics at the University of Stockholm.  She has an Eidetic Memory and a complete recollection of the position of 10,000 visible stars in the night sky.  Her hobbies include Mud Wrestling and "anything kinky".
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 19, 2018, 06:29:08 AM
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6093/6357432263_f98d0b4ed8_b.jpg)

So emaciated, no tits.  Worst so far.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 19, 2018, 06:44:22 AM
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6093/6357432263_f98d0b4ed8_b.jpg)

So emaciated, no tits.  Worst so far.

Different strokes for different folks.  I LIKE flat chested!  No sagging and stretch marks.  Better known as a "Carpenter's Dream".  Flat as a Board and EZ to Nail.  :icon_sunny:

I'm a Leg Man, not a Tit Man.  I like long legs and a nice set of firm gluts.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on January 19, 2018, 05:28:06 PM
How long until you crew of super sailors feed all the aging boomers to the sharks and go full on privateer?
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 19, 2018, 05:32:39 PM
How long until you crew of super sailors feed all the aging boomers to the sharks and go full on privateer?

About the time all my buried preps run out.  Until then, I am pretty safe I think.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 19, 2018, 06:09:47 PM
How long until you crew of super sailors feed all the aging boomers to the sharks and go full on privateer?

We're only aging physically.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Return to Reality
Post by: RE on January 20, 2018, 08:05:27 AM
I'm taking a break from Fantasyland for a more realistic boat today.  ::)  Decision on Pilot-Navigator for the Big Boat in Diner Fantasyland to come tomorrow, along with candidates for Chief Engineer.

1953 Custom built Wood boat located in Curacao.  A bit safer than Turkey. 🔫  Asking $32K, I can Jew him down to $27K I am sure.  I can buy this one myself even without partnering with Eddie, who must follow the diktats of She Who Must Be Obeyed. 👫 lol.

(http://bradford-marine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/large_1345917-1.jpg)

Standard cabin plan, but well kept and well appointed!

(https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/images/leonotis-arthur-robb-35-45-000-21880785.jpg) (https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/images/leonotis-arthur-robb-35-45-000-21880786.jpg) (https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/images/leonotis-arthur-robb-35-45-000-21880787.jpg)
https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/-leonotis-an-arthur-robb-35-for-sale.html (https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/-leonotis-an-arthur-robb-35-for-sale.html)

Electronics need an upgrade, and the engine is a 2003 with 1382 hours on it.  That might need a replacement.  I have a soft spot for custom designed wood boats though, particularly ones as old as this one.

Perfect single handed sailer.  I will of course need a crew, but only one for this one!  :icon_sunny:  I'll keep her loyalty by dropping her in my will for the boat and all the rest of my worldly possesions when I buy my ticket to the Great Beyond, along with the coordinates for all my buried preps.  Returning now to Fantasy land...

Lydia

(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/ca/1d/c2/ca1dc26065ec5d0f1a6970c0c376f228--that-day-yachts.jpg)

Bio:  Lydia grew up in the Marina owned by her family until they went broke in the financial crash of 2008.  She is a licensed Masseuse and Accupuncturist, and has studied homeopathic medicine and herbal remedies.  She fought professionally in Mixed Martial Arts in the bantam weight division, competed nationally in Pistol shooting and has a Concealed Carry permit.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 20, 2018, 10:48:11 AM
Thirteen hundred hours is low for a diesel kicker. It should have another 2500 or so of life, it its been reasonably well maintained. Maybe more. The boat is awesome.

An old wooden boat like that...you have to get the survey to know anything. If it does not have hidden flaws, I'd say it's a steal of a deal.

It looks like it WAS a fantastic boat. Whether it still is depends on the condition of the hull, the thru-hull fittings, and the chainplates.

These boats go bad primarily because of topside deck leaks that lead to wet bilges and rot associated with negligence.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 20, 2018, 10:50:17 AM
Good location too, down island. Good starting point for a nice year or two  of Caribbean sailing.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 20, 2018, 02:25:15 PM
Good location too, down island. Good starting point for a nice year or two  of Caribbean sailing.

Sadly, short of a miraculous recovery or a partner still in good enough shape to sail, that person won't be me.  :(

Far as the condition of the boat goes, at least from the pics it LOOKS like it was meticulously maintained.  However, you don't know how old those pictures are.  They could be 20 years old from two owners ago.  So yea, you have to fly down there and have it surveyed before buying.  I wouldn't trust a survey I wasn't present to see done.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 20, 2018, 04:59:07 PM
The best realization I ever had was that I didn't have to get it all done in one lifetime.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 20, 2018, 07:04:23 PM
The best realization I ever had was that I didn't have to get it all done in one lifetime.

Indeed.  In this lifetime, I am fortunately gifted with a fabulous imagination.  :icon_sunny:  When I return, it will be to where I belong, on that first cat rigged sailing canoe that made landfall on the Big Island of Hawaii.  🛶  Sailing to FREEDOM!

(http://www.hokulea.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Hokulea-Yamashita.jpg)

The Hokulea BTW is currently on a worldwide circumnavigation.  What I wouldn't give to be on that boat.😔

http://www.youtube.com/v/9yjNUbJquKI

http://www.hokulea.com/worldwide-voyage/ (http://www.hokulea.com/worldwide-voyage/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/gb1hLt9s2K0

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Staff Selection for Chief Engineer
Post by: RE on January 21, 2018, 08:09:36 AM
Ingrid won the Pilot-Navigator job.  It was actually a done deal when she dropped "anything kinky" into the Hobbies field in the online application.  The interviews were just a formality.  :icon_mrgreen:

However, we did also hire on Leilani for clothing and sail repair with her excellent sewing skills.  :icon_sunny:

Today we are interviewing for Chief Engineer to maintain our engines and 12V systems.

Jessica

(http://slickforcegirl.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Desert-Mechanic-Jessica-Burciaga-Nick-Saglimbeni-2000px.jpg)

Bio:  Jessica's dad was a professional dirt track car racing enthusiast who raced the circuit down in the deep south.  They lived OTR pulling their race cars, and spent every day after the races completely disassembling the cars after the numerous accidents, including pulling the engine for a complete overhaul.  After graduation from HS, Jessica went to work at the local JB Hunt terminal as a maintence supervisor for Cummins and Caterpillar Diesels.  Her hobbies include scuba diving and metal sculpture.

Ilsa
(http://images.teinteresa.es/noticias/Star-Trek-Damon-Lindelof-Alice_TINIMA20130524_0163_3.jpg)

Bio:  Ilsa received her Baccalaureate degree from the University of Copenhagen at the age of15, after being accepted at age 12.    She received her Ph.D from MIT at 18 with her seminal dissertation "High Efficiency Low Emission design and modifications for Diesel Engines".  Following that, she did post doctoral work at Stanford developing high efficiency Wind Turbines.  Her hobbies include doing previously unsolved Differential Equations and "anything kinky".
Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Staff Selection for Chief Engineer
Post by: Eddie on January 21, 2018, 08:31:11 AM
Ingrid won the Pilot-Navigator job.  It was actually a done deal when she dropped "anything kinky" into the Hobbies field in the online application.  The interviews were just a formality.  :icon_mrgreen:

However, we did also hire on Leilani for clothing and sail repair with her excellent sewing skills.  :icon_sunny:

Today we are interviewing for Chief Engineer to maintain our engines and 12V systems.

Jessica

(http://slickforcegirl.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Desert-Mechanic-Jessica-Burciaga-Nick-Saglimbeni-2000px.jpg)

Bio:  Jessica's dad was a professional dirt track car racing enthusiast who raced the circuit down in the deep south.  They lived OTR pulling their race cars, and spent every day after the races completely disassembling the cars after the numerous accidents, including pulling the engine for a complete overhaul.  After graduation from HS, Jessica went to work at the local JB Hunt terminal as a maintence supervisor for Cummins and Caterpillar Diesels.  Her hobbies include scuba diving and metal sculpture.

Ilsa
(http://images.teinteresa.es/noticias/Star-Trek-Damon-Lindelof-Alice_TINIMA20130524_0163_3.jpg)

Bio:  Ilsa received her Baccalaureate degree from the University of Copenhagen at the age of15, after being accepted at age 12.    She received her Ph.D from MIT at 18 with her seminal dissertation "High Efficiency Low Emission design and modifications for Diesel Engines".  Following that, she did post doctoral work at Stanford developing high efficiency Wind Turbines.  Her hobbies include doing previously unsolved Differential Equations and "anything kinky".

Jessica is an obvious fake. Nobody who knows anything would use a rusty old spanner to work on that vintage rolling stock. Extra points for anybody who can ID the vehicle's make and model from the photo.

Ilsa is over-educated. Engineers make notoriously bad mechanics, especially the ones from places like MIT. I want someone who interned at Mike's Windmill Shop.

http://www.mikeswindmillshop.com/ (http://www.mikeswindmillshop.com/)

Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Staff Selection for Chief Engineer
Post by: RE on January 21, 2018, 08:36:53 AM
Ilsa is over-educated. Engineers make notoriously bad mechanics, especially the ones from places like MIT. I want someone who interned at Mike's Windmill Shop.

Nobody dressed in skimpy clothing applied from Mike's Windmill Shop. :P

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Staff Selection for Cook
Post by: RE on January 23, 2018, 04:34:00 AM
Jessica got the Chief Engineer spot.  We like "hands-on" crew members on the Good Ship Doomstead Diner!  ;D  And she is NOT a "fake"!  She's as real as all the rest of the crew members in my IMAGINATION!

Ilsa also was hired in a position we created just for her, Chief Design Engineer.  Could not let her go with the "anything kinky" hobby.  :icon_mrgreen:

For the last of our full time crew on the GSDD, we are interviewing for Cook.  Although I love to cook myself, I don't want to have to do this job ALL the time!  I'm retired and FILTHY RICH with my Mega Millions winnings! 🤑  I wanna kick back and RELAX most of the time while the young folks do the work!  :icon_sunny:

OK, on to the final 2 candidates for Cook...

Position: Cook

Indira

(http://www.musugu.com/media/image/016BRNHEHHBFSR6H2AFRAI7X6NZBVHTUCN)

Bio:  Indira trained at the Cordon Bleu culinary institute in Paris.  Her parents run an Indian restaurant in Paris which they opened in 1999 after emigrating from India.  Indira is a polyglot fluent in Hindustani, English, French, Spanish, German, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic and Navaho.  She also can read Ancient Greek, Latin and Sanskrit.   No sailing experience, but she can Bench Press 200lb.  Hobbies include C++ programming and Archery.

Genevieve

(https://scontent.cdninstagram.com/hphotos-xaf1/t51.2885-15/e15/11230459_1614688202139128_1301642768_n.jpg)

Bio:  Genevieve also trained at the Cordon Bleu culinary institute in Paris.  Her parents run a Bistro featuring Nouvelle Cuisine as well as traditional recipes from the Toulouse region of France, and is an expert at charcuterie.  She moonlighted as a Blues Singer while working as a waitress in her parent's Bistro and plays the Flute, Clarinet and Saxophone.  Her hobbies include fishing and hunting and growing Ganja.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Seastead Anthem & Theme Song
Post by: RE on January 24, 2018, 06:19:03 AM
It turns out that Indira and Genvieve were cohorts at the Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute and were very CLOSE friends who shared a flat  on the rue Cardinale Lemoine in Paris' 5th arrondissement.  In fact it was the SAME apartment Ernest Hemingway shared with his first wife when he lived there!  :o  We do not discriminate on the Good Ship Doomstead Diner, and members of the LGBTQ community are :hi: on our staff!  :icon_sunny:  So we hired on both of them and they will share a cabin. :P  We look forward to eating some very tasty pie from both of them.  :icon_mrgreen:

We were planning on hiring on a Bosun as well, however we now have 8 full time crew for the ship as well as Cmdr. RE at the Helm when necessary, and since we are going for a max of a 3 masted schooner with triangular rigging, this is likely enough.

With staffing now complete, the GSDD needs a THEME SONG!  We are opening Nominations this week for our anthem.  I have 6 nominations I am making in this post, but the nominations will remain open all week in case I forgot a good one.  Once we have all the nominations, I will set up a Poll to determine the Winner.  My 6 Nominations are:

Come Sail Away -Styx
http://www.youtube.com/v/5FO5ijPecVY

Sloop John B - Beach Boys
http://www.youtube.com/v/nSAoEf1Ib58

Downeaster Alexa - Billy Joel
http://www.youtube.com/v/LVlDSzbrH5M

Son of a Sailor - Jimmy Buffett
http://www.youtube.com/v/oX9esXzzO7w

Pearly Shells (Sway-a-Hula)
http://www.youtube.com/v/gb1hLt9s2K0

Drunken Sailor - Irish Rovers
http://www.youtube.com/v/qGyPuey-1Jw

More nominations :hi:!

Cmdr. RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Seastead Anthem & Theme Song
Post by: Surly1 on January 24, 2018, 06:23:07 AM
It turns out that Indira and Genvieve were cohorts at the Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute and were very CLOSE friends who shared a flat  on the rue Cardinale Lemoine in Paris' 5th arrondissement.  In fact it was the SAME apartment Ernest Hemingway shared with his first wife when he lived there!  :o  We do not discriminate on the Good Ship Doomstead Diner, and members of the LGBTQ community are :hi: on our staff!  :icon_sunny:  So we hired on both of them and they will share a cabin. :P  We look forward to eating some very tasty pie from both of them. 

 :icon_mrgreen: :icon_mrgreen: :icon_mrgreen:

You are having the time of your life with this stuff, aren't you? Pie, indeed.

They say a heavyweight's punch is the last thing to go. In your case, it's your sense of humor.
Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Seastead Anthem & Theme Song
Post by: RE on January 24, 2018, 06:44:57 AM
You are having the time of your life with this stuff, aren't you? Pie, indeed.

They say a heavyweight's punch is the last thing to go. In your case, it's your sense of humor.

Much appreciated compliment, THX!  ;D

My gratitude as well to my mentors, George Carlin, Bill Hicks, Steven Wright, Sam Kinison, Rodney Dangerfield and many others who came before me.  I stand on the shoulders of Giants.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day - New Big Boat Contender
Post by: RE on January 24, 2018, 02:54:55 PM
This 100' boat is designed for REAL SAILING, not as a Whorehouse for Saudi Princes.  ::)

Note:  Nominations still open for the Theme Song of the Good Ship Doomstead Diner.  Get in your nominations today!

RE

100' VITTERS SAILING YACHT "HAVANA OF LONDON" BROKER REPORT
 

100 Vitters Havana of London Report

  Type: Sail Yacht Builder: VITTERS
  Length: 100' Built: Mfg-2000
  Location: Spain Price: $Inquire
 

"Havana of London" is a 100' S/Y custom design envisioned by Dixon Yacht Design and executed to perfection by Vitter's shipyard in the Netherlands. Vitters is responsible for some of the most exquisite large sailing yachts ever produced and "Havana of London" wears her pedigree well.

Havana of London Saling

 
 "Havana", which was originally named "That's Y", was delivered in 2000. Purchased by her current owner in 2006 she has been exceptionally well maintained and her recent refit in 2014 included a new main engine, generators and sails. She has beautiful lines and a very clean deck space which makes for easy sail handling as well as open lounging areas.
 
Open Deck Space
 Havana of London Deck

 
Cockpit
 Havana of London Cockpit

 
Salon
 Havana of London Salon

 
 Her interior configuration accommodates 7 quests in 3 staterooms and can carry up to 4 crew in an additional two cabins. Joinery is an elegant combination of classic styling and contemporary fittings; all accomplished in pear wood with a hand-rubbed effect satin finish.
 
Salon
 Havana of London Salon

 
Electrical Panels, etc.
 Havana of London

 
 "Havana of London" is an extraordinary offering. Her asking price is a fraction of replacement cost and is an opportunity not to be missed.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 24, 2018, 03:10:27 PM
How much is a "fraction of replacement cost"?

I'm guessing maybe 3 million, but that could be low.

To me boats are like wine. You don't need to pay $1000 for a bottle when you can get excellent wine for $20 a bottle.

100 to 200K would buy an incredibly good boat with all the bells an whistles. A decent boat can be had for 50K. I can buy a boat like Palloy sailed across the Pacific for maybe 15K fully equipped.

It is purty though. Real purty.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 24, 2018, 03:32:50 PM
How much is a "fraction of replacement cost"?

I'm guessing maybe 3 million, but that could be low.

To me boats are like wine. You don't need to pay $1000 for a bottle when you can get excellent wine for $20 a bottle.

100 to 200K would buy an incredibly good boat with all the bells an whistles. A decent boat can be had for 50K. I can buy a boat like Palloy sailed across the Pacific for maybe 15K fully equipped.

It is purty though. Real purty.

Well, you have to remember that in the Big Boat Fantasy category of winning the Mega Millions Jackpot, money is no object.  :icon_sunny:  In fact even the small boats are fantasy for me since I can't sail them myself anymore, but at least they come in at prices I could theoretically afford.

You're not going to find a 100' boat for $200K anywhere, not even in Turkey.  Not if it is seaworthy anyhow.  As to how much they are actually asking for this boat and what the replacement cost would be?  Very hard to say since this market is quite nuts and prices are all over the place.  I'll take a WAG you could get it for $1.5M.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Best of Both Worlds
Post by: RE on January 25, 2018, 05:00:39 AM
Getting back to semi-realistic, Eddie mentioned his old sailing buddy went to a power trawler as he got older and the sailing became too difficult.  This Motor Sailer comes in at a price I can afford, and I can drive it myself under power.  If I have some more recovery (edema in the legs is down, walking has improved) and electric winches, I might even be able to sail it, at least coastally in light-medium winds and calm seas. :icon_sunny:  I wouldn't leave port anyhow with anything but perfect weather conditions being reported, and the weather folks are pretty good these days over the 3 day time I might be offshore.  33' with 160 gal of diesel storage, located in FL so no overseas travel to get it and drive it up to Bar Harbor, ME or to Rockport, TX.  Asking only $45K in excellent condition, according to the ad anyhow.

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/m/57669/main.jpg)
http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/57669 (http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/57669)

Unfortunately, no pictures of the interior cabin.  :(

Of course motor sailers are pigs and sail like shit to windward, but you do have 3 points of sail where they do OK.  Having a kick ass diesel and plenty of fuel storage makes up for the lack of great sailing features.

If I meet my goal of doubling my money on the Kohls Gamble, I'll seriously consider this one. 🤞  Come on Bezos!  Make a fucking offer already!

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 25, 2018, 05:49:15 AM
It looks like the aft mast is mounted on the cabin roof so unless it is solid 2-inch steel plate, it would be dangerous under there.  And how about that freeboard at the stern - must be 2 metres at least.  Must sail like a pig.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 25, 2018, 05:50:07 AM
I'm very familiar with those boats. Nice. Built in Finland. Not a great sailor, but a fine motorboat with sails for auxiliary propulsion.

There are a couple of cabin layouts. Most of them are walkovers with a private hatchway to the aft cabin, which is fairly huge for a small boat. Teak decks could be a problem. I used to think I might want to buy one of these myself. They come in several different lengths, and the 33 ft one is a big boat for a 33 footer.

In Europe the brokers often have the older ones, which have a lot of wood, and are quite lovely boats. More work of course.

(https://d385tlrw8quush.cloudfront.net/2048/1536/226316_76f25e69fa8b6b8b3916705084bad1dd.jpg)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 25, 2018, 05:59:43 AM
It looks like the aft mast is mounted on the cabin roof so unless it is solid 2-inch steel plate, it would be dangerous under there.  And how about that freeboard at the stern - must be 2 metres at least.  Must sail like a pig.

I am SURE it sails like a pig! 🐷  lol.  It will however move decently downwind or on a broad reach.

Far as how well constructed it is, this one has lasted since 1975, 43 years so far so it can't be TOO bad.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 25, 2018, 06:04:40 AM
(https://www.boat-specs.com/img/boat/739/nauticat-yachts-nauticat-33-layout-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 25, 2018, 06:18:22 AM
If i want to know how a boat performs, I try to check out the forums and see what the owners say. It isn't necessarily gospel,
 but most people are fairly honest.

I have a late ''80''s Nauticat 33 Pilothouse Ketch and I know the obsessed feeling you mentioned. My wife and I absolutely love the boat for it''s build quality, fit & finish, comfort and incredible space below decks. We do spend a great deal of time at the aft deck helm however, since that''s typically where you sail from. That is, unless we''re running on a long tack in snotty weather, then we''re in the very comfortable & spacious pilothouse.

Our model has the modified fin keel, skeg-hung rudder and tall rig option. Although not the fastest sailer for her size, she does sail well in moderate to strong winds, unassisted by the engine. The standard shoal draft, full keel model sails poorly in all but higher winds. I''ve actually had her close to hull speed - 7+ knots, under full sail only. When the wind dies down to under 8 knots, the speed diminishes measurably . . . usually the time to fire up the iron genny.

As you know, motorsailing is more efficient when winds are too light for sail only. This is due to the increase in apparent wind created by the boat''s forward movement. The boat''s 90 hp Lehman really displays the advantage over other sailing vessels under these conditions. My boat''s top end is 9 knots, respectable for a 9 ton, 33 footer.

Being a ketch rig, I like the many sail plan options we have and the reduced sail area of the main - easily solo-sailed by me . . . which is most of the time.


Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 25, 2018, 06:24:57 AM
If i want to know how a boat performs, I try to check out the forums and see what the owners say. It isn't necessarily gospel,
 but most people are fairly honest.

I have a late ''80''s Nauticat 33 Pilothouse Ketch and I know the obsessed feeling you mentioned. My wife and I absolutely love the boat for it''s build quality, fit & finish, comfort and incredible space below decks. We do spend a great deal of time at the aft deck helm however, since that''s typically where you sail from. That is, unless we''re running on a long tack in snotty weather, then we''re in the very comfortable & spacious pilothouse.

Our model has the modified fin keel, skeg-hung rudder and tall rig option. Although not the fastest sailer for her size, she does sail well in moderate to strong winds, unassisted by the engine. The standard shoal draft, full keel model sails poorly in all but higher winds. I''ve actually had her close to hull speed - 7+ knots, under full sail only. When the wind dies down to under 8 knots, the speed diminishes measurably . . . usually the time to fire up the iron genny.

As you know, motorsailing is more efficient when winds are too light for sail only. This is due to the increase in apparent wind created by the boat''s forward movement. The boat''s 90 hp Lehman really displays the advantage over other sailing vessels under these conditions. My boat''s top end is 9 knots, respectable for a 9 ton, 33 footer.

Being a ketch rig, I like the many sail plan options we have and the reduced sail area of the main - easily solo-sailed by me . . . which is most of the time.


Sounds like the right boat for me!  :icon_sunny:  Fucking Bozos the Clown needs to make a goddamn offer on Kohls already!

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: MOAR Motor Sailers!
Post by: RE on January 26, 2018, 07:37:22 AM
Motor Sailers are my New Enthusiasm!  :icon_sunny:

In my youth I used to snub my nose at these vessels as being lousy for sailing and a clunky combination of sail and power.  However, in my current physical condition and mind set, they hold a LOT of appeal for a lot of reasons.

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/8a/72/7e/8a727e84e8ee0f42c37718cef3bfd083.jpg)
1-  Under power, I can drive one myself.  I'm not so dependent on having an able-bodied sea(wo)man along for the ride to yank up the sail and adjust the sheets to go out for a cruise.

2-  Because they are PIGS, they are also very ROOMY inside.  Wider beam than your typical sailboat.  Since MOST of the time this will just be a place to live parked in a Marina, living space is very important, more important really than sailing characteristics.

3- They have Pilot Houses.  Nice for staying out of cold wet weather while cruising.  I have enough medical issues, I don't need to add pneumonia to the mix.  ::)

4-  From a Prep perspective, good because they have so much water and fuel storage capacity

So I am now mainly looking at Motor Sailers to buy if I can make some more $MOOLAH$ gambling on the Stock Market. 🤞 Today's offering is a Bigger Boat than the 33'  one I dropped on a couple of days ago, but it's not a mega sized $MILLION$ dollar yacht either, coming in at 50'.  If I get real lucky with investments it might be affordable.  A bit high on the asking price at $250K and it's in Oz so getting it back to the FSoA would require hiring a transport captain, but this is the TYPE of boat I think is right for me, with a little more money to spend anyhow.  A little smaller in the low 40' range I think would be right.

This one has HUGE fuel & water storage capacity!  :o

Quote
With a massive 2240 litre diesel capacity and 1156 litres of fresh water, she is capable of long range trips.

You can probably make it across the Atlantic under power alone with that much diesel!  Fillups would be expensive though. Try to use Sail as much as possible.

https://www.boatsonline.com.au/boats-for-sale/used/sailing-boats/mariner-50-motor-sailer-recent-refit/204517 (https://www.boatsonline.com.au/boats-for-sale/used/sailing-boats/mariner-50-motor-sailer-recent-refit/204517)

(https://imgs.yachthub.com/2/0/4/5/1/7/0_4.jpg)

Functional and comfortable Interior cabin with lots of storage space for preps as well.

(https://imgs.yachthub.com/2/0/4/5/1/7/26_4.jpg)

(https://imgs.yachthub.com/2/0/4/5/1/7/27_4.jpg)

(https://imgs.yachthub.com/2/0/4/5/1/7/29_4.jpg)

I'd like to get the price under 6 figures though and in a more local spot for pickup.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 26, 2018, 08:30:56 AM
Buy a boat in Seattle if you want to have one in AK. Always a lot of good cold weather adapted boats of all kinds for sale for decent prices.

If you want to keep one in Rockport, right now I'd shop in Florida or Guatemala.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 26, 2018, 09:45:24 AM
Buy a boat in Seattle if you want to have one in AK. Always a lot of good cold weather adapted boats of all kinds for sale for decent prices.

If you want to keep one in Rockport, right now I'd shop in Florida or Guatemala.

Yea, I found one in Seattle, it's tomorrow's feature boat.  :icon_sunny:

The West Coast I like because I could do Alaska in the summer and visit with Peter in Ocean Falls.  They have a nice Marina there with cheap prices.  East Coast of course there is my Fantasy location of Bar Harbor, then I could mosey down to Norfolk and Charleston and on to FL and maybe even the VI in the winter.  For Bugout locations, on the WC I could head for NZ, on the EC head for Tristan da Cunha, Edinburgh of the Seven Seas.  :icon_sunny:

I need to make a pretty good killing gambling on the market though to afford it myself, and even with the motor sailer I'm not sure I am fit to solo it.  I have a new symptom, the edema is down in the legs but now I have sores developing around my ankles.  Heading for the Urologist in about 30 minutes.  Hopefully he can at least give me antibiotics for what appears to be a urinary tract infection.  I doubt he will be of much help with all the rest of the problems.  ::)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 26, 2018, 02:33:38 PM
Quote
For Bugout locations, on the WC I could head for NZ, on the EC head for Tristan da Cunha, Edinburgh of the Seven Seas.

Both over 10,000 Kms, and Tristan has no marinas, 1 harbour, population <300,  in-bred, 1 doctor, no nurses.  It's more fun if you actually research your location, and have a few requirements, like some level of sustainability.

(https://doomsteaddiner.net/palloy/images/Tristan.jpg)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 26, 2018, 02:41:58 PM
Quote
For Bugout locations, on the WC I could head for NZ, on the EC head for Tristan da Cunha, Edinburgh of the Seven Seas.

Both over 10,000 Kms, and Tristan has no marinas, 1 harbour, population <300,  in-bred, 1 doctor, no nurses.  It's more fun if you actually research your location, and have a few requirements, like some level of sustainability.

On the Upside, it's nice and far away from the action of Industrial Civilization Collapse.  :icon_sunny:

I know the deficiencies of Tristan da Cunha PY.  I would go for one of the many islands off the coast of Maine first if I was on the East Coast.  On the West Coast, where Peter lives in the Fjords of BC is plenty remote and difficult for Zombies to get to.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 26, 2018, 03:41:24 PM
Nearly new 55HP Volvo. Here's a sailboat you could motor just about anywhere.

This would be a great boat for a single person. It fails the LTR couple test, because with the Pullman berth, somebody always has to get up so somebody else can use the loo.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/17/87/6171787_20170314192148837_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/17/87/6171787_20170314192148837_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1489522908000)

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1979/Islander-Freeport-36-3068265/Rio-Dulce/Guatemala#.Wmu7QZM-dsP (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1979/Islander-Freeport-36-3068265/Rio-Dulce/Guatemala#.Wmu7QZM-dsP)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 26, 2018, 04:15:52 PM
Quote
Eddie: ... with the Pullman berth, somebody always has to get up so somebody else can use the loo.

And we can't have that at the End of the World, can we?

I had the loo taken out out of my boat and the skin fittings glassed over - bucket and chuck it. I also had the deck drains removed as most of the time it sailed well-heeled over. No opening hatches either.  Are you all just pissing about, or is this a serious discussion?  The sea is a dangerous place if your hull has lots of holes in it, or your plans.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 26, 2018, 04:52:24 PM
I'm not planning on ever going around the Horn or anything. That old Islander Freeport, in good repair, will sail anywhere I want to go. No need to eliminate ventilation. Where I'm most likely to go, glassed over ports would be a mistake. And without GPS I'm not going anywhere much.

In fact, at the moment I've just been thinking that I could live much cheaper on a boat on Lake Travis than I am at my house. Cheaper than any condo within driving distance of my work, too. The biggest problem is just that the lake almost dried up a few years ago and probably will again in the fullness of time.

But I could sail from Rockport or Corpus Christi to the Caribbean pretty easily. I doubt I'd ever go further than that.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 26, 2018, 05:02:46 PM
If I were singlehanding across real oceans I'd choose a Westsail 32 as the safest choice. They have a good track record of surviving in heavy weather.

(http://westsail.com/forsale/oceana.jpg)

Or maybe a steel Spray replica. There was one of those for sale cheap here before the hurricane, but  apparently most of the Rockport brokerage boats got damaged, because the dealer down there has no inventory anymore.

(http://photos.mostsailboats.org/1975/c/1975-Custom-Built-Spray-Replica_5242_1.jpg)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on January 26, 2018, 06:00:00 PM
Now that's a more sensible boat, pity it's wood.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 26, 2018, 07:25:52 PM
I'm not planning on ever going around the Horn or anything. That old Islander Freeport, in good repair, will sail anywhere I want to go. No need to eliminate ventilation. Where I'm most likely to go, glassed over ports would be a mistake. And without GPS I'm not going anywhere much.

In fact, at the moment I've just been thinking that I could live much cheaper on a boat on Lake Travis than I am at my house. Cheaper than any condo within driving distance of my work, too. The biggest problem is just that the lake almost dried up a few years ago and probably will again in the fullness of time.

But I could sail from Rockport or Corpus Christi to the Caribbean pretty easily. I doubt I'd ever go further than that.

Not planning on the Horn or the Straights of Magellan either.  A little coastal sailing in Maine and Nova Scotia is plenty of sailing adventure to finish out my life living that dream.  In fact, not sailing it at all and just satisfying the dream of living on a boat in a nice cozy marina would be enough for me.

I can't see dropping a seaworthy boat like your Westsail on a small land-bound lake like Travis.  A big lake like Superior or Winnipeg, yes.  However, I suppose you could park it on the lake until you retire, then drag it out of the water and launch it from Corpus.  If there is fuel available to do that with of course.  I also don't see your SO as being happy living full time on a 32' boat on Travis.  If you are using it as a substitute for a condo, it would have to be bigger than that.

I'm unlikely to do either at this point, I have to be satisfied with my imagination and the pics of the boats I put up on the Diner.  You will have to do it for me when I am gone.  I'll be right with you when you hoist the sails and man the tiller.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: MOAR Motor Sailers 2!
Post by: RE on January 27, 2018, 04:59:19 AM
Today's Motor Sailer comes in at a MUCH more affordable price of $49K.  It's an old wood boat too, which I have a fondness for.  Of course, the requisite Survey needs to be done before purchase.  It's located on the WC in San Diego, not Seattle, my mistake.  But still WC.  Coming in at 47', still a pretty big one.

http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1958-kettenburg-motorsailer-47-103164120/ (http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1958-kettenburg-motorsailer-47-103164120/)

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/74/66/6387466_20171002135209182_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1263222)
(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/74/66/6387466_20171002135222052_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1263222)  (http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/74/66/6387466_20171002135224008_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1263222)
(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/74/66/6387466_20171002135226456_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1263222)  (http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/74/66/6387466_20171002135230159_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1263222)

RE

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 27, 2018, 08:41:01 AM
Another equivalent to the Nauticat is the Fisher. Another decent motorsailer based on that Baltic fishing boat design somewhat like the Nauticat, but more like a Colin Archer style double-ender. They sail well enough to remain useable after the fuel plays out. I think they're still being built, now in Sri Lanka. More than a thousand have been built, and they are considered extremely seaworthy.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/18/22/6171822_0_240120180928_1.jpg?f=/1/18/22/6171822_0_240120180928_1.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1517015958000)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 27, 2018, 08:43:00 AM
Now that's a more sensible boat, pity it's wood.

Because Bruce Roberts did so many Spray replica designs and then wrote a book documenting many of the vessels his clients built, there are dozens of these boats out there, built in just about anything a boat can be built out of. I was just cutting and pasting a pic. did not notice it was a wood hull. There are many steel ones, the more modern of which have even been welded up without hard chines and look identical to  the glass ones and the wooden ones.

There are debates among people who know boats as to just how great this design is, but many have circumnavigated. that much is certain.

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/74/66/6387466_20171002135209182_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1263222)

Very lovely old boat. Too bad these cost a fortune to maintain. It would make a fine liveaboard for the marina, no doubt.



I can't see dropping a seaworthy boat like your Westsail on a small land-bound lake like Travis.

No, for the lake I'd want a boat that can point, because you have to tack very often. A modern glass cruising boat of 36 -42 feet would be fun and big enough to live on. That Islander Freeport would work, as would an Islander 36 (different design) which is a great sailing boat originally from SF Bay area.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/45/31/4724531_20140605064312712_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/45/31/4724531_20140605064312712_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1499211158000)

This one is nice and in good repair and is in Houston, for only 28K. It would have to be trucked up here, but people do that all the time.




Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 27, 2018, 08:47:29 AM
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/18/22/6171822_0_240120180928_1.jpg?f=/1/18/22/6171822_0_240120180928_1.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1517015958000)
Another equivalent to the Nauticat is the Fisher. Another decent motorsailer based on that Baltic fishing boat design like the Nauticat. They sail well enough to remain useable after the fuel plays out. I think they're still being built, now in Sri Lanka. More than a thousand have been built, and they are considered extremely seaworthy.

I think I looked at that one and passed on it because the prices was too high and/or the location was too far away.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 27, 2018, 08:51:04 AM
They tend to be pricey. I didn't check price.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 27, 2018, 08:58:09 AM
They tend to be pricey. I didn't check price.

Also, the majority of them seem to be based in the UK.  I think they are more popular there because of the weather and the fact they have a Pilot House.  I'm going to write a full article on this topic.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 27, 2018, 11:27:52 AM
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/18/22/6171822_0_240120180928_1.jpg?f=/1/18/22/6171822_0_240120180928_1.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1517015958000)
Another equivalent to the Nauticat is the Fisher. Another decent motorsailer based on that Baltic fishing boat design like the Nauticat. They sail well enough to remain useable after the fuel plays out. I think they're still being built, now in Sri Lanka. More than a thousand have been built, and they are considered extremely seaworthy.

I think I looked at that one and passed on it because the prices was too high and/or the location was too far away.

RE

I did look at that Fisher.  It came in at $89K and parked in the UK.  Too high a price for that size boat IMHO, and how to get it here from the UK?  ???  :icon_scratch:

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: If only I was healthy...
Post by: RE on January 28, 2018, 07:35:54 AM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition and/or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fix up a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures (the lower the better)
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail due to my physical limitations
4- It needs to have a fully enclosed Pilot House
5- It needs to be parked in the FSoA


Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.  BUT, if I am buying this boat just for ME to live on and not partnering or using it as an escape vehicle for a Gaggle of Diners, do I really need a 50' boat with all the extra maintenance costs that entails?  Of course not!  Every extra foot at the waterline costs you more in dockage fees.  All the hardware and sails are bigger and more expensive.  Haul Outs and paint jobs more expensive.  All I really need is a functional Galley and Head, a comfortable Berth, Standing Headroom and a nice Nav Station/Office from which I can Admin the Diner.  This is more than you get in the cabin of a Freightliner, which I lived in for nearly 7 years.  So while I continue to look at the bigger "Dream Boats", I'm also now seeking out the smaller ones which fit the criteria.  Here's the Cape Dory 30, located in FL and coming in at an asking price of $44.5K.  I can Jew this down to $40K I am sure, maybe less.

(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713104820483_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=800&h=400)
(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713103910497_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=600&h=425&exact=1) (http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713103941287_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=600&h=425&exact=1)

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)

Going with the smaller boat size given I can find a similarly priced bigger one, what are the advantages and disadvantages to weigh here in making the decision?

Big Boat Advantages:

1- Much more live aboard room, very comfortable and closer to the size of a typical apartment.
2- More storage space for preps, water and fuel with longer offshore trips possible
3- More room for Diners to come and visit for convocations and cruising to secluded coves

Big Boat Disadvantages:

1- More expensive maintenance fees.  Prices for everything rise by the foot exponentially.
2- Harder to sail with a small crew.
3- Bigger draft, so fewer places you can safely sail without grounding the vessel.

Small Boat Advantages

1- Compact with less room you have to keep clean and organized
2- More fuel efficient.  Important for Motor Sailers.
3- Easily handled by 1 or 2 people.

Small Boat Disadvantages

1- A little cramped compared to the Big Boats.
2- Less fuel, water and prep storage meaning shorter range.
3- Not much room for friends to visit and go cruising.

Now, in weighing this out for myself in my current decrepit physical condition the smaller boats win.  I don't need a really long range and lots of fuel storage because I am NOT going to do any big Blue Water crossings of the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans.  I am not circumnavigating or rounding Cape Horn or the Cape of Good Hope.  I will NOT be sailing in the Roaring 40s!  The longest crossing I might semi-realistically attempt would be from FL to the Virgin Islands, and you can Island Hop to get there.  I doubt I can Save As Many As I Can with a bigger boat, and besides if/when that becomes necessary we just steal some boats for the evacuation and GTFO of Dodge as a Flotilla.  If more than a few Diners show up for a Convocation, we pack along tents and head for a cove no more than a day or two sail from the Marina and set up an on shore camp.  On a 30' boat, you can easily carry a dozen people for a day sail, although it is a bit crowded.  I've been on 30' Fishing Trawlers with a dozen people.   Or you charter a big boat for the Convocation.

All I need is a boat with enough room for me most of the time which is economical to own and maintain on my meager income; with enough range to do coastal sailing and which a cripple can handle himself, at least under power.  The small boats fit this criteria.

The next question in this thought experiment is just what I would stock on the boat for SHTF Day?  ???   :icon_scratch:  I'll explore this question in a blog article at a future date.  Not so much for myself really as for other Doomers looking for a decent Bugout Plan which doesn't require gobs of money to organize up.  I still do hope for a Miraculous Recovery and finding a Doctor who can think outside his specialty and figure out precisely what is wrong with me and develop a treatment plan that will heal me up before SHTF Day arrives, but this doesn't seem all that likely at the moment.  Just in case a Miracle does happen though, I want to have the Plan in place and ready to execute.

Suggestions for what YOU would stock on the boat to be ready for SHTF Day and how you would organize your total Plan are :hi:.  If you are able bodied, you don't have to go with the Motor Sailer configuration, you can go with a more typical sailing yacht.  Or you could go with a Fishing Trawler if you think you will be able to get Diesel at least long enough to GTFO of Dodge in time.  The only restriction here is that the boat needs to be 35' or less  for up to 2 people.  If you have kids, you can go to 45'.

Here's another real cute Pocket Motor Sailer coming in at 27'.  Not under consideration because it is parked in the UK.  Quite reasonably priced though at £19,500.

https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/Motorboats/lm-27-motor-sailer-sloop-rigged/34696 (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/Motorboats/lm-27-motor-sailer-sloop-rigged/34696)

(https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_0_1405349650_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_1_1405349652_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_2_1405349653_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_4_1405349659_img.jpg)

...and one more which comes in just under the wire at 34' although somewhat overpriced at $69.5K.  Looks like it is parked in NZ though, so not under serious consideration.

https://www.marinehub.co.nz/boats-for-sale/wagstaff/34-motorsailer/79f788b2-7265-4a00-b5d8-5aaac9ec5f1e?offset=0 (https://www.marinehub.co.nz/boats-for-sale/wagstaff/34-motorsailer/79f788b2-7265-4a00-b5d8-5aaac9ec5f1e?offset=0)
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29e49c0-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a2a3877a-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a2a49f43-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

...if only I was healthy... :'(

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Golden Oxen on January 28, 2018, 08:37:55 AM
Perhaps it sounds a bit crazy but I find just sitting near the ocean almost as good as sailing on it.

The hours spent in my car with all the windows open and moon roof open parked along the ocean in Maine or New Hampshire are the happiest and most peaceful of times for me. My stress and anxieties disappear and a calm and trance come over me like hypnosis from the sound and presence of the ocean. Doesn't matter if there are other folks around or near the water either, they seem to fade off into another dimension or reality.

My most productive thinking sessions come from those visits and my reading comprehension increases dramatically into a total involvement in the matter.

The trance and magic like state leave instantly upon returning to the road and heading away from the ocean.     :dontknow:

                                     (https://b1e2.https.cdn.softlayer.net/80B1E2/files.maine.bvk.geoconsensus.com/portal/vtmUR783492SDESDF234/images/content/original/vtm55317745555AF0C80.jpg)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 28, 2018, 09:25:32 AM
Perhaps it sounds a bit crazy but I find just sitting near the ocean almost as good as sailing on it.

I like hanging out sitting by the ocean and watching the waves come in as well.  It is good for clearing your mind of distractions.  Still not quite what it's like to be on a sailboat with the wind driving you forward  with full sails though.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 28, 2018, 09:47:24 AM
There is a school of single people who live aboard who think smaller is better. It is EASIER, when it comes to things like getting in and out of
 a slip, anchoring, and sail handling.

There are a bunch of boats designed to fit that dream. Perhaps the best one, and certainly one of the best looking, is the Flicka 20.

(http://cdn.bluewaterboats.org/gallery/flicka-20/flicka20-louisanon-2.jpg)

Expect to pay more than you'd think. They aren't cheap boats. Looks like 25K is about average.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 28, 2018, 10:00:48 AM
Those Cape Dories are nice boats, but they are made with a plastic liner, so if you get holed in a collision (or a thru-hull fails) you might sink before you can get to the problem area to plug it. This is the main complaint I've heard about them.

Also, they aren't designed as a motorsailer either. It's just the sailboat with a different cabin top. The kicker is probably minimal for motoring, and the tanks are small, I expect.

For cold water and cold weather a Nimble might be better. That's another micro design for the minimalist. I think they're set up for an outboard.

(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics8/picnimble26108c.jpg)



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 28, 2018, 10:09:03 AM
(http://cdn.bluewaterboats.org/gallery/flicka-20/flicka20-louisanon-2.jpg)
There is a school of single people who live aboard who think smaller is better. It is EASIER, when it comes to things like getting in and out of
 a slip, anchoring, and sail handling.

There are a bunch of boats designed to fit that dream. Perhaps the best one, and certainly one of the best looking, is the Flicka 20.

Expect to pay more than you'd think. They aren't cheap boats. Looks like 25K is about average.

20' is getting a little TOO small, IMHO.  Particularly since the price differential from 30' boats is not significant here, nor are overall maintenance costs.  I also haven't run across any of these boats for sale in the FSoA.  Have you got any pics of the interior cabin for one of these microscopic sized boats?

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 28, 2018, 10:14:53 AM
Also, they aren't designed as a motorsailer either. It's just the sailboat with a different cabin top. The kicker is probably minimal for motoring, and the tanks are small, I expect.

Yea, I was unhappy with the fuel storage and engine horsepower too for this boat. :P  I would like at least minimum 100 gal of fuel storage and 50 HP engine to push one of these things through a decent gale.  Finding everything you want in one boat is hard though.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner
Post by: RE on January 30, 2018, 05:58:59 AM
The decision has been made!  The Envelope Pleeez...

(https://d3j0sq6zklqdqq.cloudfront.net/photos/2015/06/02/107-26652-johnny-carson-carnac-1433273047.jpg)

...and the Winner (for now) is...

The Wagstaff 34 located in NZ!
(https://www.marinehub.co.nz/boats-for-sale/wagstaff/34-motorsailer/79f788b2-7265-4a00-b5d8-5aaac9ec5f1e?offset=0)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

(https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=l&ai=DChcSEwimyazgw_zYAhULV34KHS8FB7kYABAVGgJwYw&sig=AOD64_2GUHDohmGAKm0YRDCT7BQpBzhclw&ctype=5&q=&ved=0ahUKEwiz7qjgw_zYAhVMVWMKHSaQA6oQwjwINg&adurl=)
Listed at $69.5K, I jewed the seller down to $61K.  I arranged for the boat to be shipped to Seattle by Seven Star Yacht Transport (http://www.sevenstar-yacht-transport.com/) for $8000.  So I am getting this boat for $70K.  My goal is to fit it out for SHTF Day and stay under $100K.  Here is what she comes with on arrival in Seattle:

http://www.youtube.com/v/P2GW-qqE3GU
Features    Details
Year Launched Approx   1986
Manufacturer / Design   Wagstaff
Model   34 Motorsailer
Stock #   VY4702-B
Construction
LOA approx   10.36 m (34')
Beam approx   3.2 m (10.5')
Hull Type   Round bilge, full keel.
Hull Construction Material   Hull - strip planked timber glassed over, teak decks. Teak decks.
Draft   1.37 m (4.5')
Engineering
Engine Name    50hp 4 cyl Nanni diesel (fresh water cooled)
Drive   Twin Disc TMC60 2R (new), 18" 3 blade prop
Cruising Speed approx   7.5 Knots
Fuel Capacity approx   320 Litres (84.5 gal)
Water Capacity approx   400 Litres (105.7 gal)
Rig
Spars   Alloy
Sails   Main and furling headsail
Rigging   S/S
Interior
Berths   5

The delivery specs are quite close to what I was looking for with a 50HP engine and 85 gallons of diesel storage.  I can bring that up to the 100 gal I was looking for with a couple of 10 gal jerry cans, or have an auxiliary tank installed.  For now, I'll go with the jerry cans and save that expense.  The jerry cans come in around $20 each at Walmart.

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcSF7yDI6mGP8uRmT0ZstexBMWX_rdyIw3lhGP2p8hFiC6VfUo5MKyZnt7GU4YOubcus1_FiDZs&usqp=CAE)
Water capacity at 400 gal is very good.  Even if I drank 1 gal/day (which I don't) this lasts more than a year.  Besides, I WILL install a reverse osmosis watermaker as one of my upgrades.  The one at left comes in around $600.  I'll budget $1000 to include installation and hardware.  1000 gal/day pssible according to spec, but I can't imagine having to run it 24/7 to get that out of it.  Most fresh water to be collected either onshore or through rainwater collection.

Now we have to look at what ammendations the boat needs to be the best SHTF Day GTFO of Dodge vehicle it can be, given its size limitations.  For today's installment of this series, I'm going to look at the basic 12V Electrical system.

The specs don't detail the electrical system for this boat, so I am going to assume it comes with the typical arrangement for this size boat of 2 deep cycle marine batts and an alternator run off the diesel engine to charge those batts.  It does not appear to have any solar or wind setup to charge the batts that I can see.

First purchase is another DC Marine Batt to up the number of main 12V Batt components to 3.  This also allows me to work with 36V Solar V Panels if I wire in series.  Higher voltage PV Panels are more efficient.  Cost for additional Batt, about $100 new, then cost for reconfiguring my Batt compartment to handle this, another $500 for this if I employ someone.  If I am miraculously fit enough to do it myself, maybe $100 in parts and 2 days labor.  I actually own the additional Batt already, so this isn't a new cost for me.  Many of the items I already have on hand go aboard the GSDD.  Cost's here are for others who are starting their prepping from scratch.

(http://www.ecodirect.com/v/vspfiles/photos/Canadian-Solar-CS6U-330P-4BB-2.jpg)
(http://satpro.tv/marine/seamages/PYI-WG-TD4-003_R.png)
With 3 Batts, I am going to run a 36V system for charging purposes and step it down to 12V for most of my appliances, along with running a variety of A/C inverters at various output wattage from a low of 75W (got one of those  :icon_sunny: ) to 500W and up to a 2000W Pure Sine Wave inverter for real energy intensive electric stuff.  I will be using 3 330W 36V Solar PV Panels to keep these charged, along with two Marine Wind Turbines.  Total cost including installation, ~$2000.

With the new powerful electric system installed, we will add outboard Electric Trolling motors to use as auxiliaries instead of the diesel in most situations.  We'll go with an 8HP Torqeedo with bow and stern mounts coming in at a price new of $4500.  We'll want 2 of these, so this is our biggest upgrade expense for around $10K unless we can find used or DIY the electric motors.  You can actually get Torqeedos up to 40HP, but these suckers are EXPENSIVE!   Close to $30K a popl  If I was considering going All Electric with the boat, I would consider getting two of these.  However, with the 50 HP Diesel already on board, that is just too much money to spend.

On the inside, we'll replace the refrigerator with a top loading freezer and use a cooler for refrigeration purposes, making ice for the cooler in the freezer.
(https://www.torqeedo.com/on/demandware.static/-/Sites-torqeedo-master/default/dwa09aee34/torqeedo/outboards/cruise/cruise-40-r/1/torqeedo-cruise-40-r-280x280.jpg)
  As backup, we'll carry a portable Ice Maker which I already own.

For electronics upgrades, we'll add radar and sonar and HAM radio, as well as 2 Walkie-Talkies operating on Marine VHF frequency.  We'll also add a Drone to use to survey landfall locations for Zombies and to look for sources of water.  Probably about $5000 to be spent on electronics.

I have spent about 2/3rds of the $30K I have available for upgrades at this point.  We'll look at smaller hardware & food storage items in the next installment of Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner.  :icon_sunny:

Cmdr. RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on January 30, 2018, 06:23:00 AM
I have a Torqueedo, and I'm not that impressed with it. I'd definitely go for the one that will run off regular lead acid or gel/mat batteries.  It might be a useful piece of equipment if you can keep batteries alive.

Flicka interior:

(http://threesheetsnw.com/files/2013/04/forepeak.jpg)

(http://cdn.bluewaterboats.org/gallery/flicka-20/flicka20-layout.gif)

It's an efficiency.

The Nimble with the pilot house cabin looks like this.

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ_ERsQ2cEVN5ZULy15iSXGoW9DfYx599t1ZgJ2KJeTrW_BwnUm)

I like a bigger boat, within reason. More room to store stuff. I have a lot of stuff. Not sure if i showed you this one. It's lying near Galveston, ready to go. 69K asking price.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/37/86/6383786_20170929070616889_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/37/86/6383786_20170929070616889_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1506674517000)



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 30, 2018, 06:27:48 AM
I have a Torqueedo, and I'm not that impressed with it. I'd definitely go for the one that will run off regular lead acid or gel/mat batteries.  It might be a useful piece of equipment if you can keep batteries alive.

In Fantasyland, I would simply buy a couple of 5000W electric motors and wire them up myself with a propeller on the shaft.  At the moment however I am just looking at off the shelf components.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on January 30, 2018, 02:30:40 PM
uhm... May I suggest you replace the existing batteries. Mixing different ages and sizes on a bank is not a good plan. Then go straight to 24 or much better 48 volts.. both of those voltages are common 36 is not. another problem is drawing that kind of motor amperage from a small bank is asking for trouble even for short bursts. buy a big bank, weight does not matter as much in a boat. I looked at the torqueedo and most of them are available in 48 volts. with a 48 volt configuration you are in the 2-4 gauge range for cabling to the motor which is doable. if you do do 36 volts when you put 1000 watts of solar on it install a charge controller. Yes your panels are technically rated at 36-40 volts but realistically unless in perfect sun at the perfect angle you will get very little charging from them that way. Insert a charger like this:
http://www.midnitesolar.com/productPhoto.php?product_ID=669&productCatName=Software&productCat_ID=43&sortOrder=1&act=p (http://www.midnitesolar.com/productPhoto.php?product_ID=669&productCatName=Software&productCat_ID=43&sortOrder=1&act=p)
as an added bonus the kid does genny starting and works at 36 volts. With it you can daisy chain all three panels together at 100 ish volts and get good charging even in crappy weather. I would suggest a step down transformer for the 12 volt loads like lights and small inverters common in golf carts http://www.ebay.com/bhp/48v-to-12v-converter (http://www.ebay.com/bhp/48v-to-12v-converter)
 but a 48 volt inverter for the big stuff. Aims is a good enough one on a budget. Outback marine would be better but pricey. It also has a charger for when you are in port so you can leave for the day fully charged.
 https://www.ebay.com/itm/2000-Watt-Pure-Sine-Inverter-Charger-12-Volt-24-Volt-and-48-Volt-By-AIMS/173072094938?epid=9011364607&hash=item284be696da:m:mQGtrjZ7e9SQ9zuJZ6Lrj6Q (https://www.ebay.com/itm/2000-Watt-Pure-Sine-Inverter-Charger-12-Volt-24-Volt-and-48-Volt-By-AIMS/173072094938?epid=9011364607&hash=item284be696da:m:mQGtrjZ7e9SQ9zuJZ6Lrj6Q)
Dont skimp on safety dc breakers and disconnects
http://www.midnitesolar.com/productPhoto.php?product_ID=74&productCatName=Mini%20%20DC%20Disconnect&productCat_ID=8&sortOrder=3&act=p (http://www.midnitesolar.com/productPhoto.php?product_ID=74&productCatName=Mini%20%20DC%20Disconnect&productCat_ID=8&sortOrder=3&act=p)

David B.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 30, 2018, 03:52:07 PM
uhm... May I suggest you replace the existing batteries. Mixing different ages and sizes on a bank is not a good plan. Then go straight to 24 or much better 48 volts.. both of those voltages are common 36 is not. another problem is drawing that kind of motor amperage from a small bank is asking for trouble even for short bursts. buy a big bank, weight does not matter as much in a boat. I looked at the torqueedo and most of them are available in 48 volts. with a 48 volt configuration you are in the 2-4 gauge range for cabling to the motor which is doable. if you do do 36 volts when you put 1000 watts of solar on it install a charge controller. Yes your panels are technically rated at 36-40 volts but realistically unless in perfect sun at the perfect angle you will get very little charging from them that way. Insert a charger like this:
http://www.midnitesolar.com/productPhoto.php?product_ID=669&productCatName=Software&productCat_ID=43&sortOrder=1&act=p (http://www.midnitesolar.com/productPhoto.php?product_ID=669&productCatName=Software&productCat_ID=43&sortOrder=1&act=p)
as an added bonus the kid does genny starting and works at 36 volts. With it you can daisy chain all three panels together at 100 ish volts and get good charging even in crappy weather. I would suggest a step down transformer for the 12 volt loads like lights and small inverters common in golf carts http://www.ebay.com/bhp/48v-to-12v-converter (http://www.ebay.com/bhp/48v-to-12v-converter)
 but a 48 volt inverter for the big stuff. Aims is a good enough one on a budget. Outback marine would be better but pricey. It also has a charger for when you are in port so you can leave for the day fully charged.
 https://www.ebay.com/itm/2000-Watt-Pure-Sine-Inverter-Charger-12-Volt-24-Volt-and-48-Volt-By-AIMS/173072094938?epid=9011364607&hash=item284be696da:m:mQGtrjZ7e9SQ9zuJZ6Lrj6Q (https://www.ebay.com/itm/2000-Watt-Pure-Sine-Inverter-Charger-12-Volt-24-Volt-and-48-Volt-By-AIMS/173072094938?epid=9011364607&hash=item284be696da:m:mQGtrjZ7e9SQ9zuJZ6Lrj6Q)
Dont skimp on safety dc breakers and disconnects
http://www.midnitesolar.com/productPhoto.php?product_ID=74&productCatName=Mini%20%20DC%20Disconnect&productCat_ID=8&sortOrder=3&act=p (http://www.midnitesolar.com/productPhoto.php?product_ID=74&productCatName=Mini%20%20DC%20Disconnect&productCat_ID=8&sortOrder=3&act=p)

David B.

I bow to the expert on this one.  Will go with 48V.  I will use a DC step down transformer to get 12V power out of the bank without having to disconnect batts.

(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/sogAAOSwsBtaMQcf/s-l500.jpg)

How much do you project your 48V system will cost all together?

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on January 30, 2018, 05:27:02 PM
Price will depend on the battery bank. I think prices were on the links for everything else. If I had to do it I'd want l16 sized but as a smaller option t105. Expect half the system cost in batteries.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on January 30, 2018, 06:46:04 PM
Marine banks tend to favor agm but personally I think flooded lead acid take a punch better and comes back from abuse. Based on 1000 watts of solar at 48 volts that is 20 amps of charging. Batteries are happiest charging at 10 percent of rated capacity so ideally 8 100-125 Ahr batteries in the 12 volt family. You would have 2 strings but I think that the extra cabling is worth it at sea. Flooded if you can vent them agm if you can't.  I hear Sams club is a popular choice for batteries in the US.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 30, 2018, 08:10:37 PM
Marine banks tend to favor agm but personally I think flooded lead acid take a punch better and comes back from abuse. Based on 1000 watts of solar at 48 volts that is 20 amps of charging. Batteries are happiest charging at 10 percent of rated capacity so ideally 8 100-125 Ahr batteries in the 12 volt family. You would have 2 strings but I think that the extra cabling is worth it at sea. Flooded if you can vent them agm if you can't.  I hear Sams club is a popular choice for batteries in the US.

All the Sam's Clubs here in Alaska were closed.  However I think I could get those Batts at Batts & Bulbs for around $120 each.  Venting on a boat would be difficult, so I would go with the agm.  8 batts is a lot though, so I think I will cut the system size down in half to 500W.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on January 30, 2018, 09:11:05 PM
If you already have the panels install all 3. The kid or most good charge controllers will allow you to limit the total current going into the batteries at any one time. It also has a dump feature as well. Over solaring is the new normal now. Great functions for places like Seattle.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on January 30, 2018, 09:15:32 PM
If you already have the panels install all 3. The kid or most good charge controllers will allow you to limit the total current going into the batteries at any one time. It also has a dump feature as well. Over solar ing is the new normal now.

The solar panels I REALLY have are 120W & 12V and out of date.  I'll need new solar panels anyhow, so I'll go for 2 48V @ 250W each.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 2
Post by: RE on January 31, 2018, 05:58:03 AM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
  We have fit out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner with the main components for renewable electric power as well as auxiliary electric propulsion systems to back up the main 50HP diesel kicker.  Now we need to look at preps to carry on board to make the post SHTF Day survival a bit easier for a while.  Hopefully long enough that it lasts until I Buy my Ticket to the Great Beyond.  ::)

(http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/21857574.jpg)
The boat does not appear to have a tender included, aka small boat to use to get from an anchorage position to shore.  For this we will go with a Seyvlor Inflatable that we can power with one of the 8HP Torqeedo motors, or row if necessary.  Cost around $2000 new, but we can probably pick one up on the used market for $500.

We'll dispense with the idea of packing along a survival raft if the GSDD is holed and going to Davey Jones Locker.  If she is going down, I will go with her.  It is traditional for the Captain to go down with the ship.  I would like to go out that way anyhow.  Short of a massive coronary while I am asleep, I can't think of any way to kick the bucket I would like more than that.

Far as maintenance and spear fishing/lobstering are concerned, we will invest in a Hookah System electric powered floating compressor with a 100' hose to use while anchored in secluded coves on uninhabited islands off the coast of Maine and Nova Scotia.  100' is more than enough depth to do good lobstering, it's usually between 25'-50'.  Besides that, when you dive and spend much time at 100' you gotta worry about the BENDS on the way back up.  In my diving days when I was still an athletic and adventurous individual I about never went below 50'.  This is plenty deep to get a nice look at the life forms beneath the sea.  In fact you can get a pretty good look just Snorkeling if you can hold your breath for a minute or so.

We will also include a SCUBA (Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus)tank for some free diving away from the GSDD.  Said tank can also be used to drive Compressed Air  Tools like Impact Drivers and the like.  These are very handy devices.

Compressed air is in fact one of the most powerful tools we have courtesy of the Age of Oil you want to conserve as long as you can.  Making those high pressure cannisters for holding the gas is not likely to last a long time.  Besides the SCUBA tank, I would also have at least one tool compressor tank aboard as well.  Finding room for all this stuff may become problematic though at some point on a 34' boat.  ::)

(https://www.browniesthirdlunginfo.com/images/gas/f390x-brownies-third-lung-gas-recreational.jpg)

The Hookah system will allow us to do basic hull maintenance and repairs without having to haul the boat out of the water into dry dock, although this probably becomes necessary after 5 years or so.  It also will allow us to go down to the bottom to seek out shellfish like Lobsters, Scallops, Mussels and Oysters and do some Spear Fishing.

We also will carry a full set of Ryobi 18V Rechargeable electric tools, including (but not necessarily limited to) the following:

(http://toolguyd.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Ryobi-18V-Cordless-Combo-Kit-P1872.jpg)
1- Drill
2- Circular Saw
3- Reciprocating Saw
4- Jig Saw
5- Chain Saw
6- Router
7- Water Pump
8- Vacuum
9- Disc Sander

I have most of these already, so not a new expense.  :icon_sunny:

We'll also have on board Compressed Air Tools like an Impact Driver and of course an array of Hand Tools as well.

In our next installment of Fitting Out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner we'll lok at some of our Food Preps and shore living gear.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 02, 2018, 06:54:09 PM
This one is on the hard near Galveston Bay. Looks like it needs some love, but these boats are supposed to sail very well. It doesn't show in the photo, but I think this is a big canoe stern boat, but they're said to sail well and point to weather well.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00U0U_k7Yu1ZsnBdU_600x450.jpg)

https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/formosa-sailing-vessel/6479838289.html

It's what was known as a Slocum 42. It isn't the leaky teaky William Garden  design. More like a Passport. 1980's technology. They draw 6.5 feet of water. Not a great boat for the bays on the Texas coast, but nice for blue water. But, only asking 30K. I could drive there in 3 hours and have a look.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 02, 2018, 06:57:31 PM
Sistership, for more photos and to show what a well kept one looks like.

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1982/Formosa-Slocum-3173513/FL/United-States#.WnUkwJM-dsM (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1982/Formosa-Slocum-3173513/FL/United-States#.WnUkwJM-dsM)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 02, 2018, 07:11:38 PM
Sistership, for more photos and to show what a well kept one looks like.

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1982/Formosa-Slocum-3173513/FL/United-States#.WnUkwJM-dsM (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1982/Formosa-Slocum-3173513/FL/United-States#.WnUkwJM-dsM)

My Sunday Brunch Article this week is another in the Seastead series.  I was going to publish it in the forum here, but it got long and I think it's worth a blog article now.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day - MOVED
Post by: RE on February 03, 2018, 10:31:23 AM
Eddie's "Seastead of the Day" thread here has been moved to the Seasteading board, where it is the Feature Thread now.

For today's  Seastead, I'll feature a bigger Motor Sailer which is a bit out of my budget but sure would be comfy.  With 7500 ltr fuel and 1000 ltr water it will go a long way under power alone. Priced new @ $1.1M and up depending on what options you order.  Not sure what they fetch on the used market these days if you can find one.  A McIntyre 50.

https://www.tradeboats.com.au/tradeaboat-reviews/boats/0912/mcintyre-50-motor-sailer-review (https://www.tradeboats.com.au/tradeaboat-reviews/boats/0912/mcintyre-50-motor-sailer-review)

(https://d3lp4xedbqa8a5.cloudfront.net/imagegen/cp/black/800/600/assets/TradeBoats/TABOnceOff/61443/8673.jpg)

(https://d3lp4xedbqa8a5.cloudfront.net/imagegen/cp/black/800/600/assets/TradeBoats/TABOnceOff/61443/8679.jpg)  (https://d3lp4xedbqa8a5.cloudfront.net/imagegen/cp/black/800/600/assets/TradeBoats/TABOnceOff/61443/8681.jpg)(https://d3lp4xedbqa8a5.cloudfront.net/imagegen/cp/black/800/600/assets/TradeBoats/TABOnceOff/61443/8680.jpg)  (https://d3lp4xedbqa8a5.cloudfront.net/imagegen/cp/black/800/600/assets/TradeBoats/TABOnceOff/61443/8672.jpg)

I'll have a full Feature Article tomorrow for Sunday Brunch on the Blog for outfitting the Good Ship Doomstead Diner for SHTF Day.  A MUST READ if you are organizing a Boat Based Bugout plan.

...if only I was healthy... :'(

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Seattle Sailboats for Sale
Post by: RE on February 03, 2018, 04:09:49 PM
I found a bunch of nice Motor Sailers in WA at good prices!  :icon_sunny:  This home built 22' boat coming in at just $16K!

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/53/72/5775372_0_190520171057_1.jpg?t=1452067200000&w=1200&h=1200)

A little too small for me, but for a Millenial Wannabee Yachtie Survivalist with a low budget, probably a good choice.

I like this Bruckman 50' model.  Looks like it has good lines and would sail well as well as motor well.  Great Cabin design and quality from the pics.

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/62/92/616292_0_230620101303_5.jpg?t=1275003160000&w=1200&h=1200) (http://images.boats.com/resize/1/62/92/616292_0_230620101303_2.jpg?t=1275003160000&w=1200&h=1200)

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/2017-bruckmann-mk-ii-motorsailer-616292/#.WnZNuOeUuUl (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/2017-bruckmann-mk-ii-motorsailer-616292/#.WnZNuOeUuUl)

Have my article for tomorrow finished for Sunday Brunch.  Titled now Boat Bugout Planning.   :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 03, 2018, 05:06:29 PM
They always have nice boats for sale up there, usually for good prices. Slips are super expensive. Looking forward to your article.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 03, 2018, 05:23:17 PM
They always have nice boats for sale up there, usually for good prices. Slips are super expensive. Looking forward to your article.

If I bought one there, I would motor it out of Seattle in a big hurry.  Head for the marina in Ocean Falls with Peter.

(http://www.canadiannaturephotographer.com/oceanfalls/_DSC5330.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 03, 2018, 05:34:56 PM
I could sure see living on a mooring there. But I've never lived anywhere that cold or wet. It'd be fine in high summer. The best.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 03, 2018, 05:41:40 PM
I could sure see living on a mooring there. But I've never lived anywhere that cold or wet. It'd be fine in high summer. The best.

Ocean Falls is not that cold because it's right on the water.  Damn wet though for sure.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 03, 2018, 05:54:44 PM
They have snow. I've seen pictures.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 03, 2018, 06:07:20 PM
They have snow. I've seen pictures.

Snow does NOT = COLD

It only needs to be a little below 32F to get snow.  That is not cold, it's shorts and shirtsleeves weather.  -20F is getting cold.  Fairbanks weather.   These days, we hardly ever see those temps even here in the Mat-Su Valley.  We are getting plenty of wind though, which brings the wind chill factor down quite a bit.  Not sure what the wind situation is like in Ocean Falls.

RE
Title: Boat Bugout Planning
Post by: RE on February 04, 2018, 05:29:29 AM


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Published on the Doomstead Diner on February 4, 2018



 






Discuss this article at the Doomsteading Table inside the Diner



 



Note: There are inside jokes in this article you won't get if you are not a regular Diner.  If you wonder why I made a reference, just move on. lol.



 



Home Built 22 2009 Homebuilt 22 for sale in Edmonds, WA My friend and co-Admin on the Diner Eddie and myself are both Sailing Enthusiasts, although neither of us currently own a boat you could reasonably do a Bugout with when TSHTF.  Eddie is in a better position to actually do this, he has a good deal more MONEY than I do, and he is Healthier too.  I do hope for a miraculous recovery from my various health problems though, and I do have enough MONEY to pursue the Seasteading paradigm that I outline here.  It's probably more than a typical Millenial has available, but it can be reduced substantially also, particularly if you are a handy sort of person who can do refurbishing and repair yourself.  Damaged boats like these go for pennies on the dollar quite often, and there are quite a few of them around Houston/Corpus Christi for instance these days in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.  Also numerous ones in the Brit & FSoA Virgin Islands.  At auction, you can sometimes pick up a 30' boat in reasonable condition for under $10K.  The little Pocket Cruiser at right is asking $16K and in good shape in Edmonds, WA.  Possibly affordable for a Millenial working as a Starbucks Barrista and saving his pennies while living in Mom's basement in the McMansion and keeping bizzy on the X-Box.  If he is not spending his excess income on Ganja, he can pour it into fixing up the boat and getting it ready for SHTF Day.  Once it is in decent shape also, he'll be able to move out of mom's basement and play the X-Box games in the cabin.  He might even get laid once or twice also. lol.



This paradigm is also cheaper than buying your own Doomstead and fitting that out for post SHTF Day Survival.  Buying land and setting up such a location is pretty expensive, and you need to do it well out of range of the Big Shities.  This takes you away from work opportunities for making higher wages while the money is still good.  You are also limited in that paradigm because you are subject to the vissicitudes of Nature for that neighborhood.  A beautiful Doomstead in the Canadian Wilderness can be wiped out by a forest fire in a heartbeat these days, even if you can run your car on charcoal gas you make yourself and heat your cabin in -20F temps.  Drought around your Texas Doomstead can ruin that plan in fair short order too.  Of course, you ALSO have the issue of Protecting & Defending your Doomstead once the political landscape collapses, since your "Title" to the property won't be worth a hill of beans at that point.  The cops you might try calling to help you fight of the Zombies probably would take your preps from you themselves after the Zombies were wiped out.



The "Seasteading" paradigm is hardly free of its own problems though.  Boats aren't very secure when docked or moored and easily burglarized or the whole damn boat stolen.  At sea as time goes by here in collapse you'll likely have to worry about Pirates too.  This already is a significant problem for Yachties sailing around Africa and the Mediterranean.   Modern boats also have a lot of parts which can (and will eventually) fail, and you can only carry so many spare parts and sails on a relatively small boat.  Then of course you have the traditional problems of the weather, which isn't getting any better these days.  Quite a few yachties lost their floating homes in the Carribean this year when the Hurricanes barreled through town.



http://www.tenayatravels.com/images/2012%20April/end%20of%20trip%20round%20NZ/Doubtful%20Walks-106.JPG Despite these disadvantages, the Seasteading paradigm has a lot of romantic appeal, along with some realistic advantages as well.  If you live aboard NOW, before SHTF Day you can do it cheaper than either mortgaging for a McMansion or even just renting a flat in many overpriced real estate markets.  You can also change your location and take your dwelling with you to find work, although you are generally limited to the coastlines.  That is however where most of the population lives, so there are some opportunities for work still available in various places.  When SHTF Day comes to your neighborhood, you can make your escape (in theory) to virtually anywhere in the world if you are a capable enough sailor.  You could head for an Island in the South Pacific in a Tropical Rainforest Paradise to do daily battle with PYTHONS who want to share your living space, or the Fjords of New Zealand or even to Tristan da Cunha, Edinburgh of the Seven Seas, considered the most remote island on earth and home to about 300 inbred Brits. lol..



In this article, I examine some of the gear you want to have along with you, packed on your floating Bugout Machine all the time for a quick escape to GTFO of Dodge.  This article is actually the 3rd in a series I have been pursuing with Eddie on the Seasteading Forum Inside the Diner.  You can find the first two articles in the series in that thread, along with many suggestions from both Eddie and myself on worthwhile and affordable boats to consider for a Seasteading SHTF Day prep paradigm.



Disclaimer:  By NO MEANS is a Seasteading Prep Plan infallible, or necessarily even the best one for anybody.  There is no way to avoid all the problems that will occur during a full on Collapse Scenario.  However, as prep planning goes, it's one of the better ones and also one of the more affordable ones to pursue.  It's a whole lot better than throwing up your hands and just giving up and morphing into a misanthropic nihilist impatiently waiting for everyone including himself to die. Set a goal for yourself and make it happen.  Even if you fail it's better than moaning and groaning about your impending death.



 



Now, onto planning for SHTF Day on the Good Ship Doomstead Diner…



 




⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 3










Land Preps & Food



Staying at sea 100% of the time while in theory possible if you can live on just fish is generally not a real good plan for a bugout.  You're going to need to make shore some of the time to collect food of one sort or another.  Most repairs to a boat are far better accomplished at a dock, even if you don't haul it out of the water.  So you need to plan for making shore in some places at some times for some length of time, although that could vary quite a bit.



You have 2 basic types of shore locations you could pull into, developed ones from the Industrial Culture with Marinas and currently with supplies you can buy with $MONEY$, and Primitive ones, secluded coves on Islands and in Fjords where there are no services, but also no dangerous people.  Once SHTF Day arrives,  Marinas probably will not be terrifically safe, nor will you likely be able to buy much with money which has gone basically worthless.



Right now the Yachty Live-Aboard lifestyle is fairly EZ, so long as you have the boat and a steady supply of Mailbox Money rolling in from SS, Pensions and/or Investments.  Things become a LOT tougher once you take those things away.  Basically the only reason people in 3rd World Island Paradises tolerate retired Brits, Krauts, Frogs, & Yanks is because they are a source of $MONEY$ for their economy.  Take away the money, they will be White Meat on the BBQ in the backyard in no time.  White folks living in 3rd World countries will be mercilessly SLAUGHTERED by the locals in a Grand Celebration of throwing off the last vestiges of colonial rule.



So while today a Ray Jason of the blog Sea Gypsie Philosopher can live comfortably and cheaply on the Aventura cruising around the Carribean marinas where he can get free Wi-Fi along with his docking fee, if you are planning on using your vessel as a Bugout Machine for SHTF Day, you more have to consider what you will need to make life somewhat more pleasant in a secluded cove on an island off the coast of Maine (or wherever your choice of secluded coves happens to be located).



In this installment of the series, we are going to look at some of the Preps you will want to have aboard at all times, safely stowed away for SHTF Day when you have to GTFO of Dodge in a hurry and can't make one more Last Prep Run to Walmart.  On a boat the size of the GSDD, you run into problems here with stowage space for all the STUFF you might want to carry with you to make on-shore living in primitive locations a bit easier to set up.  If you are the dude from the Primitive Technology Utoob Website of course you can do everything with a stone axe you make yourself and a pair of shorts purchased at K-mart, but most of us are not quite that resourceful.

 






 


So, if you are not a Primitive Survivalist Professional, what do you want to try and stuff in the Good Ship Doomstead Diner for SHTF Bugout Day? ???



There are endless items from Industrial Civilization which could prove useful, although many of them have fairly short functional life spans.  We want to look for stuff that will give us at least 5-10 years of service once JIT Delivery Collapses.  We'll begin with our Food Preps, then get to shore living Preps after that.



Food Preps



Long Lasting / Dried Foods / Vacuum Sealed



100 lbs Rice, 100 lbs Spaghetti, 75 lbs Beans, 50 lbs Beef Jerky, 20 lbs assorted Nuts.  Dried Fruits. 10 gallons assorted vegetable oils.  5 Gallons Peanut Butter.  50 bags assorted Bear Creek Soups. 30 Bags assorted Freeze Dried Mountain House foods. 10 cases factory wrapped Energy Bars (24/case).



This is doubtless too much food to store in the small galley of the Wagstaff.  We will need to convert at least one of the Bunks to a storage closet for long lasting foods.  The galley storage itself will contain more normal every day foods we can get until SHTF Day arrives.  Frozen Steaks, Canned Soups, Fresh veggies etc.  We'll also have several bottles of multi-vitamins, vitamin C and assorted other vitamins.  Under normal circumstances the supply of Normal Foods will last 1-2 months, enough for cruising around the local islands and seeking out good secluded coves to head for on SHTF Day.

 






Besides the packaged food which should last around 2 years with supplement from Fishing and Lobstering, we're going to want to start growing some food wherever it is we drop anchor.  So we'll want along Heirloom Seeds in nitrogen sealed packets for crops that grow well in our chosen neighborhood.  Also prior to SHTF Day we'll have planted some perenials that bear fruit of various kinds, apples, cherries, walnuts etc in the Maine area climate I have chosen.  We'll also bring along Mushroom spores of various types, Shitake, Oyster, Portabella and of course White Button shrooms.  For carbs we'll bring along some seed potatoes and sweet potatoes.  With our 2 years of Buffer time to get our Food Forest going, we should be producing a nice annual yield to continue onward with the animal protein from the ocean, and also have some food to barter for other goods.  Maintaining secrecy though about the location of the secluded cove will be important for the first few years.

 






Shelter & Equipment



With our nutrition needs now mostly taken care of, we want to look at  building a semi-permanent living arrangement on shore.  The boat won't last forever even in the best case scenario, and there is always the possibility it will be blown off its anchorage by a nor'easter.  Besides that, many of the skills we need to accumulate and practice need to be done on shore, such as making fire, making cordage and rope from natural materials, stone knapping…the list is endless.  Personally I am done when the batteries go dead for the power tools, but younger and healthier members of the Diner Tribe will need to work on these skills.



There are so many things you might WANT to bring along here for the ride, but you are quite constrained by the storage space on a 34' boat.  It's also hard to prioritize as to what is MOST important to pack for the Final Bugout?  I'll list a few important items, in no particular order and no exact quantity.  How much you can actually stuff onto the boat can really only be answered once you start packing her up.  How much living space are you willing to sacrifice to carry more preps?

 






You can substantially enhance and upgrade the amount of stuff you have available for after SHTF Day by creating Storage Caches in varous secluded coves in your sailing neighborhood.  Such caches can be created with 55 Gallon storage drums or heavy duty PVC storage containers and buried, with the burial coordinates stored encrypted in your GPS/Smart Phone/Journal.  This is a good Insurance Policy also against being raided.  In order to get these cache locations set up in time before SHTF Day, the sooner you can get started on this Plan the better, of course.  However, for most people at the moment just buying the fucking boat will take a while, so you just have to hope SHTF Day does not arrive before you have time to get all your plans and preps set up.  Meanwhile, what do you jam into those 55 Gal drums waiting for SHTF Day? ???  :icon_scratch:



Rope, Cordage, Cable, Monofilament, Wire, Bungee Cord, Nylon netting etc.



It's going to be a long time (if ever) before you can make rope and line in anywhere near the quality of the stuff you pick up at Walmart these days.  Also you will have to eventually learn to live without Elastics like Bungee Cord.  Elastics are something we take for granted nowadays, but before around the 1800s they weren't available  at all, not even made from latex. So the more of this stuff you can stock up on the better.  The uses for line and rope are of course endless.  You will also want hardware like block and tackle and turnbuckles, splicing equipment etc.  If you have enough cord, you can make nets yourself fairly easily, but they won't be as good as commercially made nets either, and if you are fishing for a good percentage of your food, nets are invaluable.



In the Tools category for your cordage, you're going to want to have both a Manual and Electric Winch along, preferably one powerful enough to haul your boat onto a cradle on land for maintenance and storage purposes.  You'll also need pulleys, block & tackle etc for the bigger ropes and cable.  For small stuff like Thread and Monofilament, you'll need needles to pull it with.  For wire, you'll need Pliers to grab it and twist it with.  Remember, after SHTF Day, all this stuff will become harder & harder to come by.



Hardware, Nails, Screws, Glue, Duck Tape



Although eventually you will have to find other ways to fasten materials together (mostly by lashing), the longer you can put off this problem the better.  Certainly you want enough hardware around to make it easier to put up your first Lean-to, Yurt or A-Frame like Mr. Primitive Technology set up for himself.  BTW, I don't think the Thatch on his roof would make it through a nor'easter or hurricane with even just Cat 1 winds.  Also, how long in REAL TIME does it take him to collect all the materials and build one of these things?  ???   :icon_scratch:  Even if it does take a few days though, it's still a lot less loss than your typical FSoA style McMansion getting washed away at the beach in the latest King Tide.



Duck Tape is a product you absolutely cannot have too much of.  Bury at least a couple of cases of the large size rolls.  For glue, a few cans of 2 part epoxy is good, plus a big supply of typical Elmers Wood Glue.



Another nice material to have in your cache is some flat plane glass, to make Windows out of.  Windows improve your hut enviroment a LOT!  You can use plastic sheeting for this as well, but glass is definitely classier for the prepper.



http://blog.cheaperthandirt.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/tentsandtarps.jpg Tarps & Tents



Like Duck Tape, Glue, Nails and many other industrially produced items, Tarps are something you can never have too many of, in too many sizes.  The polymer material these suckers are made from is something you will never be able to reproduce, and are good for everything from groundcloths to roofing, tents to blankets, patching holes, you name it.



Even though you can make a Tent from a Tarp plus you will be building a more permanent dwelling on the land once you are established, it's still good to have at least a couple of industrially produced tents along with you in a couple of sizes.  You want a relatively small one you can carry on a backpack if you want to trek inland on your island to do some Hunter-Gathering.  You also want a relatively large one to set up on other islands as temporary shelter while you scour this location for mussels and clams and look for wild edible foods.



Like all the rest of your industrially produced preps, your tents and tarps will not last forever, and the more you have them out and exposed to UV radiation, rain and wind, the faster they will deteriorate.  As quickly as possible you want to become proficient at making temporary shelters from the locally available materials like Mr. Primitive Technology, and keep your tents and tarps packed up and dry for emergency use, like say for in the aftermath of a Hurricane where your nice Thatch Hut A-Frame got blown away by 100mph winds.  If you just use them for emergencies, you probably can get 5-10 years out of them.



Land Transportation



Wherever you make port, you're going to want to have some form of transportation besides just your feet.  So you want to carry aboard a bicycle at the very least, a BMX style off-road bike with wide knobby tires probably the best choice.  You'll need quite a few Spare Parts for this, since after SHTF Day you probably won't be able to get replacement parts that fit.  Tires. Inner Tubes, Chains, Brake & Shift Cables and Derailers here.  With a decent supply of spare parts, you might make the bike last 5 years or even 10, depending how often you use it and over what kind of terrain.



For myself, I would bring along my Ewz, a direct drive electric scooter which has very few parts and is amazingly simple in design.  No chain to break, no gears and you hardly ever need to use the brakes because the motor does the braking when you let go of the throttle.  I might even consider upgrading that to a 4 wheel model if I have enough room left in on-board boat storage to fit it.  These vehicles either dissassemble or fold up into pretty compact shapes, so putting it aboard a 34' vessel isn't out of the question.



The main limitation on any of these small EVs in terms of lifespan after SHTF Day is the batteries.  If you have some kind of civilization still running, it will be possible for quite some time to recycle old lead-acid batts, but this will require some system of trade as well as some means to transport around the newly recycled batts and take away to the recycling center worn out batts.  None of that is very likely to be possible in a real collapse scenario, so you can kiss off your EV after probably MAX 5 years.  Not a real problem for me since I don't figure to live more than 5 more years anyhow but worth planning for if you have a longer life expectancy than this.



There is still more gear to look at, Medical supplies in particular.   We also need to consider how we can begin trading with others once the main fallout from SHTF Day is over in a couple of years, 90% of the population is dead and the survivors are attempting to reform community and rise from the ashes of collapse.



http://unveiledmiracles.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Phoenix-5.jpg



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 




Title: Re: Boat Bugout Planning
Post by: Nearingsfault on February 04, 2018, 06:20:18 AM
<p style="text-align: right;">
   
   This paradigm is also cheaper than buying your own Doomstead and fitting that out for post SHTF Day Survival.  Buying land and setting up such a location is pretty expensive, and you need to do it well out of range of the Big Shities.  This takes you away from work opportunities for making higher wages while the money is still good.  You are also limited in that paradigm because you are subject to the vissicitudes of Nature for that neighborhood.  A beautiful Doomstead in the Canadian Wilderness can be wiped out by a forest fire in a heartbeat these days, even if you can run your car on charcoal gas you make yourself and heat your cabin in -20F temps.  Drought around your Texas Doomstead can ruin that plan in fair short order too.  Of course, you <strong>ALSO</strong> have the issue of Protecting & Defending your Doomstead once the political landscape collapses, since your "Title" to the property won't be worth a hill of beans at that point.  The cops you might try calling to help you fight of the Zombies probably would take your preps from you themselves after the Zombies were wiped out.

It is a beautiful spot and I like to think I have it covered but you are right; zombies, social order collapse and natural disasters could overwhelm me in days. I think this year I will prep up the travel trailer. I like this article RE I could see a different incarnation of myself going this route.
Title: Re: Boat Bugout Planning
Post by: RE on February 04, 2018, 06:34:49 AM
I think this year I will prep up the travel trailer. I like this article RE I could see a different incarnation of myself going this route.

Always important to have a Plan BGoing Mobile in one form or another is the best Plan B I can think of.  On land, you do that with a Stealth Van or Trailer arrangement.  It should always be ready-to-go at a moment's notice.  When the Firemen pound on your door at 2AM, you're nor gonna have a lot of time to pack it up and GTFO of Dodge.  You need to be able to jump in that mother fucker with your kids, put the Pedal to the Metal and GTFO of Dodge as fast as you can.

(http://static2.businessinsider.com/image/5a2a2f8d8a49863c0b8b4927/the-wildfire-in-ventura-county-grew-by-almost-100000-acres-over-the-weekend-triggering-more-evacuations.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/v/ToxymSLzJeM
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on February 04, 2018, 03:12:12 PM
I really do think you ought to announce somewhere near the beginning that what follows is a joke, because it written like it is serious and that there is really some kind of survival solution in seasteading.  Electric bicycles indeed.  As anyone who has had a yacht will know, they need a constant supply of care, labour and money for parts, and often make life hardly worth living.  The only thing they are good for is to get you to somewhere else, once, and that's only if they sail well, which most don't. 

Your whole attitude to seasteading is to try to maintain a first world lifestyle by buying things before TSHTF, when it should be to adopt a third world lifestyle now, and practice at it to really get the hang of it.  No one building a palm frond shelter expects it to survive a cyclone, so there is no point in making it too fancy.  Everything is going to get wet when it rains, so metal tools are pointless and electronics are just a waste of resources.  Everything will want to eat your food stores, including the weevils that are already in it.  Rope will be very precious and can't be spared for lashing your shelter together, you have to get it from the bush - what and how is the key to that.  Planting a garden near the beach with heirloom seeds and just wait a few months, then eat it, so easy.  Trade your surplus food for recycled batteries!  (Sigh)


Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 04, 2018, 05:49:29 PM
I really do think you ought to announce somewhere near the beginning that what follows is a joke, because it written like it is serious and that there is really some kind of survival solution in seasteading.  Electric bicycles indeed.  As anyone who has had a yacht will know, they need a constant supply of care, labour and money for parts, and often make life hardly worth living.  The only thing they are good for is to get you to somewhere else, once, and that's only if they sail well, which most don't. 

Your whole attitude to seasteading is to try to maintain a first world lifestyle by buying things before TSHTF, when it should be to adopt a third world lifestyle now, and practice at it to really get the hang of it.  No one building a palm frond shelter expects it to survive a cyclone, so there is no point in making it too fancy.  Everything is going to get wet when it rains, so metal tools are pointless and electronics are just a waste of resources.  Everything will want to eat your food stores, including the weevils that are already in it.  Rope will be very precious and can't be spared for lashing your shelter together, you have to get it from the bush - what and how is the key to that.  Planting a garden near the beach with heirloom seeds and just wait a few months, then eat it, so easy.  Trade your surplus food for recycled batteries!  (Sigh)

Your opinion has been duly noted and filed.
(http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/trash.gif)

First off, in this plan the boat can be maintained perfectly well for as long as you have BAU running and enough mailbox money to buy parts as you need them from Amazon and have them shipped to the marina.  Then when SHTF Day arrives, it doesn't have to get you all that far, just from the coast of  Maine at Bar Harbor to one of the many islands which dot the coast that are uninhabited.  You are correct it won't work forever, but with some luck it will hold up for a few years.  You can bring along a roto-molded pvc kayak that will last until the sun goes Red Giant for daily fishing and lobstering tasks.

(http://nebula.wsimg.com/8913a57a48d4c08be08d8e5d380da6e2?AccessKeyId=9433939B3326382A3DC4&disposition=0&alloworigin=1)

Second, I didn't say "wait a few months" for your permaculture garden to be productive, I gave it 2 years to get established.  Actually more if you can get going on the plan before SHTF Day arrives and start cultivating your chosen spot before it arrives.

Third, I don't expect a complete descent instantaneously to H-G living.  More likely is a population crash that takes a few years to play out.  If there are to be survivors after that, they will need to work together and they will find ways to scavenge materials from the Age of Oil to keep things running a while longer, while they then also make the transition to using only materials they can access locally. 3rd Worlders don't live like H-Gs for the most part these days, they do have electricity. You have electricity.  In Puerto Rico right now what they are making do with are portable generators and batteries while they wait and hope for the island as a whole to get wired back up and semi-working.  My  supply of batts are guaranteed to last 10 years by Duracell.  That is longer than I will last, and I'll sue them if they crap out before that! lol.

(http://image.nj.com/home/advance-media/width600/img/breaking_news_national_desk/photo/puerto-rico-hurricane-maria-f3c0bc93f8762af6.jpg)

Far as electric scooters (not bicycles) are concerned, they are very simple and quite robust.  There is very little that can break on them.  The only thing I have had to do with mine in the 5 or so years I have owned it is replace one inner tube and get a new batt pack.  If I had along with me a spare batt pack, I would expect to get about 5 years of work out of the scooter, which is pretty good.  If all trade has stopped after that, the scooter is dead, another piece of junk from the Age of Oil that will rust away.  Simlarly, most of the prep materials will have deteriorated by then, and I make that clear in the article.  It's not a permanent solution, you're going to have to start using local materials in ways you have available to put them together.

About the only thing I do agree with in your post is that it would be helpful to start practicing techniques now that will help you to survive as more and more services and products from Industrial Civilization begin to disappear.  However, you need some way to leave IC when the time comes, and unless you are an old geezer with a pension it is impractical to try to do it now.  You don't live like an H-G, you buy food in a grocery store like I do.  You don't live in a thatch hut, you live in a McHovel built from industrially produced materials which is powered by electricity.  The main difference between you and me is you sweat more and have to share your living quarters with PYTHONS.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on February 05, 2018, 12:28:13 AM
Quote
RE: The main difference between you and me is you sweat more and have to share your living quarters with PYTHONS.

I LIKE pythons, that's our big difference.  Last night it started raining at 9 pm really hard and kept going until 9am - 162 mm, windy too - I would have checked the cyclone map but the internet was down.  The frog chorus was deafening, not enough pythons that the trouble.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 05, 2018, 12:59:28 AM
Quote
RE: The main difference between you and me is you sweat more and have to share your living quarters with PYTHONS.

I LIKE pythons, that's our big difference.  Last night it started raining at 9 pm really hard and kept going until 9am - 162 mm, windy too - I would have checked the cyclone map but the internet was down.  The frog chorus was deafening, not enough pythons that the trouble.

I like pythons, I just don't want them crawling around my digs where they threaten my dog, cat and chooks.  Eventually they get big enough to threaten me too.

(https://i0.heartyhosting.com/www.nationalenquirer.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/python-swallows-man-video-F.jpg?fit=640%2C420&ssl=1)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Golden Oxen on February 05, 2018, 03:56:02 AM
I really do think you ought to announce somewhere near the beginning that what follows is a joke, because it written like it is serious and that there is really some kind of survival solution in seasteading.  Electric bicycles indeed.  As anyone who has had a yacht will know, they need a constant supply of care, labour and money for parts, and often make life hardly worth living.  The only thing they are good for is to get you to somewhere else, once, and that's only if they sail well, which most don't. 

Your whole attitude to seasteading is to try to maintain a first world lifestyle by buying things before TSHTF, when it should be to adopt a third world lifestyle now, and practice at it to really get the hang of it.  No one building a palm frond shelter expects it to survive a cyclone, so there is no point in making it too fancy.  Everything is going to get wet when it rains, so metal tools are pointless and electronics are just a waste of resources.  Everything will want to eat your food stores, including the weevils that are already in it.  Rope will be very precious and can't be spared for lashing your shelter together, you have to get it from the bush - what and how is the key to that.  Planting a garden near the beach with heirloom seeds and just wait a few months, then eat it, so easy.  Trade your surplus food for recycled batteries!  (Sigh)

Many say Will was the brightest bulb of all Palloy, certainly not a member of the Dim.

He meant each and everyone of us, himself included no doubt.

A bright bulb indeed, almost as bright as the Sun me thinks :icon_sunny:

Quote
All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances

                                          (http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/shakespeare/william/portrait.jpg)
Title: 🐱 Seastead of the Day: CATS
Post by: RE on February 05, 2018, 05:07:50 AM
(https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/t/chinese-stripe-necked-turtle-ocadia-sinensis-year-old-its-back-front-white-background-63253235.jpg)
Back a ways, I gave my main reason for not looking at Catamarans (cats) as a choice for the Good Ship Doomstead Diner, which is that they aren't self-righting like a keelboat is.  With big enough seas and/or high winds, there's always the possibility the boat can be rolled over or pitch-poled, and once it has turned turtle you are well and truly fucked.  There is no real good way to get the thing turned back right side up while you are at sea unless you are fortunate enough to have the sea do it AGAIN and roll you back over to right side up.

However, if you are not planning on doing any blue water sailing and big crossings (which in the Boat Based Bugout Plan we are not) but just doing coastal sailing and relatively short crossings of 200 NM or less, the likelihood of being flipped over is pretty small unless you sail it in a hurricane, which would not be too bright.  So cats are worth considering for a few reasons, there are advantages to them.

To begin with, for the live aboard BEFORE SHTF Day arrives, they are ROOMY!  You have a lot more space in the main cabin because the beam is so wide overall.  This makes it more like living in a small land based cabin or apartment than living on a narrow boat.

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/02/eb/01/02eb014f793885b4aa6c653c7ec125be.jpg)

Next, they are faster than monohulls because the two individual hulls are each more narrow and have a higher hull speed.  So any trips you do make in the boat are going to get done faster, which makes the trips safer.

They also have less draft than monohulls, so you can bring them in closer to shore without grounding the vessel.  That means less distance to row every day to make it into shore in your tender to go gathering some mussels and clams and harvesting some wild edible plants.  You also can venture into more shallow estuaries, which you can't do with a keelboat.  You can also beach them, although not recommended because it's not good for the hull paint job.  However, if you build a ramp with rollers and have a good winch to yank it onto shore, you don't need a big cradle like with a keelboat.

While sailing, they have the advantage that they don't heel over as much as a monohull does on a reach.  So you don't have preps sliding off the counters so much if you forgot to secure them down.  You also have a lot more deck space on which to mount your Solar PV cells, and/or store more preps in water tight containers.

The main DISADVANTAGE with a cat is the $PRICE$ they come in at and the sizes you need to go with to get a decent live aboard model.  You can get decent live aboard monohulls down as low as 22' if you are OK with being REALLY CRAMPED, but 30' and up you start getting enough space to live pretty normally.  With cats though, you have to get well into the 40' range before you can find one that would be reasonably comfortable to live on, and so far while searching down used ones for sale I haven't found a good one for under $150K.  I can on the other hand find numerous monohulls in the mid 40' range for under $100K, which is my general limit I would spend on a boat for just myself.

Here's the closest one I found to something that might work as a Cat Bugout Machine, coming in at just 32' & $58K.  However, no interior pics and I think it would be pretty cramped.

(https://www.philippineyachtcharter.com/for-sale/fastback_32plus.jpg)

https://www.philippineyachtcharter.com/cruising_catamarans.php (https://www.philippineyachtcharter.com/cruising_catamarans.php)

Fastback 32 Catamaran For Sale

1997 Fastback 32 cruising catamaran by John Goss (Australia) for sale in Philippines. Accomplished 30,000 miles in two round trips (Australia - Philippines - Australia), mostly single handed. Good condition, with just a few items needing attention. Special features: excellent headroom below decks - current owner is 6'2" and has a couple of inches extra headroom; "sugar scoops" added to hulls making her 35 foot LOA. The owner is disabled and ready to retire to land. Currently Australian registered. The items need attention are: new front netting, fresh water pump, new batteries, shower-room floor needs replacing.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on February 05, 2018, 06:09:58 AM
As a past owner of 30-foot cat and monohull, the cats are roomier, although you have to go to 42-foot to be able to stand in the main cabin area.  They are much faster and shallower draft.  If cats have their keels properly shod, they can be dragged up a beach OK, or you can use the tide to leave you high and dry for a short while. 

For a proper balanced rig, there is no chance of being capsized, but my Iroquois was way over-canvassed and I nearly turned it over on my first coastal sail - it had lee-boards for extra grip on the water, and when hit by a blast of wind it ploughed into a steep wave, stopped dead, and then one hull lifted.  Generally the motion is more upright but more jerky, and you also get diagonal pitching in some seas.

This isn't my one, for sale in UK http://yachts.apolloduck.com/boat.phtml?id=554757 (http://yachts.apolloduck.com/boat.phtml?id=554757)

(https://cache.apolloduck.com/image_bin/554757_1.jpg?1517731778)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 05, 2018, 08:19:03 AM
As a past owner of 30-foot cat and monohull, the cats are roomier, although you have to go to 42-foot to be able to stand in the main cabin area.  They are much faster and shallower draft.  If cats have their keels properly shod, they can be dragged up a beach OK, or you can use the tide to leave you high and dry for a short while. 

For a proper balanced rig, there is no chance of being capsized, but my Iroquois was way over-canvassed and I nearly turned it over on my first coastal sail - it had lee-boards for extra grip on the water, and when hit by a blast of wind it ploughed into a steep wave, stopped dead, and then one hull lifted.  Generally the motion is more upright but more jerky, and you also get diagonal pitching in some seas.

This isn't my one, for sale in UK http://yachts.apolloduck.com/boat.phtml?id=554757 (http://yachts.apolloduck.com/boat.phtml?id=554757)

(https://cache.apolloduck.com/image_bin/554757_1.jpg?1517731778)

For full time live aboard before SHTF Day, I definitely want standing headroom in the main cabin.  So the boat pretty much has to be over 40'.  The problem then becomes they just aren't price competitive with monohulls of similar size.  If I was just doing my total fantasy stuff of boats I can't afford without winning the Lotto, I would DEFINITELY consider a cat in the 60' range.  I took a group day sail on one of those when I went to Hawaii for a meet.  $200 for the day and all the booze included!  :icon_sunny:  The guy who was running it was definitely making bank.  There were 20 people on board for $4K/day and he was booked solid for 2 months in advance.  The one below is similar.

(http://www.catamaransite.com/images/FP-Marquises-56-2/FP-Marquises-56-02-02.jpg)

I have now found some cats in the 38' range that come in just under $100K, but I still can do better with 44' monohulls in the $60K range.  The most important consideration for me really is not the Bugout Plan, it's living aboard the boat BEFORE TSHTF.  I want a good size galley and head and a nice size Nav Station to set up all my electronics.  The Motor Sailers still win for me at the moment for overall amenities and power and range while motoring.  However, I am buying no boats of any size or configuration unless I can find some Doc that can properly diagnose me and get me on a treatment plan that actually works to improve my condition.

BTW, thanks for relieving me of my fears of getting pitch poled or rolled over in one of these, although I still wouldn't take one on an ocean crossing.  The most I might semi-realistically attempt on the east coast of the FSoA is FL to the Bahamas or here in Alaska to go Island Hopping in the Aleutians during the summer.  Maybe head for St. Matthews Island on SHTF Day and end my days walking the earth there with all the dead reindeer.  That would be a real First Class Ticket to the Great Beyond.  :icon_sunny:

(http://qualicuminstitute.ca/images/graphr.gif)

RE
Title: Re: 🐱 Seastead of the Day: CATS
Post by: RE on February 06, 2018, 05:42:17 AM
Continuing on today looking for our potential  Good Ship Doomstead Diner Seastead in the Cat category, I turned up a really BIG ONE at an almost affordable price of $220K in Spain.  Definitely affordable if I could convince Eddie to partner with me.   ::)  124'!!!   :o  That's a LOT of boat for that price!  We could have some fabulous Diner/SUN Convocations on this one!  Of course, my health would need to take a miraculous turn for the better. 🤕

The Diners Party Hearty on the Good Ship Doomstead Diner
(https://aolani.cc/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Aolani-Catamaran-SailingOver-e1490230223360.jpg)

Now, here's the real for sale boat in Spain...

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/39/96/6553996_20171207083642711_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/39/96/6553996_20171207083642711_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1512635803000)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/39/96/6553996_20171207083648290_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/39/96/6553996_20171207083648290_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1512635808000)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/39/96/6553996_20171207083650834_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/39/96/6553996_20171207083650834_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1512635811000)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/39/96/6553996_20171207083657462_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/39/96/6553996_20171207083657462_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1512635817000)

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2005/Lagoon-380-S2-3159627/Spain#.WnlYDeeUuUk (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2005/Lagoon-380-S2-3159627/Spain#.WnlYDeeUuUk)

There are some deficiencies though from looking at the pics & specs.  Both the Galley & Nav Station are too small for this size of boat, IMHO.  Also under powered IMHO with just 58HP from the two diesel engines.  Fuel and Water storage tanks too small also.  I also don't see a fully enclosed wheelhouse for this one.  Finally, it's in Spain so that means shipping it back to the FSoA, which would be expensive for this size boat.  However, the price is just GREAT!  Another cat I looked at in this size range was asking $24M.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on February 06, 2018, 06:31:05 AM
Sorry, that's not 124 feet.  It is 38 feet, 11.55 meters.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 06, 2018, 06:42:24 AM
Sorry, that's not 124 feet.  It is 38 feet, 11.55 meters.

I knew it looked small!  lol.  It said 124' in the ad though.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 06, 2018, 08:18:07 AM
Boat Base Pugout Planning now UP on Global Economic Intersection!  :icon_sunny:

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935 (http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 06, 2018, 08:28:21 AM
OK, here is a REAL 165' Cat.  ::)  I have no idea what they cost, but if I won the mega millions, I'd buy one.  :icon_sunny:

http://www.aeroyacht.com/sailing-catamarans/sunreef-catamarans-70-to-150/165-sunreef-ultimate/165-sunreef-ultimate-copy/ (http://www.aeroyacht.com/sailing-catamarans/sunreef-catamarans-70-to-150/165-sunreef-ultimate/165-sunreef-ultimate-copy/)

(https://i0.wp.com/www.aeroyacht.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Sunreef-165-Ultimate-Superyacht-catamaran51.jpg)

(https://i1.wp.com/www.aeroyacht.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Sunreef-165-Ultimate-Superyacht-catamaran18.jpg)

(https://i2.wp.com/www.aeroyacht.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Sunreef-165-Ultimate-Superyacht-catamaran6.jpg)

(https://i1.wp.com/www.aeroyacht.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Sunreef-165-Ultimate-Superyacht-catamaran2.jpg)

(https://i1.wp.com/www.aeroyacht.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Sunreef-165-Ultimate-Superyacht-catamaran1.jpg)

How many crew do you think you need to sail one of these behemoths?

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 06, 2018, 08:51:12 AM
Crew of one, if it has in mast furling or a stack pack and roller furling jib, and halyards run to the cockpit. Two would be better, of course.

Bigger isn't better, though.

All those nice cats you posted are super expensive, but there are plenty of older big production cats and one-offs and good user-built Wharrams out there for decent prices. Anything over 40 feet or so, and the disadvantages start to outweigh the advantages, in my book.

I saw a great looking older (80's) cat on the coast here not too long ago for 52K. In fair to good condition, looked like. Huge amount of room, great ports and light in the salon. Two hydraulic drive diesel kickers, the works. Probably a 500K boat new. They started at 150K and it's come down from there. It's the slip fees that make people let go of these boats. Too expensive to own for most of us, unless it's your house.

I was looking at houseboats here, as an alternative for my lake living idea. There are a ton of them on the market since the drought. (The lake is full again, for now, though.) I can buy a nice houseboat for 70-150K, but slip fees now run 750/month for an end-tie outdoor spot, and (drumroll)  $960/mo (plus 15.50 per foot over 60 ft) for a covered slip in a decent marina within driving distance to my work.

I could buy a small house for that, pay the note and the taxes for what the boat payment and slip payment would run....so it isn't a good financial decision to live aboard after all.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 06, 2018, 08:57:24 AM
Crew of one, if it has in mast furling or a stack pack and roller furling jib, and halyards run to the cockpit. Two would be better, of course.

Bigger isn't better, though.

All those nice cats you posted are super expensive, but there are plenty of older big production cats and one-offs and good user-built Wharrams out there for decent prices. Anything over 40 feet or so, and the disadvantages start to outweigh the advantages, in my book.

I saw a great looking older (80's) cat on the coast here not too long ago for 52K. In fair to good condition, looked like. Huge amount of room, great ports and light in the salon. Two hydraulic drive diesel kickers, the works. Probably a 500K boat new. They started at 150K and it's come down from there. It's the slip fees that make people let go of these boats. Too expensive to own for most of us, unless it's your house.

I was looking at houseboats here, as an alternative for my lake living idea. There are a ton of them on the market since the drought. (The lake is full again, for now, though.) I can buy a nice houseboat for 70-150K, but slip fees now run 750/month for an end-tie outdoor spot, and (drumroll)  $960/mo (plus 15.50 per foot over 60 ft) for a covered slip in a decent marina within driving distance to my work.

I could buy a small house for that, pay the note and the taxes for what the boat payment and slip payment would run....so it isn't a good financial decision to live aboard after all.

After much searching, I've given up on the idea of Cats and finding one at a price I can afford with the amenities I want.  I am back to the motor sailers.  I found a better one than the Wagstaff 34, and it's my new leader.  I'll have the post on it up tomorrow.  I'm actually considering contacting the seller on this one to go have a look.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 06, 2018, 09:12:04 AM
In Seattle?
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 06, 2018, 09:44:11 AM
Good boats everywhere I look these days. This one is in Oregon. I like the look of her a lot.


http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html (http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html)(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/picacapulco40101b.jpg)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 06, 2018, 10:41:17 AM
In Seattle?

No, this one is in CA.  Long Beach.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on February 06, 2018, 11:51:06 AM
Good boats everywhere I look these days. This one is in Oregon. I like the look of her a lot.


http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html (http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html)(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/picacapulco40101b.jpg)
That add was so well written and detailed I forgot for a minute I have two little kids. It had me ready to pick up a phone. I really liked the detail on the on board equipment.  You can picture someone just topping up the stores and heading out. It sounds like the boat is itching to be out there again doing what it was meant to do. It brightened my day.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 06, 2018, 12:45:27 PM
Good boats everywhere I look these days. This one is in Oregon. I like the look of her a lot.


http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html (http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html)(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/picacapulco40101b.jpg)
That add was so well written and detailed I forgot for a minute I have two little kids. It had me ready to pick up a phone. I really liked the detail on the on board equipment.  You can picture someone just topping up the stores and heading out. It sounds like the boat is itching to be out there again doing what it was meant to do. It brightened my day.

My old friend the late Captain Jack told me once that most people who died in the islands in hurricanes were on their boats. I asked him what the hell they'd be doing on their boat if they knew a  hurricane was coming.

He said this:

Sailors travel all over the world, through storms and weather and rogue waves and everything else. Their attitude generally is that their boat has taken care of them, and so they feel deeply that they have an obligation to take care of their boat.

When I read an ad like that one above, I always think of that story. That boat went around the world and hit all the typical ports of call circumnavigators hit, and had work done in the all the usual yards (where it's much cheaper to get stuff done than here.) I'd love to read the owner's account of their adventures. It sure sounds like they had plenty.

My guess is that old age made them leave their boat and the cruising life.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 06, 2018, 01:18:01 PM
Good boats everywhere I look these days. This one is in Oregon. I like the look of her a lot.


http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html (http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html)(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/picacapulco40101b.jpg)
That add was so well written and detailed I forgot for a minute I have two little kids. It had me ready to pick up a phone. I really liked the detail on the on board equipment.  You can picture someone just topping up the stores and heading out. It sounds like the boat is itching to be out there again doing what it was meant to do. It brightened my day.

Eddie's find is a really good one.  I've got another one for tomorrow in the motor sailer division.  Eddie's wins though for two reasons.  One is that PRICE!  :o  That is just amazing with all that is included!  Second is the location in OR.  That's closer to Peter in Ocean Falls then the one I found in CA.  Only thing I don't like is no fully enclosed Pilot House.

You don't have to give up the dream just because you have kids.  Lots of Yachties raise their kids on sailboats.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-sun-0802-balancing-act-20150731-column.html (http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-sun-0802-balancing-act-20150731-column.html)

Sailboat family: Raising three kids under 3 with ocean for a backyard

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-55bba0c8/turbine/ct-balancing-0802-1-jpg-20150729/750/750x422)
Brittany Meyers with her three daughters, 16-month-old twins Haven and Mira, and Isla, 3, on their sailboat. Meyers and her husband, Scott, live most of the year on their sailboat in the British Virgin Islands. (Brittany Meyers)

Brittany Meyers and her husband, Scott, live on a 44-foot sailboat in the British Virgin Islands with their three children, all under 3.

"This surprises zero people who know us," Meyers, 36, told me. "When I was younger, my main goal was to live in Africa."

She was volunteering in East Africa during her 20s, in fact, when a safari company executive approached her with a job offer.

"He said, 'Do you have any marketing experience?'" she recalled. "All I had done is wait tables, but I was, like, 'That's marketing.' So I ended up working for the safari company for three years."

Her husband, 39, bought his first boat at age 28 with plans to live on it in chilly, gray Seattle.

"He's been a … nomad all his life," Meyers said.

They met while racing sailboats on Lake Michigan. So when the couple, then childless, quit their jobs in Chicago and set sail in 2010, their family and friends didn't register much surprise.

They returned home in 2012 to have their first daughter, Isla, sold their old boat, bought a larger boat and headed back onto the water.

Then Meyers learned she was expecting twins. Haven and Mira were born 16 months ago, and the family wasted no time setting sail a few months later.

Meyers said they plan to stay on the boat for the next 10 years or so. They're weighing their schooling options (island public schools, island private schools, home schooling) and finding ways to supplement the money they saved before they first set sail. Scott has a 200-ton captain's license, so he works as a mariner when they're at sea and sells real estate when they're back home — typically for a few months during hurricane season.

I caught up with the Meyers at her parents' home in Arlington Heights, where the family will be staying until October. I asked her if it feels more or less constricting to live in a three-bedroom house in the suburb where she grew up.

"In some ways, it's a lot harder here," she said. "On the boat, the girls are never more than 12 feet away from me. I always tell people, 'Boats are actually pretty baby-proof, minus the whole surrounded-by-water thing.'"

The cabinets are all locked. Everything's fastened to the floor. Things don't topple over. When they're awake and sailing, the girls are tethered and harnessed to the boat.
Memories of summers past with no rules

None of which stops critics from accusing the couple of needlessly putting their kids in harm's way. Meyers chronicles their adventures on her blog, www.windtraveler.net (http://www.windtraveler.net), and on Facebook, where she frequently hears from people who think she's loony.

"They fall into two camps: First, the people who believe it's just unsafe to be surrounded by water," she says. "Second, the people who say our girls are being raised in a bubble and aren't getting socialized and are going to grow up and be freaks."

Freaks. Sure. From all that sunshine and quality time with their parents and exposure to other cultures.

"It's not like we're floating at sea for days and days on end," Meyers said. "We're in port a lot of the time. Our girls are around other kids all the time."

Yeah, but is it really fair to deny them the all-American childhood spent strapped into a car seat, riding from one scheduled activity to another?

"We sometimes feel bad they're not in soccer or gymnastics," Meyers said. "My husband especially, he was very much the athlete. But we go paddle boarding. They climb trees. They climb all over our boat. They're always interacting with the natural environment, so it's sort of a yin and yang."

And the together time is enviable.

"We definitely think of it as a gift," Meyers said. "We structured our lives and worked and saved, and for the most part, our girls have been with their mom and dad 24/7. I think that's a good thing."

I think it's a beautiful thing.

hstevens@tribpub.com

Twitter @heidistevens13
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on February 06, 2018, 02:01:25 PM
Interesting. Lets just say not never just highly unlikely. Plus I'm a single dad now. We might have ended up rving but the clock ran out.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Best Boat for the $MONEY$ Competition
Post by: RE on February 07, 2018, 05:05:14 AM
Note: After I composed this article, Eddie posted up a link to another boat which comes in at half the price of this one.  Both boats though come in at a price I can afford.  Both are of similar size, in the 45' range.  Both are located on the West Coast of the FSoA, one in CA, the other in OR.  Differences are the boat I found is about a decade younger than Eddie's find and one is designed more as a pure sailing vessel, the other a motor sailer.  However, the distinctions are blurred here because Eddie's find has an exceptionally large auxiliary engine and fuel storage tank for a sailboat this size; and the one I found appears to be a typical sailboat hull just with a motor sailer cabin top and deck arrangement.  Both appear to be very well maintained by caring owners.  The extremely low price of the one Eddie found makes it the tentative leader here in the overall competition for Best Boat for the $MONEY$, but you would actually have to get your boots on the ground where they are parked to have a look and decide.

We have a new leader in the Motor Sailer division of boats I can realistically afford!  :circle:  I am pretty much giving up on the Cats, I can't find one in the right size range at a reasonable enough price.

1983 Lancer Pilot House.  45', asking 69K, located Long Beach, CA.
http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1983-lancer-pilot-house-103149634/ (http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1983-lancer-pilot-house-103149634/)

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/13/90/6351390_20171013144134409_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1264582)

Coming in @ 45', this boat is 11' longer than the 34' Wagstaff MS which was the previous leader.  It's coming in at the same price, and it's located in the FSoA, not NZ so no shipping cost.  It's only 3 years older than the Wagstaff, and it has a WHOPPING BIG 170hp Perkins Diesel with only 1550 hours on it.  Enclosed Pilot House that I am looking for.  Galley and Nav Station both look perfectly sized and well appointed.  Decent lines, looks like it would sail OK, although I would mainly be motoring it anyhow most of the time I actually took it out for a cruise, which would not be too often anyhow.  Regular maintenance record and upgrades.

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/13/90/6351390_20170829135554435_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1264582)  (http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/13/90/6351390_20170829135607508_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1264582)

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/13/90/6351390_20170829135634224_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1264582)  (http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/13/90/6351390_20171016151336981_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1264582)

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/13/90/6351390_20170829135647220_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1264582)  (http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/13/90/6351390_20170829135705803_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1264582)

I am seriously considering contacting the seller and heading down to Long Beeach to have a look at this vessel.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 07, 2018, 05:21:50 AM
Lancers are not as heavily built as most motorsailers. In general the brand is known for the typical water intrusion problems (rotten decks and leaky ports) that a lot of boats of that era have, but they do vary. I'm sure there are some good ones. I had a friend who had a Lancer 28. No my favorite boats, but that one looks nice from a floating apartment POV.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 07, 2018, 05:46:08 AM
Lancers are not as heavily built as most motorsailers. In general the brand is known for the typical water intrusion problems (rotten decks and leaky ports) that a lot of boats of that era have, but they do vary. I'm sure there are some good ones. I had a friend who had a Lancer 28. No my favorite boats, but that one looks nice from a floating apartment POV.

Like I said, you gotta get your boots on the ground and actually LOOK at it.  It's like my 1983 Tioga.  Many of the RVs from this period were leaky, the roof gave out, etc.  However, if you find one that hasn't had those problems in over 30 years, it's a WINNER!  :icon_sunny:  It was one of the ones that came off the production line really tight.  You can only know if you inspect it yourself.

RE
Title: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: RE on February 07, 2018, 02:09:57 PM
We have a good little discussion going on on Global Economic Intersection on the Boat Based Bugout Planning article, which JL published over there as well.  You might want to check out the commentary and chip in your 2 cents.

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935 (http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935)

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: RE on February 07, 2018, 07:56:44 PM
We have a good little discussion going on on Global Economic Intersection on the Boat Based Bugout Planning article, which JL published over there as well.  You might want to check out the commentary and chip in your 2 cents.

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935 (http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935)

RE

Eddie chipped in on the discussion on GEI, and I added a bit more as well.  I'm hoping to snag a couple of new Diners in Steve and Charles.  :icon_sunny:  Join the Party over there!

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 08, 2018, 06:03:01 AM
Eddie mentioned that the problem with owning a boat isn't the up front cost, but rather the Marina fees.  He's basing this on the fees he would have to pay to put a houseboat under a covered slip on Lake Travis.  Of COURSE Lake Travis is expensive!  It's in the Austin RE Market!  Duh.

Here are the prices from the South Shore Harbor Marina in TX:

Boat Size     Slip Size    Monthly Rate     Per Slip Foot
 30′ and Less     30′     $232.50     $7.75
 30’–35′     35′     $271.25     $7.75
 36’–40′     40′     $320.00     $8.00
 41’–45′     45′     $360.00     $8.00
 46’–49′     50′     $400.00     $8.00
 50’–and Greater     60′     $480.00     $8.00

As you can see, a 45' boat is $360/mo.  Besides that, I'm paying the docking fee!  ::)

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: K-Dog on February 08, 2018, 06:13:17 AM
We have a good little discussion going on on Global Economic Intersection on the Boat Based Bugout Planning article, which JL published over there as well.  You might want to check out the commentary and chip in your 2 cents.

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935 (http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935)

RE

Eddie chipped in on the discussion on GEI, and I added a bit more as well.  I'm hoping to snag a couple of new Diners in Steve and Charles.  :icon_sunny:  Join the Party over there!

RE

Storyline

(https://popbabble.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/mcconaughey-failure-to-launch.jpg)

Quote
At 35, Tripp has an interesting job, a hip car, a passion for sailing, and a great house - trouble is, he lives with his parents. They want him out, so they hire Paula, an "interventionist," who has a formula in these cases: chance encounter, get him to ask her out, involve him in a trauma, meet his friends and get their nod, delay sex, have him teach her something, then launch him. It's worked up to now, but this gets complicated when Tripp thinks she's getting too serious and one of his pals is attracted to Paula's deadpan, semi-alcoholic roommate, who's plagued by a mockingbird. Too many secrets may scrub the launch, and what if Paula really likes him? Who can intervene then? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Romance in DE pants and it does not resemble real life at because he has a job.  Does not matter what it is, a legit job is a legit job.  But some millennials don't need no stinkin job.
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d8/Gold_Hat_portrayed_by_Alfonso_Bedoya.jpg)

Seriously, having a boat is fine but bugout only!  Unless you follow the pied-piper of arrogance.  If you follow him ( Orlov ) you can watch your women be raped before you are killed.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.imfdb.org%2Fimages%2Fthumb%2Fc%2Fc6%2FCRm2.jpg%2F600px-CRm2.jpg&f=1)

Because there is going to be no place to hide and they will have the 50 caliber machine guns not you.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 08, 2018, 06:20:00 AM
Corpus Christi city marina downtown is where we want to be. There, or one of the municipal marinas in Rockport. (Not sure what the status is for Rockport at present). In Corpus, a liveaboard slip is $400 or so. The amenities and location are excellent. Urban waterfront wth lots of restaurants within walking distance. Rockport is adequate, and quieter. Cost there is comparable to the CC T-Heads.

Port Aransas marinas are closest to the blue water, but they aren't at all protected from storms, and they look a little lower end. There are some private marinas that are quieter friendly places too, but the amenities are lacking. You're gonna pay over 300 anywhere these days.  Most are $400 with electricity. They always charge an additional "liveaboard fee" for people who live on their boats too. that varies.

The Clear Lake area marinas like the one you referenced are too far from where I live, and traffic sucks getting there. But there are some good deals there. I've heard there's one place that's still below $200. Also, there are occasionally dockominiums there you can own outright that can be bought in the 20K range. Of course you still have electricity and an HOA fee every month. But not much.

In the NW slips are higher, like $800 last time I was checking.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 08, 2018, 06:25:16 AM
The lowest rent slips are in Palacios, which is an old Dow Chemical company town south on Matagorda Bay. Kind of isolated though.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 08, 2018, 06:32:37 AM
Corpus Christi city marina downtown is where we want to be. There, or one of the municipal marinas in Rockport. (Not sure what the status is for Rockport at present). In Corpus, a liveaboard slip is $400 or so. The amenities and location are excellent. Urban waterfront wth lots of restaurants within walking distance. Rockport is adequate, and quieter. Cost there is comparable to the CC T-Heads.

Port Aransas marinas are closest to the blue water, but they aren't at all protected from storms, and they look a little lower end. There are some private marinas that are quieter friendly places too, but the amenities are lacking. You're gonna pay over 300 anywhere these days.  Most are $400 with electricity. They always charge an additional "liveaboard fee" for people who live on their boats too. that varies.

The Clear Lake area marinas like the one you referenced are too far from where I live, and traffic sucks getting there. But there are some good deals there. I've heard there's one place that's still below $200. Also, there are occasionally dockominiums there you can own outright that can be bought in the 20K range. Of course you still have electricity and an HOA fee every month. But not much.

In the NW slips are higher, like $800 last time I was checking.

For you, the boat isn't full-time live aboard.  It's your Vacation Boat while you are still drilling teeth.  I'm the one living on the boat.  For your find,  the $15K you pay for your half of the boat is probably what you pay for 2 years of vacations in St. John.  It's chump change.  When you want to take some time off from the dentistry racket with your beloved, I jump in SaVANnah for the week, or I go house-sit for you.

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: cernunnos5 on February 08, 2018, 07:19:19 AM



(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.imfdb.org%2Fimages%2Fthumb%2Fc%2Fc6%2FCRm2.jpg%2F600px-CRm2.jpg&f=1)

C5, here. I thought I would jump in as a person that had spent many years living in "Land boats" or RVs.

In my own evolution from Survivalist to Prepper and then to what I am now calling Adapter, I have come to totally reject the idea of Bugging Out as a workable solution. Same with Nomadic Survival. I have lived that as far as it would go... and it lead nowhere. A temporary fix at best.
BOAT often stands for Bring Out Another Thousand. It will need constant and expensive repair. Though it might seem like a cheap option compared to land ownership, it is not. For the same price, you can easily find junk land. Land that will still be there after the boat has sunk. No matter what, its going to cost you something.
Part of it is the Survival Mythology. Bad prepping advice. The assumption that you will have to Run Away and this is the first thing you have to prepare for. Its Romanticism. Look. If you like camping, go camping. If you like boating, go boating. But dont get that confused with self sufficiency.
As a bonus, as a person that has talked with alot of unprepared preppers, a common theme I here is, I'll grab my arsenal and head to the marina and steal a boat. I here it ALL THE TIME. Its plan one for many. Immature preppers. Shese. Lets picture that. Say you live in a city of a few million. That means, well over a thousand peoples plan one is to steal your boat. They have got no food. No future. But a shit load of guns. Its all based on theft. Release the pirates.

Its time for a re evaluation. Survival means STAYING PUT. Not Running Away. If you cant live where you are, Live somewhere you can. Do it NOW and avoid this  Running Away fantasy. Running to Where?
Stay by your food source. Stay by your friends. Stay by your shelter. Stay by your family. Stay by your community. All the things that are Actual Survival. If you do not have that, well that is where you should be putting the biggest percentage of your prepping focus. That is what you invest your energy into. Not playing Bush Rambo or Pirates of the Caribbean.

Just my 2 cents. Hopefully its usefull to someone.

Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: RE on February 08, 2018, 07:36:41 AM
Running to Where?

This spot looks good to me.  Off the coast of New England.  See if you can find it.  :icon_scratch:

Bugout Island 1
Bugout Island 1

Nice 2  C U drop in from Lurkerville C5.   :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 08, 2018, 07:47:29 AM
 My preps are mostly aimed at weathering the coming storm in place here. I own livestock, for pete's sake.  I have enough food to last until I have crops up, I think. It would be bad enough, but we could probably hold out for quite a while from economic collapse. Climate collapse might call for a pilgrimage by water, possibly.

The bug-out scenario is a true last resort, when it ain't workin' out, and it looks like times for a geographic cure.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 08, 2018, 07:59:47 AM
My preps are mostly aimed at weathering the coming storm in place here. I own livestock, for pete's sake.  I have enough food to last until I have crops up, I think. It would be bad enough, but we could probably hold out for quite a while from economic collapse. Climate collapse might call for a pilgrimage by water, possibly.

The bug-out scenario is a true last resort, when it ain't workin' out, and it looks like times for a geographic cure.

For YOU, that works because you have enough MONEY to afford a 40 acre Doomstead.  For the rest of us who are not in the .5%, we have to find a plan that we can AFFORD on a typical income.  You are RICH.  That makes prepping a lot easier.  ::)

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: Surly1 on February 08, 2018, 09:23:52 AM
C5, here. I thought I would jump in as a person that had spent many years living in "Land boats" or RVs.

In my own evolution from Survivalist to Prepper and then to what I am now calling Adapter, I have come to totally reject the idea of Bugging Out as a workable solution. Same with Nomadic Survival. I have lived that as far as it would go... and it lead nowhere. A temporary fix at best.

Thanks for a breath of fresh air, C5. Having been descended from a long line of hard heads who nobody cold ever tell anything to, in my dotage I have decided to place a premium on the advice of others. Others get a built in 30 per cent premium if they have actually LIVED what they are talking about. Clearly you have.

BOAT often stands for Bring Out Another Thousand. It will need constant and expensive repair. Though it might seem like a cheap option compared to land ownership, it is not. For the same price, you can easily find junk land. Land that will still be there after the boat has sunk. No matter what, its going to cost you something.

When I was much younger, I owned a sailboat together with three other friends who shared upkeep, slip fees, taxes, etc. We spent the better part of a year's worth of weekends and bad beer by-the-case in blister repair, sanding, fairing, then mastering the dark arts of fiberglass and two part epoxy, the better to restore a hull. Most of what we put into the boat was labor, but even replacement of simple boat hardware like blocks, sheaves, winches, etc. mounts up pretty quickly. To say nothing of dry-dock and slip fees. Bring Out Another Thousand indeed, or alternatively, A Hole in the Water Into Which You Throw Money. I follow the conversation here with interest because I know the principals, and it is intrinsically interesting, but I know it's not for me.


Part of it is the Survival Mythology. Bad prepping advice. The assumption that you will have to Run Away and this is the first thing you have to prepare for. Its Romanticism. Look. If you like camping, go camping. If you like boating, go boating. But dont get that confused with self sufficiency.
As a bonus, as a person that has talked with alot of unprepared preppers, a common theme I here is, I'll grab my arsenal and head to the marina and steal a boat. I here it ALL THE TIME. Its plan one for many. Immature preppers. Shese. Lets picture that. Say you live in a city of a few million. That means, well over a thousand peoples plan one is to steal your boat. They have got no food. No future. But a shit load of guns. Its all based on theft. Release the pirates.

They all deserve one another, IMO. This is what you get when you have a generation (or two) raised on video shooter games. Mike Tyson put it best: "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face."

Its time for a re evaluation. Survival means STAYING PUT. Not Running Away. If you cant live where you are, Live somewhere you can. Do it NOW and avoid this  Running Away fantasy. Running to Where?
Stay by your food source. Stay by your friends. Stay by your shelter. Stay by your family. Stay by your community. All the things that are Actual Survival. If you do not have that, well that is where you should be putting the biggest percentage of your prepping focus. That is what you invest your energy into. Not playing Bush Rambo or Pirates of the Caribbean.

Just my 2 cents. Hopefully its usefull to someone.

A-fucking-men. I live in a part of the world that is a natural funnel anyhow, with few ways out. So running is not an option, and hell, now I am a lot slower than before. Short of a tsunami there's no reason to go, anyhow. Build community. Be a good neighbor. Invest in the quality of life of the people around you, and try to be a good friend. All have far more survival value than "playing Bush Rambo."

Your words make a GREAT deal of sense and hit home with me.
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: RE on February 08, 2018, 09:38:09 AM
A-fucking-men. I live in a part of the world that is a natural funnel anyhow, with few ways out. So running is not an option, and hell, now I am a lot slower than before. Short of a tsunami there's no reason to go, anyhow.

Just wait until a Cat 5 Hurricane hits Norfolk dead on.  You'll change your tune then. You'll be wishing you had listened to me and could put to sea 3 days before it arrived when you got the Newz here on the Diner, courtesy of Jeff Masters & Bob Henson on Weather Underground. :P

Surly's McHovel Wuz Here
(http://jonathanauch.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/wpid4238-auch_nyc_street_photography_DSC_3204.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: Golden Oxen on February 08, 2018, 09:50:21 AM
C5, here. I thought I would jump in as a person that had spent many years living in "Land boats" or RVs.

In my own evolution from Survivalist to Prepper and then to what I am now calling Adapter, I have come to totally reject the idea of Bugging Out as a workable solution. Same with Nomadic Survival. I have lived that as far as it would go... and it lead nowhere. A temporary fix at best.

Thanks for a breath of fresh air, C5. Having been descended from a long line of hard heads who nobody cold ever tell anything to, in my dotage I have decided to place a premium on the advice of others. Others get a built in 30 per cent premium if they have actually LIVED what they are talking about. Clearly you have.

BOAT often stands for Bring Out Another Thousand. It will need constant and expensive repair. Though it might seem like a cheap option compared to land ownership, it is not. For the same price, you can easily find junk land. Land that will still be there after the boat has sunk. No matter what, its going to cost you something.

When I was much younger, I owned a sailboat together with three other friends who shared upkeep, slip fees, taxes, etc. We spent the better part of a year's worth of weekends and bad beer by-the-case in blister repair, sanding, fairing, then mastering the dark arts of fiberglass and two part epoxy, the better to restore a hull. Most of what we put into the boat was labor, but even replacement of simple boat hardware like blocks, sheaves, winches, etc. mounts up pretty quickly. To say nothing of dry-dock and slip fees. Bring Out Another Thousand indeed, or alternatively, A Hole in the Water Into Which You Throw Money. I follow the conversation here with interest because I know the principals, and it is intrinsically interesting, but I know it's not for me.


Part of it is the Survival Mythology. Bad prepping advice. The assumption that you will have to Run Away and this is the first thing you have to prepare for. Its Romanticism. Look. If you like camping, go camping. If you like boating, go boating. But dont get that confused with self sufficiency.
As a bonus, as a person that has talked with alot of unprepared preppers, a common theme I here is, I'll grab my arsenal and head to the marina and steal a boat. I here it ALL THE TIME. Its plan one for many. Immature preppers. Shese. Lets picture that. Say you live in a city of a few million. That means, well over a thousand peoples plan one is to steal your boat. They have got no food. No future. But a shit load of guns. Its all based on theft. Release the pirates.

They all deserve one another, IMO. This is what you get when you have a generation (or two) raised on video shooter games. Mike Tyson put it best: "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face."

Its time for a re evaluation. Survival means STAYING PUT. Not Running Away. If you cant live where you are, Live somewhere you can. Do it NOW and avoid this  Running Away fantasy. Running to Where?
Stay by your food source. Stay by your friends. Stay by your shelter. Stay by your family. Stay by your community. All the things that are Actual Survival. If you do not have that, well that is where you should be putting the biggest percentage of your prepping focus. That is what you invest your energy into. Not playing Bush Rambo or Pirates of the Caribbean.

Just my 2 cents. Hopefully its usefull to someone.

A-fucking-men. I live in a part of the world that is a natural funnel anyhow, with few ways out. So running is not an option, and hell, now I am a lot slower than before. Short of a tsunami there's no reason to go, anyhow. Build community. Be a good neighbor. Invest in the quality of life of the people around you, and try to be a good friend. All have far more survival value than "playing Bush Rambo."

Your words make a GREAT deal of sense and hit home with me.

May I add my complete agreement as well gentlemen. Surly that was quite a reply.

Truth and honesty always have an admirable quality about them.   

Much admired author of mine, James Howard Kunstler,  is also an advocate of Surly's thoughts on the matter.

Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: Surly1 on February 08, 2018, 12:45:17 PM
A-fucking-men. I live in a part of the world that is a natural funnel anyhow, with few ways out. So running is not an option, and hell, now I am a lot slower than before. Short of a tsunami there's no reason to go, anyhow.

Just wait until a Cat 5 Hurricane hits Norfolk dead on.  You'll change your tune then. You'll be wishing you had listened to me and could put to sea 3 days before it arrived when you got the Newz here on the Diner, courtesy of Jeff Masters & Bob Henson on Weather Underground. :P

Surly's McHovel Wuz Here
(http://jonathanauch.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/wpid4238-auch_nyc_street_photography_DSC_3204.jpg)

RE

With three days notice I can be in fucking AZ with AZ. IN 48 hours I can be in St. Louis. Most people don't have the determination to GTFO when a storm is three days out because of the uncertainty of path prediction. Most people won't think about leaving until the storm is two hours out, in which case the highways here would look like the Highway of Death from Iraq to Kuwait during the first Gulf War.

(http://www.globalresearch.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/CABAA-CCBCA-DDBCH-BJ_thumb.jpg)
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: RE on February 08, 2018, 03:06:48 PM
With three days notice I can be in fucking AZ with AZ.

You can GTFO of Dodge, but your house & preps can't.  :hi: to homelessness.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 06:29:57 AM
Today's find is a 1994 41' Hunter located in VA.  FABULOUS Galley!  :icon_sunny:  Real SLEEK, looks like it would sail well. Asking $75K.

http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1994-hunter-sailboat-103091179/?refSource=standard%20listing (http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1994-hunter-sailboat-103091179/?refSource=standard%20listing)

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/20/7/6282007_0_270720170810_0.jpg?t=1265031)

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/20/7/6282007_0_270720170810_7.jpg?t=1265031)

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: K-Dog on February 09, 2018, 07:37:33 AM



(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.imfdb.org%2Fimages%2Fthumb%2Fc%2Fc6%2FCRm2.jpg%2F600px-CRm2.jpg&f=1)

C5, here. I thought I would jump in as a person that had spent many years living in "Land boats" or RVs.

In my own evolution from Survivalist to Prepper and then to what I am now calling Adapter, I have come to totally reject the idea of Bugging Out as a workable solution. Same with Nomadic Survival. I have lived that as far as it would go... and it lead nowhere. A temporary fix at best.
BOAT often stands for Bring Out Another Thousand. It will need constant and expensive repair. Though it might seem like a cheap option compared to land ownership, it is not. For the same price, you can easily find junk land. Land that will still be there after the boat has sunk. No matter what, its going to cost you something.
Part of it is the Survival Mythology. Bad prepping advice. The assumption that you will have to Run Away and this is the first thing you have to prepare for. Its Romanticism. Look. If you like camping, go camping. If you like boating, go boating. But dont get that confused with self sufficiency.
As a bonus, as a person that has talked with alot of unprepared preppers, a common theme I here is, I'll grab my arsenal and head to the marina and steal a boat. I here it ALL THE TIME. Its plan one for many. Immature preppers. Shese. Lets picture that. Say you live in a city of a few million. That means, well over a thousand peoples plan one is to steal your boat. They have got no food. No future. But a shit load of guns. Its all based on theft. Release the pirates.

Its time for a re evaluation. Survival means STAYING PUT. Not Running Away. If you cant live where you are, Live somewhere you can. Do it NOW and avoid this  Running Away fantasy. Running to Where?
Stay by your food source. Stay by your friends. Stay by your shelter. Stay by your family. Stay by your community. All the things that are Actual Survival. If you do not have that, well that is where you should be putting the biggest percentage of your prepping focus. That is what you invest your energy into. Not playing Bush Rambo or Pirates of the Caribbean.

Just my 2 cents. Hopefully its usefull to someone.

Initially in collapse people may be well behaved.  They won't really go bat-shit until hunger sets in.  Unless travel in an early calm time gets you to a good place already prepared, travel would not be a good idea and would waste time.  There will be no point in being mobile when there is no place to go. 

Ultimate survival will mean joining up with a group.  Lone wolves in sailboats or RV's will be eaten for dinner.  Hiway pirates could shoot bugout travelers from duck blinds as they come down the road.  Land pirates.  They can hide but you can't.  You are on the 'open' road and a pack of smokes will be enough for someone to take you out when we hit duck blind hard times times a few month's in.

(http://www.evelynanddenny.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/my2cents.png)
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 07:44:16 AM
Initially in collapse people may be well behaved.  They won't really go bat-shit until hunger sets in.  Useless travel in an early calm time gets you to a good place already prepared, travel would not be a good idea and would waste time.  There will be no point in being mobile when there is no place to go.

But there IS a place to go!  The uninhabited island you have scoped out beforehand and prepped up.

RE

Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: K-Dog on February 09, 2018, 08:19:11 AM
Initially in collapse people may be well behaved.  They won't really go bat-shit until hunger sets in.  Useless travel in an early calm time gets you to a good place already prepared, travel would not be a good idea and would waste time.  There will be no point in being mobile when there is no place to go.

But there IS a place to go!  The uninhabited island you have scoped out beforehand and prepped up.

RE

How many people have the resources to prep an Island?  It would be a logistical nightmare.  It would be your own personal mission to Mars.  Who owns the island?  If it is not you then you are going to have a problem.  That Island you showed looked like a couple of families could farm the land in an imagined self-sufficiency which would not be possible in actuality.  Once on the island shortages in supplies will be noticed and some essentials will need to be acquired.  If three families tries to farm that island we are going to have a tragedy of the commons.

Stuck on an island and you need supplies with no way to get them.  Seeds for crops?  Nobody to trade with on an Island.  People live by their connections.  An island stuck in the sea off New England will have a shorter and cooler growing season than a mainland setup.  Nobody ever lived there for a reason.  It will be as hard for you to leave and return to the island as it is for anyone else.  The island fantasy has to be the best fantasy of all but it requires high seven figure incomes to set up.    Caves carved into hard rock to hold endless pallets of supplies would be nice but it all has to be ready to go when SHTF with a seamless bugout that assumes nobody else has had their eye on the same island like the workers who set up your fortress.  Islands need to be defended and the biggest gun wins.

RE can differ but RE is in Alaska where he might be able to squat somewhere on an island with an easy boat ride away from the mainland.  In Alaska the islands would also not be colder than anywhere else it seems to me.  In the lower 48 it will be a different story.  1000 people might want one island.  RE can smuggle in a few supplies by himself because he can come and go.  That could be difficult elsewhere.

But if one could pull it off an island with radar guided 50 caliber machine guns which would automatically defend your inner garden plot from invading boaters would be really cool while you figure out how to grow a carrot.  By yourself.  No you-tube.  Supermodels optional.

(http://dyj7luh3166cu.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/2017/06/2-Dr-No%E2%80%99s-Hideout-James-Bond.png)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 08:25:34 AM
Today's find is a 1994 41' Hunter located in VA.  FABULOUS Galley!  :icon_sunny:  Real SLEEK, looks like it would sail well. Asking $75K.

http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1994-hunter-sailboat-103091179/?refSource=standard%20listing (http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1994-hunter-sailboat-103091179/?refSource=standard%20listing)

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/20/7/6282007_0_270720170810_0.jpg?t=1265031)

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/20/7/6282007_0_270720170810_7.jpg?t=1265031)

RE

It'd be fine for a short bug-out run, but not sure I'd want to cross an ocean in one. Hunters and Catalinas are the Ford and Chevy of bay boats. Fast around the marks and not much wood to have to maintain, but lightly built and rigged.  For 75K I can find a real boat.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day --- Hurricane Bargains
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 09:46:48 AM
Here's a great, heavy, old, China Clipper that needs some love. But it's a blue water boat that probably only needs cosmetics and maybe the rig rebuilt, maybe chainplates. Engine? Who knows, but it's only a 36 footer. I could sail this boat anywhere with no engine at all. It'd be a pain at times, but I could do it. Sails can be had used. This boat is worth saving, unless the decks are rotted to shit.

Asking price $ 12K. You could probably get it for less.

(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/pictayana42101b.jpg)

http://sailingtexas.com/201801/stayana42101.html (http://sailingtexas.com/201801/stayana42101.html)

Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 10:40:01 AM
Initially in collapse people may be well behaved.  They won't really go bat-shit until hunger sets in.  Useless travel in an early calm time gets you to a good place already prepared, travel would not be a good idea and would waste time.  There will be no point in being mobile when there is no place to go.

But there IS a place to go!  The uninhabited island you have scoped out beforehand and prepped up.

RE

How many people have the resources to prep an Island?  It would be a logistical nightmare.  It would be your own personal mission to Mars.  Who owns the island?  If it is not you then you are going to have a problem.  That Island you showed looked like a couple of families could farm the land in an imagined self-sufficiency which would not be possible in actuality.  Once on the island shortages in supplies will be noticed and some essentials will need to be acquired.  If three families tries to farm that island we are going to have a tragedy of the commons.

Stuck on an island and you need supplies with no way to get them.  Seeds for crops?  Nobody to trade with on an Island.  People live by their connections.  An island stuck in the sea off New England will have a shorter and cooler growing season than a mainland setup.  Nobody ever lived there for a reason.  It will be as hard for you to leave and return to the island as it is for anyone else.  The island fantasy has to be the best fantasy of all but it requires high seven figure incomes to set up.    Caves carved into hard rock to hold endless pallets of supplies would be nice but it all has to be ready to go when SHTF with a seamless bugout that assumes nobody else has had their eye on the same island like the workers who set up your fortress.  Islands need to be defended and the biggest gun wins.

RE can differ but RE is in Alaska where he might be able to squat somewhere on an island with an easy boat ride away from the mainland.  In Alaska the islands would also not be colder than anywhere else it seems to me.  In the lower 48 it will be a different story.  1000 people might want one island.  RE can smuggle in a few supplies by himself because he can come and go.  That could be difficult elsewhere.

But if one could pull it off an island with radar guided 50 caliber machine guns which would automatically defend your inner garden plot from invading boaters would be really cool while you figure out how to grow a carrot.  By yourself.  No you-tube.  Supermodels optional.


You haven't been following the thread well.  The proposed island is not in Alaska, it is in Maine (lower 48).  You don't buy it, you squat it after TSHTF Day.  You have caches buried on the island with seeds, tools, hardware etc ready to dig up when you get there.  Go back and read my initial posts on the Plan.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day --- Hurricane Bargains
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 10:53:52 AM
Here's a great, heavy, old, China Clipper that needs some love. But it's a blue water boat that probably only needs cosmetics and maybe the rig rebuilt, maybe chainplates. Engine? Who knows, but it's only a 36 footer. I could sail this boat anywhere with no engine at all. It'd be a pain at times, but I could do it. Sails can be had used. This boat is worth saving, unless the decks are rotted to shit.

Asking price $ 12K. You could probably get it for less.

(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/pictayana42101b.jpg)

http://sailingtexas.com/201801/stayana42101.html (http://sailingtexas.com/201801/stayana42101.html)

It's LOA is 42', not 36'.

You could sail it anywhere with no engine?  How about to Ocean Falls?

The decks are a MESS.  It's gotta have leaks all over the place.

(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/pictayana42101c.jpg)

Even at that Low, Low Chump Change Price Everyday, I'm not tempted on this one.  Try again.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 11:49:43 AM
Actually those are repairs that haven't yet been painted. Not a big deal if the repairs are really repairs and not just scabs on rot.

It's hard to know how bad the decks are without a survey, but I'm sure they aren't perfect. It looks like they lost the toe-rail in the storm. A common cosmetic problem when boats rub against the pier.

It's less that 28 ft on the waterline. I could sail it to hell and back, but it'd be hard to sail upwind in a narrow channel. Not a boat that points well. But with practice, I could probably sail that boat in and out of a slip, if the wind was adequate (but not blowing hard), and I had lots of room to maneuver.

The biggest threat of not having a kicker is that's there's no way to save yourself if you allow yourself to get blown on to a lee shore. You have to know what you're doing, and be familiar with the boat and what it will and won't do. You get that with practice.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 11:56:49 AM
Actually those are repairs that haven't yet been painted. Not a big deal if the repairs are really repairs and not just scabs on rot.

It's hard to know how bad the decks are without a survey, but I'm sure they aren't perfect. It looks like they lost the toe-rail in the storm. A common cosmetic problem when boats rub against the pier.

It's less that 28 ft on the waterline. I could sail it to hell and back, but it'd be hard to sail upwind in a narrow channel. Not a boat that points well. But with practice, I could probably sail that boat in and out of a slip, if the wind was adequate (but not blowing hard), and I had lots of room to maneuver.

The biggest threat of not having a kicker is that's there's no way to save yourself if you allow yourself to get blown on to a lee shore. You have to know what you're doing, and be familiar with the boat and what it will and won't do. You get that with practice.

You yourself said you're not up for a boat that would take a lot of work to get ship-shape, and this one clearly would.  I am not up for a boat that doesn't have a kick ass auxialiary engine.  This one meets no criteria other than the price, which is of course dirt cheap.  If you went and looked at it and came back and said we could have it fixed up professionally for say $10K,maybe then we could consider it.  But we still would need to install an engine on it, and that would be expensive too.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 12:06:07 PM
The engine might be okay. I don't know. Not much info in the ad. I just posted it to show a good boat that would likely sail from here to wherever, for a price that's dirt cheap. It's not a boat I'd probably want to buy. I might steal it in a pinch though. Or one like it. If I truly needed to bug out. Low probability event.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 12:13:27 PM
The engine might be okay. I don't know. Not much info in the ad. I just posted it to show a good boat that would likely sail from here to wherever, for a price that's dirt cheap. It's not a boat I'd probably want to buy. I might steal it in a pinch though. Or one like it. If I truly needed to bug out. Low probability event.

The problem with STEALING a boat for a bugout is that it's not properly equipped in all likelihood.  It only serves as a transportation vehicle, not a survival vehicle.  You need water desal, solar PV, food storage, yada yada all the stuff I delineated in the article.  You also can't go and pre-prepare your bugout location if you rely on stealing at the last minute.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 12:21:10 PM
Not an ideal scenario, but preferable to certain death.

http://www.youtube.com/v/rZVjKlBCvhg&fs=1

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 12:27:02 PM
Not an ideal scenario, but preferable to certain death.

Your death is still certain without the right preps aboard.  Unless of course you are Cody Lundin or Mr. Primitive Technology.  Which neither of us are.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 12:31:24 PM
Pirates make do with treasure. (And I have plenty of preps. I just have to get them aboard and get the hell outa Dodge before I get caught.)

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTEEWylunUdAFFVcS2yR4rlz6AcQNlpZvzY1lrEosvx3QXoGNh1)

Dude, you're, like, bummin' me out with all your negative waves.

http://www.youtube.com/v/aT9Lm4Y886k&fs=1
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 12:38:22 PM
Pirates make do with treasure. (And I have plenty of preps. I just have to get them aboard and get the hell outa Dodge before I get caught.)

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTEEWylunUdAFFVcS2yR4rlz6AcQNlpZvzY1lrEosvx3QXoGNh1)

Dude, you're, like, bummin' me out with all your negative waves.

http://www.youtube.com/v/aT9Lm4Y886k&fs=1

Even if you could load all your batts and solar panels aboard the stolen boat without getting caught (how many hours/days do you think that would take to get done? ???), you STILL haven't got a bugout location prepped up.  You gotta do all this in ADVANCE to make it work.  I will pound you to death with Negative Waves on this one. :P

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 12:56:25 PM
I have considered a few bug-out locations from Rockport and CC. Think I'm just gonna share that info with everybody on the planet?

Unlike you, I've actually sailed to at least one of these potential locations.  If I told you, I have to kill you, now wouldn't I? It'd be like if Palloy told us where he's holed up.

Suffice it to say there is a semi-remote location within a one or two day sail of any of the marinas I mentioned the other day, where I could hide in plain sight. And...it is not an island. And it requires almost no sailing expertise to get there. I've actually mentioned it here before, but it's been a long, long time, and nobody remembers. Maybe you could re-read all my posts and figure it out.

You can't carry a lot on a sailboat. You'd have to cut the preps to the bone. I could get by for some time with fishing gear, vitamin C, and bait.

But, I'm no thief. I would have to be in dire circumstances to rip somebody off like that. Goes against my toilet training. That's why I window shop for boats every day. Sooner or later I might find exactly the right boat and even find a cheap slip. Intention is some powerful shit.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 01:13:16 PM
I have considered a few bug-out locations from Rockport and CC. Think I'm just gonna share that info with everybody on the planet?

Unlike you, I've actually sailed to at least one of these potential locations.  If I told you, I have to kill you, now wouldn't I? It'd be like if Palloy told us where he's holed up.

Suffice it to say there is a semi-remote location within a one or two day sail of any of the marinas I mentioned the other day, where I could hide in plain sight. And...it is not an island. And it requires almost no sailing expertise to get there. I've actually mentioned it here before, but it's been a long, long time, and nobody remembers. Maybe you could re-read all my posts and figure it out.

You can't carry a lot on a sailboat. You'd have to cut the preps to the bone. I could get by for some time with fishing gear, vitamin C, and bait.

But, I'm no thief. I would have to be in dire circumstances to rip somebody off like that. Goes against my toilet training. That's why I window shop for boats every day. Sooner or later I might find exactly the right boat and even find a cheap slip. Intention is some powerful shit.

Under THE PLAN, prepping a location up is not done in one trip, because you can only carry so much with you on each trip.  So you need to own the boat for a while and be able to make several trips to your designated bugout location and bury your caches of preps.

It doesn't have to be an island, as I said the Fjords of BC are quite isolated, and I am sure there are isolated places along the TX coastline also, though probably not with as much geographical obstacles as fjords provide.

Would you have to kill me if you revealed this to me?  Of course not!  We're PARTNERS!  I will go to my grave before I reveal the SECRET, just as I would with Azozeo's Gold.  No torture could get it out of me, I am already used to constant pain.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 01:27:42 PM
I have considered a few bug-out locations from Rockport and CC. Think I'm just gonna share that info with everybody on the planet?

Unlike you, I've actually sailed to at least one of these potential locations.  If I told you, I have to kill you, now wouldn't I? It'd be like if Palloy told us where he's holed up.

Suffice it to say there is a semi-remote location within a one or two day sail of any of the marinas I mentioned the other day, where I could hide in plain sight. And...it is not an island. And it requires almost no sailing expertise to get there. I've actually mentioned it here before, but it's been a long, long time, and nobody remembers. Maybe you could re-read all my posts and figure it out.

You can't carry a lot on a sailboat. You'd have to cut the preps to the bone. I could get by for some time with fishing gear, vitamin C, and bait.

But, I'm no thief. I would have to be in dire circumstances to rip somebody off like that. Goes against my toilet training. That's why I window shop for boats every day. Sooner or later I might find exactly the right boat and even find a cheap slip. Intention is some powerful shit.

Under THE PLAN, prepping a location up is not done in one trip, because you can only carry so much with you on each trip.  So you need to own the boat for a while and be able to make several trips to your designated bugout location and bury your caches of preps.

It doesn't have to be an island, as I said the Fjords of BC are quite isolated, and I am sure there are isolated places along the TX coastline also, though probably not with as much geographical obstacles as fjords provide.

Would you have to kill me if you revealed this to me?  Of course not!  We're PARTNERS!  I will go to my grave before I reveal the SECRET, just as I would with Azozeo's Gold.  No torture could get it out of me, I am already used to constant pain.

RE

If you TRUST me, PM me the chosen Bugout Location within a day sail of Rockport.  I want to map it out.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 01:38:53 PM
Of course I trust you. Like I said, I already posted this publicly. I'm only holding out now to pull your chain. :)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2018, 01:42:56 PM
Of course I trust you. Like I said, I already posted this publicly. I'm only holding out now to pull your chain. :)

So stop chain pulling me and PM me the location so I can map it. :P I want to see how good your selection of boat based bugout locations in TX is.

RE
Title: Re: More Gratuitous Seastead Silliness
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2018, 04:50:59 PM
This one will go soon, probably cheap. It's already reasonably priced. It's an ugly Morgan tub, but they are floating apartments, and they sail okay, albeit not very well into the wind. It has a centerboard, so it can go places that are shallow. The owner was going to the Bahamas but the Lord blessed him with a child. Wah, Wah.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00q0q_4K23WAQAKxp_600x450.jpg)

https://galveston.craigslist.org/boa/d/38-ft-1977-morgan-38-heritage/6448857701.html
Title: ⛵ More Gratuitous Seastead Silliness
Post by: RE on February 10, 2018, 04:52:49 AM
This one will go soon, probably cheap. It's already reasonably priced. It's an ugly Morgan tub, but they are floating apartments, and they sail okay, albeit not very well into the wind. It has a centerboard, so it can go places that are shallow. The owner was going to the Bahamas but the Lord blessed him with a child. Wah, Wah.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00q0q_4K23WAQAKxp_600x450.jpg)

https://galveston.craigslist.org/boa/d/38-ft-1977-morgan-38-heritage/6448857701.html

This is better than your last one, but not as good as the one in OR.  I'm not a huge fan of centerboards, and even with the board up it still has a draft of 4'.  Many full keel boats have a 5' draft, so you're only getting a foot of extra clearance to sail in shallow water.  If you expect to be doing that type of sailing, a Cat is probably the better choice, if you can find one at a decent price.

Other deficiencies in this boat as a Bugout Machine are the small water & fuel tanks.  Main advantage is it is already in TX so no shipping cost.

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
Post by: cernunnos5 on February 10, 2018, 05:36:22 AM

Nice 2  C U drop in from Lurkerville C5.   :icon_sunny:

RE
Thanks...and my apologies. To avoid the usual prepper arguments, I went off to play minor Survival Guru at my own blog. Unfortunately, this uses up most of my creative typing energy and leaves me a bit burnt out... soooo, not alot left over of me to share on other collapse boards.

I do "lurk" here for news though. Some stuff shows up faster here than other news source boards.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 10, 2018, 10:33:57 AM
I agree with your assessment, but it is very nice below, with a ton of room for a 38 foot boat. A marina queen with AC and a salon big enough for a dinner party.

I'm just posting what's currently on sale. Quality varies, obviously. The Hardin I posted several days back is still my current favorite.. It would be very hard to sail with no kicker though. Huge and lots of freeboard, it'd take time to get good at berthing her WITH a kicker. No bow thruster. At 69K it's a steal. Very nice boat. It has wooden masts, but they're new and done in West system, so they'll outlast me. I need that boat. LOL.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/37/86/6383786_20170929070616889_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/37/86/6383786_20170929070616889_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1506674517000)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 10, 2018, 11:10:56 AM
I agree with your assessment, but it is very nice below, with a ton of room for a 38 foot boat. A marina queen with AC and a salon big enough for a dinner party.

I'm just posting what's currently on sale. Quality varies, obviously. The Hardin I posted several days back is still my current favorite.. It would be very hard to sail with no kicker though. Huge and lots of freeboard, it'd take time to get good at berthing her WITH a kicker. No bow thruster. At 69K it's a steal. Very nice boat. It has wooden masts, but they're new and done in West system, so they'll outlast me. I need that boat. LOL.

Oh for sure there are plenty of boats out there for sale of varying quality.  We're trying to find the BEST boat for the buck here though that is acceptable to BOTH of us.  That's not so EZ because we look for different features.

A/C already installed is not a big deal, because that can be installed cheap.  In fact you could just buy a 10K BTU portable unit that would cool a boat just fine.
(https://images.wards.com/is/image/imsdm/045230?$mwMain350$)

I wouldn't consider any boat with NO engine whatsoever, regardless how skillful you are at sailing into a slip.  There are too many reasons it proves useful, like keeping you moving if you hit still air.  Keeping you off a lee shore. Charging your batts. etc.

I have a boat for tomorrow I hope you approve of.  Currently in Ontario.  A serious sailing vessel.  ;D

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 10, 2018, 11:29:45 AM
I prefer an engine too, but I'm thinking ahead to the day when they're not easy to get fuel for.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 10, 2018, 11:41:53 AM
I agree with your assessment, but it is very nice below, with a ton of room for a 38 foot boat. A marina queen with AC and a salon big enough for a dinner party.

I'm just posting what's currently on sale. Quality varies, obviously. The Hardin I posted several days back is still my current favorite.. It would be very hard to sail with no kicker though. Huge and lots of freeboard, it'd take time to get good at berthing her WITH a kicker. No bow thruster. At 69K it's a steal. Very nice boat. It has wooden masts, but they're new and done in West system, so they'll outlast me. I need that boat. LOL.

Oh for sure there are plenty of boats out there for sale of varying quality.  We're trying to find the BEST boat for the buck here though that is acceptable to BOTH of us.  That's not so EZ because we look for different features.

A/C already installed is not a big deal, because that can be installed cheap.  In fact you could just buy a 10K BTU portable unit that would cool a boat just fine.
(https://images.wards.com/is/image/imsdm/045230?$mwMain350$)

I wouldn't consider any boat with NO engine whatsoever, regardless how skillful you are at sailing into a slip.  There are too many reasons it proves useful, like keeping you moving if you hit still air.  Keeping you off a lee shore. Charging your batts. etc.

I have a boat for tomorrow I hope you approve of.  Currently in Ontario.  A serious sailing vessel.  ;D

RE

Ontario to the Gulf of Mexico is part of the Great Circle. My old sailing buddy just did that trip in his 35 foot trawler. Ontario to Texas would be a fine trip. Not sure about whether there are bridges that would be a problem for a tall mast. Probably. Maybe you could lash the mast to the deck and motor to New Orleans, where it could be raised before you cross the Gulf...or leave it down and motor the ICWW all the way, which would be easier, but less enjoyable, in my view.

from Ontario  sail Lake Huron. and Lake Michigan to Chicago, then the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal to the the Des Plaines River, then float down the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers to the Gulf.

Maybe David could join us for the first leg, and he could get his sailing bona fides.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 10, 2018, 01:05:05 PM
I prefer an engine too, but I'm thinking ahead to the day when they're not easy to get fuel for.

Well, we definitely want to use the engine as little as possible, both to conserve fuel and save engine wear & tear.  We will of course eventually need to be growing our own biodiesel.  I wonder if you can make biodiesel from fish oil? ???  :icon_scratch:  As long as the diesel is available, you keep the tanks topped off, along with some 55 gal drums buried in your Bugout location.

Quote
Ontario to the Gulf of Mexico is part of the Great Circle. My old sailing buddy just did that trip in his 35 foot trawler. Ontario to Texas would be a fine trip. Not sure about whether there are bridges that would be a problem for a tall mast. Probably. Maybe you could lash the mast to the deck and motor to New Orleans, where it could be raised before you cross the Gulf...or leave it down and motor the ICWW all the way, which would be easier, but less enjoyable, in my view.

from Ontario  sail Lake Huron. and Lake Michigan to Chicago, then the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal to the the Des Plaines River, then float down the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers to the Gulf.

Maybe David could join us for the first leg, and he could get his sailing bona fides.

Pulling the masts on this boat would not be EZ.  It's a BIG boat.  I'll have to look into how you could sail it down to TX.

No problem fitting DB on the boat and his 2 kids, or you and your entire family and all their SOs too!  Palloy can fit too with a few of his Chooks and Pythons!  ::)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 10, 2018, 01:17:34 PM

Pulling the masts on this boat would not be EZ.  It's a BIG boat.  I'll have to look into how you could sail it down to TX.


To get this boat to TX, you're going to have to sail it out of Hudson Bay in the summer when you are clear of ice.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: jdwheeler42 on February 10, 2018, 04:38:51 PM
Well, we definitely want to use the engine as little as possible, both to conserve fuel and save engine wear & tear.  We will of course eventually need to be growing our own biodiesel.  I wonder if you can make biodiesel from fish oil? ???  :icon_scratch:  As long as the diesel is available, you keep the tanks topped off, along with some 55 gal drums buried in your Bugout location.
You certainly could make biodiesel from fish oil.... the big question is how expensive it would be.  Also, to work well in modern diesel engines, you need alcohol to react with the oil, and I can't think of where a good maritime source of that would come from.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 10, 2018, 05:53:41 PM
Well, we definitely want to use the engine as little as possible, both to conserve fuel and save engine wear & tear.  We will of course eventually need to be growing our own biodiesel.  I wonder if you can make biodiesel from fish oil? ???  :icon_scratch:  As long as the diesel is available, you keep the tanks topped off, along with some 55 gal drums buried in your Bugout location.
You certainly could make biodiesel from fish oil.... the big question is how expensive it would be.  Also, to work well in modern diesel engines, you need alcohol to react with the oil, and I can't think of where a good maritime source of that would come from.

Cost is not an issue since you are fishing it up yourself.  The question is how many pounds of fish do you need to make a gallon of biodiesel?

For the alcohol, maybe you could ferment seaweed?  Anyhow, there should be trees around and you can have a Potato Tower on board the boat!  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on February 10, 2018, 06:25:03 PM
Methanol would work better for biodiesel. Ethanol works but It's more prone to problems. I played with it a bit before I discovered gasification. (And a bear ate all my fryer oil but that is another story).  Most diesels will run on straight oil if you preheat it. I've seen modern diesel generators running on straight oil a VW jetta and a Volvo. No turbos though. Here is a thread about it on a yachtie site:
http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/62920-wvo-sailboat.html#/topics/62920 (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/62920-wvo-sailboat.html#/topics/62920)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 10, 2018, 06:38:14 PM
Methanol would work better for biodiesel. Ethanol works but It's more prone to problems. I played with it a bit before I discovered gasification. (And a bear ate all my fryer oil but that is another story).  Most diesels will run on straight oil if you preheat it. I've seen modern diesel generators running on straight oil a VW jetta and a Volvo. No turbos though. Here is a thread about it on a yachtie site:
http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/62920-wvo-sailboat.html#/topics/62920 (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/62920-wvo-sailboat.html#/topics/62920)

Great info DB!  Thanks!

We can also always pull out the diesel engine and substitute a gas powered engine.  There will be plenty of them around in the junkyards to scavenge from.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on February 10, 2018, 09:18:06 PM
Quote
RE: The question is how many pounds of fish do you need to make a gallon of biodiesel?

Lots.  More than you can catch.
How many acres of forest do you need to supply the feedstock for all the fuel you need?
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 10, 2018, 09:51:11 PM
Quote
RE: The question is how many pounds of fish do you need to make a gallon of biodiesel?

Lots.  More than you can catch.
How many acres of forest do you need to supply the feedstock for all the fuel you need?

That depends on how often you actually turn on the engine.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: The Good Ship Doomstead Diner Tall Ship Leader
Post by: RE on February 11, 2018, 06:11:38 AM
Now THIS is a Tall Ship worthy of being the Good Ship Doomstead Diner!  :icon_sunny:

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1947/Custom-Passenger-Sailing-Vessel-2181631/Canada?refSource=browse listing#.Wn6TuOeUuUk (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1947/Custom-Passenger-Sailing-Vessel-2181631/Canada?refSource=browse listing#.Wn6TuOeUuUk)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_1.jpg?f=/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_1.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1297189804000)

Year:
    1947
Length:
    245'
Engine/Fuel Type:
    Single / diesel

Located In:
    ON, Canada
Hull Material:
    Steel
YW#:
    14984-2181631

Current Price:
    US$ 1,750,000

The ship was dry docked and fully serviced and re-certified in 2014 and is ready for cruising.

This 245' Sailing Vessel was reconfigured and rebuilt as new at the completion of 2007 and accommodates 76 passengers plus crew. The vessel is fully SOLAS 2010 Compliant. It is fully equipped and classed for ocean operations as a commercial passenger vessel. It is in perfect turn key condition and is fully operational and ready to work. There is no question this 245' Barquentine Tall Ship is the most capable and interesting vessel of its class and size available on the world market today.


Coming in at 247', it will easily accommodate all the Diners and their families.  Located conveniently this time in Ontario, Canada on the NA continent instead of Turkey.  ::)  Not a floating whorehouse for Saudi Princes.  Reasonable price for this size vessel @ $1.75M.  Triangular rigging on 3 masts that don't need a lot of monkeys to handle the square sails.  Built in 1947 in Canada originally, but completely rebuilt in 2007.  Main Salon with seating for 76 people!!  :o 1500 HP of ICE Power!!!  :o

The GSDD will need some additions and refits to be the ULTIMATE GTFO of Dodge SHTF Day Escape Vehicle. We'll need Solar PV panels and Wind turbines to generate renewable energy.  We'll need some on board Hydroponics and Potato Towers to grow food while offshore.  We'll also need defense against attacking Pirates and Zombies.  For this, we mount Bow & Stern Ball Turrets with Anti-Aircraft guns and RPG  launchers.  ;D

http://www.youtube.com/v/RcPTnsAP9wU

Main Crew for the GSDD

Commodore: RE
Captain: Eddie
First Mate: Eddie's Beloved
Navigator: Palloy
Ship's Dentist: Eddie
Ship's Medic: LD
Ship's Doctor: Unfilled Position
Ship's Nurse:  Unfilled Position
Cook: RE
Engineer: DavidB
Bosun: Surly
Astronomer: Azozeo
Chief Monk: Knarf
Chief Permaculturist: JDW
Chief Ganga Grower: K-Dog
Chief Renewable Energy Officer: AG
Bow Gunner: RE
Stern Gunner: AZ

Deck Hands:  :icon_mrgreen:

(http://c0419384.cdn2.cloudfiles.rackspacecloud.com/ttgzwrqc-2517_l-Nikki Whelan-main.jpg)(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/6f/e2/f5/6fe2f5f081db3c77a62f50c5ad7d025d--girls-soccer-soccer-fans.jpg)(https://lh6.ggpht.com/gniIR0mlzes5fbcJjkskWo8jHcMrSwG9HxgXIlepAnoAwjIi2gKytbzmGr2pv8IRdAE=h1080)

Diners getting a Sun Tan on Deck
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_5.jpg?f=/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_5.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1297189805000)

Eddie in the Pilot House Guiding the GSDD into Port under Sail Alone
Engine off, no bow thrusters, he's GOOD! lol
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_7.jpg?f=/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_7.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1297189805000)

Now we just need to Crowd Fund the money for it on Indigogo or GoFundMe.  ::)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 11, 2018, 07:15:14 AM
Sweet! I like that boat....er, ship. If I have to dock her sans engine it's a good thing it's steel. I hope it's thick steel.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 11, 2018, 07:24:15 AM
Sweet! I like that boat....er, ship. If I have to dock her sans engine it's a good thing it's steel. I hope it's thick steel.

We can always hang some Banksters over the side as fenders.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: The Good Ship Doomstead Diner Tall Ship Leader
Post by: RE on February 12, 2018, 05:55:25 AM
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_1.jpg?f=/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_1.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1297189804000)
  I was considering how to make the GSDD Tall Ship a going economic concern prior to SHTF Day.  Also how to make the purchase affordable if I don't win the Mega-Millions Jackpot in the next few weeks.  ::)

Coming in @ $1.75M, I think we need 10 Investors @ $175K each.  They will each need CASH of $35K each (20%) minimum with a bank loan for the rest.  We probably can jew down the seller though to $1.5M.

So now we have to figure how to make some $MONEY$ 🤑 off this ship! ???  :icon_scratch:  We have to cover some fairly substantial regular bills here to make this a going economic concern.

The first means I though of was to make it a Hospital Ship and go for Grants to operate it wherever the latest coastal disaster zone is.  We're looking at a nice Disaster shaping up for Yachties in Tonga, with Cyclone Gita due to make landfall sometime today as a Cat 4 or Cat 5.

As a hospital ship, we would have dedicated cabins for surgery, dentistry and a trauma ward as well.  With more than 250' to work with here, setting up the Hospital shouldn't be too hard.  The main problem with this plan is it depends on getting Goobermint and Illuminati Grants to fund it, the people who were devstated by the latest Climate Disaster are not going to be able to afford to pay you much.  At the same time, as Goobermints go broke here, they are getting less generous with the grant money for worthy causes also.

The second and possibly more realistic idea is to go CAPITALISTA PIGMAN with it!  ;D  In this case you set it up as a Floating AirB&B in a really HOT RE market like say Seattle.  Here you need to figure what your costs would be to run this and how much you could charge for the Staterooms to cover these costs?  ???  :icon_scratch:

Generally, slips for boats are sold by the foot, $8/foot is fairly common in the average market.  If you multiplied that out by 250', you're talking $2000/mo rent, which is very reasonable.  There are problems with this idea though, first and foremost being most marinas wouldn't have anywhere to drop a 250' boat at ANY price, other than mooring it out in the middle of the bay where you would need to use a tender to get from the boat to the shore and back all the time.  For the AirB&B Seattle tourista or bizman, this would be very inconvenient, plus as the Hotelier, you would need to run this service 24/7.  That dog won't hunt.

However, if you CAN find dock space, it could be quite profitable.  I'll put the monthly dock rental @ $10,000/mo.  However, each of the 20 or so Staterooms on the vessel go for $1000/WEEK, for an aggregate of $80K/mo income.  Then you make additional money with the on board restaurant as well, so $100K/mo is not out of the question here.  It just needs to be properly advertised and it could be a Cash Cow!  Great Investment Opportunity!  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 12, 2018, 08:33:41 AM
There ARE people doing this. Check out this guy in Mobile. He rents them out. They never leave the dock, and he markets the boats on the used boat market. I'm guessing he only buys boats that are fire sale priced, and then puts them in rental, and then flips them. It could work. Just too much money on the front end for the tall ship. It'd be fun, but the risk outweighs the reward for an investment. Start smaller.

https://mobile.craigslist.org/boa/d/4-years-running-airbnb-yacht/6492470481.html

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 12, 2018, 08:39:23 AM
If you had the connections to grease the proper palms, it might work in the islands. Good time to do it while many of the previously available tourist rentals have been wiped out, at least temporarily. But you have to have a silent partner($$) down there to make things go smooth with the government. And a dock. Not many cheap slips for a 150 ft ship. If you anchored out you'd be ferrying people back and forth constantly.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 12, 2018, 12:35:52 PM
If you had the connections to grease the proper palms, it might work in the islands. Good time to do it while many of the previously available tourist rentals have been wiped out, at least temporarily. But you have to have a silent partner($$) down there to make things go smooth with the government. And a dock. Not many cheap slips for a 150 ft ship. If you anchored out you'd be ferrying people back and forth constantly.

I already mentioned the problems with docking it, and it's 250', not 150.  Ferrying is a non-starter, I mentioned that too.

Assuming a suitable docking space could be found in the islands, I still need my 10 Investors (well, 9 more counting me) to buy it, and I still need crew to sail it out of Hudson Bay to wherever the vacation spot is.

You on the other hand could sell your McMansion, Lake House and Toothstead and buy it yourself, dock it in Rockport and run a Dental Bizness aboard along with the AirB&B.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 12, 2018, 01:42:20 PM
If you had the connections to grease the proper palms, it might work in the islands. Good time to do it while many of the previously available tourist rentals have been wiped out, at least temporarily. But you have to have a silent partner($$) down there to make things go smooth with the government. And a dock. Not many cheap slips for a 150 ft ship. If you anchored out you'd be ferrying people back and forth constantly.

I already mentioned the problems with docking it, and it's 250', not 150.  Ferrying is a non-starter, I mentioned that too.

Assuming a suitable docking space could be found in the islands, I still need my 10 Investors (well, 9 more counting me) to buy it, and I still need crew to sail it out of Hudson Bay to wherever the vacation spot is.

You on the other hand could sell your McMansion, Lake House and Toothstead and buy it yourself, dock it in Rockport and run a Dental Bizness aboard along with the AirB&B.

RE

It wold take deeper pocket than mine to make that business plan work. I don't have near enough money to care for a ship. Maintenance is generally estimated at $100 a foot/year. You could defer that a little in the beginning, perhaps, but not for long.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 12, 2018, 01:56:02 PM
I might be remembering that rule of thumb incorrectly. One source I just checked says 10% of the purchase price yearly is the necessary set-aside for capital expenses. That'd be what, 175K per year, as opposed 270K?  Slightly less. Still quite a lot, if she were to be kept capable of going to sea.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 12, 2018, 01:59:10 PM
If you had the connections to grease the proper palms, it might work in the islands. Good time to do it while many of the previously available tourist rentals have been wiped out, at least temporarily. But you have to have a silent partner($$) down there to make things go smooth with the government. And a dock. Not many cheap slips for a 150 ft ship. If you anchored out you'd be ferrying people back and forth constantly.

I already mentioned the problems with docking it, and it's 250', not 150.  Ferrying is a non-starter, I mentioned that too.

Assuming a suitable docking space could be found in the islands, I still need my 10 Investors (well, 9 more counting me) to buy it, and I still need crew to sail it out of Hudson Bay to wherever the vacation spot is.

You on the other hand could sell your McMansion, Lake House and Toothstead and buy it yourself, dock it in Rockport and run a Dental Bizness aboard along with the AirB&B.

RE

It wold take deeper pocket than mine to make that business plan work. I don't have near enough money to care for a ship. Maintenance is generally estimated at $100 a foot/year. You could defer that a little in the beginning, perhaps, but not for long.

The ship is making $100K/mo from the AirB&B and restaurant alone. MINIMUM.  Then the on-board Dental Biz brings in another ~500K/year.  EVERYTHING is fucking tax deductible, docking fees, maintenance, etc.

It's risky, no doubt.  But, NO GUTS, NO GLORY!  I'll risk everything I have for it.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 12, 2018, 02:11:25 PM
You got to have a license to drive that baby. Or about $100K per year to pay a captain. The license is not easy, takes time at sea to log the hours, etc.

http://maritimeinstitute.com/license_requirements.html (http://maritimeinstitute.com/license_requirements.html)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 12, 2018, 02:22:03 PM
You got to have a license to drive that baby. Or about $100K per year to pay a captain. The license is not easy, takes time at sea to log the hours, etc.

http://maritimeinstitute.com/license_requirements.html (http://maritimeinstitute.com/license_requirements.html)

We're not driving it, except to get it from Hudson Bay to wherever we park it.  In the example, Rockport, TX so you can run a Dental Bizness on it and I run a Hotel & Restaurant.  I have EXPERIENCE in the Restaurant Biz, and you have EXPERIENCE in the Dental Biz.  What could possibly go wrong? lol.

When SHTF DAY comes, you won't need no stinkin' license.  Just try not to crash into anything as we GTFO of Dodge.  ::)  You get to use that fucking impressive 1500HP Diesel kicker on the way out of town also.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: The Good Ship Doomstead Diner - The Biz Plan
Post by: RE on February 13, 2018, 11:44:10 AM
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_1.jpg?f=/1/51/80/3205180_0_080220111030_1.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1297189804000)
Now that I have thoroughly DESTROYED  :icon_mrgreen: Eddie's arguments against liquidating his McMansion, Lake House, Toothstead and Dental Bizness to buy the Good Ship Doomstead Diner and sail it down from Hudson Bay to Park it in Texas until SHTF Day arrives, we need to look in more detail at the economics of the bizness(es).

First off, the docking location should not be Rockport, although that is somewhat Scenic.  It should be in the Houston Ship Channel and close to downtown Houston.  This will be good for Eddie's Dental Biz as well as my Hotel-Restaurant Biz.  We can sieve off Energy Industry shills attending the CERN conference and other Energy Shill get togethers.  The ship channel will also have a dock big enough for a 250' boat.  It won't come cheap, but we will probably cover the rent in one week during the CERN conference, when we jack up the prices on the staterooms and the food to triple average cost over the year. We will SOAK Moriarty and his buddies that week!  We can also provide whores for the Saudis who drop in and take a piece of their action for a little extra vigorish!  :icon_sunny:

Now, in terms of Space Allocation, I am not sure how much room Eddie needs for the Dental Office.  The typical PAIN dispensary with the Chair & Air Drill doesn't take up much room, but I don't know how much space he needs for all the rest of his PAIN dispensing equipment and supplies?  ???  :icon_scratch:  This will need to be worked out in the interior plan.  Regardless, I figure in the Houston market he can pull in minimum $500K gross with his racket.

For the Restaurant, it will take up the top inside deck level in the stern of the vessel, with all the windows.  This way Diners can have a nice view of all the Oil Storage Tanks around them that provide them their living style.  I figure there is room there for 20 tables @ 4 to a table.

Breakfast meal would not provide much income from the surrounding population, so that is provided as part of the fee for a stateroom.  For anyone dropping in from the general community for breakfast, $15 to partake of the Buffet.

For Lunch, we can probably fill all 20 tables twice from 11AM to 3PM.  Average cost for a Diner Gourmet Lunch $20, not including the Wine and Beer.  So that is $3200/lunch/day gross income.

For Dinner, we can fill all 20 tables 3 times from 4PM to 10PM at an average dinner menu price of $30, for a gross income there of $7200. So daily income from the restaurant is about $10K, but figure half that is burned in the cost of the food and your staff. $5000/day profit though during weekdays, 200 days/year that works out to $2M/year.

Hotel daily gross income for 20 staterooms @ $1000/week, $20,000.  Subtract $10K for your janitorial costs and your advertising expenses for  a $10K/week net, $500K/year profit.

All in all, the GSDD EASILY pays for itself before SHTF Day arrives.  It is a RISKY Biz Plan of course, I don't deny that.  But, NO GUTS, NO GLORY!

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 13, 2018, 11:58:49 AM
Not the ship channel. The place would be the Kemah Boardwalk. This is on the channel from Clear Lake into Galveston Bay.

(https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/fetch/c_limit,f_auto,h_640,q_60,w_800/https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/crm/houston/Kemah-bridge-with-Bubba-RED-6.2.15_3bd737e5-e8b2-6397-314c51e16e0dc381.jpg)

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTq-WxM3jxmXPXjRPdbfHikYzuM3yPw7BufUxLhfKJjZygp3vpT)

(https://tipspoke.com/pix/p7598/kemah-boardwalk2.jpg)

Once it was a line of grundgey dive bars and seafood joints (Jimmy Walker's ((RIP)) was the only high end place).

We used to sit at a joint there called Joe Lee's, and watch the boats come and go while our little kids threw french fries to huge schools of catfish that would prowl the docks. Now it's fucking Disneyland, more or less.

Call me when the funding comes through. I'll be happy to practice there for a while.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 13, 2018, 12:11:05 PM
Call me when the funding comes through. I'll be happy to practice there for a while.

Grant funding is generally matching funds.  I will put up $50K, if you put up $50K we are in BIZNESS!   :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 13, 2018, 12:59:57 PM
100K won't pay for dockage for a commercial BnB location for the first year. Put your 50K in Canadian pot stocks and Kohl's.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 13, 2018, 01:15:16 PM
$100K is just our down payment.  We'll need a loan to get going here on the order of $2M.  A few more investors would be good.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 22, 2018, 05:04:18 AM
This beauty is just the right size and in pristine condition, also located already in Maine so I wouldn't have to sail the Northwest Passage to get there.  :icon_sunny:  Top quality Finnish boatbuilders.  Price is high though, it would stretch my nest egg to the breaking point.  :(  Need a partner for this one.  ;)

RE

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1997-nauticat-38-5273031/?refSource=similar%20listing#.Wo68xeeUuUk (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1997-nauticat-38-5273031/?refSource=similar%20listing#.Wo68xeeUuUk)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/30/31/5273031_20150731105508060_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1438364967000&w=1200&h=1200)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/30/31/5273031_20150803115406271_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1438364967000&w=1200&h=1200)

Is that Pilot station cool or what?  8)

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 22, 2018, 09:11:51 AM
This beauty is just the right size and in pristine condition, also located already in Maine so I wouldn't have to sail the Northwest Passage to get there.  :icon_sunny:  Top quality Finnish boatbuilders.  Price is high though, it would stretch my nest egg to the breaking point.  :(  Need a partner for this one.  ;)

RE

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1997-nauticat-38-5273031/?refSource=similar%20listing#.Wo68xeeUuUk (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1997-nauticat-38-5273031/?refSource=similar%20listing#.Wo68xeeUuUk)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/30/31/5273031_20150731105508060_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1438364967000&w=1200&h=1200)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/30/31/5273031_20150803115406271_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1438364967000&w=1200&h=1200)

Is that Pilot station cool or what?  8)

RE

Nice boat, but look for one with the fin keel. The full keel version is said to be a real dog under sail, but the fin keel model is better. Those are very pretty boats.
Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 22, 2018, 09:51:49 AM
Nice boat, but look for one with the fin keel. The full keel version is said to be a real dog under sail, but the fin keel model is better. Those are very pretty boats.

Too much money, but I'll keep it in mind about the fin keel being superior.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 23, 2018, 03:07:25 AM
TOTALLY out of budget at $1M, but boy, what a BEAUTY!  :icon_sunny:  I gotta win the fucking LOTTO.

RE

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1933/William-Hand-motorsailer-2685698/South-Freeport/ME/United-States#.Wo-gYeeUuUk (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1933/William-Hand-motorsailer-2685698/South-Freeport/ME/United-States#.Wo-gYeeUuUk)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/72/6/4557206_20140127061611578_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/72/6/4557206_20140127061611578_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1390832255000)

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/72/6/4557206_20140127061605423_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/72/6/4557206_20140127061605423_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1391268852000)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 23, 2018, 08:37:00 AM
Here's a sweet steel boat with lots of room. Did I show you this one already? Can't remember. This would make a nice charter boat.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/38/18/6603818_20180205191100707_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/38/18/6603818_20180205191100707_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1517857873000)

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1985/Sutton-Custom-Steel-Island-Schooner-3175358/Titusville/FL/United-States?refSource=enhanced%20listing&refSource=enhanced%20listing#.WpBBm5M-dsM (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1985/Sutton-Custom-Steel-Island-Schooner-3175358/Titusville/FL/United-States?refSource=enhanced%20listing&refSource=enhanced%20listing#.WpBBm5M-dsM)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 23, 2018, 08:58:31 AM
Here's a sweet steel boat with lots of room. Did I show you this one already? Can't remember. This would make a nice charter boat.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/38/18/6603818_20180205191100707_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/38/18/6603818_20180205191100707_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1517857873000)

No, I would remember because I hate the color.  Definitely would need a full paint job if we bought it. lol.

However, it does have all the right attributes.  200 gal each of diesel and water, and an 85 HP engine.  Price also quite good  :emthup:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on February 26, 2018, 10:55:10 AM
Okay, I found mine. This is the one. I just need to get the money somewhere. Unfortunately, it's in Ft. Lauderdale, which is not a quick sail to Texas, the way the Florida Gulf coast is. But I've sailed out of Ft. Lauderdale before. Beautiful city for sailors. All canals and green lawns and bridges that raise. The rich are not like you and I.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00K0K_cTPxcvZ53rC_600x450.jpg)

https://miami.craigslist.org/brw/boa/d/beautiful-refitted-45-hardin/6491616448.html

This is the boat my SO and I could agree on. She really likes these (because they're a floating apartment) and this one has all the bells and whistles and has been completely restored. the price is high, but fair, given the upgrades.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on February 26, 2018, 11:02:57 AM
Okay, I found mine. This is the one. I just need to get the money somewhere. Unfortunately, it's in Ft. Lauderdale, which is not a quick sail to Texas, the way the Florida Gulf coast is. But I've sailed out of Ft. Lauderdale before. Beautiful city for sailors. All canals and green lawns and bridges that raise. The rich are not like you and I.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00K0K_cTPxcvZ53rC_600x450.jpg)

https://miami.craigslist.org/brw/boa/d/beautiful-refitted-45-hardin/6491616448.html

This is the boat my SO and I could agree on. She really likes these (because they're a floating apartment) and this one has all the bells and whistles and has been completely restored. the price is high, but fair, given the upgrades.

Offer $80K.  I'll go in for $40K on this one.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 10, 2018, 11:34:37 AM
All of a sudden, the good boat deals are in the Caribbean. I think the hurricanes ruined the charter season for the small operators, and they are getting out in droves.

Maybe fear of more bad storms on the horizon too. But the US Virgins and BVI now have many many boats on the block. Most have some cosmetic damage. Others need more work.

This looks like a great deal. Nice location in Elephant Bay (or it could be in Honeymoon Bay), just across from downtown Charlotte Amalie. My friends' old house looked down from high atop Water Island to the anchorage where this boat is probably moored. I wonder if the house is even there now.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00N0N_jkKS4UcmvnX_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00g0g_edZxeGStGZv_600x450.jpg)



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on March 10, 2018, 11:38:31 AM
All of a sudden, the good boat deals are in the Caribbean. I think the hurricanes ruined the charter season for the small operators, and they are getting out in droves.

Maybe fear of more bad storms on the horizon too. But the US Virgins and BVI now have many many boats on the block. Most have some cosmetic damage. Others need more work.

This looks like a great deal. Nice location in Elephant Bay (or it could be in Honeymoon Bay), just across from downtown Charlotte Amalie. My friends' old house looked down from high atop Water Island to the anchorage where this boat is probably moored. I wonder if the house is even there now.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00N0N_jkKS4UcmvnX_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00g0g_edZxeGStGZv_600x450.jpg)

How much?  Then there is the issue of getting the boat from BVI to Corpus or even Lake Travis.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 10, 2018, 11:45:15 AM
They want 40K. I wouldn't move that one anywhere. Maybe over to Coral Bay, a one day sail, and maybe down island in hurricane season. These deals make me want to sell off and move.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on March 10, 2018, 11:49:21 AM
They want 40K. I wouldn't move that one anywhere. Maybe over to Coral Bay, a one day sail, and maybe down island in hurricane season. These deals make me want to sell off and move.

Selling out and moving is a GREAT IDEA I have been pitching at you forever.  ::)  However, I'm not sure the Caribbean Islands are the ideal spot to move TO.  There is a REASON those boats are going so cheap.  You really want to live in Hurricane Alley?

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 10, 2018, 11:51:22 AM
HALF the year. LOL
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on March 10, 2018, 12:05:36 PM
HALF the year. LOL

So where do you go the other half of the year?  ???

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 10, 2018, 12:13:55 PM
St. Vincent, the Grenadines, and Margarita (if it's safe for pale people these days, not sure).

Or alternately in Rio Dulce, Panama, Roatan, Belize. All of those spots are considerably safer than the Eastern Caribbean, but nowhere is guaranteed storm free.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on March 10, 2018, 12:24:51 PM
St. Vincent, the Grenadines, and Margarita (if it's safe for pale people these days, not sure).

Or alternately in Rio Dulce, Panama, Roatan, Belize. All of those spots are considerably safer than the Eastern Caribbean, but nowhere is guaranteed storm free.

How about the Canary Islands?  They don't get hit too often with Hurricanes.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 10, 2018, 12:25:21 PM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00x0x_hwxEea8HvCo_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00B0B_lUntfQzcAOf_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00A0A_849fdREi4yt_600x450.jpg)

I once took a week-long bareboat course on one of these. Big old tubs with a lot of windage, but comfortable below. Built for the charter trade back in the day. This would make a nice island boat. I wouldn't want to cross an ocean in one. Asking 35K and has good solar.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on March 10, 2018, 12:33:15 PM

I once took a week-long bareboat course on one of these. Big old tubs with a lot of windage, but comfortable below. Built for the charter trade back in the day. This would make a nice island boat. I wouldn't want to cross an ocean in one. Asking 35K and has good solar.

Nah.  You have put up much nicer ones for a similar price.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 10, 2018, 12:34:16 PM
St. Vincent, the Grenadines, and Margarita (if it's safe for pale people these days, not sure).

Or alternately in Rio Dulce, Panama, Roatan, Belize. All of those spots are considerably safer than the Eastern Caribbean, but nowhere is guaranteed storm free.

How about the Canary Islands?  They don't get hit too often with Hurricanes.

RE

More of a real sail to get there. It's much easier to sail from the Canaries to the Caribbean. I think maybe Palloy made that crossing. From the Eastern Caribbean,  you usually have to sail due north to get out of the trades, as far as Bermuda, and then the crossing is usually first to the Azores. From there it's not much difference in distance to the Canaries or to Gibraltar.

(http://www.cruiserswiki.org/images/thumb/f/ff/Trans-atla-001.jpg/455px-Trans-atla-001.jpg)

If you got that far, the Mediterranean wouldn't be a bad next stop. But that's sailing around the world, and it costs more than anchoring out in Coral Bay.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 10, 2018, 12:43:05 PM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00909_cwvjPWW5zjn_600x450.jpg)


This one looks very good, but it got dismasted in the hurricanes. More of a project, but a very nice boat if fully repaired. They're asking 60K but I bet you could get it much cheaper if you had cash. I'm not sure how much it'd take to re-rig it. It wouldn't be cheap.

https://virgin.craigslist.org/boa/6512014407.html

A lot of boats are for sale. Many of them, the owners are still asking too much. Prices will go down more, I expect. Things are not going to bounce back very quickly.






Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on March 10, 2018, 12:47:23 PM
If you got that far, the Mediterranean wouldn't be a bad next stop. But that's sailing around the world, and it costs more than anchoring out in Coral Bay.

Not sure I would want to sail around the Greek Islands again today.  Nice in the 80s, but a little more dicey now.  ::)

(https://secure.i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03438/ref_3438820b.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on March 10, 2018, 02:50:58 PM
Quote
How about the Canary Islands?  They don't get hit too often with Hurricanes.

While waiting to do the Atlantic crossing in Tenerife, Canary Islands, I was hit by the 'Mistrale' which is the strong , red dusty wind out of the Sahara that blows millions of tonnes of dust onto Brazil. Hanging from the stern, my inflatable dinghy with tiny outboard motor flew up into the air and came down upside down. Impossible to get on board, the dunking eventually wrecked the motor.

Crossing the Atlantic against the Trade winds is definitely NOT recommended.  Grenada and the Grenadines are definitely a good target.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 16, 2018, 07:40:17 AM
This salty looking cutter ketch is located on the very southern edge of the Alaska coast. Looks well maintained and very well equipped other than being very basic down below. I wish there were more pics. 75K.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00z0z_bmBhg5tGh1C_600x450.jpg)

https://juneau.craigslist.org/boa/d/56-roberts-sailboat/6530856496.html

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 16, 2018, 08:27:44 AM
Today's a two-fer. I had to post this one too. It looks like one of the finest Colvin owner-finished boats I've ever seen, and it's set up for world sailing by a single-hander or a couple. Very well thought out boat. Not really big. Not cheap at 79K, but that's just the ask. Nice boat. Lying SF

(https://images.craigslist.org/01111_2AfbgHJ3sab_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00A0A_j2P9TKKO1Al_600x450.jpg)

https://juneau.craigslist.org/boa/d/1994-steel-gaff-rigged-ketch/6489127816.html



Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on March 31, 2018, 02:18:53 PM
This 100' Gulet built in Turkey and the only one in North America selling at a bargain price of $865K.  ::)  Currently in FL.

Any good deals in the VI Eddie?

RE

http://www.boattrader.com/listing/2010-custom-seme-fethiye-gulet-103176622/?refSource=standard (http://www.boattrader.com/listing/2010-custom-seme-fethiye-gulet-103176622/?refSource=standard) listing

http://www.youtube.com/v/rolBjZwrNUE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on March 31, 2018, 03:06:52 PM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00H0H_3ZY5TU4feM2_600x450.jpg)

One of your favorites for roughly half price of what it would be in the states. Just across the bay from where we are. Just crossed the pond.

https://virgin.craigslist.org/boa/d/nauticat-38-motorsailor/6529495932.html

Plenty of cheap boats with no masts. Really cheap.



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on March 31, 2018, 03:14:15 PM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00H0H_3ZY5TU4feM2_600x450.jpg)

One of your favorites for roughly half price of what it would be in the states. Just across the bay from where we are. Just crossed the pond.

https://virgin.craigslist.org/boa/d/nauticat-38-motorsailor/6529495932.html

Plenty of cheap boats with no masts. Really cheap.

That one looks GREAT!  :icon_sunny: Right size, good price and I m sure I could Jew it down to $40K.

More pics of the interior cabin would be nice.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 01, 2018, 02:00:25 PM
Here's one for ya. Just needs a good power washing.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 01, 2018, 05:11:26 PM
Here's one for ya. Just needs a good power washing.


A little small for a live aboard.  Price?

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 01, 2018, 06:17:59 PM
I was kidding. Just one of the many derelicts I took pics of today. It's bigger than it looks in
 the pic. Probably a 36 footer. See where it was submerged? Probably for months. Click to enlarge. I expect that one won't be coming back. Just for salvage only.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 01, 2018, 06:33:16 PM
I was kidding. Just one of the many derelicts I took pics of today. It's bigger than it looks in
 the pic. Probably a 36 footer. See where it was submerged? Probably for months. Click to enlarge. I expect that one won't be coming back. Just for salvage only.

Pretty EZ to see where it was submerged.  However, if you gutted it and power washed it, the hull doesn't look like it is too bad shape.  Looks like it got dismasted also though, so the fixup job just wouldn't be worth it.  I am sure better, EZier fixer-uppers are available.  Even in better shape though, that configuration doesn't work for me.  I don't think there is enough room for comfortable live aboard.  You need to be well up into the 40' range for a comfortable multi-hull.

Looking forward to seeing the pics of the other derelicts too!  One wonders how many Ray Jasons lost their homes last hurricane season?  ???  :icon_scratch:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 07, 2018, 10:38:34 AM
Not sure how I missed this one until now. Small, but a beauty. Sometimes smaller is better. When I look at this boat I badly want to take her for a long sail. You could sail this boat anywhere, through nearly anything, limited only by your own skill and judgment.

This boat was built the year I was born, and then some 30 years later a real sailor decided to make it his business to restore her to the highest standards and equip her with the best rigging, a new modern kicker, new wiring circuits, new sails and who-knows-what else. This boat is a legacy to the man who saved her. A floating monument to his skill and vision. I have no idea who that might have been, but I'm curious.

(https://images.craigslist.org/01212_eti5vPFZbUT_600x450.jpg)

There are a lot of good photos if you click on the link. This is one well-sorted boat, and absolutely gorgeous in my eyes. A near perfect single-hander. The only thing I'd add would be self-steering and GPS. (I suspect the guy who sailed this boat had no need for either one).

https://gulfport.craigslist.org/boa/d/classic-sailboat-for-sale/6538858708.html (https://gulfport.craigslist.org/boa/d/classic-sailboat-for-sale/6538858708.html)

More on Tancook Whalers.
http://apprenticinglandandsea.com/?p=366 (http://apprenticinglandandsea.com/?p=366)



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 07, 2018, 12:51:41 PM
Not sure how I missed this one until now. Small, but a beauty. Sometimes smaller is better. When I look at this boat I badly want to take her for a long sail. You could sail this boat anywhere, through nearly anything, limited only by your own skill and judgment.

This boat was built the year I was born, and then some 30 years later a real sailor decided to make it his business to restore her to the highest standards and equip her with the best rigging, a new modern kicker, new wiring circuits, new sails and who-knows-what else. This boat is a legacy to the man who saved her. A floating monument to his skill and vision. I have no idea who that might have been, but I'm curious.

(https://images.craigslist.org/01212_eti5vPFZbUT_600x450.jpg)

There are a lot of good photos if you click on the link. This is one well-sorted boat, and absolutely gorgeous in my eyes. A near perfect single-hander. The only thing I'd add would be self-steering and GPS. (I suspect the guy who sailed this boat had no need for either one).

https://gulfport.craigslist.org/boa/d/classic-sailboat-for-sale/6538858708.html (https://gulfport.craigslist.org/boa/d/classic-sailboat-for-sale/6538858708.html)

More on Tancook Whalers.
http://apprenticinglandandsea.com/?p=366 (http://apprenticinglandandsea.com/?p=366)

Great Price!

Looks a little cramped for live aboard, but probably I could deal with it.  Doubt you and the wife could though.  No information I saw on the size of the water & fuel tank storage, no pilot house either.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 07, 2018, 01:08:58 PM
A real old school pocket cruiser though. Not much modern tech to fail. Your great-grandfather's boat, basically. But in what looks like very good condition. And it has more room below than it looks like. 2 quarter berths and a V-berth and a large settee. Lots of locker space. Great stove, even AC. In New Orleans he needed that, LOL.

Perfect for a singlehanded circumnavigation. I bet it'll heave to like a Spray in a gale, and you can go below and sleep through it, like Slocum often did.

And yeah, it's a give-away price for a boat like that. Nobody appreciates what it is except a few wooden boat nerds. Very rare to see a boat like that in southern US waters.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 07, 2018, 01:27:29 PM
A real old school pocket cruiser though. Not much modern tech to fail. Your great-grandfather's boat, basically. But in what looks like very good condition. And it has more room below than it looks like. 2 quarter berths and a V-berth and a large settee. Lots of locker space. Great stove, even AC. In New Orleans he needed that, LOL.

Perfect for a singlehanded circumnavigation. I bet it'll heave to like a Spray in a gale, and you can go below and sleep through it, like Slocum often did.

And yeah, it's a give-away price for a boat like that. Nobody appreciates what it is except a few wooden boat nerds. Very rare to see a boat like that in southern US waters.

If I was 50 again in the shape I was then, at that price I would have bought her in a heartbeat and taken her circumnavigating.  Round Cape Horn and the Straights of Magellan too!  Can't do that today though.  Amazing what a difference a decade can make.  :(

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on April 07, 2018, 03:10:53 PM
It has a frightfully cluttered deck, you will have to go out there in bad weather to sort out the mess of ropes or to change head sails.

(https://doomsteaddiner.net/palloy/images/deck.jpg)

You worry about the size of water tanks, but what about the hull/keel shape?

Are the fore and aft extensions designed in components, or add-ons? 2"x2" wood through-bolted doesn't look like enough.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 07, 2018, 03:58:03 PM
I could wish for more handholds myself, but that's not hard to change. The rig is a proven design, from the traditional working boats of Nova Scotia. They built much bigger ones, too, which were schooner rigged.

It's a versatile sail plan. The jib is roller furled, making it unnecessary to go up on the forward deck, once the staysail is stowed and the main is reefed. In most wind conditions it'd be easy to sail with its self tending staysail and roller jib. Reefing the main looks like the hard part to me. But at least it isn't gaff rigged.

from the linked article on Tancooks:

Shortly, through the fog, appeared brown sails (their sails were nearly always tanned) and a white hull, between 40 and 50 feet long. The boat seemed to approach slowly, to hesitate a moment, and then to leap past in the manner of boats passing at sea – a phenomenon of which Conrad remarks in “Chance.” But there was time to observe two or three men in yellow oilskins, the helmsman standing with the end of the great ten-foot tiller behind his back, lifted slightly form the comb, and the load of barrels and boxes partly covered by a tarpaulin or, more likely, by the brown staysail (it was not set) in her waist… They were then close abourd. The tiller was swung a trifle to weather; the loose-footed overlapping foresail filled with an audible snap, and away she went, at eight or nine knots, her lee rail occasionally awash, and with a smoothness and lack of fuss in that broken water which, somehow, no other boat has ever seemed to me quite able to obtain – and I have known some good ones! … My friend… remarked … “Damn good boats, them Tancook whalers!” (Yachting, February, 1933)




Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 07, 2018, 07:10:58 PM
There are 3 different viewpoints in evidence here coming from 3 different POVs.

When Eddie looks at boats, he likes traditional sailboats of the type Joshua Slocum sailed.  Not too big, easily sailed as a single hander, capable of the kind of voyages he imagined in his youth.

When Palloy looks at boats, he likes the thing stripped to the bare bones with little to fail or trip over.  Boats of the type that got him to his tropical rainforest collapse hole.

When I look at boats, I look at the creature comforts for a full time live aboard, as well as how well and far it can operate under power.

As a result of these differences in perspective, the boats we come up with as "ideal" are generally different in configuration.  This one from Eddie doesn't really fit most of my criteria, but the price is so good it would be hard to resist if it is in as good shape as it is made out to be.  You would have to go on site to determine that.

I'll drop on another more in line with what I look for.  This Beneteau is about as small as I would go for full time live aboard and comes in at a good price.  Beneteau is also a well regarded yacht manufacturer and the boats sail well.

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1986-beneteau-jeanneau-espace-1000-6584462/?refSource=standard%20listing#.Wsl3mJeIaUk (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1986-beneteau-jeanneau-espace-1000-6584462/?refSource=standard%20listing#.Wsl3mJeIaUk)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/44/62/6584462_0_311219691600_1.jpg?t=1516089600000&w=1200&h=1200)

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 01:20:43 AM
This Gulfstar looks about right for me to live aboard and comes in at a good price too.  Currently in Mazatlan.

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/74/80/6577480_20180110102207124_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1515518328000&w=1200&h=1200)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/74/80/6577480_20180110102427587_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1515518328000&w=1200&h=1200)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/74/80/6577480_20180110102649627_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1515518328000&w=1200&h=1200)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 08, 2018, 07:04:01 AM
Gulfstars are notorious for blisters and soft and leaky decks, but some years were not so bad.  Not a bad floating apartment though.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 07:30:15 AM
Gulfstars are notorious for blisters and soft and leaky decks, but some years were not so bad.  Not a bad floating apartment though.

Vintage 1971.  If it hasn't blistered or leaked by now, it's not going to.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 08, 2018, 07:58:51 AM
I'm fairly sure it HAS both leaked and blistered. What was done about that would be the thing to find out. Blisters are not that big a deal, imho, topside leaks are a big deal. 1971 would have been one of the early GS's and they are the worst ones. The build quality was poor in general. That one looks okay from the photos, but I'd bet there are issues, hence the low price.

I look at boats every day, and my current thought is the the kind of boat that appeals to you cannot be had for less than about 55K, unless you get very lucky. That Nauticat in Tortola, at 50K (asking) is the best boat for the price I've seen lately. There are some marginally better deals on landlocked inland lakes, but then you'd have big moving costs. and those boats seldom have decent electronics.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 08:04:18 AM
I'm fairly sure it HAS both leaked and blistered. What was done about that would be the thing to find out. Blisters are not that big a deal, imho, topside leaks are a big deal. 1971 would have been one of the early GS's and they are the worst ones. The build quality was poor in general. That one looks okay from the photos, but I'd bet there are issues, hence the low price.

I look at boats every day, and my current thought is the the kind of boat that appeals to you cannot be had for less than about 55K, unless you get very lucky. That Nauticat in Tortola, at 50K (asking) is the best boat for the price I've seen lately. There are some marginally better deals on landlocked inland lakes, but then you'd have big moving costs. and those boats seldom have decent electronics.

That Whaler you put up came in at an even lower price, so it probably had issues also.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 08, 2018, 08:38:11 AM
Possibly.

Wooden boats have to be taken care of. But the whaler was small, and an outlier as far as the market goes. It might not sell at any price. Only a certain kind of boat nut wants a boat like that. Even most blue water sailors (like palloy) would shy away. Wood has a terrible reputation. And it doesn't hold up well in warm waters like the Gulf. That's why there are many more of those boats left in cold climates.

A wooden boat with a wet bilge is automatically very suspect. It wouldn't be too hard to evaluate. Look in the bilge. Poke around with an ice pick. Do a quick haul and look at the hull.

My guess, right or wrong, is that the guy who restored that boat restored the hull too, and did it right, since everything else he touched looked EXTREMELY well done, way better than nearly any resto I've ever seen outside of Wooden Boat magazine or one of the wooden boat-building schools. A proper West System bottom would have made it on par with a modern glass boat, as long as the bilges stayed dry.

I'm not trying to bust your chops. But I've looked at a lot of Gulfstars, and there are always several for sale cheap. For your needs, it might be fine.  But to my mind a leaky deck is about the worst problem a glass boat can have.

There are certain early glass boats that are exceptionally good, because the hulls aren't cored. Some of them even have solid glass decks (although these are rare).  These boats are pretty bullet-proof when it comes to water infiltration issues. The Columbia 50 I posted, or the Spencer 44 would be good examples.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 08:42:24 AM
I liked the Nautical better anyway.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 08:55:28 AM
Cheapest yet.  $8400.  Great Fixer-Upper!  Gotta get her across the pond though from England.

RE

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1962-classic-motor-sailer-6659624/?refSource=standard%20listing#.Wso6IJeIaUk (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1962-classic-motor-sailer-6659624/?refSource=standard%20listing#.Wso6IJeIaUk)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/96/24/6659624_20180326051721684_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1522066299000&w=1200&h=1200)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 08, 2018, 09:23:42 AM
Those Nauticat boats are very well built, but they have teak decks, and so also have to be vetted for deck leaks. A Nauticat that has had the teak decks removed and the leaks fixed would be one for the ages. I'd be okay with the deep keel version.

That's what I look for on those Hardins I like.  Or on Masons. There is a Mason 53 in Texas for 130K that was built with glass decks and not teak. I think that's a great deal, but pricey for my budget.

I'm torn between several issues when I evaluate "seastead" boats, which is the kind of boat I like.

It needs to sail well.

It needs to provide the basics of live-aboard life, like a decent galley and a decent berth to sleep in.

Size is a trade-off.

Smaller equals easier to sail (especially important if you're single-handing or your mate is your wife) , easier and cheaper  to maintain, easier to anchor, easier to maneuver in tight quarters. It also means a cheaper slip as long as you're living in BAU.

Certain production boats fill this niche. The Westsail 32 is the poster boy for this kind of boat. (Very slow though.)

Big equals more storage, more berths, roomier and often better lit galleys, more privacy below, more room for stuff like workshop space, water makers and generators and dive compressors, dive tanks, fuel tanks, propane tanks, water tanks, holding tanks, etc. etc. Maintenance for an ocean sailboat is estimated at $100/ft/yr minimum under BAU. At least there are no property taxes. Some of the old 60's and early 70's glass boats, like Columbias, aren't that roomy below, even at 50 ft on deck.

If I were anchored out in Coral Bay, a 50 ft boat would be fine. In a Corpus Christi slip, it'd cost maybe 30-40% more in slip fees than a 36 footer, and in many marinas you'd have to side-tie, which is not so good in high wind. Crossing an ocean, anything over 36 feet is likely to be very difficult to sail alone.

All of the above applies to monohulls, primarily. I'm not a fan of cats and tris, but maybe that's because I never sailed one.

Always choices. Experienced live-aboard sailors usually recommend a smaller boat, but there are different schools of thought, like the late John Samson, who designed those huge ferro-cement boats that are still out there floating.

You could make an argument that after the fossil fuel is gone, a really big boat might be a means to conduct commerce, on a micro scale.



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 08, 2018, 09:27:00 AM
Cheapest yet.  $8400.  Great Fixer-Upper!  Gotta get her across the pond though from England.

RE

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1962-classic-motor-sailer-6659624/?refSource=standard%20listing#.Wso6IJeIaUk (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1962-classic-motor-sailer-6659624/?refSource=standard%20listing#.Wso6IJeIaUk)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/96/24/6659624_20180326051721684_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1522066299000&w=1200&h=1200)

Dead man's boat. Needs a lot of love. Somebody should bring her back, though.

Just like cars, it costs more to restore a neglected boat ultimately than it does to buy one already fixed. If you don't love saving old boats, or maybe own a boat yard and have cheap available labor, it isn't worth the time and money.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 09:44:25 AM
Those Nauticat boats are very well built, but they have teak decks, and so also have to be vetted for deck leaks. A Nauticat that has had the teak decks removed and the leaks fixed would be one for the ages. I'd be okay with the deep keel version.

That's what I look for on those Hardins I like.  Or on Masons. There is a Mason 53 in Texas for 130K that was built with glass decks and not teak. I think that's a great deal, but pricey for my budget.

I'm torn between several issues when I evaluate "seastead" boats, which is the kind of boat I like.

It needs to sail well.

It needs to provide the basics of live-aboard life, like a decent galley and a decent berth to sleep in.

Size is a trade-off.

Smaller equals easier to sail (especially important if you're single-handing or your mate is your wife) , easier and cheaper  to maintain, easier to anchor, easier to maneuver in tight quarters. It also means a cheaper slip as long as you're living in BAU.

Certain production boats fill this niche. The Westsail 32 is the poster boy for this kind of boat. (Very slow though.)

Big equals more storage, more berths, roomier and often better lit galleys, more privacy below, more room for stuff like workshop space, water makers and generators and dive compressors, dive tanks, fuel tanks, propane tanks, water tanks, holding tanks, etc. etc. Maintenance for an ocean sailboat is estimated at $100/ft/yr minimum under BAU. At least there are no property taxes. Some of the old 60's and early 70's glass boats, like Columbias, aren't that roomy below, even at 50 ft on deck.

If I were anchored out in Coral Bay, a 50 ft boat would be fine. In a Corpus Christi slip, it'd cost maybe 30-40% more in slip fees than a 36 footer, and in many marinas you'd have to side-tie, which is not so good in high wind. Crossing an ocean, anything over 36 feet is likely to be very difficult to sail alone.
l
All of the above applies to monohulls, primarily. I'm not a fan of cats and tris, but maybe that's because I never sailed one.

Always choices. Experienced live-aboard sailors usually recommend a smaller boat, but there are different schools of thought, like the late John Samson, who designed those huge ferro-cement boats that are still out there floating.

You could make an argument that after the fossil fuel is gone, a really big boat might be a means to conduct commerce, on a micro scale.

If I was still healthy, most of my criteria would be the same as yours.  However, in my current condition I am looking mainly for creature comforts for the liveaboard and strong motoring ability.  The only times I would go under sail was if I had visitors.  No intention of doing ocean crossings.  Max would be something like crossing from FL to the VI, but again only with crew aboard.

Generally speaking, anything smaller than 35' LOA starts to get too cramped for liveaboard.  You can do it of course, many do but you just don't have much storage room or room for guests either.  On the other hand, anything bigger than about 45' costs a lot more money in maintenance and slip fees, so my "sweet spot" is usually at around 38'.  Prices on nice ones generally can be found for $60K, which is in budget for me.  Not buying anything though unless and until I can get my dietary problems resolved.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 08, 2018, 10:59:13 AM
Max would be something like crossing from FL to the VI, but again only with crew aboard.

Not as much of a cake walk as it sounds. It took us nine full days, with no engine (there were undiagnosed bearing problems with the prop shaft, which made running the engine a very short term proposition.) No real storms, but a couple of rainstorms. I jibed the main of our '63 ft schooner in the middle of the night, which scared the bejeezus out of me. Wooden mast and spars. Could have been a bad thing, but I was lucky. I often am.

And you have to sail RIGHT THROUGH the Bermuda Triangle. (cue the Jaws music).

It was great fun, once I got my sea legs. I caught a big Mahi-Mahi. I was visited by porpoises on my early morning watch after several days of nothing but waves to look at. Sounds like a minor thing, but it was magical. The site of PR after a week at sea was epic. The site of Charlotte Amalie at night, all lit up, is beautiful when you see it for the first time. I was off watch and didn't want to wake up, but they made me. I'm glad.

GPS is great. Celestial navigation is not preferred (by me, anyway). Easy to describe but hard to accomplish on a moving platform. I suggest lots of practice. Don't be like those two lesbians from Hawaii. LOL.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 02:04:50 PM
Max would be something like crossing from FL to the VI, but again only with crew aboard.

Not as much of a cake walk as it sounds. It took us nine full days, with no engine (there were undiagnosed bearing problems with the prop shaft, which made running the engine a very short term proposition.) No real storms, but a couple of rainstorms. I jibed the main of our '63 ft schooner in the middle of the night, which scared the bejeezus out of me. Wooden mast and spars. Could have been a bad thing, but I was lucky. I often am.

And you have to sail RIGHT THROUGH the Bermuda Triangle. (cue the Jaws music).

It was great fun, once I got my sea legs. I caught a big Mahi-Mahi. I was visited by porpoises on my early morning watch after several days of nothing but waves to look at. Sounds like a minor thing, but it was magical. The site of PR after a week at sea was epic. The site of Charlotte Amalie at night, all lit up, is beautiful when you see it for the first time. I was off watch and didn't want to wake up, but they made me. I'm glad.

GPS is great. Celestial navigation is not preferred (by me, anyway). Easy to describe but hard to accomplish on a moving platform. I suggest lots of practice. Don't be like those two lesbians from Hawaii. LOL.

Well, I  certainly wouldn't undertake the trip without the engine being fully vetted and tested, as well as fuel to do the whole trip under power if there is headwind all the way.  That's another reason I like the motorsailers.  Rain also not an issue really since you have the Pilot House.

Multiple backups of GPS of course.  I have a couple of good waterproof handheld Garmins already, I would add a full size marine with electronic charts as the main unit.  My cell phones also have GPS and navigation software installed.  Also Radar & Sonar.  Only would do it with a 2-3 person crew.

Again though, not happening unless the G-I problems can be resolved.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 02:36:41 PM
Another Jenneau.  1983 Vintage, asking only $40K.  Looks in great shape.  Gotta get this one across the pond also though, currently in Portugal.

RE

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1983-jeanneau-espace-1000-6638437/?refSource=standard%20listing#.WsqInpeIaUk (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1983-jeanneau-espace-1000-6638437/?refSource=standard%20listing#.WsqInpeIaUk)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/84/37/6638437_20180307052802154_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1520428835000&w=1200&h=1200)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/84/37/6638437_20180307052831483_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1520428835000&w=1200&h=1200)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 08, 2018, 03:25:18 PM
Another Jenneau.  1983 Vintage, asking only $40K.  Looks in great shape.  Gotta get this one across the pond also though, currently in Portugal.

RE

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1983-jeanneau-espace-1000-6638437/?refSource=standard%20listing#.WsqInpeIaUk (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1983-jeanneau-espace-1000-6638437/?refSource=standard%20listing#.WsqInpeIaUk)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/84/37/6638437_20180307052802154_1_LARGE.jpgt=1520428835000&w=1200&h=1200)
http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1984-marine-trader-islander-trader-103288883?refSource=standard%20listing&refSource=standard%20listing (http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1984-marine-trader-islander-trader-103288883?refSource=standard%20listing&refSource=standard%20listing)


(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/84/37/6638437_20180307052831483_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1520428835000&w=1200&h=1200)

Nice enough boat but all raised deck boats are just ugly. My ancient Coronado, Morgan Out-Islands, this one too. Boats just look better with a toe rail and decks and a discreet cabin trunk.  They're designed with that ugly raised deck way to maximize cabin space, I get that. But some corners should not be cut.

I saw this one. These are not know to be great boats, but I like the look. This one is landlocked on Lake Texoma. It costs too much these days for a boat of this value to be moved to the coast...easier to find one already in the salt somewhere. They're asking way too much at 85K. They'd be lucky to get 50. It's a Marine Trader 46.

(http://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/12/16/6671216_20180405114343986_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1269195)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 04:10:08 PM
Nice enough boat but all raised deck boats are just ugly. My ancient Coronado, Morgan Out-Islands, this one too. Boats just look better with a toe rail and decks and a discreet cabin trunk.  They're designed with that ugly raised deck way to maximize cabin space, I get that. But some corners should not be cut.

I don't agree they're ugly.  I like the look, like a fishing trawler.  The raised roof doesn't really get you much more living space.  What it gets you is the indoor Pilot station with all the windows so you have 360 vision around the boat.  Very nice to have in cold rainy weather like you get in Maine or BC or SE Alaska.  The only downside far as I am concerned is they put up a lot of windage so these boats don't sail well to windward.  But that's why you have the big diesel.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 08, 2018, 04:20:14 PM
No I mean I don't like the raised DECK, not the pilot house. I like pilot houses, even though in the Gulf and in the Caribbean a dodger makes more sense on most boats.

It does make it much nicer below, with all the glass. My only deal-breaker would be if it had no outside steering station. Some motorsailers don't. I like a pilothouse with a galley-up layout so the galley gets the light.

Raised deck equals this.

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/m/25622/main.jpg)

This Morgan does not have a pilothouse, but it does have a raised deck.

I just don't like the look. It's like a Mansard roof.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 08, 2018, 04:29:20 PM
No I mean I don't like the raised DECK, not the pilot house. I like pilot houses, even though in the Gulf and in the Caribbean a dodger makes more sense on most boats.

It does make it much nicer below, with all the glass. My only deal-breaker would be if it had no outside steering station. Some motorsailers don't. I like a pilothouse with a galley-up layout so the galley gets the light.

Raised deck equals this.

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/m/25622/main.jpg)

This Morgan does not have a pilothouse, but it does have a raised deck.

I just don't like the look. It's like a Mansard roof.

The Jenneau has an ouside steering station also.

In terms of the raised deck, it gets you more headroom which tall people like.  This not a real concern of mine though. lol.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Is this THE ONE?
Post by: RE on April 09, 2018, 01:49:59 AM
This `1985 Nauticat looks like it might be THE ONE!  :icon_sunny:

http://www.youtube.com/v/Vy7RaQUmOzE

Good price currently asking $70K, but I can jew him down to $60K I am sure.  Located conveniently in South Carolina where the SUN☼ Foundation is incorporated.  Tons of great equipment come with it.  It has RADAR and Autopilot already!!!!  Great A/C shore electrics with dual 30A circuits!.  You can power anything with that much juice available.  Heating and AC also!  THIS is a LIVEABOARD!

Interior looks used but not in bad shape, just cosmetic.  Some sandpaper and stain and polyurethane should cure that.  Check out this great list of stuff included in the price!

Description

The quintessential motorsailer, the Nauticat 38 is a Finnish build with high-quality workmanship and attention to detail.

With plentiful space above-decks and below, "TORTUGA" is a comfortable boat with ample storage for cruising or living aboard. Her 5'11" draft renders her island-hopper friendly, and she is ready for new owners and new adventures!

Deck/Hull

New Bilge Pumps

New High Water Alarm

New Cutlass Bearing

New LED Navigation Lights

St. Croix Dinghy Davits

Electronics

Garmin 1040xs Chartplotter

Radar

AIS

Autopilot

Electrical

New 120-Volt Wiring & Panels

Twin 30-Amp Shore Power Service

New Starting & House Batteries (2016)

Accommodations

Flagship Marine Reverse Cycle Heat & A/C (18,000 BTU)

AIRTRTONIC Diesel Heating

Tinted Solar Windows

Solar Curtains

LED Lighting Throughout

Frigoboat Refrigeration

3-Burner Stove & Oven

New Salon Upholstery


(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/7/72/6550772_20171206121811416_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1512414592000&w=1200&h=1200)

Many more pics at the link. http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1985-nauticat-38-6550772/?refSource=standard (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1985-nauticat-38-6550772/?refSource=standard) listing#.Wsr7npeIaUk

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 09, 2018, 05:45:18 AM
New Bilge Pumps

New High Water Alarm

New Cutlass Bearing

Been taking on water. Most likely it's time to replace the teak decks. That'd be your bargaining position. Not a bad boat at all. Worth a new deck. Either that or move to Texas where it seldom rains.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 09, 2018, 05:57:38 AM
New Bilge Pumps

New High Water Alarm

New Cutlass Bearing

Been taking on water. Most likely it's time to replace the teak decks. That'd be your bargaining position. Not a bad boat at all. Worth a new deck. Either that or move to Texas where it seldom rains.

Don't I remember a Hurricane last year?  Harvey or something?  Not sure that's the best location.

Definitely needs a full survey though.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 09, 2018, 07:02:24 AM
Nauticat teak decks are above average quality. It could be that the water-in-the-bilge issue was just a bad cutless bearing. The teak decks are old enough that they almost certainly need routine maintenance, like recaulking and replacing any missing bungs. That's not a big deal.

The decks are screwed down, so they are at risk to leak if they have not been properly cared for, but a survey should point that out. Or just demand to hose the decks down hard and then check the bilge to see if you have leaks.

You know from the "new" stuff that there was some water in the boat. The other potential problems with that are potential engine issues. If the engine runs well, I wouldn't worry.

It also could have also caused wetting, staining, and delamination of all that nice interior veneer wood in the cabins. That would just be a cosmetic issue if the boat doesn't leak now, and might just be minor.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 09, 2018, 10:18:43 AM
It is properly "cutless bearing" and not cutlass bearing. Cutlasses don't have bearings, as far as I know.

Avast, ye lubbers!
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 09, 2018, 11:15:27 AM
Feel like taking a weekend trip down to SC to have a look at it?  We could time it when LD is on hometime and visit with them and you could visit your relatives too.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 09, 2018, 11:27:31 AM
I could be persuaded to fly in for a quick look, if you're serious. If I were you I'd ask them about the stuff I listed above and make 'em fess up, so you know if it's really worth your time. I don't need to visit the relatives again. That was a one-off. Wouldn't mind sharing a beer or two with you and LD, though.

I recommend against you buying a boat, because you're well set up where you are, and you might end up regretting the move, I'm afraid. You're old enough to know better.

But I'm not telling you what to do. I understand the attraction. At least it's not a woman. You can sell her if you change your mind and probably get most of your money back, other than the slip fees.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 09, 2018, 11:30:04 AM
I expect the engine has high hours, too, fwiw. That would not concern me if it cranked and ran good. But I'd want to run it for some hours to make sure, and see if used a lot of oil, etc. You know something about diesels.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 09, 2018, 11:42:07 AM
I expect the engine has high hours, too, fwiw. That would not concern me if it cranked and ran good. But I'd want to run it for some hours to make sure, and see if used a lot of oil, etc. You know something about diesels.

2000 hours on the engine.

Am I serious?  Yes, although mainly as an excuse to visit with you and LD & GM.  At the moment I am set up well and I certainly could regret such a purchase.  I'm not unfamiliar with the kind of money sink they can turn into.  It would take some serious noodling to work out comparative costs with my current situation.  I'd also like to move it to a better RE market and run it as a part time AirB&B while I zip around in SaVANnah. But of course there are those pesky unresolved health issues.   ::) However, if I die you'll get a free boat!  lol. :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 09, 2018, 11:56:45 AM
No, don't say that. I don't want a boat at the expense of your life. I'd rather see you get well and live a long life aboard waiting for certain doom.

Thought about a name?
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 09, 2018, 12:19:05 PM
No, don't say that. I don't want a boat at the expense of your life. I'd rather see you get well and live a long life aboard waiting for certain doom.

Thought about a name?

Well, I'd like to name her the Doomstead Diner, but I already made that mistake once naming the blog Doomstead Diner.   Not great for your popularity, and definitely not great for an AirB&B. LOL.  Who is going to want to rent out a boat advertising certain Doom?  ::)

I'd like Nostradamus also, but boats are traditionally named after females.  This is more abstract than having "Doom" in the title though, most people would not get it.  Cassandra thus becomes the next possibility as a female, although I would feel a little like I was stealing that from Ugo.  Then there is the made up Ruskie style name of Kollapsnik as a possibility.  Or I could honor my past career and call her "Ocean Gymmie".

You got any ideas?

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 09, 2018, 01:46:50 PM
For purposes of talking on the radio, short and easy is better for boat names. I'd suggest just Diner.

Another possibility might be Bug-Out......

Get Away sounds good for the AirBnB crowd.

Reverse Engineer is not bad.

Naughty Cat?

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 09, 2018, 03:08:59 PM
For purposes of talking on the radio, short and easy is better for boat names. I'd suggest just Diner.

Another possibility might be Bug-Out......

Get Away sounds good for the AirBnB crowd.

Reverse Engineer is not bad.

Naughty Cat?

Those have possibilities as well.

In terms of VHF Radio Friendly one word names, we could go Philosophical also...

Karma

Salvation

Spirit

Tribe

Prep

Compassion

or 2 words

Great Beyond

Better Tomorrow

Keep Peace

Live Free

Can't forget another one...

SUN☼

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 11, 2018, 07:12:04 AM
I had to share this one. I expect it'll go very quickly, if it hasn't already. It's a bit derelict, but it's sitting in an assumable slip somewhere in San Francisco

(Doesn't look like the Safeway Marina..maybe one of the Piers?)

At 30K to buy and a $963/month slip fee, this makes it the cheapest condo (by far) in the city.

(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/picherreshoff55101a.jpg)

http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sherreshoff55101.html (http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sherreshoff55101.html)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 11, 2018, 07:17:29 AM
I had to share this one. I expect it'll go very quickly, if it hasn't already. It's a bit derelict, but it's sitting in an assumable slip somewhere in San Francisco

(Doesn't look like the Safeway Marina..maybe one of the Piers?)

At 30K to buy and a $963/month slip fee, this makes it the cheapest condo (by far) in the city.

(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics9/picherreshoff55101a.jpg)

http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sherreshoff55101.html (http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sherreshoff55101.html)

PERFECT for Air B&B!  Who cares how well it sails or if it leaks?  As long as it stays above water, that one will make money!

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 11, 2018, 07:34:14 AM
If you can get away with doing AirBnB on that pier, you are absolutely correct. Hell, I'd rent it. I expect it's gone by now.
Title: 🐱 Seastead of the Day: CATS
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:06:58 PM
(https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/t/chinese-stripe-necked-turtle-ocadia-sinensis-year-old-its-back-front-white-background-63253235.jpg)
Back a ways, I gave my main reason for not looking at Catamarans (cats) as a choice for the Good Ship Doomstead Diner, which is that they aren't self-righting like a keelboat is.  With big enough seas and/or high winds, there's always the possibility the boat can be rolled over or pitch-poled, and once it has turned turtle you are well and truly fucked.  There is no real good way to get the thing turned back right side up while you are at sea unless you are fortunate enough to have the sea do it AGAIN and roll you back over to right side up.

However, if you are not planning on doing any blue water sailing and big crossings (which in the Boat Based Bugout Plan we are not) but just doing coastal sailing and relatively short crossings of 200 NM or less, the likelihood of being flipped over is pretty small unless you sail it in a hurricane, which would not be too bright.  So cats are worth considering for a few reasons, there are advantages to them.

To begin with, for the live aboard BEFORE SHTF Day arrives, they are ROOMY!  You have a lot more space in the main cabin because the beam is so wide overall.  This makes it more like living in a small land based cabin or apartment than living on a narrow boat.

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/02/eb/01/02eb014f793885b4aa6c653c7ec125be.jpg)

Next, they are faster than monohulls because the two individual hulls are each more narrow and have a higher hull speed.  So any trips you do make in the boat are going to get done faster, which makes the trips safer.

They also have less draft than monohulls, so you can bring them in closer to shore without grounding the vessel.  That means less distance to row every day to make it into shore in your tender to go gathering some mussels and clams and harvesting some wild edible plants.  You also can venture into more shallow estuaries, which you can't do with a keelboat.  You can also beach them, although not recommended because it's not good for the hull paint job.  However, if you build a ramp with rollers and have a good winch to yank it onto shore, you don't need a big cradle like with a keelboat.

While sailing, they have the advantage that they don't heel over as much as a monohull does on a reach.  So you don't have preps sliding off the counters so much if you forgot to secure them down.  You also have a lot more deck space on which to mount your Solar PV cells, and/or store more preps in water tight containers.

The main DISADVANTAGE with a cat is the $PRICE$ they come in at and the sizes you need to go with to get a decent live aboard model.  You can get decent live aboard monohulls down as low as 22' if you are OK with being REALLY CRAMPED, but 30' and up you start getting enough space to live pretty normally.  With cats though, you have to get well into the 40' range before you can find one that would be reasonably comfortable to live on, and so far while searching down used ones for sale I haven't found a good one for under $150K.  I can on the other hand find numerous monohulls in the mid 40' range for under $100K, which is my general limit I would spend on a boat for just myself.

Here's the closest one I found to something that might work as a Cat Bugout Machine, coming in at just 32' & $58K.  However, no interior pics and I think it would be pretty cramped.

(https://www.philippineyachtcharter.com/for-sale/fastback_32plus.jpg)

https://www.philippineyachtcharter.com/cruising_catamarans.php (https://www.philippineyachtcharter.com/cruising_catamarans.php)

Fastback 32 Catamaran For Sale

1997 Fastback 32 cruising catamaran by John Goss (Australia) for sale in Philippines. Accomplished 30,000 miles in two round trips (Australia - Philippines - Australia), mostly single handed. Good condition, with just a few items needing attention. Special features: excellent headroom below decks - current owner is 6'2" and has a couple of inches extra headroom; "sugar scoops" added to hulls making her 35 foot LOA. The owner is disabled and ready to retire to land. Currently Australian registered. The items need attention are: new front netting, fresh water pump, new batteries, shower-room floor needs replacing.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 3
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:07:28 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
Land Preps & Food

Staying at sea 100% of the time while in theory possible if you can live on just fish is generally not a real good plan for a bugout.  You're going to need to make shore some of the time to collect food of one sort or another.  Most repairs to a boat are far better accomplished at a dock, even if you don't haul it out of the water.  So you need to plan for making shore in some places at some times for some length of time, although that could vary quite a bit.

You have 2 basic types of shore locations you could pull into, developed ones from the Industrial Culture with Marinas and currently with supplies you can buy with $MONEY$, and Primitive ones, secluded coves on Islands and in Fjords where there are no services, but also no dangerous people.  Once SHTF Day arrives,  Marinas probably will not be terrifically safe, nor will you likely be able to buy much with money which has gone basically worthless.

Right now the Yachty Live-Aboard lifestyle is fairly EZ, so long as you have the boat and a steady supply of Mailbox Money rolling in from SS, Pensions and/or Investments.  Things become a LOT tougher once you take those things away.  Basically the only reason people in 3rd World Island Paradises tolerate retired Brits, Krauts, Frogs, & Yanks is because they are a source of $MONEY$ for their economy.  Take away the money, they will be White Meat on the BBQ in the backyard.  White folks living in 3rd World countries will be mercilessly SLAUGHTERED by the locals in a Grand Celebration of throwing off the last vestiges of colonial rule.

So while today a Ray Jason can live comfortably and cheaply on the Aventura cruising around the Carribean marinas where he can get free Wi-Fi along with his docking fee, if you are planning on using your vessel as a Bugout Machine for SHTF Day, you more have to consider what you will need to make life somewhat more pleasant in a secluded cove on an island off the coast of Maine (or wherever your choice of secluded coves happens to be located).

In this installment of the series, we are going to look at some of the Preps you will want to have aboard at all times, safely stowed away for SHTF Day when you have to GTFO of Dodge in a hurry and can't make one more Last Prep Run to Walmart.  On a boat the size of the GSDD, you run into problems here with stowage space for all the STUFF you might want to carry with you to make on-shore living in primitive locations a bit easier to set up.  If you are the dude from the Primitive Living Utoob website of course you can do everything with a stone axe you make yourself and a pair of shorts purchased at K-mart, but most of us are not quite that resourceful.

http://www.youtube.com/v/_7985zBEM3o

So, if you are not a Primitive Survivalist Professional, what do you want to try and stuff in the Good Ship Doomstead Diner for SHTF Bugout Day? ???

There are endless items from Industrial Civilization which could prove useful, although many of them have fairly short functional life spans.  We want to look for stuff that will give us at least 5-10 years of service once JIT Delivery Collapses.  We'll begin with our Food Preps, then get to shore living Preps after that.

Food Preps

Long Lasting / Dried Foods / Vacuum Sealed

100 lbs Rice, 100 lbs Spaghetti, 75 lbs Beans, 50 lbs Beef Jerky, 20 lbs assorted Nuts.  Dried Fruits. 10 gallons assorted vegetable oils.  5 Gallons Peanut Butter.  50 bags assorted Bear Creek Soups. 30 Bags assorted Freeze Dried Mountain House foods. 10 cases factory wrapped Energy Bars (24/case).

This is doubtless too much food to store in the small galley of the Wagstaff.  We will need to convert one of the Bunks to a storage closet for long lasting foods.  The galley storage itself will contain more normal every day foods we can get until SHTF Day arrives.  Frozen Steaks, Canned Soups, Fresh veggies etc.  We'll also have several bottles of multi-vitamins, vitamin C and assorted other vitamins.  Under normal circumstances the supply of Normal Foods will last 1-2 month, enough for cruising around the local islands and seeking out good secluded coves to head for on SHTF Day.

(http://inthewild.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/IMGP3908.jpg)

Besides the packaged food which should last around 2 years with supplement from Fishing and Lobstering, we're going to want to start growing some food wherever it is we drop anchor.  So we'll want along Heirloom Seeds in nitrogen sealed packets for crops that grow well in our chosen neighborhood.  Also prior to SHTF Day we'll have planted some perenials that bear fruit of various kinds, apples, cherries, walnuts etc.  We'll also bring along Mushroom spores of various types, Shitake, Oyster, Portabella and of course White Button shrooms.  For carbs we'll bring along some seed potatoes and sweet potatoes.  With our 2 years of Buffer time to get our Food Forest going, we should be producing a nice annual yield to continue onward with the animal protein from the ocean, and also have some food to barter for other goods.  Maintaining secrecy though about the location of the secluded cove will be important for the first few years.

(http://www.theshiningearth.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Hale-Akua-Permaculture-Garden-Maui-Brecia-Kralovic-Logan-Art.jpg)

Shelter & Equipment

With our nutrition needs now mostly taken care of, we want to look at  building a semi-permanent living arrangement on shore.  The boat won't last forever even in the best case scenario, and there is always the possibility it will be blown off its anchorage by a nor'easter.  Besides that, many of the skills we need to accumulate and practice need to be done on shore, such as making fire, making cordage and rope from natural materials, stone knapping...the list is endless.  Personally I am done when the batteries go dead for the power tools, but younger and healthier members of the Diner Tribe will need to work on these skills.

There are so many things you might WANT to bring along here for the ride, but you are quite constrained by the storage space on a 34' boat.  It's also hard to prioritize as to what is MOST important to pack for the Final Bugout.  I'll list a few important items, in no particular order and no exact quantity.  How much you can actually stuff onto the boat can really only be answered once you start packing her up.  How much living space are you willing to sacrifice to carry more preps?

(http://uueugene.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/fflcbarrel1.jpg)
You can substantially enhance and upgrade the amount of stuff you have available for after SHTF Day by creating Storage Caches in varous secluded coves in your sailing neighborhood.  Such caches can be created with 55 Gallon storage drums or heavy duty PVC storage containers and buried, with the burial coordinates stored encrypted in your GPS/Smart Phone/Journal.  This is a good Insurance Policy also against being raided.  In order to get these cache locations set up in time before SHTF Day, the sooner you can get started on this Plan the better, of course.  However, for most people at the moment just buying the fucking boat will take a while, so you just have to hope SHTF Day does not arrive before you have time to get all your plans and preps set up.  Meanwhile, what do you jam into those 55 Gal drums waiting for SHTF Day? ???  :icon_scratch:

Rope, Cordage, Cable, Monofilament, Wire, Bungee Cord, Nylon netting etc.

It's going to be a long time (if ever) before you can make rope and line in anywhere near the quality of the stuff you pick up at Walmart these days.  Also you will have to eventually learn to live without Elastics like Bungee Cord.  So the more of this stuff you can stock up on the better.  The uses for line and rope are of course endless.  You will also want hardware like block and tackle and turnbuckles, splicing equipment etc.  If you have enough cord, you can make nets yourself fairly easily, but they won't be as good as commercially made nets either, and if you are fishing for a good percentage of your food, nets are invaluable.

In the Tools category for your cordage, you're going to want to have both a Manual and Electric Winch along, preferably one powerful enough to haul your boat onto a cradle on land for maintenance and storage purposes.  You'll also need pulleys, block & tackle etc for the bigger ropes and cable.  for small stuff like Thread and Monofilament, you'll need needles to pull it with.  For wire, you'll need Pliers to grab it and twist it with.  Remember, after SHTF Day, all this stuff will become harder & harder to come by.

Hardware, Nails, Screws, Glue, Duck Tape

Although eventually you will have to find other ways to fasten materials together (mostly by lashing), the longer you can put off this problem the better.  Certainly you want enough hardware around to make it easier to put up your first Lean-to, Yurt or A-Frame like Mr. Primitive Technology set up for himself.  BTW, I don't think the Thatch on his roof would make it through a nor'easter or hurricane with even just Cat 1 winds.  Also, how long in REAL TIME does it take him to collect all the materials and build one of these things?  ???   :icon_scratch:  Even if it does take a few days though, it's still a lot less loss than your typical FSoA style McMansion getting washed away at the beach.

Duck Tape is a product you absolutely cannot have too much of.  Bury at least a couple of cases of the large size rolls.  For glue, a few cans of 2 part epoxy is good, plus a big supply of typical Elmers Wood Glue.

Another nice material to have in your cache is some flat plane glass, to make Windows out of.  Windows improve your hut enviroment a LOT!  You can use plastic sheeting for this as well, but glass is definitely classier for the prepper.

Tarps & Tents

Like Duck Tape, Glue, Nails and mny other industrially produced items, Tarps are something you can never have too many of, in too many sizes.  The polymer material these suckers are made from is something you will never be able to reproduce
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 3
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:07:29 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
Land Preps & Food

Staying at sea 100% of the time while in theory possible if you can live on just fish is generally not a real good plan for a bugout.  You're going to need to make shore some of the time to collect food of one sort or another.  Most repairs to a boat are far better accomplished at a dock, even if you don't haul it out of the water.  So you need to plan for making shore in some places at some times for some length of time, although that could vary quite a bit.

You have 2 basic types of shore locations you could pull into, developed ones from the Industrial Culture with Marinas and currently with supplies you can buy with $MONEY$, and Primitive ones, secluded coves on Islands and in Fjords where there are no services, but also no dangerous people.  Once SHTF Day arrives,  Marinas probably will not be terrifically safe, nor will you likely be able to buy much with money which has gone basically worthless.

Right now the Yachty Live-Aboard lifestyle is fairly EZ, so long as you have the boat and a steady supply of Mailbox Money rolling in from SS, Pensions and/or Investments.  Things become a LOT tougher once you take those things away.  Basically the only reason people in 3rd World Island Paradises tolerate retired Brits, Krauts, Frogs, & Yanks is because they are a source of $MONEY$ for their economy.  Take away the money, they will be White Meat on the BBQ in the backyard.  White folks living in 3rd World countries will be mercilessly SLAUGHTERED by the locals in a Grand Celebration of throwing off the last vestiges of colonial rule.

So while today a Ray Jason can live comfortably and cheaply on the Aventura cruising around the Carribean marinas where he can get free Wi-Fi along with his docking fee, if you are planning on using your vessel as a Bugout Machine for SHTF Day, you more have to consider what you will need to make life somewhat more pleasant in a secluded cove on an island off the coast of Maine (or wherever your choice of secluded coves happens to be located).

In this installment of the series, we are going to look at some of the Preps you will want to have aboard at all times, safely stowed away for SHTF Day when you have to GTFO of Dodge in a hurry and can't make one more Last Prep Run to Walmart.  On a boat the size of the GSDD, you run into problems here with stowage space for all the STUFF you might want to carry with you to make on-shore living in primitive locations a bit easier to set up.  If you are the dude from the Primitive Living Utoob website of course you can do everything with a stone axe you make yourself and a pair of shorts purchased at K-mart, but most of us are not quite that resourceful.

http://www.youtube.com/v/_7985zBEM3o

So, if you are not a Primitive Survivalist Professional, what do you want to try and stuff in the Good Ship Doomstead Diner for SHTF Bugout Day? ???

There are endless items from Industrial Civilization which could prove useful, although many of them have fairly short functional life spans.  We want to look for stuff that will give us at least 5-10 years of service once JIT Delivery Collapses.  We'll begin with our Food Preps, then get to shore living Preps after that.

Food Preps

Long Lasting / Dried Foods / Vacuum Sealed

100 lbs Rice, 100 lbs Spaghetti, 75 lbs Beans, 50 lbs Beef Jerky, 20 lbs assorted Nuts.  Dried Fruits. 10 gallons assorted vegetable oils.  5 Gallons Peanut Butter.  50 bags assorted Bear Creek Soups. 30 Bags assorted Freeze Dried Mountain House foods. 10 cases factory wrapped Energy Bars (24/case).

This is doubtless too much food to store in the small galley of the Wagstaff.  We will need to convert one of the Bunks to a storage closet for long lasting foods.  The galley storage itself will contain more normal every day foods we can get until SHTF Day arrives.  Frozen Steaks, Canned Soups, Fresh veggies etc.  We'll also have several bottles of multi-vitamins, vitamin C and assorted other vitamins.  Under normal circumstances the supply of Normal Foods will last 2 weeks -1 month, enough for cruising around the local islands and seeking out good secluded coves to head for on SHTF Day.

(http://inthewild.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/IMGP3908.jpg)

Besides the packaged food which should last around 2 years with supplement from Fishing and Lobstering, we're going to want to start growing some food wherever it is we drop anchor.  So we'll want along Heirloom Seeds in nitrogen sealed packets for crops that grow well in our chosen neighborhood.  Also prior to SHTF Day we'll have planted some perenials that bear fruit of various kinds, apples, cherries, walnuts etc.  We'll also bring along Mushroom spores of various types, Shitake, Oyster, Portabella and of course White Button shrooms.  For carbs we'll bring along some seed potatoes and sweet potatoes.  With our 2 years of Buffer time to get our Food Forest going, we should be producing a nice annual yield to continue onward with the animal protein from the ocean, and also have some food to barter for other goods.  Maintaining secrecy though about the location of the secluded cove will be important for the first few years.

(http://www.theshiningearth.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Hale-Akua-Permaculture-Garden-Maui-Brecia-Kralovic-Logan-Art.jpg)

Shelter & Equipment

With our nutrition needs now mostly taken care of, we want to look at  building a semi-permanent living arrangement on shore.  The boat won't last forever even in the best case scenario, and there is always the possibility it will be blown off its anchorage by a nor'easter.  Besides that, many of the skills we need to accumulate and practice need to be done on shore, such as making fire, making cordage and rope from natural materials, stone knapping...the list is endless.  Personally I am done when the batteries go dead for the power tools, but younger and healthier members of the Diner Tribe will need to work on these skills.

There are so many things you might WANT to bring along here for the ride, but you are quite constrained by the storage space on a 34' boat.  It's also hard to prioritize as to what is MOST important to pack for the Final Bugout.  I'll list a few important items, in no particular order and no exact quantity.  How much you can actually stuff onto the boat can really only be answered once you start packing her up.  How much living space are you willing to sacrifice to carry more preps?

(http://uueugene.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/fflcbarrel1.jpg)
You can substantially enhance and upgrade the amount of stuff you have available for after SHTF Day by creating Storage Chaches in varous secluded coves in your sailing neighborhood.  Such caches can be created with 55 Gallon storage drums or heavy duty PVC storage containers and buried, with the burial coordinates stored encrypted in your GPS.  This is a good Insurance Policy also against being raided.  In order to get these cache locations set up in time before SHTF Day, the sooner you can get started on this Plan the better, of course.  However, for most people at the moment just buying the fucking boat will take a while, so you just have to hope SHTF Day does not arrive before you have time to get all your plans and preps set up.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 3
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:08:00 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
Land Preps & Food

Staying at sea 100% of the time while in theory possible if you can live on just fish is generally not a real good plan for a bugout.  You're going to need to make shore some of the time to collect food of one sort or another.  Most repairs to a boat are far better accomplished at a dock, even if you don't haul it out of the water.  So you need to plan for making shore in some places at some times for some length of time, although that could vary quite a bit.

You have 2 basic types of shore locations you could pull into, developed ones from the Industrial Culture with Marinas and currently with supplies you can buy with $MONEY$, and Primitive ones, secluded coves on Islands and in Fjords where there are no services, but also no dangerous people.  Once SHTF Day arrives,  Marinas probably will not be terrifically safe, nor will you likely be able to buy much with money which has gone basically worthless.

Right now the Yachty Live-Aboard lifestyle is fairly EZ, so long as you have the boat and a steady supply of Mailbox Money rolling in from SS, Pensions and/or Investments.  Things become a LOT tougher once you take those things away.  Basically the only reason people in 3rd World Island Paradises tolerate retired Brits, Krauts, Frogs, & Yanks is because they are a source of $MONEY$ for their economy.  Take away the money, they will be White Meat on the BBQ in the backyard.  White folks living in 3rd World countries will be mercilessly SLAUGHTERED by the locals in a Grand Celebration of throwing off the last vestiges of colonial rule.

So while today a Ray Jason can live comfortably and cheaply on the Aventura cruising around the Carribean marinas where he can get free Wi-Fi along with his docking fee, if you are planning on using your vessel as a Bugout Machine for SHTF Day, you more have to consider what you will need to make life somewhat more pleasant in a secluded cove on an island off the coast of Maine (or wherever your choice of secluded coves happens to be located).

In this installment of the series, we are going to look at some of the Preps you will want to have aboard at all times, safely stowed away for SHTF Day when you have to GTFO of Dodge in a hurry and can't make one more Last Prep Run to Walmart.  On a boat the size of the GSDD, you run into problems here with stowage space for all the STUFF you might want to carry with you to make on-shore living in primitive locations a bit easier to set up.  If you are the dude from the Primitive Living Utoob website of course you can do everything with a stone axe you make yourself and a pair of shorts purchased at K-mart, but most of us are not quite that resourceful.

http://www.youtube.com/v/_7985zBEM3o

So, if you are not a Primitive Survivalist Professional, what do you want to try and stuff in the Good Ship Doomstead Diner for SHTF Bugout Day? ???

There are endless items from Industrial Civilization which could prove useful, although many of them have fairly short functional life spans.  We want to look for stuff that will give us at least 5-10 years of service once JIT Delivery Collapses.  We'll begin with our Food Preps, then get to shore living Preps after that.

Food Preps

Long Lasting / Dried Foods / Vacuum Sealed

100 lbs Rice, 100 lbs Spaghetti, 75 lbs Beans, 50 lbs Beef Jerky, 20 lbs assorted Nuts.  Dried Fruits. 10 gallons assorted vegetable oils.  5 Gallons Peanut Butter.  50 bags assorted Bear Creek Soups. 30 Bags assorted Freeze Dried Mountain House foods. 10 cases factory wrapped Energy Bars (24/case).

This is doubtless too much food to store in the small galley of the Wagstaff.  We will need to convert one of the Bunks to a storage closet for long lasting foods.  The galley storage itself will contain more normal every day foods we can get until SHTF Day arrives.  Frozen Steaks, Canned Soups, Fresh veggies etc.  We'll also have several bottles of multi-vitamins, vitamin C and assorted other vitamins.  Under normal circumstances the supply of Normal Foods will last 2 weeks -1 month, enough for cruising around the local islands and seeking out good secluded coves to head for on SHTF Day.

(http://inthewild.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/IMGP3908.jpg)

Besides the packaged food which should last around 2 years with supplement from Fishing and Lobstering, we're going to want to start growing some food wherever it is we drop anchor.  So we'll want along Heirloom Seeds in nitrogen sealed packets for crops that grow well in our chosen neighborhood.  Also prior to SHTF Day we'll have planted some perenials that bear fruit of various kinds, apples, cherries, walnuts etc.  We'll also bring along Mushroom spores of various types, Shitake, Oyster, Portabella and of course White Button shrooms.  For carbs we'll bring along some seed potatoes and sweet potatoes.  With our 2 years of Buffer time to get our Food Forest going, we should be producing a nice annual yield to continue onward with the animal protein from the ocean, and also have some food to barter for other goods.  Maintaining secrecy though about the location of the secluded cove will be important for the first few years.

(http://www.theshiningearth.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Hale-Akua-Permaculture-Garden-Maui-Brecia-Kralovic-Logan-Art.jpg)

Shelter & Equipment

With our nutrition needs now mostly taken care of, we want to look at  building a semi-permanent living arrangement on shore.  The boat won't last forever even in the best case scenario, and there is always the possibility it will be blown off its anchorage by a nor'easter.  Besides that, many of the skills we need to accumulate and practice need to be done on shore, such as making fire, making cordage and rope from natural materials, stone knapping...the list is endless.  Personally I am done when the batteries go dead for the power tools, but younger and healthier members of the Diner Tribe will need to work on these skills.

There are so many things you might WANT to bring along here for the ride, but you are quite constrained by the storage space on a 34' boat.  It's also hard to prioritize as to what is MOST important to pack for the Final Bugout.  I'll list a few important items, in no particular order and no exact quantity.  How much you can actually stuff onto the boat can really only be answered once you start packing her up.  How much living space are you willing to sacrifice to carry more preps?

You can substantially enhance and upgrade the amount of stuff you have available for after SHTF Day by creating Storage Chaches in varous secluded coves in your sailing neighborhood.  Such caches can be created with 55 Gallon storage drums or heavy duty PVC storage containers and buried, with the burial coordinates stored encrypted in your GPS.  This is a good Insurance Policy also against being raided.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 3
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:08:00 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
Land Preps & Food

Staying at sea 100% of the time while in theory possible if you can live on just fish is generally not a real good plan for a bugout.  You're going to need to make shore some of the time to collect food of one sort or another.  Most repairs to a boat are far better accomplished at a dock, even if you don't haul it out of the water.  So you need to plan for making shore in some places at some times for some length of time, although that could vary quite a bit.

You have 2 basic types of shore locations you could pull into, developed ones from the Industrial Culture with Marinas and currently with supplies you can buy with $MONEY$, and Primitive ones, secluded coves on Islands and in Fjords where there are no services, but also no dangerous people.  Once SHTF Day arrives,  Marinas probably will not be terrifically safe, nor will you likely be able to buy much with money which has gone basically worthless.

Right now the Yachty Live-Aboard lifestyle is fairly EZ, so long as you have the boat and a steady supply of Mailbox Money rolling in from SS, Pensions and/or Investments.  Things become a LOT tougher once you take those things away.  Basically the only reason people in 3rd World Island Paradises tolerate retired Brits, Krauts, Frogs, & Yanks is because they are a source of $MONEY$ for their economy.  Take away the money, they will be White Meat on the BBQ in the backyard.  White folks living in 3rd World countries will be mercilessly SLAUGHTERED by the locals in a Grand Celebration of throwing off the last vestiges of colonial rule.

So while today a Ray Jason can live comfortably and cheaply on the Aventura cruising around the Carribean marinas where he can get free Wi-Fi along with his docking fee, if you are planning on using your vessel as a Bugout Machine for SHTF Day, you more have to consider what you will need to make life somewhat more pleasant in a secluded cove on an island off the coast of Maine (or wherever your choice of secluded coves happens to be located).

In this installment of the series, we are going to look at some of the Preps you will want to have aboard at all times, safely stowed away for SHTF Day when you have to GTFO of Dodge in a hurry and can't make one more Last Prep Run to Walmart.  On a boat the size of the GSDD, you run into problems here with stowage space for all the STUFF you might want to carry with you to make on-shore living in primitive locations a bit easier to set up.  If you are the dude from the Primitive Living Utoob website of course you can do everything with a stone axe you make yourself and a pair of shorts purchased at K-mart, but most of us are not quite that resourceful.

http://www.youtube.com/v/_7985zBEM3o

So, if you are not a Primitive Survivalist Professional, what do you want to try and stuff in the Good Ship Doomstead Diner for SHTF Bugout Day? ???

There are endless items from Industrial Civilization which could prove useful, although many of them have fairly short functional life spans.  We want to look for stuff that will give us at least 5-10 years of service once JIT Delivery Collapses.  We'll begin with our Food Preps, then get to shore living Preps after that.

Food Preps

Long Lasting / Dried Foods / Vacuum Sealed

100 lbs Rice, 100 lbs Spaghetti, 75 lbs Beans, 50 lbs Beef Jerky, 20 lbs assorted Nuts.  Dried Fruits. 10 gallons assorted vegetable oils.  5 Gallons Peanut Butter.  50 bags assorted Bear Creek Soups. 30 Bags assorted Freeze Dried Mountain House foods. 10 cases factory wrapped Energy Bars (24/case).

This is doubtless too much food to store in the small galley of the Wagstaff.  We will need to convert one of the Bunks to a storage closet for long lasting foods.  The galley storage itself will contain more normal every day foods we can get until SHTF Day arrives.  Frozen Steaks, Canned Soups, Fresh veggies etc.  We'll also have several bottles of multi-vitamins, vitamin C and assorted other vitamins.  Under normal circumstances the supply of Normal Foods will last 2 weeks -1 month, enough for cruising around the local islands and seeking out good secluded coves to head for on SHTF Day.

(http://inthewild.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/IMGP3908.jpg)

Besides the packaged food which should last around 2 years with supplement from Fishing and Lobstering, we're going to want to start growing some food wherever it is we drop anchor.  So we'll want along Heirloom Seeds in nitrogen sealed packets for crops that grow well in our chosen neighborhood.  Also prior to SHTF Day we'll have planted some perenials that bear fruit of various kinds, apples, cherries, walnuts etc.  We'll also bring along Mushroom spores of various types, Shitake, Oyster, Portabella and of course White Button shrooms.  For carbs we'll bring along some seed potatoes and sweet potatoes.  With our 2 years of Buffer time to get our Food Forest going, we should be producing a nice annual yield to continue onward with the animal protein from the ocean, and also have some food to barter for other goods.  Maintaining secrecy though about the location of the secluded cove will be important for the first few years.

(http://www.theshiningearth.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Hale-Akua-Permaculture-Garden-Maui-Brecia-Kralovic-Logan-Art.jpg)

Shelter & Equipment

With our nutrition needs now mostly taken care of, we want to look at  building a semi-permanent living arrangement on shore.  The boat won't last forever even in the best case scenario, and there is always the possibility it will be blown off its anchorage by a nor'easter.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 3
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:08:31 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
Land Preps & Food

Staying at sea 100% of the time while in theory possible if you can live on just fish is generally not a real good plan for a bugout.  You're going to need to make shore some of the time to collect food of one sort or another.  Most repairs to a boat are far better accomplished at a dock, even if you don't haul it out of the water.  So you need to plan for making shore in some places at some times for some length of time, although that could vary quite a bit.

You have 2 basic types of shore locations you could pull into, developed ones from the Industrial Culture with Marinas and currently with supplies you can buy with $MONEY$, and Primitive ones, secluded coves on Islands and in Fjords where there are no services, but also no dangerous people.  Once SHTF Day arrives,  Marinas probably will not be terrifically safe, nor will you likely be able to buy much with money which has gone basically worthless.

Right now the Yachty Live-Aboard lifestyle is fairly EZ, so long as you have the boat and a steady supply of Mailbox Money rolling in from SS, Pensions and/or Investments.  Things become a LOT tougher once you take those things away.  Basically the only reason people in 3rd World Island Paradises tolerate retired Brits, Krauts, Frogs, & Yanks is because they are a source of $MONEY$ for their economy.  Take away the money, they will be White Meat on the BBQ in the backyard.  White folks living in 3rd World countries will be mercilessly SLAUGHTERED by the locals in a Grand Celebration of throwing off the last vestiges of colonial rule.

So while today a Ray Jason can live comfortably and cheaply on the Aventura cruising around the Carribean marinas where he can get free Wi-Fi along with his docking fee, if you are planning on using your vessel as a Bugout Machine for SHTF Day, you more have to consider what you will need to make life somewhat more pleasant in a secluded cove on an island off the coast of Maine (or wherever your choice of secluded coves happens to be located).

In this installment of the series, we are going to look at some of the Preps you will want to have aboard at all times, safely stowed away for SHTF Day when you have to GTFO of Dodge in a hurry and can't make one more Last Prep Run to Walmart.  On a boat the size of the GSDD, you run into problems here with stowage space for all the STUFF you might want to carry with you to make on-shore living in primitive locations a bit easier to set up.  If you are the dude from the Primitive Living Utoob website of course you can do everything with a stone axe you make yourself and a pair of shorts purchased at K-mart, but most of us are not quite that resourceful.

http://www.youtube.com/v/_7985zBEM3o

So, if you are not a Primitive Survivalist Professional, what do you want to try and stuff in the Good Ship Doomstead Diner for SHTF Bugout Day? ???

There are endless items from Industrial Civilization which could prove useful, although many of them have fairly short functional life spans.  We want to look for stuff that will give us at least 5-10 years of service once JIT Delivery Collapses.  We'll begin with our Food Preps, then get to shore living Preps after that.

Food Preps

Long Lasting Dried Foods Vacuum Sealed

100 lbs Rice, 100 lbs Spaghetti, 75 lbs Beans, 50 lbs Beef Jerky, 20 lbs assorted Nuts.  Dried Fruits. 10 gallons assorted vegetable oils.  5 Gallons Peanut Butter.  50 bags assorted Bear Creek Soups. 30 Bags assorted Freeze Dried Mountain House foods. 10 cases factory wrapped Energy Bars (24/case).

This is doubtless too much food to store in the small galley of the Wagstaff.  We will need to convert one of the Bunks to a storage cabinet for long lasting foods.  The galley storage itself will contain more normal every day foods we can get until SHTF Day arrives.  Frozen Steaks, Canned Soups, Fresh veggies etc.  Under normal circumstances the supply of Normal Foods will last 2 weeks -1 month.

Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 3
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:08:31 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
Land Preps & Food

Staying at sea 100% of the time while in theory possible if you can live on just fish is generally not a real good plan for a bugout.  You're going to need to make shore some of the time to collect food of one sort or another.  Most repairs to a boat are far better accomplished at a dock, even if you don't haul it out of the water.  So you need to plan for making shore in some places at some times for some length of time, although that could vary quite a bit.

You have 2 basic types of shore locations you could pull into, developed ones from the Industrial Culture with Marinas and currently with supplies you can buy with $MONEY$ and Primitive ones, secluded coves on Islands and in Fjords where there are no services, but also no dangerous people.  Once SHTF Day arrives,  Marna's probably will not be terrifically safe, nor will you likely be able to buy much with money which has gone basically worthless.

Right now the Yachty Live-Aboard lifestyle is fairly EZ, so long as you have the boat and a steady supply of Mailbox Money rolling in from SS, Pensions and/or Investments.  Things become a LOT tougher once you take those things away.  Basically the only reason people in 3rd World Island Paradises tolerate retired Brits, Krauts, Frogs, & Yanks is because they are a source of $MONEY$ for their economy.  Take away the money, they will be White Meat on the BBQ in the backyard.  White folks living in 3rd World countries will be mercilessly SLAUGHTERED by the locals in a Grand Celebration of throwing off the last vestiges of colonial rule.

So while today a Ray Jason can live comfortably and cheaply on the Aventura cruising around the Carribean marinas where he can get free Wi-Fi along with his docking fee, if you are planning on using your vessel as a Bugout Machine for SHTF Day, you more have to consider what you will need to make life somewhat more pleasant in a secluded cove on an island off the coast of Maine (or wherever your choice of secluded coves happens to be located).

In this installment of the series, we are going to look at some of the Preps you will want to have aboard at all times, safely stowed away for SHTF Day when you have to GTFO of Dodge in a hurry and can't make one more Last Prep Run to Walmart.  On a boat the size of the GSDD, you run into problems here with stowage space for all the STUFF you might want to carry with you to make on-shore living in primitive locations a bit easier to set up.  If you are the dude from the Primitive Living Utoob website of course you can do everything with a stone axe you make yourself and a pair of shorts purchased at K-mart, but most of us are not quite that resourceful.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 3
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:09:02 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
Land Preps & Food

Staying at sea 100% of the time while in theory possible if you can live on just fish is generally not a real good plan for a bugout.  You're going to need to make shore some of the time to collect food of one sort or another.  Most repairs to a boat are far better accomplished at a dock, even if you don't haul it out of the water.  So you need to plan for making shore in some places at some times for some length of time, although that could vary quite a bit.

You have 2 basic types of shore locations you could pull into, developed ones from the Industrial Culture with Marinas and currently with supplies you can buy with $MONEY$ and Primitive ones, secluded coves on Islands and in Fjords where there are no services, but also no dangerous people.  Once SHTF Day arrives,  Marna's probably will not be terrifically safe, nor will you likely be able to buy much with money which has gone basically worthless.

Right now the Yachty Live-Aboard lifestyle is fairly EZ, so long as you have the boat and a steady supply of Mailbox Money rolling in from SS, Pensions and/or Investments.  Things become a LOT tougher once you take those things away.  Basically the only reason people in 3rd World Island Paradises tolerate retired Brits, Krauts, Frogs, & Yanks is because they are a source of $MONEY$ for their economy.  Take away the money, they will be White Meat on the BBQ in the backyard.  White folks living in 3rd World countries will be mercilessly SLAUGHTERED by the locals in a Grand Celebration of throwing off the last vestiges of colonial rule.

So while today a Ray Jason can live comfortably and cheaply on the Aventura cruising around the Carribean marinas where he can get free Wi-Fi along with his docking fee
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 2
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:09:02 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
  We have fit out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner with the main components for renewable electric power as well as auxiliary electric propulsion systems to back up the main 50HP diesel kicker.  Now we need to look at preps to carry on board to make the post SHTF Day survival a bit easier for a while.  Hopefully long enough that it lasts until I Buy my Ticket to the Great Beyond.  ::)

(http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/21857574.jpg)
The boat does not appear to have a tender incuded, aka small boat to use to get from an anchorage position to shore.  For this we will go with a Seyvlor Inflatable that we can power with one of the 8HP Torqeedo motors, or row if necessary.  Cost around $2000 new, but we can probably pick one up on the used market for $500.

We'll dispense with the idea of packing along a survival raft if the GSDD is holed and gong to Davey Jones Locker.  If she is going down, I will go with her.  It is traditional for the Captain to go down with the ship.  I would like to go out that way anyhow.  Short of a massive coronary while I am asleep, I can't think of any way to kick the bucket I would like more than that.

For maintenance and spear fishing/lobstering are concerned, we will invest in a Hookah System electric powered floating compressor with a 100' hose to use while anchored in secluded coves on uninhabited islands off the coast of Maine and Nova Scotia.  100' is more than enough depth to do good lobstering, it's usually between 25'-50'.  Besides that, when you dive and spend much time at 100' you gotta worry about the BENDS on the way back up.  In my diving days when I was still an athletic and adventurous individual I about never went below 50'.  This is plenty deep to get a nice look at the life forms beneath the sea.  In fact you can get a pretty good look just Snorkeling if you can hold your breath for a minute or so.

We will also include a SCUBA (Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus)tank for some free diving away from the GSDD.  Said tank can also be used to drive Compressed Air  Tools like Impact Drivers and the like.  These are very handy devices.

Commpressed air is in fact one of the most powerful tools we have courtesy of the Age of Oil you want to conserve as long as you can.  Making those high pressure cannisters for holding the gas is not likely to last a long time.  Besides the SCUBA tank, I would also have at least one tool compressor tank aboard.

(https://www.browniesthirdlunginfo.com/images/gas/f390x-brownies-third-lung-gas-recreational.jpg)

The Hookah system will allow us to do basic hull maintenance and repairs without having to haul the boat out of the water into dry dock, although this probably becomes necessary after 5 years or so.
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner 2
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:09:02 PM
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)
  We have fit out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner with the main components for renewable electric power as well as auxiliary electric propulsion systems to back up the main 50HP diesel kicker.  Now we need to look at preps to carry on board to make the post SHTF Day survival a bit easier for a while.  Hopefully long enough that it lasts until I Buy my Ticket to the Great Beyond.  ::)

(http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/21857574.jpg)
The boat does not appear to have a tender incuded, aka small boat to use to get from an anchorage position to shore.  For this we will go with a Seyvlor Inflatable that we can power with one of the 8HP Torqeedo motors, or row if necessary.  Cost around $2000 new, but we can probably pick one up on the used market for $500.

We'll dispense with the idea of packing along a survival raft if the GSDD is holed and gong to Davey Jones Locker.  If she is going down, I will go with her.  It is traditional for the Captain to go down with the ship.  I would like to go out that way anyhow.  Short of a massive coronary while I am asleep, I can't think of any way to kick the bucket I would like more than that.

For maintenance and spear fishing/lobstering are concerned, we will invest in a Hookah System electric powered floating compressor with a 100' hose to use while anchored in secluded coves on uninhabited islands off the coast of Maine and Nova Scotia.  100' is more than enough depth to do good lobstering, it's usually between 25'-50'.  Besides that, when you dive and spend much time at 100' you gotta worry about the BENDS on the way back up.  In my diving days when I was still an athletic and adventurous individual I about never went below 50'.  This is plenty deep to get a nice look at the life forms beneath the sea.  In fact you can get a pretty good look just Snorkeling if you can hold your breath for a minute or so.

We will also include a SCUBA tank for some free diving away from the GSDD.  Said tank can also be used to drive Compressed Air  Tools like Impact Drivers and the like.

(https://www.browniesthirdlunginfo.com/images/gas/f390x-brownies-third-lung-gas-recreational.jpg)

The Hookah system will allow us to do basic hull maintenance and repairs without having to haul the boat out of the water into dry dock, although this probably becomes necessary after 5 years or so.
Title: Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:09:33 PM
The decision has been made!  The Envelope Pleeez...

(https://d3j0sq6zklqdqq.cloudfront.net/photos/2015/06/02/107-26652-johnny-carson-carnac-1433273047.jpg)

...and the Winner (for now) is...

The Wagstaff 34 located in NZ!
(https://www.marinehub.co.nz/boats-for-sale/wagstaff/34-motorsailer/79f788b2-7265-4a00-b5d8-5aaac9ec5f1e?offset=0)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

(https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=l&ai=DChcSEwimyazgw_zYAhULV34KHS8FB7kYABAVGgJwYw&sig=AOD64_2GUHDohmGAKm0YRDCT7BQpBzhclw&ctype=5&q=&ved=0ahUKEwiz7qjgw_zYAhVMVWMKHSaQA6oQwjwINg&adurl=)
Listed at $69.5K, I jewed the seller down to $61K.  I arranged for the boat to be shipped to Seattle by Seven Star Yacht Transport (http://www.sevenstar-yacht-transport.com/) for $8000.  So I am getting this boat for $70K.  My goal is to fit it out for SHTF Day and stay under $100K.  Here is what she comes with on arrival in Seattle:

http://www.youtube.com/v/P2GW-qqE3GU
Features    Details
Year Launched Approx   1986
Manufacturer / Design   Wagstaff
Model   34 Motorsailer
Stock #   VY4702-B
Construction
LOA approx   10.36 m (34')
Beam approx   3.2 m (10.5')
Hull Type   Round bilge, full keel.
Hull Construction Material   Hull - strip planked timber glassed over, teak decks. Teak decks.
Draft   1.37 m (4.5')
Engineering
Engine Name    50hp 4 cyl Nanni diesel (fresh water cooled)
Drive   Twin Disc TMC60 2R (new), 18" 3 blade prop
Cruising Speed approx   7.5 Knots
Fuel Capacity approx   320 Litres (84.5 gal)
Water Capacity approx   400 Litres (105.7 gal)
Rig
Spars   Alloy
Sails   Main and furling headsail
Rigging   S/S
Interior
Berths   5

The delivery specs are quite close to what I was looking for with a 50HP engine and 85 gallons of diesel storage.  I can bring that up to the 100 gal I was looking for with a couple of 10 gal jerry cans, or have an auxiliary tank installed.  For now, I'll go with the jerry cans and save that expense.  The jerry cans come in around $20 each at Walmart.

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcSF7yDI6mGP8uRmT0ZstexBMWX_rdyIw3lhGP2p8hFiC6VfUo5MKyZnt7GU4YOubcus1_FiDZs&usqp=CAE)
Water capacity at 400 gal is very good.  Even if I drank 1 gal/day (which I don't) this lasts more than a year.  Besides, I WILL install a reverse osmosis watermaker as one of my upgrades.  The one at left comes in around $600.  I'll budget $1000 to include installation and hardware.  1000 gal/day pssible according to spec, but I can't imagine having to run it 24/7 to get that out of it.  Most fresh water to be collected either onshore or through rainwater collection.

Now we have to look at what ammendations the boat needs to be the best SHTF Day GTFO of Dodge vehicle it can be, given its size limitations.  For today's installment of this series, I'm going to look at the basic 12V Electrical system.

The specs don't detail the electrical system for this boat, so I am going to assume it comes with the typical arrangement for this size boat of 2 deep cycle marine batts and an alternator run off the diesel engine to charge those batts.  It does not appear to have any solar or wind setup to charge the batts that I can see.

First purchase is another DC Marine Batt to up the number of main 12V Batt components to 3.  This also allows me to work with 36V Solar V Panels if I wire in series.  Higher voltage PV Panels are more efficient.  Cost for additional Batt, about $100 new, then cost for reconfiguring my Batt compartment to handle this, another $500 for this if I employ someone.  If I am miraculously fit enough to do it myself, maybe $100 in parts and 2 days labor.  I actually own the additional Batt already, so this isn't a new cost for me.  Many of the items I already have on hand go aboard the GSDD.  Cost's here are for others who are starting their prepping from scratch.

With 3 Batts, I am going to run a 36V system for charging purposes and step it down to 12V for most of my appliances, along with running a variety of inverters at various output wattage from a low of 75W (got one of those  :icon_sunny: ) to 500W and up to a 2000W Pure Sine Wave inverter for real energy intensive electric stuff.  I will be using 3 36V Solar PV Panels to keep these charged, along with two
Title: Seastead of the Day: Fitting out the Good Ship Doomstead Diner
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:09:34 PM
The decision has been made!  The Envelope Pleeez...

...and the Winner (for now) is...

The Wagstaff 34 located in NZ!
(https://www.marinehub.co.nz/boats-for-sale/wagstaff/34-motorsailer/79f788b2-7265-4a00-b5d8-5aaac9ec5f1e?offset=0)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/v/w4K2RJvAbeo
Listed at $69.5K, I jewed the seller down to $61K.  I arranged for the boat to be shipped to Seattle by Seven Star Yacht Transport (http://www.sevenstar-yacht-transport.com/) for $8000.  So I am getting this boat for $70K.  My goal is to fit it out for SHTF Day and stay under $100K.  Here is what she comes with on arrival in Seattle:

Features    Details
Year Launched Approx   1986
Manufacturer / Design   Wagstaff
Model   34 Motorsailer
Stock #   VY4702-B
Construction
LOA approx   10.36 m (34')
Beam approx   3.2 m (10.5')
Hull Type   Round bilge, full keel.
Hull Construction Material   Hull - strip planked timber glassed over, teak decks. Teak decks.
Draft   1.37 m (4.5')
Engineering
Engine Name    50hp 4 cyl Nanni diesel (fresh water cooled)
Drive   Twin Disc TMC60 2R (new), 18" 3 blade prop
Cruising Speed approx   7.5 Knots
Fuel Capacity approx   320 Litres (84.5 gal)
Water Capacity approx   400 Litres (105.7 gal)
Rig
Spars   Alloy
Sails   Main and furling headsail
Rigging   S/S
Interior
Berths   5
Title: Seastead of the Day: If only I was healthy...
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:11:01 PM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition and/or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fix up a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures (the lower the better)
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail due to my physical limitations
4- It needs to have a fully enclosed Pilot House
5- It needs to be parked in the FSoA


Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.  BUT, if I am buying this boat just for ME to live on and not partnering or using it as an escape vehicle for a Gaggle of Diners, do I really need a 50' boat with all the extra maintenance costs that entails?  Of course not!  Every extra foot at the waterline costs you more in dockage fees.  All the hardware and sails are bigger and more expensive.  Haul Outs and paint jobs more expensive.  All I really need is a functional Galley and Head, a comfortable Berth, Standing Headroom and a nice Nav Station/Office from which I can Admin the Diner.  This is more than you get in the cabin of a Freightliner, which I lived in for nearly 7 years.  So while I continue to look at the bigger "Dream Boats", I'm also now seeking out the smaller ones which fit the criteria.  Here's the Cape Dory 30, located in FL and coming in at an asking price of $44.5K.  I can Jew this down to $40K I am sure, maybe less.

(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713104820483_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=800&h=400)
(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713103910497_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=600&h=425&exact=1) (http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713103941287_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=600&h=425&exact=1)

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)

Going with the smaller boat size given I can find a similarly priced bigger one, what are the advantages and disadvantages to weigh here in making the decision?

Big Boat Advantages:

1- Much more live aboard room, very comfortable and closer to the size of a typical apartment.
2- More storage space for preps, water and fuel with longer offshore trips possible
3- More room for Diners to come and visit for convocations and cruising to secluded coves

Big Boat Disadvantages:

1- More expensive maintenance fees.  Prices for everything rise by the foot exponentially.
2- Harder to sail with a small crew.
3- Bigger draft, so fewer places you can safely sail without grounding the vessel.

Small Boat Advantages

1- Compact with less room you have to keep clean and organized
2- More fuel efficient.  Important for Motor Sailers.
3- Easily handled by 1 or 2 people.

Small Boat Disadvantages

1- A little cramped compared to the Big Boats.
2- Less fuel, water and prep storage meaning shorter range.
3- Not much room for friends to visit and go cruising.

Now, in weighing this out for myself in my current decrepit physical condition the smaller boats win.  I don't need a really long range and lots of fuel storage because I am NOT going to do any big Blue Water crossings of the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans.  I am not circumnavigating or rounding Cape Horn or the Cape of Good Hope.  I will NOT be sailing in the Roaring 40s!  The longest crossing I might semi-realistically attempt would be from FL to the Virgin Islands, and you can Island Hop to get there.  I doubt I can Save As Many As I Can with a bigger boat, and besides if/when that becomes necessary we just steal some boats for the evacuation and GTFO of Dodge as a Flotilla.  If more than a few Diners show up for a Convocation, we pack along tents and head for a cove no more than a day or two sail from the Marina and set up an on shore camp.  On a 30' boat, you can easily carry a dozen people for a day sail, although it is a bit crowded.  I've been on 30' Fishing Trawlers with a dozen people.   Or you charter a big boat for the Convocation.

All I need is a boat with enough room for me most of the time which is economical to own and maintain on my meager income; with enough range to do coastal sailing and which a cripple can handle himself, at least under power.  The small boats fit this criteria.

The next question in this thought experiment is just what I would stock on the boat for SHTF Day?  ???   :icon_scratch:  I'll explore this question in a blog article at a future date.  Not so much for myself really as for other Doomers looking for a decent Bugout Plan which doesn't require gobs of money to organize up.  I still do hope for a Miraculous Recovery and finding a Doctor who can think outside his specialty and figure out precisely what is wrong with me and develop a treatment plan that will heal me up before SHTF Day arrives, but this doesn't seem all that likely at the moment.  Just in case a Miracle does happen though, I want to have the Plan in place and ready to execute.  You CANNOT LOSE HOPE. EVAH!!!  Without Hope, you are the Walking Dead, a Zombie.  Like Dr. McStinksion and his followers.

Suggestions for what YOU would stock on the boat to be ready for SHTF Day and how you would organize your total Plan are :hi:.  If you are able bodied, you don't have to go with the Motor Sailer configuration, you can go with a more typical sailing yacht.  Or you could go with a Fishing Trawler if you think you will be able to get Diesel at least long enough to GTFO of Dodge in time.  The only restriction here is that the boat needs to be 35' or less  for up to 2 people.  If you have kids, you can go to 45'.

Here's another real cute Pocket Motor Sailer coming in at 27'.  Not under consideration because it is parked in the UK.  Quite reasonably priced though at £19,500.

https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/Motorboats/lm-27-motor-sailer-sloop-rigged/34696 (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/Motorboats/lm-27-motor-sailer-sloop-rigged/34696)

(https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_0_1405349650_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_1_1405349652_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_2_1405349653_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_4_1405349659_img.jpg)

...and one more which comes in just under the wire at 34' although somewhat overpriced at $69.5K.  Looks like it is parked in NZ though, so not under serious consideration.

https://www.marinehub.co.nz/boats-for-sale/wagstaff/34-motorsailer/79f788b2-7265-4a00-b5d8-5aaac9ec5f1e?offset=0 (https://www.marinehub.co.nz/boats-for-sale/wagstaff/34-motorsailer/79f788b2-7265-4a00-b5d8-5aaac9ec5f1e?offset=0)
(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29ce1da-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a29e49c0-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a2a3877a-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

(https://cdn.marinehub.co.nz//i/9434fa00-4016-47e4-abdf-1f3b4d631069/stock/vy4702-b_img5a279a2a49f43-1024-678-Wagstaff_34_Motorsailer-m.jpg)

...if only I was healthy... :'(

RE
Title: Seastead of the Day: If only I were healthy...
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:12:01 PM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition and/or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fix up a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures (the lower the better)
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail due to my physical limitations
4- It needs to have a fully enclosed Pilot House
5- It needs to be parked in the FSoA


Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.  BUT, if I am buying this boat just for ME to live on and not partnering or using it as an escape vehicle for a Gaggle of Diners, do I really need a 50' boat with all the extra maintenance costs that entails?  Of course not!  Every extra foot at the waterline costs you more in dockage fees.  All the hardware and sails are bigger and more expensive.  Haul Outs and paint jobs more expensive.  All I really need is a functional Galley and Head, a comfortable Berth, Standing Headroom and a nice Nav Station/Office from which I can Admin the Diner.  This is more than you get in the cabin of a Freightliner, which I lived in for nearly 7 years.  So while I continue to look at the bigger "Dream Boats", I'm also now seeking out the smaller ones which fit the criteria.  Here's the Cape Dory 30, located in FL and coming in at an asking price of $44.5K.  I can Jew this down to $40K I am sure, maybe less.

(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713104820483_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=800&h=400)
(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713103910497_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=600&h=425&exact=1) (http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713103941287_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=600&h=425&exact=1)

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)

Going with the smaller boat size given I can find a similarly priced bigger one, what are the advantages and disadvantages to weigh here in making the decision?

Big Boat Advantages:

1- Much more live aboard room, very comfortable and closer to the size of a typical apartment.
2- More storage space for preps, water and fuel with longer offshore trips possible
3- More room for Diners to come and visit for convocations and cruising to secluded coves

Big Boat Disadvantages:

1- More expensive maintenance fees.  Prices for everything rise by the foot exponentially.
2- Harder to sail with a small crew.
3- Bigger draft, so fewer places you can safely sail without grounding the vessel.

Small Boat Advantages

1- Compact with less room you have to keep clean and organized
2- More fuel efficient.  Important for Motor Sailers.
3- Easily handled by 1 or 2 people.

Small Boat Disadvantages

1- A little cramped compared to the Big Boats.
2- Less fuel, water and prep storage meaning shorter range.
3- Not much room for friends to visit and go cruising.

Now, in weighing this out for myself in my current decrepit condition the smaller boats win.  I don't need a really long range and lots of fuel storage because I am NOT going to do any big Blue Water crossings of the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans.  The longest crossing I might semi-realistically attempt would be from FL to the Virgin Islands, and you can Island Hop to get there.  I doubt I can Save As Many As I Can with a bigger boat, and besides if/when that becomes necessary we just steal some boats for the evacuation and GTFO of Dodge as a Flotilla.  If more than a few Diners show up for a Convocation, we pack along tents and head for a cove no more than a day or two sail from the Marina and set up an on shore camp.  On a 30' boat, you can easily carry a dozen people for a day sail, although it is a bit crowded.  Or you charter a big boat for the Convocation.

All I need is a boat with enough room for me most of the time which is economical to own and maintain on my meager income; with enough range to do coastal sailing and which a cripple can handle himself, at least under power.  The small boats fit this criteria.

The next question in this thought experiment is just what I would stock on the boat for SHTF Day?  ???   :icon_scratch:  I'll explore this question in a blog article at a future date.  Not so much for myself really as for other Doomers looking for a decent Bugout Plan which doesn't require gobs of money to organize up.  I still do hope for a Miraculous Recovery and finding a Doctor who can think outside his specialty and figure out precisely what is wrong with me and develop a treatment plan that will heal me up before SHTF Day arrives, but this doesn't seem all that likely at the moment.  Just in case a Miracle does happen though, I want to have the Plan in place and ready to execute.

Suggestions for what YOU would stock on the boat to be ready for SHTF Day and how you would organize your total Plan are :hi:.  If you are able bodied, you don't have to go with the Motor Sailer configuration, you can go with a more typical sailing yacht.  Or you could go with a Fishing Trawler if you think you will be able to get Diesel at least long enough to GTFO of Dodge in time.  The only restriction here is that the boat needs to be 35' or less  for up to 2 people.  If you have kids, you can go to 45'.

Here's another real cute Pocket Motor Sailer coming in at 27'.  Not under consideration because it is parked in the UK.  Quite reasonably priced though at £19,500.

https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/Motorboats/lm-27-motor-sailer-sloop-rigged/34696 (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/Motorboats/lm-27-motor-sailer-sloop-rigged/34696)

(https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_0_1405349650_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_1_1405349652_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_2_1405349653_img.jpg)  (https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/img/adphotos/696/34696_-_photo_4_1405349659_img.jpg)
Title: Seastead of the Day: If only I were healthy...
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:12:33 PM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition and/or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fixup a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail
4- It needs to have a fully enclosed Pilot House
5- It needs to be parked in the FSoA

Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.  BUT, if I am buying this boat just for ME to live on and not partnering or using it as an escape vehicle for a Gaggle of Diners, do I really need a 50' boat with all the extra maintenance costs that entails?  Of course not!  Every extra foot at the waterline costs you more in dockage fees.  All the hardware and sails are bigger and more expensive.  Haul Outs and paint jobs more expensive.  All I really need is a functional Galley and Head, a comfortable Berth, Standing Headroom and a nice Nav Station/Office from which I can Admin the Diner.  This is more than you get in the cabin of a Freightliner, which I lived in for nearly 7 years.  So while I continue to look at the bigger "Dream Boats", I'm also now seeking out the smaller ones which fit the criteria.  Here's the Cape Dory 30, located in FL and coming in at an asking price of $44.5K.  I can Jew this down to $40K I am sure, maybe less.

(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713104820483_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=800&h=400)
(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713103910497_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=600&h=425&exact=1) (http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713103941287_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=600&h=425&exact=1)

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)

Going with the smaller boat size given I can find a similarly priced bigger one, what are the advantages and disadvantages to weigh here in making the decision?

Big Boat Advantages:

1- Much more live aboard room, very comfortable and closer to the size of a typical apartment.
2- More storage space for preps, water and fuel with longer offshore trips possible
3- More room for Diners to come and visit for convocations and cruising to secluded coves

Big Boat Disadvantages:

1- More expensive maintenance fees.  Prices for everything rise by the foot exponentially.
2- Harder to sail with a small crew.
3- Bigger draft, so fewer places you can safely sail without grounding the vessel.

Small Boat Advantages

1- Compact with less room you have to keep clean and organized
2- More fuel efficient.  Important for Motor Sailers.
3- Easily handled by 1 or 2 people.

Small Boat Disadvantages

1- A little cramped compared to the Big Boats.
2- Less fuel, water and prep storage meaning shorter range.
3- Not much room for friends to visit and go cruising.

Now, in weighing this out for myself in my current decrepit condition the smaller boats win.  I don't need a really long range and lots of fuel storage because I am NOT going to do any big Blue Water crossings of the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans.  The longest crossing I might semi-realistically attempt
Title: Seastead of the Day: If only I were healthy...
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:13:03 PM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition and/or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fixup a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail
4- It needs to have a fully enclosed Pilot House
5- It needs to be parked in the FSoA

Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.  BUT, if I am buying this boat just for ME to live on and not partnering or using it as an escape vehicle for a Gaggle of Diners, do I really need a 50' boat with all the extra maintenance costs that entails?  Of course not!  Every extra foot at the waterline costs you more in dockage fees.  All the hardware and sails are bigger and more expensive.  Haul Outs and paint jobs more expensive.  All I really need is a functional Galley and Head, a comfortable Berth, Standing Headroom and a nice Nav Station/Office from which I can Admin the Diner.  This is more than you get in the cabin of a Freightliner, which I lived in for nearly 7 years.  So while I continue to look at the bigger "Dream Boats", I'm also now seeking out the smaller ones which fit the criteria.  Here's the Cape Dory 30, located in FL and coming in at an asking price of $44.5K.  I can Jew this down to $40K I am sure, maybe less.

(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713104820483_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=800&h=400)

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)

Going with the smaller boat size given I can find a similarly priced bigger one, what are the advantages and disadvantages to weigh here in making the decision?

Big Boat Advantages:

1- Much more live aboard room, very comfortable and closer to the size of a typical apartment.
2- More storage space for preps, water and fuel with longer offshore trips possible
3- More room for Diners to come and visit for convocations and cruising to secluded coves

Big Boat Disadvantages:

1- More expensive maintenance fees.  Prices for everything rise by the foot exponentially.
2- Harder to sail with a small crew.
3- Bigger draft, so fewer places you can safely sail without grounding the vessel.

Small Boat Advantages

1- Compact with less room you have to keep clean and organized
2- More fuel efficient.  Important for Motor Sailers.
3- Easily handled by 1 or 2 people.

Title: Seastead of the Day: If only I were healthy...
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:13:04 PM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fixup a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail
4- It needs to have a fully enclosed Pilot House
5- It needs to be parked in the FSoA

Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.  BUT, if I am buying this boat just for ME to live on and not partnering or using it as an escape vehicle for a Gaggle of Diners, do I really need a 50' boat with all the extra maintenance costs that entails?  Of course not!  Every extra foot at the waterline costs you more in dockage fees.  All the hardware and sails are bigger and more expensive.  All I really need is a functional Galley and Head, a comfortable Berth, Standing Headroom and a nice Nav Station/Office from which I can Admin the Diner.  So while I continue to look at the bigger "Dream Boats", I'm also now seeking out the smaller ones which fit the criteria.  Here's the Cape Dory 30, located in FL and coming in at an asking price of $44.5K.  I can Jew this down to $40K I am sure, maybe less.

(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713104820483_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=800&h=400)

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)

Going with the smaller boat size given I can find a similarly priced bigger one, what are the advantages and disadvantes to wiegh here in making the decision?

Big Boat Advantages:

Title: Seastead of the Day: If only I were healthy...
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:13:35 PM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fixup a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail
4- It needs to have a fully enclosed Pilot House
5- It needs to be parked in the FSoA

Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.  BUT, if I am buying this boat just for ME to live on and not partnering or using it as an escape vehicle for a Gaggle of Diners, do I really need a 50' boat with all the extra maintenance costs that entails?  Of course not!  Every extra foot at the waterline costs you more in dockage fees.  All the hardware and sails are bigger and more expensive.  All I really need is a functional Galley and Head, a comfortable Berth, Standing Headroom and a nice Nav Station/Office from which I can Admin the Diner.  So while I continue to look at the bigger "Dream Boats", I'm also now seeking out the smaller ones which fit the criteria.  Here's the Cape Dory 30, located in FL and coming in at an asking price of $44.5K.  I can Jew this down to $40K I am sure, maybe less.

(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713104820483_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=800&h=400)

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)

Going with the smaller boat size given I can find a similarly priced bigger one
Title: Seastead of the Day: If only I were healthy...
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:13:35 PM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fixup a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail
4- It needs to be parked in the FSoA

Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: MOAR Motor Sailers!
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:14:06 PM
Motor Sailers are my New Enthusiasm!  :icon_sunny:

In my youth I used to snub my nose at these vessels as being lousy for sailing and a clunky combination of sail and power.  However, in my current physical condition and mind set, they hold a LOT of appeal for a lot of reasons.

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/8a/72/7e/8a727e84e8ee0f42c37718cef3bfd083.jpg)
1-  Under power, I can drive one myself.  I'm not so dependent on having an able-bodied sea(wo)man along for the ride to yank up the sail and adjust the sheets to go out for a cruise.

2-  Because they are PIGS, they are also very ROOMY inside.  Wider beam than your typical sailboat.  Since MOST of the time this will just be a place to live parked in a Marina, living space is very important, more important really than sailing characteristics.

3- They have Pilot Houses.  Nice for staying out of cold wet weather while cruising.  I have enough medical issues, I don't need to add pneumonia to the mix.  ::)

4-  From a Prep perspective, good because they have so much water and fuel storage capacity

So I am now mainly looking at Motor Sailers to buy if I can make some more $MOOLAH$ gambling on the Stock Market. 🤞 Today's offering is a Bigger Boat than the 33'  one I dropped on a couple of days ago, but it's not a mega sized $MILLION$ dollar yacht either, coming in at 50'.  If I get real lucky with investments it might be affordable.  A bit high on the asking price at $250K and it's in Oz so getting it back to the FSoA would require hiring a transport captain, but this is the TYPE of boat I think is right for me, with a little more money to spend anyhow.  A little smaller in the low 40' range I think would be right.

This one has HUGE fuel & water storage capacity!  :o

Quote
With a massive 2240 litre diesel capacity and 1156 litres of fresh water, she is capable of long range trips.

You can probably make it across the Atlantic under power alone with that much diesel!  Fillups would be expensive though. Try to use Sail as much as possible.

https://www.boatsonline.com.au/boats-for-sale/used/sailing-boats/mariner-50-motor-sailer-recent-refit/204517 (https://www.boatsonline.com.au/boats-for-sale/used/sailing-boats/mariner-50-motor-sailer-recent-refit/204517)

(https://imgs.yachthub.com/2/0/4/5/1/7/0_4.jpg)

Functional and comfortable Interior cabin with lots of storage space for preps as well.

(https://imgs.yachthub.com/2/0/4/5/1/7/26_4.jpg)

(https://imgs.yachthub.com/2/0/4/5/1/7/27_4.jpg)

(https://imgs.yachthub.com/2/0/4/5/1/7/29_4.jpg)

I'd like to get the price under 6 figures though and in a more local spot for pickup.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Seastead Anthem & Theme Song
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:14:36 PM
It turns out that Indira and Genvieve were cohorts at the Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute and were very CLOSE friends who shared a flat  on the rue Cardinale Lemoine in Paris' 5th arrondissement.  In fact it was the SAME apartment Ernest Hemingway shared with his first wife when he lived there!  :o  We do not discriminate on the Good Ship Doomstead Diner, and members of the LGBTQ community are :hi: on our staff!  :icon_sunny:  So we hired on both of them and they will share a cabin. :P  We look forward to eating some very tasty pie from both of them.  :icon_mrgreen:

We were planning on hiring on a Bosun as well, however we now have 8 full time crew for the ship as well as Cmdr. RE at the Helm when necessary, and since we are going for a max of a 3 masted schooner with triangular rigging, this is likely enough.

With staffing now complete, the GSDD needs a THEME SONG!  We are opening Nominations this week for our anthem.  I have 6 nominations I am making in this post, but the nominations will remain open all week in case I forgot a good one.  Once we have all the nominations, I will set up a Poll to determine the Winner.  My 5 Nominations are:

Come Sail Away -Styx
http://www.youtube.com/v/5FO5ijPecVY

Sloop John B - Beach Boys
http://www.youtube.com/v/nSAoEf1Ib58

Downeaster Alexa - Billy Joel
http://www.youtube.com/v/LVlDSzbrH5M

Son of a Sailor - Jimmy Buffett
http://www.youtube.com/v/oX9esXzzO7w

Pearly Shells (Sway-a-Hula)
http://www.youtube.com/v/gb1hLt9s2K0

Drunken Sailor - Irish Rovers
http://www.youtube.com/v/qGyPuey-1Jw

More nominations :hi:!

Cmdr. RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Return to Reality
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:15:07 PM
I'm taking a break from Fantasyland for a more realistic boat today.  ::)  Decision on Pilot-Navigator for the Big Boat in Diner Fantasyland to come tomorrow, along with candidates for Chief Engineer.

1953 Custom built Wood boat located in Curacao.  A bit safer than Turkey. 🔫  Asking $32K, I can Jew him down to $27K I am sure.  I can buy this one myself even without partnering with Eddie, who must follow the diktats of She Who Must Be Obeyed. 👫 lol.

(http://bradford-marine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/large_1345917-1.jpg)

Standard cabin plan, but well kept and well appointed!

(https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/images/leonotis-arthur-robb-35-45-000-21880785.jpg) (https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/images/leonotis-arthur-robb-35-45-000-21880786.jpg) (https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/images/leonotis-arthur-robb-35-45-000-21880787.jpg)
https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/-leonotis-an-arthur-robb-35-for-sale.html (https://www.sailboat-cruising.com/-leonotis-an-arthur-robb-35-for-sale.html)

Electronics need an upgrade, and the engine is a 2003 with 1382 hours on it.  That might need a replacement.  I have a soft spot for custom designed wood boats though, particularly ones as old as this one.

Perfect single handed sailer.  I will of course need a crew, but only one for this one!  :icon_sunny:  I'll keep her loyalty by dropping her in my will for the boat and all the rest of my worldly possesions when I buy my ticket to the Great Beyond, along with the coordinates for all my buried preps.

(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/ca/1d/c2/ca1dc26065ec5d0f1a6970c0c376f228--that-day-yachts.jpg)

RE
Title: Seastead of the Day: Seeking a Bigger Boat
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:15:08 PM
If I don't get the REVOLUTIONARY Sailing Submarine built with my Mega-Millions, I am looking at currently available sailing vessels for the Good Ship Doomstead Diner.  In order to house all the Diners comfortably, the main requirement is that they are over 100' at the waterline.

Many of the boats in this size category are Square-Riggers, which have a lot of Nostalgic Appeal.

(https://twistedsifter.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/royal-clipper-the-largest-full-rigged-sailing-ship-in-the-world-2.jpg?w=800&h=533)
Biggest Square-Rigger in the World

However, let's face it, Square-Riggers have a LOT of deficiencies!  They are PIGS and generally quite slow, and they sail like shit to windward.  They also take a large crew of nimble sailing monkeys to climb up and furl the sails when the wind picks up.  Would YOU want this job?  Only a young male overloaded with testosterone would find this appealing.

So I am only looking at boats with more modern triangular rigs.  Here are the Top 5 located so far up for sale:

Sail 100+ Feet

METEOR € 25,000,000
169ft Royal Huisman 2007
Location: Florida, USA

She is described as a 'gaff rigged schooner' with the forward mast being shorter than the main. Three roller furlers serve the forward mast to achieve ease of handling. The deck work is what really makes METEOR stand out from the crowd. Details such as the raised wooden cockpit surrounds and the beautifully crafted superstructures are reminiscent of a bygone era, and provide a really social area to relax in. Her hull is dark blue with a black underwater hull. The two colours are separated with a solid white boot line.

WELLENREITER € 7,500,000
151ft Jongert 2003
Location: Golfe Juan, France

Designed by Andre Hoek, WELLENREITER is the largest yacht ever launched by Jongert. Belowdecks an air of luxury prevails. The full beam owner’s stateroom is located astern and includes an office, sitting room and vast walk-through bathroom, a spectacular feature normally found on large motoryachts. This superyacht accommodates seven guests in a master suite with an adjacent ensuite single, one double and one twin cabin, plus five crew.

THIS IS US € 5,950,000
137ft Holland Jachtbouw 2005
Location: Tarragona, Spain

Produced by a collaboration of the highly regarded Holland Jachtbouw yard and Hoek Design studio, THIS IS US represents the very best of Dutch build quality and design. Her powerful carbon rig, carbon-spectra sails and deep lifting keel allow THIS IS US to perform just as a high performance cruising yacht should. Following an extensive refit in 2013 at Holland Jachtbouw and further work including hull repaint in 2015, THIS IS US is in excellent order.

MANUTARA $ 2,750,000
115ft Valdettaro Custom 1994
Location: Palm Beach, FL, USA

MANUTARA is one of the largest, most comfortable cruising yachts in her class. Her combined upgraded condition, five-stateroom plus crew layout along with an abundance of amenities, private spaces and dining options make her ideal for family cruising. Her four guest staterooms convert from 8 single beds to 4 king-sized beds, plus the full-beam master suite with a centerline king bed provide for incredible versatility. Wide steps on the reverse transom give easy dinghy and water access. With her previous owner she has had an outstanding charter record.

BILLY BUDD II € 3,600,000
112ft Royal Huisman 34m Luxury Sailing Yacht 1994
Location: Genova, Italy

From the legendary Royal Huisman yard with naval architecture designed by Judel Vrolijk, the 34.3m BILLY BUDD II was built for a client who holds high performance as his first criterion. She is designed to be a fast and comfortable cruising yacht with a fully-battened main, with many of the winches from Rondal.


Obviously, since Money is no object here, I would go for the Meteor at 169'.  Even after the IRS takes out the taxes on my $1B winnings, I still have $500M left so this is Pocket Change.  In fact I could buy all 5 of them for a Fleet and still be under $200K.  Maintenance costs, staffing and docking fees though would quickly burn up my winnings, so not gonna do that.

Going for Bang for the Buck and value, I would probably go for the Manutara @ 115' and a $2.75M price tag.  With just a single mast, she doesn't require much in the way of crew either, since there has to be electric assist for raising those sails and reefing them.

Despite my general penurious nature, I'll probably spring for the Meteor anyhow.  The accomodations are just too nice to pass up!  :icon_sunny:

Main Salon for Diner Meetings
(http://www.wellingtonyachts.com/sites/default/files/styles/primary/public/images/meteor%20main%20salon.jpg?itok=o7okYf0q)

RE's Stateroom
(http://www.wellingtonyachts.com/sites/default/files/styles/primary/public/images/Meteor%20master%20sr.jpg?itok=zCa8Mt96)

In order to keep maintenance costs down, the Good Ship Doomstead Diner will mostly be at sea, anchored in remote coves or  if near civilization then on a mooring offshore.  Docking this thing would be a ridiculous problem in most marinas, even if you had a slip big enough and bow thrusters!  It's big enough to carry a substantial size tender on davits for commuting to shore.

(http://www.nickjacksonco.com/images/gallery/500-4%20Tiara%20afttrans.JPG)

Tomorrow I will be interviewing for the position of Pilot/Navigator on the Good Ship Doomstead Diner.  The candidates are HOT! :icon_mrgreen:

RE
Title: Seastead of the Day: Seeking a Bigger Boat
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:15:38 PM
If I don't get the REVOLUTIONARY Sailing Submarine built with my Mega-Millions, I am looking at currently available sailing vessels for the Good Ship Doomstead Diner.  In order to house all the Diners comfortably, the main requirement is that they are over 100' at the waterline.

Many of the boats in this size category are Square-Riggers, which have a lot of Nostalgic Appeal.

(https://twistedsifter.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/royal-clipper-the-largest-full-rigged-sailing-ship-in-the-world-2.jpg?w=800&h=533)
Biggest Square-Rigger in the World

However, let's face it, Square-Riggers have a LOT of deficiencies!  They are PIGS and generally quite slow, and they sail like shit to windward.  They also take a large crew of nimble sailing monkeys to climb up and furl the sails when the wind picks up.  Would YOU want this job?  Only a young male overloaded with testosterone would find this appealing.

So I am only looking at boats with more modern triangular rigs.  Here are the Top 5 located so far up for sale:

Sail 100+ Feet

METEOR € 25,000,000
169ft Royal Huisman 2007
Location: Florida, USA

She is described as a 'gaff rigged schooner' with the forward mast being shorter than the main. Three roller furlers serve the forward mast to achieve ease of handling. The deck work is what really makes METEOR stand out from the crowd. Details such as the raised wooden cockpit surrounds and the beautifully crafted superstructures are reminiscent of a bygone era, and provide a really social area to relax in. Her hull is dark blue with a black underwater hull. The two colours are separated with a solid white boot line.

WELLENREITER € 7,500,000
151ft Jongert 2003
Location: Golfe Juan, France

Designed by Andre Hoek, WELLENREITER is the largest yacht ever launched by Jongert. Belowdecks an air of luxury prevails. The full beam owner’s stateroom is located astern and includes an office, sitting room and vast walk-through bathroom, a spectacular feature normally found on large motoryachts. This superyacht accommodates seven guests in a master suite with an adjacent ensuite single, one double and one twin cabin, plus five crew.

THIS IS US € 5,950,000
137ft Holland Jachtbouw 2005
Location: Tarragona, Spain

Produced by a collaboration of the highly regarded Holland Jachtbouw yard and Hoek Design studio, THIS IS US represents the very best of Dutch build quality and design. Her powerful carbon rig, carbon-spectra sails and deep lifting keel allow THIS IS US to perform just as a high performance cruising yacht should. Following an extensive refit in 2013 at Holland Jachtbouw and further work including hull repaint in 2015, THIS IS US is in excellent order.

MANUTARA $ 2,750,000
115ft Valdettaro Custom 1994
Location: Palm Beach, FL, USA

MANUTARA is one of the largest, most comfortable cruising yachts in her class. Her combined upgraded condition, five-stateroom plus crew layout along with an abundance of amenities, private spaces and dining options make her ideal for family cruising. Her four guest staterooms convert from 8 single beds to 4 king-sized beds, plus the full-beam master suite with a centerline king bed provide for incredible versatility. Wide steps on the reverse transom give easy dinghy and water access. With her previous owner she has had an outstanding charter record.

BILLY BUDD II € 3,600,000
112ft Royal Huisman 34m Luxury Sailing Yacht 1994
Location: Genova, Italy

From the legendary Royal Huisman yard with naval architecture designed by Judel Vrolijk, the 34.3m BILLY BUDD II was built for a client who holds high performance as his first criterion. She is designed to be a fast and comfortable cruising yacht with a fully-battened main, with many of the winches from Rondal.

Title: Seastead of the Day: Seeking a Bigger Boat
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 12:15:39 PM
If I don't get the REVOLUTIONARY Sailing Submarine built with my Mega-Millions, I am looking at currently available sailing vessels for the Good Ship Doomstead Diner.  In order to house all the Diners comfortably, the main requirement is that they are over 100' at the waterline.

Many of the boats in this size category are Square-Riggers, which have a lot of Nostalgic Appeal.

(https://twistedsifter.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/royal-clipper-the-largest-full-rigged-sailing-ship-in-the-world-2.jpg?w=800&h=533)

However, let's face it, Square-Riggers have a LOT of deficiencies!  They are PIGS and generally quite slow, and they sail like shit to windward.


Sail 100+ Feet

METEOR € 25,000,000
169ft Royal Huisman 2007
Location: Florida, USA

She is described as a 'gaff rigged schooner' with the forward mast being shorter than the main. Three roller furlers serve the forward mast to achieve ease of handling. The deck work is what really makes METEOR stand out from the crowd. Details such as the raised wooden cockpit surrounds and the beautifully crafted superstructures are reminiscent of a bygone era, and provide a really social area to relax in. Her hull is dark blue with a black underwater hull. The two colours are separated with a solid white boot line.

WELLENREITER € 7,500,000
151ft Jongert 2003
Location: Golfe Juan, France

Designed by Andre Hoek, WELLENREITER is the largest yacht ever launched by Jongert. Belowdecks an air of luxury prevails. The full beam owner’s stateroom is located astern and includes an office, sitting room and vast walk-through bathroom, a spectacular feature normally found on large motoryachts. This superyacht accommodates seven guests in a master suite with an adjacent ensuite single, one double and one twin cabin, plus five crew.

THIS IS US € 5,950,000
137ft Holland Jachtbouw 2005
Location: Tarragona, Spain

Produced by a collaboration of the highly regarded Holland Jachtbouw yard and Hoek Design studio, THIS IS US represents the very best of Dutch build quality and design. Her powerful carbon rig, carbon-spectra sails and deep lifting keel allow THIS IS US to perform just as a high performance cruising yacht should. Following an extensive refit in 2013 at Holland Jachtbouw and further work including hull repaint in 2015, THIS IS US is in excellent order.

MANUTARA $ 2,750,000
115ft Valdettaro Custom 1994
Location: Palm Beach, FL, USA

MANUTARA is one of the largest, most comfortable cruising yachts in her class. Her combined upgraded condition, five-stateroom plus crew layout along with an abundance of amenities, private spaces and dining options make her ideal for family cruising. Her four guest staterooms convert from 8 single beds to 4 king-sized beds, plus the full-beam master suite with a centerline king bed provide for incredible versatility. Wide steps on the reverse transom give easy dinghy and water access. With her previous owner she has had an outstanding charter record.

BILLY BUDD II € 3,600,000
112ft Royal Huisman 34m Luxury Sailing Yacht 1994
Location: Genova, Italy

From the legendary Royal Huisman yard with naval architecture designed by Judel Vrolijk, the 34.3m BILLY BUDD II was built for a client who holds high performance as his first criterion. She is designed to be a fast and comfortable cruising yacht with a fully-battened main, with many of the winches from Rondal.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day: If only I were healthy...
Post by: Eddie on April 13, 2018, 04:59:18 PM
Back in the Semi-Realistic category, for today's Seastead offering I am shrinking down considerably, getting into the category of "Pocket Cruisers".  This one is a Cape Dory 30' model, located in FL.  I have found some smaller ones as well, but not in decent condition and/or not parked in the FSoA, so they are out of consideration in the S-R  category.  I'm not going to fixup a beat up old boat, nor am I going to sail one of these things from the UK to the FSoA.  So anything under consideration here has to meet a few basic criteria:

1- It needs to be in good shape
2- It needs to come in at a price in the 5 figures
3- It needs to be a Motor Sailer that functions well under power or sail
4- It needs to have a fully enclosed Pilot House
5- It needs to be parked in the FSoA

Now, I have found a few boats that meet this criteria in larger sizes up to as much as 50'.  BUT, if I am buying this boat just for ME to live on and not partnering or using it as an escape vehicle for a Gaggle of Diners, do I really need a 50' boat with all the extra maintenance costs that entails?  Of course not!  Every extra foot at the waterline costs you more in dockage fees.  All the hardware and sails are bigger and more expensive.  Haul Outs and paint jobs more expensive.  All I really need is a functional Galley and Head, a comfortable Berth, Standing Headroom and a nice Nav Station/Office from which I can Admin the Diner.  This is more than you get in the cabin of a Freightliner, which I lived in for nearly 7 years.  So while I continue to look at the bigger "Dream Boats", I'm also now seeking out the smaller ones which fit the criteria.  Here's the Cape Dory 30, located in FL and coming in at an asking price of $44.5K.  I can Jew this down to $40K I am sure, maybe less.

(http://images.boatsgroupwebsites.com/resize/1/2/22/5870222_20160713104820483_1_XLARGE.jpg?w=800&h=400)

http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1 (http://pieroneyachtsales.com/boats-for-sale/1987-cape-dory-300-motorsailer-bradenton-florida-5870222/?print=1&full=1)

Going with the smaller boat size given I can find a similarly priced bigger one, what are the advantages and disadvantages to weigh here in making the decision?

Big Boat Advantages:

1- Much more live aboard room, very comfortable and closer to the size of a typical apartment.
2- More storage space for preps, water and fuel with longer offshore trips possible
3- More room for Diners to come and visit for convocations and cruising to secluded coves

Big Boat Disadvantages:

1- More expensive maintenance fees.  Prices for everything rise by the foot exponentially.
2- Harder to sail with a small crew.
3- Bigger draft, so fewer places you can safely sail without grounding the vessel.

Small Boat Advantages

1- Compact with less room you have to keep clean and organized
2- More fuel efficient.  Important for Motor Sailers.
3- Easily handled by 1 or 2 people.

I think I looked at that Cape Dory before. Nice boats, Cape Dorys, but they have a liner, so if they ever get a hole in the hull, you can only plug it from outside (at least that's likely) so some people think that isn't safe. They are expensive boats when new. It'd meet your needs just fine. Tanks don't hold much.

Wow, you went crazy today while I was working.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day: If only I were healthy...
Post by: RE on April 13, 2018, 05:33:40 PM
I think I looked at that Cape Dory before. Nice boats, Cape Dorys, but they have a liner, so if they ever get a hole in the hull, you can only plug it from outside (at least that's likely) so some people think that isn't safe. They are expensive boats when new. It'd meet your needs just fine. Tanks don't hold much.

Wow, you went crazy today while I was working.

No, the Diner Database had another Puking🤮 Event while I was asleep.  It's in the same wretched shape as its proprietor.

Those are all "Blast from the Past" posts.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on April 14, 2018, 07:53:00 AM
Taking a multi week sailing course is a life goal of mine. My sailing experience is limited to lasers and day sailers some cats as well. I figure I have to wait until the kids are older though. I do wonder if you could expect the same kind of reception you were used to if things got really bad. In that scenario I would want everything with me to be doled out for favours not pre positioned on land.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 14, 2018, 09:33:57 AM
Taking a multi week sailing course is a life goal of mine. My sailing experience is limited to lasers and day sailers some cats as well. I figure I have to wait until the kids are older though. I do wonder if you could expect the same kind of reception you were used to if things got really bad. In that scenario I would want everything with me to be doled out for favours not pre positioned on land.

You live in Ontario man.  You have Lake Superior to the south and Hudson Bay to the north!  Just buy a beat up boat at a Marina and fix it up!  You have the skills for this, unlike most Homo Saps.  Your kids don't need to be any older than they already are to hang out watching dad fix up the boat.  Just have hot dogs for them to eat.  You can pick up a trailerable 25' centerboard for less than $5K if you look around.  Once you can sail that, a jump to a 35' fin keel capable of circumnavigation is no big fucking deal.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 14, 2018, 11:27:02 AM
I think that the best way to learn is to find a 25-30 ft. boat to charter occasionally on one of your local lakes, in the summer . There probably are a few available. Put the kids in good life jackets and take them. Get a buddy or a family member to go with you. Maybe leave them with grandma for your maiden voyage, but after that, theres no need. Kids love boats. Just don't scare them.

Sailing a small cabin boat is no different than sailing a Laser. It's actually easier. The hardest part is getting used to prop walk when you motor out of the slip in reverse. Get a fixed keel boat with a roller furling jib, which means you only have one sail to raise and lower (the main). Avoid windy days at first. The best way to learn to sail is in light air. Later you can learn how to sail in higher wind. Learn what a reef is and how to reef, and reef the main early if it's blowing. The roller jib you can reef effortlessly just by rolling it part way in. If it seems too windy, go out with reefed jib only or just motor.

Read the rules of the road, and how to anchor.  Some charter places make you pass a simple written test. They want to rent to you, so they will coach you and not fail you if you make a few mistakes. The rule chapter in Chapman's has all the rules and conventions. Read about channel markers.

Practice motoring in and out of the slip, hopefully with no wind to cope with. Not difficult with a small boat.

Lake sailing well is harder than ocean sailing (storms excepted), because the wind is constantly changing. But it's not that hard. You'll get it very quickly.

Once you learn how to jibe (and how to not accidentally jibe) the mainsail, there isn't much risk of knocking yourself or someone else out with the boom. This is something that total novices sometimes do that is a little dangerous. Learn what a lee shore is, and use your engine if you find yourself accidentally blown onto a lee shore. A depth sounder is nice. A GPS chart plotter is overkill, but if the boat has one, turn it on and use it. Its good practice.

I would suggest chartering over buying, just because you'll have the use of a nicer boat, and somebody else will have to do all the maintenance chores, and you won't have to make a huge investment.

I took a week-long bareboat course once, and it was fun, but it's really unnecessary.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 14, 2018, 11:49:04 AM
Lake sailing well is harder than ocean sailing (storms excepted), because the wind is constantly changing.

Not really true on a lake the size of Superior.  That one is a small ocean unto itself.  Main difference is it doesn't have the fetch of the Atlantic or Pacific, so the waves it generates are not as big.  Otherwse though, fairly similar I think.  I have never sailed on Superior, so I am not talking from experience, just what I think is the case.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 14, 2018, 11:55:16 AM
I didn't mean the GREAT lakes. I would not suggest starting there, unless it's great summer weather.

I haven't sailed there, but I've watched boats sailing on Lake Michigan, and it's close enough to being an ocean for me. Ocean rules, basically. And known for storms. Tricky place for beginners, in my view.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 14, 2018, 12:05:47 PM
I didn't mean the GREAT lakes. I would not suggest starting there, unless it's great summer weather.

I haven't sailed there, but I've watched boats sailing on Lake Michigan, and it's close enough to being an ocean for me. Ocean rules, basically. And known for storms. Tricky place for beginners, in my view.

Close to shore, I don't think too bad a place to learn.  But then again, remember the Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.  And that was a diesel powered boat too!  :o

http://www.youtube.com/v/9vST6hVRj2A

A smaller lake with a trailerable 25' boat probably a better learning experience though.  ::)

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 14, 2018, 12:15:01 PM
Rogue wave phenomenon sunk the Edmund Fitzgerald.

Heavy cargo, and the hull collapsed because two giant waves happened close enough together that one of them lifted the bow and the other lifted the stern, and the middle was temporarily unsupported by water and not strong enough to stay rigid with hundreds of tons of ore weighting it down. That's what they finally decided.

The storms of November....

Great fucking song.

I first heard it in high school, and even when it was new, it sounded like a very old and traditional song. We had tickets to see Gordon Lightfoot here a couple of years back, and a freak ice storm shut down the town, basically. I probably won't ever see him now. LOL.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 14, 2018, 12:23:59 PM
Rogue wave phenomenon sunk the Edmund Fitzgerald.

Heavy cargo, and the hull collapsed because two giant waves happened close enough together that one of them lifted the bow and the other lifted the stern, and the middle was temporarily unsupported by water and not strong enough to stay rigid with hundreds of tons of ore weighting it down. That's what they finally decided.

The storms of November....

Great fucking song.

I first heard it in high school, and even when it was new, it sounded like a very old and traditional song. We had tickets to see Gordon Lightfoot here a couple of years back, and a freak ice storm shut down the town, basically. I probably won't ever see him now. LOL.

According to AG and reasonably true based on climatic changes, Rogue Waves are becoming more common.  A few commercial freighters are lost every year to this.  If you head out into the Deep Blue these days, be prepped for some pretty big ass waves.  My Fantasy Sailboat design is for a boat you can sink to 100' below sea level to ride out a storm.  Aluminum Hard Chine Folding Trimaran.

I never saw Gordon Lightfoot in concert, but that song has always enchanted me.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 14, 2018, 01:12:06 PM
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/99/29/6149929_20170222103033694_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/99/29/6149929_20170222103033694_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1487759435000)

At 25K this is a lot of boat for the money. It doesn't look spectacular, but I like it. These Fortuna boats were built in South Africa, and the "Bruce Roberts" design is possibly pirated. Roberts' company claims Fortuna used plans bought from some sketchy naval architects in Oz, who stole the designs from them.

The boat has crossed the pond at least once, if it originated in Cape Town.  I like self-steering as opposed to autopilot. No batteries required.

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1984/Bruce-Roberts-Fortuna-3061006/Kemah/TX/United-States?refSource=standard%20listing#.WtJb4dPwbVo (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1984/Bruce-Roberts-Fortuna-3061006/Kemah/TX/United-States?refSource=standard%20listing#.WtJb4dPwbVo)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 14, 2018, 01:23:11 PM
(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/99/29/6149929_20170222103033694_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/99/29/6149929_20170222103033694_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1487759435000)

At 25K this is a lot of boat for the money. It doesn't look spectacular, but I like it. These Fortuna boats were built in South Africa, and the "Bruce Roberts" design is possibly pirated. Roberts' company claims Fortuna used plans bought from some sketchy naval architects in Oz, who stole the designs from them.

The boat has crossed the pond at least once, if it originated in Cape Town.  I like self-steering as opposed to autopilot. No batteries required.

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1984/Bruce-Roberts-Fortuna-3061006/Kemah/TX/United-States?refSource=standard%20listing#.WtJb4dPwbVo (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1984/Bruce-Roberts-Fortuna-3061006/Kemah/TX/United-States?refSource=standard%20listing#.WtJb4dPwbVo)

Not my favorite design, but looks OK and that is a good price.  No good interior pics though.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 14, 2018, 01:32:37 PM
This boat has been for sale for years. I talked to the seller about it at least 3 years ago. They have finally dropped the price an additional 10K, just this month. It is a nice boat, but has a wooden mast that needs repair. I got a quote of less than $1500 to fix it, back when I was first looking at it.

It has a small  pilot house, but these 37' canoe stern boats are not roomy below. Not a motorsailer, but Tayanas are one of the world's most popular cruising boats. Lot of them out there.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/64/14/706414_20110628152212_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/64/14/706414_20110628152212_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1335915548000)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 14, 2018, 01:42:24 PM
This boat has been for sale for years. I talked to the seller about it at least 3 years ago. They have finally dropped the price an additional 10K, just this month. It is a nice boat, but has a wooden mast that needs repair. I got a quote of less than $1500 to fix it, back when I was first looking at it.

It has a small  pilot house, but these 37' canoe stern boats are not roomy below. Not a motorsailer, but Tayanas are one of the world's most popular cruising boats. Lot of them out there.

(http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/64/14/706414_20110628152212_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/64/14/706414_20110628152212_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=924&h=693&t=1335915548000)

Another one fitting the "OK" category, but depends on absolute price and the configuration and condition of the cabin interior for a liveaboard.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 15, 2018, 10:14:18 AM
Here's another "minimalist boat" and nicely done from what I see. Pearson built good boats, and it's been converted to junk rig. Guys who go this route are minimalist fanatics. I'm persuaded that junk rig boats have many advantages, but I've never sailed one. Boats like this demonstrate that you can buy a worthy live-aboard without spending big bucks. The guy is only asking $7150, with the requirement that you have to be a junk rig fanatic too, to buy it.

No problem, only a junk rig fanatic would want it.

(http://www.raggedyedge.net/_/rsrc/1509101296948/Home/IMG_0303.JPG?height=400&width=300)

https://miami.craigslist.org/brw/boa/d/pearson-367-western-junk-rig/6554689027.html (https://miami.craigslist.org/brw/boa/d/pearson-367-western-junk-rig/6554689027.html)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 15, 2018, 02:23:51 PM
Here's another "minimalist boat" and nicely done from what I see. Pearson built good boats, and it's been converted to junk rig. Guys who go this route are minimalist fanatics. I'm persuaded that junk rig boats have many advantages, but I've never sailed one. Boats like this demonstrate that you can buy a worthy live-aboard without spending big bucks. The guy is only asking $7150, with the requirement that you have to be a junk rig fanatic too, to buy it.

No problem, only a junk rig fanatic would want it.


At that price, it probably has leaks.

Back in my youth when I had my subscriptions to Sail Magazine and Cruising World, a Pearson 38 Center Cockpit was one of my most salivated over boats.  That and a Cheoy Lee Canoe Stern.  At the time I really liked Center Cockpits for the spacious rear stateroom, I'm no longer a fan of that design though.

Far as the Junk Rig goes, how many people have circumnavigated with this sail plan?  I also obviously am not a fan of an"engineless" boat.  Then there are just about no worthwhile pictures of the interior.

As a permanently parked cheap living space, maybe if it's not too leaky.  Otherwise no deal on this one.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 15, 2018, 02:52:29 PM
I found the owner's real web page, with some additional info. Looks like a hell of a deal to me.. No leaks Just no diesel kicker. They even list everything they think it needs. To bad it's in Florida. If it were here, I'd probably buy it.

http://www.raggedyedge.net/j367 (http://www.raggedyedge.net/j367)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 15, 2018, 02:59:24 PM
I found the owner's real web page, with some additional info. Looks like a hell of a deal to me.. No leaks Just no diesel kicker. They even list everything they think it needs. To bad it's in Florida. If it were here, I'd probably buy it.

http://www.raggedyedge.net/j367 (http://www.raggedyedge.net/j367)

Wouldn't cost that much to ship.  An O-O with a Lowboy and an oversize permit would do it for $3000 I bet.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 16, 2018, 12:05:47 AM
Here's a nice Starter 25' MacGregor Trailerable model for DB, coming in at the bargain price of $4500 including the trailer. He can pull it himself from Georgia to Ontario with a decent size 3/4 Ton 8 cylinder pickup.  Great Road Trip for the kids!  :icon_sunny: He can park it on his property, no slip fees.  With some experience, you could sail this one on Superior.  I would still avoid that though when the Gales of November come early.  Remember the Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.  :o  Stick to nice breezy days in the Hoser summer.  ::)

http://www.youtube.com/v/K6DUFPNILvM

If I can get SaVANnah down to the Lower 48 and the Great White North, I think she could pull this boat.  That would be a pretty ideal combination.  :icon_sunny:  I will need to upgrade the suspension for this, but the engine is up to the task. Only 140K Miles on it and smooth as silk when running. 8C Turbocharged Super V-8, that sucker can pull a lot of weight, even over the mountains of the Yukon Territory. Ford Chassis from this era is a killer.  This is a lot of vehicle and towing power for the price I got her at.  Will need to upgrade the brakes and have good trailer brakes also.  There is probably nothing scarier in driving when you are going downhill on a long grade and your brakes start SMOKING. Your knuckles get SERIOUSLY white, trust me on this.  It can go for over an hour, because you need to keep the speed so slow and you have to pull over and let the brakes cool also periodically.  You hit long grades like this in the Rockies and in the Appalachians. Nevertheless, if I can get some of the health back, I may go down this route. 🤞  If that is the way I am destined to Buy My Ticket to the Great Beyond, it would not be a bad way to to leave this Meat Package once and for all time.

http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/54584 (http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/54584)

1983 25' MacGregor⛵
(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/m/54584/main.jpg)

Quote
   1983 MacGregor 25' Sailboat.
Turnkey ready to sail today!

Totally redone on the interior, navy blue canvas cushion covers, canvas curtains, VHF radio, Kenmore radio with USB port and Pandora. Sails are in good shape, comes with a total of 3 sails; One main, one jib, and one genoa sail, pop-top cover, sleeps 3. The deck is color speckled intentionally.

Comes with a 140 watt solar panel, 180 amp hours of batteries, 8hp Suzuki engine.
Family has outgrown. Trailer has been worked on and is sturdy.
$4500 or reasonable offer.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 16, 2018, 07:26:43 AM
My issue with the McGregor and similar trailerable boats is that they are, by necessity of design, inherently less stable than a similar size boat with a fixed keel, and therefore more subject to being knocked down in a sudden wind gust.

As someone who has had this happen, in less than great conditions, with little kids of  my own on board, I have to mention it as a concern.

They also don't come with an engine, and would require an outboard motor of some kind. If you were an expert sailor you could certainly get by without an engine, but they make life easier,and increase safety for beginners.

Chartering a fixed keel boat with a roller furling jib and a diesel auxiliary makes for an easy intro, with no long term investment.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 16, 2018, 09:07:07 AM
My issue with the McGregor and similar trailerable boats is that they are, by necessity of design, inherently less stable than a similar size boat with a fixed keel, and therefore more subject to being knocked down in a sudden wind gust.

As someone who has had this happen, in less than great conditions, with little kids of  my own on board, I have to mention it as a concern.

They also don't come with an engine, and would require an outboard motor of some kind. If you were an expert sailor you could certainly get by without an engine, but they make life easier,and increase safety for beginners.

Chartering a fixed keel boat with a roller furling jib and a diesel auxiliary makes for an easy intro, with no long term investment.

This MacGregor comes with an 8HP Suzuki outboard.  In anything but really bad conditions, that is plenty for this size of boat, although if I was replacing it I would go for 20HP.

Of course such a configuration of boat is not as stable as a fixed keel, but you're not taking the fucking thing circumnavigating either.  Getting a keelboat onto a trailer is no EZ task.  I've seen this done, and even with a small boat it's a pain in the ass.  You're making a trade-off here of convenience in trailering and storage for the stability you would get from a full keel.

Chartering a fixed keel boat means prior to that you have to have taken some type of course that hands out a ticket for you to charter boats.  That by itself probably costs as much as this MacGregor does.  You can't just walk out on the dock and hand somebody $2000 and expect them to hand over their boat for you to practice on.  You buy this MacGregor, you can practice anytime you like, you just hook the thing to your Chevy 3/4 Ton Hemi and drop it in the local lake on nice daze on the weekend.

Can you get knocked down with this boat?  Yes, of course you can, but this also is good experience if it happens to you (preferably not with the kids on board at the time of course, or at least below decks).  If you drop the boat on smaller lakes to begin with, you're probably not going to encounter such winds anyhow.  If/when you feel confident enough in your skills to drop it on the Great Lake they call Gitchee-Goomey and the winds of November come early and are getting big, stow the kids below decks and hook yourself to the boat with a cable, take down the sails and GTFO of Dodge with your trusty 8HP Suzuki as fast as you fucking can.  Make shore and the boat ramp and haul the mother fucker out of the water with your big ass Chevy Hemi.

It's a starter boat, its not anything real permanent except for maybe somebody like me who just pulls it around on a trailer most of the time.  Great X-tra storage space for Preps!  :icon_sunny:

Permanent Bugout machine, for DB with 2 kids this is not enough boat.  35' minimum there IMHO.  But he can move up to that later after gaining experience on this VERY cheap MacGregor.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Nearingsfault on April 16, 2018, 09:51:10 AM
My issue with the McGregor and similar trailerable boats is that they are, by necessity of design, inherently less stable than a similar size boat with a fixed keel, and therefore more subject to being knocked down in a sudden wind gust.

As someone who has had this happen, in less than great conditions, with little kids of  my own on board, I have to mention it as a concern.

They also don't come with an engine, and would require an outboard motor of some kind. If you were an expert sailor you could certainly get by without an engine, but they make life easier,and increase safety for beginners.

Chartering a fixed keel boat with a roller furling jib and a diesel auxiliary makes for an easy intro, with no long term investment.

This MacGregor comes with an 8HP Suzuki outboard.  In anything but really bad conditions, that is plenty for this size of boat, although if I was replacing it I would go for 20HP.

Of course such a configuration of boat is not as stable as a fixed keel, but you're not taking the fucking thing circumnavigating either.  Getting a keelboat onto a trailer is no EZ task.  I've seen this done, and even with a small boat it's a pain in the ass.  You're making a trade-off here of convenience in trailering and storage for the stability you would get from a full keel.

Chartering a fixed keel boat means prior to that you have to have taken some type of course that hands out a ticket for you to charter boats.  That by itself probably costs as much as this MacGregor does.  You can't just walk out on the dock and hand somebody $2000 and expect them to hand over their boat for you to practice on.  You buy this MacGregor, you can practice anytime you like, you just hook the thing to your Chevy 3/4 Ton Hemi and drop it in the local lake on nice daze on the weekend.

Can you get knocked down with this boat?  Yes, of course you can, but this also is good experience if it happens to you (preferably not with the kids on board at the time of course, or at least below decks).  If you drop the boat on smaller lakes to begin with, you're probably not going to encounter such winds anyhow.  If/when you feel confident enough in your skills to drop it on the Great Lake they call Gitchee-Goomey and the winds of November come early and are getting big, stow the kids below decks and hook yourself to the boat with a cable, take down the sails and GTFO of Dodge with your trusty 8HP Suzuki as fast as you fucking can.  Make shore and the boat ramp and haul the mother fucker out of the water with your big ass Chevy Hemi.

It's a starter boat, its not anything real permanent except for maybe somebody like me who just pulls it around on a trailer most of the time.  Great X-tra storage space for Preps!  :icon_sunny:

Permanent Bugout machine, for DB with 2 kids this is not enough boat.  35' minimum there IMHO.  But he can move up to that later after gaining experience on this VERY cheap MacGregor.

RE
A born salesman! Gordon lightfoot grew up 90 minutes from here in Orillia where my older daughter was born. its tied for the nearest "city" being about 30000. In Gordon's time it was the size of the towns near us (about 3500)... As previously discussed I would bug out as an absolute last resort once the homestead was no longer viable/defendable. Were that the case I would seek refuge in another enclave near here with like minded people I know. If absolutely forced to bug out I would sail off into the 90 percent of Canada that is still public land in the trailer. Lower maintenance costs than a boat. Gas is a problem of course but so is a trailered boat. That would really be my last move though. I'm in C5's camp on that one.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 16, 2018, 10:32:57 AM
My issue with the McGregor and similar trailerable boats is that they are, by necessity of design, inherently less stable than a similar size boat with a fixed keel, and therefore more subject to being knocked down in a sudden wind gust.

As someone who has had this happen, in less than great conditions, with little kids of  my own on board, I have to mention it as a concern.

They also don't come with an engine, and would require an outboard motor of some kind. If you were an expert sailor you could certainly get by without an engine, but they make life easier,and increase safety for beginners.

Chartering a fixed keel boat with a roller furling jib and a diesel auxiliary makes for an easy intro, with no long term investment.

This MacGregor comes with an 8HP Suzuki outboard.  In anything but really bad conditions, that is plenty for this size of boat, although if I was replacing it I would go for 20HP.

Of course such a configuration of boat is not as stable as a fixed keel, but you're not taking the fucking thing circumnavigating either.  Getting a keelboat onto a trailer is no EZ task.  I've seen this done, and even with a small boat it's a pain in the ass.  You're making a trade-off here of convenience in trailering and storage for the stability you would get from a full keel.

Chartering a fixed keel boat means prior to that you have to have taken some type of course that hands out a ticket for you to charter boats.  That by itself probably costs as much as this MacGregor does.  You can't just walk out on the dock and hand somebody $2000 and expect them to hand over their boat for you to practice on.  You buy this MacGregor, you can practice anytime you like, you just hook the thing to your Chevy 3/4 Ton Hemi and drop it in the local lake on nice daze on the weekend.

Can you get knocked down with this boat?  Yes, of course you can, but this also is good experience if it happens to you (preferably not with the kids on board at the time of course, or at least below decks).  If you drop the boat on smaller lakes to begin with, you're probably not going to encounter such winds anyhow.  If/when you feel confident enough in your skills to drop it on the Great Lake they call Gitchee-Goomey and the winds of November come early and are getting big, stow the kids below decks and hook yourself to the boat with a cable, take down the sails and GTFO of Dodge with your trusty 8HP Suzuki as fast as you fucking can.  Make shore and the boat ramp and haul the mother fucker out of the water with your big ass Chevy Hemi.

It's a starter boat, its not anything real permanent except for maybe somebody like me who just pulls it around on a trailer most of the time.  Great X-tra storage space for Preps!  :icon_sunny:

Permanent Bugout machine, for DB with 2 kids this is not enough boat.  35' minimum there IMHO.  But he can move up to that later after gaining experience on this VERY cheap MacGregor.

RE
A born salesman! Gordon lightfoot grew up 90 minutes from here in Orillia where my older daughter was born. its tied for the nearest "city" being about 30000. In Gordon's time it was the size of the towns near us (about 3500)... As previously discussed I would bug out as an absolute last resort once the homestead was no longer viable/defendable. Were that the case I would seek refuge in another enclave near here with like minded people I know. If absolutely forced to bug out I would sail off into the 90 percent of Canada that is still public land in the trailer. Lower maintenance costs than a boat. Gas is a problem of course but so is a trailered boat. That would really be my last move though. I'm in C%'s camp on that one.

As I have mentioned, said boat is NOT a real good bugout machine by itself.  In combination with a Stealth Van, it could be OK, mainly as a trailer to haul preps, but also a good fishing boat.  You're not going to go circumnavigating in a boat like this, unless you are a Darwin Award candidate.  ::) I wouldn't even take it more than 20 miles offshore on Superior and only in good weather. You park the boat in a well protected cove and use it to fish from.  You practice your sailing techniques on it.  When you got it down well enough, THEN you buy a decent 35-45' boat that can handle Hudson Bay.  When you take on that trip, do it in midsummer to GTFO of Dodge.  Wait for the icebergs to melt down before you go blue water.  Unless you think you are really good by then anyhow.  If I was real healthy again I might try it, but only with Eddie aboard as well.  Even then I wouldn't do it unless it was a pure survival necessity.  That is very risky shit.  Doesn't matter how good you are.  You are rolling the dice.

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: BuddyJ on April 16, 2018, 12:22:10 PM
If I can get SaVANnah down to the Lower 48 and the Great White North, I think she could pull this boat.  That would be a pretty ideal combination.  :icon_sunny:  I will need to upgrade the suspension for this, but the engine is up to the task. Only 140K Miles on it and smooth as silk when running. 8C Turbocharged Super V-8, that sucker can pull a lot of weight, even over the mountains of the Yukon Territory.

Are we talking about Ford E-150 chassis vans? Who did the turbo work on yours? Ford didn't put turbo's on the Tritan modular motors until later, and that was more for performance models like Mustang Cobra's or some brawny F-150 racey truck type things. In the modern era Ford is slapping them on everything, but back then turbo's were mostly found on diesel pickups. The early Triton modular v8s were like normally aspirated 4.6L or 5.4L. I've towed with a 5.4L Triton in a pickup truck, but no more than a ton or two. It did quite well everywhere from California coastal roads to crossing the continental divide a few times. In exchange for shitty fuel mileage of course.  ;D
Title: Re: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 16, 2018, 02:48:01 PM
If I can get SaVANnah down to the Lower 48 and the Great White North, I think she could pull this boat.  That would be a pretty ideal combination.  :icon_sunny:  I will need to upgrade the suspension for this, but the engine is up to the task. Only 140K Miles on it and smooth as silk when running. 8C Turbocharged Super V-8, that sucker can pull a lot of weight, even over the mountains of the Yukon Territory.

Are we talking about Ford E-150 chassis vans? Who did the turbo work on yours? Ford didn't put turbo's on the Tritan modular motors until later, and that was more for performance models like Mustang Cobra's or some brawny F-150 racey truck type things. In the modern era Ford is slapping them on everything, but back then turbo's were mostly found on diesel pickups. The early Triton modular v8s were like normally aspirated 4.6L or 5.4L. I've towed with a 5.4L Triton in a pickup truck, but no more than a ton or two. It did quite well everywhere from California coastal roads to crossing the continental divide a few times. In exchange for shitty fuel mileage of course.  ;D

Previous owner was an Israeli with an auto shop in Anchorage.  He was selling out and heading back for Israel.  Insane, IMHO.

It would be stretching the limit to pull that size boat all the time with SaVANnah.  It would fry the engine or the tranny at some point with that vehicle.  More realistically, I would have to drop the boat size down to 20'.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day: Folding Trimarans
Post by: RE on April 17, 2018, 12:23:37 AM
To me, the ultimate in Trailerable Sailboats are the Ian Farrier designed Folding Trimarans, which come in models from around 18' to I think as big as 34'.  The 22' model is the most widely built and is its own racing class.  It's a very fast boat that will sail to windward better than any monohull anywhere near that size.  You will kick the ass of any monohull in the regatta if you are halfway decent.  Classes of boats were split because of these type of multihulls.  They blow the living shit out of any keelboat for speed.

(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c1/dd/4d/c1dd4dd10ad7da0624c50c2d3810de22.jpg)

Here is the same type of boat with the pontoons folded and either getting ready to sail or finishing off the day.

(http://cdn.sailingscuttlebutt.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/2017-12-11_13-07-44-620x350.jpg)

Here is one on its trailer (this one is a 28' model)

(http://www.windcraft.net/images/stories/f28trai2.jpg)

Here is a short video of an F-22 in action

You could, in theory circumnavigate one of these, although you would need to be VERY Spartan and a very good sailor to do it.  Myself, I would not try that stunt even if I was 30 again and in top shape still able to do double backs and hoist my compact body up a mast on arm power only. You CAN in theory right one of these folders if it has turned turtle, although you would need to be a very good swimmer/snorkeler to do it and wait for the seas to calm before you try it.  You can buy the plans for them and build them yourself.  I would power it up electric with 2 20HP motors on the pontoons and a 30 HP gas outboard on the main hull.  You could push through anything with that shit on that size boat.  ;D

http://www.youtube.com/v/WUvP5FdhYbY[/embed]

Forgetting for the moment of trying to go Blue Water with this, on any typical lake it won't be hard to sail, it wouldn't even be that tough on the Great Lake they call Gitchee-Goomey.  The only problem here is that scaling up to a larger monohull later will take some adjustment, the sailing characteristics are not the same.  I don't think though the adjustment would be all that hard.

For me on my own, I think I could get away with a 22' Ian Farrier and pull it with SaVANnah.  They are lightweight boats.  It could work as a Bugout system for me.  Finding one at a good price though is tough, they don't usually come cheap.  Also even healthy I don't have the skills to build one myself in the back yard.  Only somebody like Peter or DB could do that.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 19, 2018, 07:16:14 PM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00K0K_lvXu14dO7PJ_600x450.jpg)

Dead man's boat. This one is probably bought already, at this price (6K). Looks fast and seaworthy, but neglected.

https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/39-cc-northeast-sailboat/6565048721.html
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 19, 2018, 07:21:47 PM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00K0K_lvXu14dO7PJ_600x450.jpg)

Dead man's boat. This one is probably bought already, at this price (6K). Looks fast and seaworthy, but neglected.

https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/39-cc-northeast-sailboat/6565048721.html

Houston location.  Why don't you buy that one?  It's even cheaper than that other dead man's boat.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 21, 2018, 09:09:49 AM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00K0K_lvXu14dO7PJ_600x450.jpg)

Dead man's boat. This one is probably bought already, at this price (6K). Looks fast and seaworthy, but neglected.

https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/39-cc-northeast-sailboat/6565048721.html

Houston location.  Why don't you buy that one?  It's even cheaper than that other dead man's boat.

RE

What I see this year is that prices are continuing to fall even more, after having fallen for more than five years. If I were in a position to live aboard, I would be tempted to buy now, maybe not this one, but one of the many good ones I've been seeing. But I've had to accept that it just wouldn't be smart to take on the debt...or to cash out of something... to acquire what, as of right now would be more of a liability than an asset.

For guys like me (and you) right now, where we are, money in the bank or some decent investment, or even preps, is better than putting money into a boat. If the boat were free, the insurance, slip fees, and gas back and forth to take care of it would put an undue burden on my finances. I won't buy unless my situation changes into one more compatible with living on the boat, which I'd love...but doesn't make sense, really.

It is the freedom that keeps me looking. Living aboard is living free of a lot of constraints and bullshit. It represents an exit strategy from boring BAU and work. It would be an excellent chapter in my life, of that I have no doubt. But responsibility comes first.



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 21, 2018, 09:19:43 AM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00K0K_lvXu14dO7PJ_600x450.jpg)

Dead man's boat. This one is probably bought already, at this price (6K). Looks fast and seaworthy, but neglected.

https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/39-cc-northeast-sailboat/6565048721.html

Houston location.  Why don't you buy that one?  It's even cheaper than that other dead man's boat.

RE

What I see this year is that prices are continuing to fall even more, after having fallen for more than five years. If I were in a position to live aboard, I would be tempted to buy now, maybe not this one, but one of the many good ones I've been seeing. But I've had to accept that it just wouldn't be smart to take on the debt...or to cash out of something... to acquire what, as of right now would be more of a liability than an asset.

For guys like me (and you) right now, where we are, money in the bank or some decent investment, or even preps, is better than putting money into a boat. If the boat were free, the insurance, slip fees, and gas back and forth to take care of it would put an undue burden on my finances. I won't buy unless my situation changes into one more compatible with living on the boat, which I'd love...but doesn't make sense, really.

It is the freedom that keeps me looking. Living aboard is living free of a lot of constraints and bullshit. It represents an exit strategy from boring BAU and work. It would be an excellent chapter in my life, of that I have no doubt. But responsibility comes first.

Those are good reasons, but it does buy one more thing, which is the Insurance Policy of a GTFO of Dodge vehicle, along with of course many pleasant weekends before SHTF Day comes to go sailing and exploring.  You could save money on your VI vacations also, take that into account.

I am in a position now to be a liveaboard, but unfortunately not much of a sailor to move it around and the hot & humid weather of south TX is not very appealing to me, even with good A/C in the cabin.  So this one doesn't fit the bill for me either, cheap as it comes.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 21, 2018, 09:32:42 AM
Too expensive for just the get-outa-Dodge advantage. Besides, I don't need to get outa Dodge. I just want to sometimes. LOL. Until the climate gets a lot worse, or I cash out of the stead, I have that strategy to spend money on.

More than a survival strategy, for me the boat would be......like the guy who knows he has cancer but isn't that sick yet, and just wants to have one more really good adventure while it's still possible. It would be a chance to enjoy living on the ocean while there are still interesting things living in it, and places to go worth visiting and experiencing.

Okay, I'm done slacking. Off to the pig wars.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 25, 2018, 07:20:29 PM
This one is as local as it gets and looks very interesting. I wish the pics were better.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00303_cZ0DHvFQisR_600x450.jpg)

https://corpuschristi.craigslist.org/boa/d/sailboat/6569975484.html

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 25, 2018, 07:27:13 PM
This one is as local as it gets and looks very interesting. I wish the pics were better.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00303_cZ0DHvFQisR_600x450.jpg)

https://corpuschristi.craigslist.org/boa/d/sailboat/6569975484.html

What's wrong with $30K for that boat if it has no leaks?  That's a good price.  49' !!!!.  A real live aboard!   I'm in for half if we put in good A/C.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 05:17:45 AM
Very tempting. Looks like somebody back from cruising and ready to get out.

If you were in good enough health to enjoy living aboard I'd take you up on it, but you couldn't get up and down the companionway right now, and I wouldn't be close enough to even check on you if you had a problem. Makes no sense for you anymore.

Still, maybe worth looking at. I am tempted to drive down, even though I'm not sure where the money would come from.I might email the seller or call.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 05:24:44 AM
Very tempting. Looks like somebody back from cruising and ready to get out.

If you were in good enough health to enjoy living aboard I'd take you up on it, but you couldn't get up and down the companionway right now, and I wouldn't be close enough to even check on you if you had a problem. Makes no sense for you anymore.

Still, maybe worth looking at. I am tempted to drive down, even though I'm not sure where the money would come from.I might email the seller or call.

First off, I remain hopeful of some recovery here!

Second, I already have an elevator system with an electric winch figured out to get up and down from the cabin.  I also probably could do it manually as long as there are rail handholds to pull myself with.  There are all sorts of commercial units available for cripples to use also.

Take pics when you get there.  I am reserving the right to buy in if I can get healthy enough for it in a few months.

RE

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 05:47:30 AM
Very tempting. Looks like somebody back from cruising and ready to get out.

If you were in good enough health to enjoy living aboard I'd take you up on it, but you couldn't get up and down the companionway right now, and I wouldn't be close enough to even check on you if you had a problem. Makes no sense for you anymore.

Still, maybe worth looking at. I am tempted to drive down, even though I'm not sure where the money would come from.I might email the seller or call.

First off, I remain hopeful of some recovery here!

Second, I already have an elevator system with an electric winch figured out to get up and down from the cabin.  I also probably could do it manually as long as there are rail handholds to pull myself with.  There are all sorts of commercial units available for cripples to use also.

Take pics when you get there.  I am reserving the right to buy in if I can get healthy enough for it in a few months.

RE

Also, I would NOT depend on you to come help me if/when I need it, anymore than I do living up here.  You live too far away and have your bizness.  I do of course hope that you will fly up here when the End is truly Nigh and get here before I draw my last breath.  I would like to see you one more time.

However, the Yachty liveaboard community is very tight knit, and I am sure there are others who will help me as needs be.  Having spent a good deal of time with me IRL, you know I am not the same character IRL as I am online.  I am funny and generally people do like me IRL.  I don't get in your face IRL like online because, well, I don't want to get punched in the face. lol.

Third, I will find peole to employ as helpers like James and Serra.  I am sure there are some people down in Rockport living at the margins who could use some part-time work at $30/hr.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 07:33:20 AM
I hope you improve too, and you might. But right now I doubt you could really cope wth getting up and down that much. I know you'd get along fine with the other live-aboards and you could hire some help, but it still sounds tricky to me.

AC is not a big problem with a big boat like that. A big RV unit could live on a hatch. Not pretty, but much cheaper than the built-in marine AC units that use water for coolant. You'd need two of those for a boat that big, and it'd run 5K probably. You could get a used RV unit for less than a thousand, I think. I wonder if it's steel? I need to find out more.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 08:15:30 AM
I shot him an email. No phone number. Maybe its a scam.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 09:24:31 AM
I hope you improve too, and you might. But right now I doubt you could really cope wth getting up and down that much. I know you'd get along fine with the other live-aboards and you could hire some help, but it still sounds tricky to me.

AC is not a big problem with a big boat like that. A big RV unit could live on a hatch. Not pretty, but much cheaper than the built-in marine AC units that use water for coolant. You'd need two of those for a boat that big, and it'd run 5K probably. You could get a used RV unit for less than a thousand, I think. I wonder if it's steel? I need to find out more.

There are also good portable indoor A/C  units that you can just duct out one of the hatches.  This Whynter is 12,000 BTU and would probably do the whole boat.  $500 new at Home Depot.  2 would definitely be enough.  Just need shore power or a kick ass inverter or generator to run them.

(https://cdn.thewirecutter.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/portable-air-conditioner-lowres-5042994.jpg)

As I said, getting up and down out the companionway is not an issue.  It's like that car seat you dug up that lifts you up and down, there is plenty of handicap lift stuff around that can be adapted.  This would actually be easier, all you need is one of the lifts that fit on a van door to get the wheelchair in and out.  But anyhow, I still can hoist myself up into the van most of the time without even using my stools.  I just need handholds to use my arms to pull with.

(http://an-soyuz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/easy-climber-elevator-cost-handicap-stair-lift-staircase-cost-acorn-stairlift-price-stair-assist.jpg)

My life would be little different in reality, I would spend 90% of my time at my computer in the Nav Station managing the Diner or sleeping in my berth.  But I would be on a SAILBOAT!  :icon_sunny: My imagination takes care of the rest.

(http://www.staradvertiser.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/web1_f4-WEB-hokulea-01.jpg)

I'll be interested to see if you hear back.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 10:48:05 AM
It's real. He called me. He lives aboard in the same marina, on a houseboat now, supposedly because he has 2 teenage kids, which is a good reason.

He says the only thing the boat needs is upgraded electronics. It's a Samson ferrocement boat like a couple of others I've posted. It's been out sailing in the last few weeks.

It's loaded with cruising equipment and sails. Lots of gear.

I'm going to call him Saturday and if it's still there, I'll drive down. Be careful what you wish for.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 10:51:59 AM
Be careful what you wish for.

Yea I know.  ::)

I look forward to seeing the pics.  I'll screw myself up to fly down and look at it if it looks realistic to buy.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 11:59:20 AM
Live-aboard slip fee in that marina (the old Rockport Municipal Harbor, a decent location) would be around $450, I think. There are good heads and showers on shore that are government maintained. I doubt that boat has holding tanks, so getting to the toilet might be a deal breaker, just wanted to mention that one (I'll check). The marina is within easy scooter distance to the grocery store.

(http://www.acnd.org/images/RockportFishBowlweb.jpg)

http://www.acnd.org/facilities/harbors-rates (http://www.acnd.org/facilities/harbors-rates)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 12:18:03 PM
Live-aboard slip fee in that marina (the old Rockport Municipal Harbor, a decent location) would be around $450, I think. There are good heads and showers on shore that are government maintained. I doubt that boat has holding tanks, so getting to the toilet might be a deal breaker, just wanted to mention that one (I'll check). The marina is within easy scooter distance to the grocery store.

$450 is well within price range (less than my current rent).  Electric bill is a question mark.  Probably need to heat it electric in the winter besides cooling electric in summer.  Do cooking mostly electric also rather than using propane.  Shore power essential.

On board head with holding tank not that huge a problem, porta-potty can work there.  Dispose of the daily bodily waste once a day or so most depending how often I actually excrete solid waste, which is not often.  Piss just gets dumped over board out of the piss jug.  On shore shower good enough, most I shower is once a week.  No snow, so the electric scooters will always be fine, but need to be able to plug them in somewhere on shore.  Need Parking Spot for SaVANnah and a trailer.  Most supplies delivered by Amazon anyhow.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 12:59:02 PM
You can read their fee structure from that link . You'd want the 50A/220V service, which I figured in to the $450. I don't think it'd be much more, worst case. The boat is 49 ft on deck, which is how they measure. With the bowsprit it's a 55, but they don't nail you for that in the public marina.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 01:08:02 PM
You can read their fee structure from that link . You'd want the 50A/220V service, which I figured in to the $450. I don't think it'd be much more, worst case. The boat is 49 ft on deck, which is how they measure. With the bowsprit it's a 55, but they don't nail you for that in the public marina.

50A/220 is PLENTY.

What other monthly costs do you project might come into play?

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 01:17:25 PM
I think the parking for your car is free, but it'd be in the sun and salt. It's conceivable you might want a storage warehouse for the van if you stayed long term and didn't drive it much. Other than that, I can't think of anything. The Key Allegro marina has a bar, but I know they're more expensive (and they got blown away, not sure if they're 100% yet either).

There are a number of other marinas, but those county ones are the cheapest, and not much downside. There are working shrimp boats there, maybe some early am noise? Nothing too worriesome. I have overnighted at that marina in the dim past. That year it had been really wet weather and there was a gator in the marina. LOL.

Not a problem most of the time, though.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 01:32:38 PM
I expect the boat will be needing a bottom job and zincs. That'll be $2500 to $3500, but you could put it off, maybe. You don't need electronics just to sail the bay. I could install GPS. Most things can wait. He lived onboard previously. It might have some kind of AC. Probably an RV unit or even a window unit. If I go down, I'll find out a lot more and report back.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 02:36:39 PM
I think the parking for your car is free, but it'd be in the sun and salt. It's conceivable you might want a storage warehouse for the van if you stayed long term and didn't drive it much. Other than that, I can't think of anything. The Key Allegro marina has a bar, but I know they're more expensive (and they got blown away, not sure if they're 100% yet either).

There are a number of other marinas, but those county ones are the cheapest, and not much downside. There are working shrimp boats there, maybe some early am noise? Nothing too worriesome. I have overnighted at that marina in the dim past. That year it had been really wet weather and there was a gator in the marina. LOL.

Not a problem most of the time, though.

More important than the bar is Wi-Fi.  Need an internet connection beyond the phone 4G.

I would likely get a storage facility for SaVANnah & Trailer and buy a beater vehicle to keep at the Marina.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 02:48:48 PM
I expect the boat will be needing a bottom job and zincs. That'll be $2500 to $3500, but you could put it off, maybe. You don't need electronics just to sail the bay. I could install GPS. Most things can wait. He lived onboard previously. It might have some kind of AC. Probably an RV unit or even a window unit. If I go down, I'll find out a lot more and report back.

I am sure it will need a few $1000 to spruce up at the beginning.  We split that 50-50.  Do you know how many hours the kicker has on it?

Sailing electronics are mainly your responsibility, since I won't be doing the sailing.  LOL.  However, in the interest of having it ready for a full-on Bugout, I will chip in there.  As I mentioned previously, I already have portable GPS units and celestial navigation software.  I don't have electronic charts for that neighborhood. I have more than enough computational power for anything.  If you are going to sail it often and take my crippled ass with you, I would kick in for a radar unit.  Sonar also.  Definitely kick in for a HAM Radio setup and Marine VHF.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 26, 2018, 06:47:33 PM
Here's a better pic.

(https://scontent-dfw5-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/11898538_1047731311927201_2111081506440264571_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=008abe01a6ccd653c4e852fdd2d97e38&oe=5B618C2D)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 26, 2018, 07:09:31 PM
Here's a better pic.

(https://scontent-dfw5-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/11898538_1047731311927201_2111081506440264571_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=008abe01a6ccd653c4e852fdd2d97e38&oe=5B618C2D)

That is just a GREAT looking boat on all levels.  I also like ferrocement hulls, very durable.

Gotta find out the engine situation and storage tank capacities for water and fuel.  Also WiFi availability in the marina.

At that price, this boat is a steal if it is in decent shape overall.  I could even afford it and keep my place up here at the same time for a couple of years doing the Sunbird thing.  Make the transition a little at a time.  Just spend the winter down there.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 27, 2018, 05:31:31 AM
Several negatives to consider. Not sure if it's worth the trouble of investigating, although I do like it. I like the center cockpit Samsons better, because they have a huge  aft cabin. This one does not.

One thing, ferrocement boats are subject to structural failures that might not be easy to see on a quick pre-purchase survey. The weak link is the steel wire mesh they're cored with. Like all rebar, it rusts. Only the best of those hulls is worth owning. There are some good ones, but this boat has not been restored. Hard to assess.

Also, its a huge boat. I'm not sure I want to tackle the deferred maintenance. I really don't have several thousand bucks to dump into a new project right now. I see this one as requiring serious money above and beyond the purchase price. The sails look 40 years old.

If I do go see it, I doubt I'll change my mind. It would take a haul-out to even begin to get some idea about the hull, although a wet bilge would make me suspect immediately. I'd be surprised if it didn't have a wet bilge.

There are too many great boats out there now for 50-60K with all the maintenance done, ready to enjoy for a few years. this one would be like buying  some great big old Victorian mansion with a leaky roof and bad plumbing, most likely.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 27, 2018, 06:51:38 AM
Several negatives to consider. Not sure if it's worth the trouble of investigating, although I do like it. I like the center cockpit Samsons better, because they have a huge  aft cabin. This one does not.

One thing, ferrocement boats are subject to structural failures that might not be easy to see on a quick pre-purchase survey. The weak link is the steel wire mesh they're cored with. Like all rebar, it rusts. Only the best of those hulls is worth owning. There are some good ones, but this boat has not been restored. Hard to assess.

Also, its a huge boat. I'm not sure I want to tackle the deferred maintenance. I really don't have several thousand bucks to dump into a new project right now. I see this one as requiring serious money above and beyond the purchase price. The sails look 40 years old.

If I do go see it, I doubt I'll change my mind. It would take a haul-out to even begin to get some idea about the hull, although a wet bilge would make me suspect immediately. I'd be surprised if it didn't have a wet bilge.

There are too many great boats out there now for 50-60K with all the maintenance done, ready to enjoy for a few years. this one would be like buying  some great big old Victorian mansion with a leaky roof and bad plumbing, most likely.

Every kind of hull has negatives.  Wood hulls get rot.  Fiberglass blisters and delaminates.  Steel rusts.  As you say though, the only way to know is to go look at it, and if buying you have to pay for a haul out and have a professional survey done.  If it turns out to be a dog and you don't buy it, that is lost money of course.  I would risk my half of the cost of that.

If the sails are old, they will need replacement, but that doesn't have to happen right away.  He said it was just out sailing a few weeks ago, so they clearly still work and so do the halyards.  Anyhow, it can all be distributed out over time until you retire getting it all ship shape.

If you don't want to check it out, don't check it out.  However, that price is just great even if it is not in as good shape as some $60K boats.  $30K is a lot of money difference to spend on improvements.

RE

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on April 27, 2018, 04:34:56 PM
(found on Best of Craigslist)


 Free 18' Sailboat

(https://www.craigslist.org/about/best/phx/6100073306-1.jpg)



Free 18' Sailboat. Grandpa was a sailor, missed the open water and so he hired a crane to drop a sailboat in his swimming pool. Time to get the boat out. Free to anyone who can remove the boat without damaging the block wall or landscaping. Serious inquires only. No trailer, no boom, no sails or rigging. Rudder? Yes. Still free. Thank you.

post id: 6100073306 email to friend 
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 27, 2018, 06:27:42 PM

Free 18' Sailboat. Grandpa was a sailor, missed the open water and so he hired a crane to drop a sailboat in his swimming pool. Time to get the boat out. Free to anyone who can remove the boat without damaging the block wall or landscaping. Serious inquires only. No trailer, no boom, no sails or rigging. Rudder? Yes. Still free. Thank you.

What a joke.  You would have to hire a crane to take it out the same way grandpa dropped it in there.  That would cost more than the boat is worth.  Best solution is to cut it up with a chainsaw.

RE
Title: ⛵ Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 29, 2018, 09:19:33 AM
Nice Pocket Cruiser for the Solo.  If I was in the market just for myself, I would consider this one even though I consider this tight for a live aboard.  $17K in Alameda, CA.  Probably get it for $15K.  Looks in great shape, lots of pics at the site.  Small enough to easily sail solo.  Cheap docking and maintenance fees.  I would basically coastal sail it from Alaska to Baja CA on a yearly cycle following the seasons.  Also not too expensive to truck to another location on the GoM or East Coast or Hudson Bay as home port.  You can pull this one with a 1 Ton Pickup yourself.

http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1982-s-2-9-2c-6528266/?refSource=standard%20listing#.WuXpxZeIaUk (http://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1982-s-2-9-2c-6528266/?refSource=standard%20listing#.WuXpxZeIaUk)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/82/66/6528266_0_041220171606_17.jpg?t=1510300800000&w=1200&h=1200)

(http://images.boats.com/resize/1/82/66/6528266_0_111120171407_3.jpg?t=1510300800000&w=1200&h=1200)

RE

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on April 29, 2018, 02:43:48 PM
That's the first boat you've looked at that is sensible.  It's very beamy at 12', which would suit a houseboat.  Don't know how you would sail it Alaska to Baja and back (4,500 nm) each year.  Not sure how waterproof the hatches would be, or what the ropes coming from the mast(?) coming back to the cockpit are for.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on April 29, 2018, 04:30:47 PM
That's the first boat you've looked at that is sensible.  It's very beamy at 12', which would suit a houseboat.  Don't know how you would sail it Alaska to Baja and back (4,500 nm) each year.  Not sure how waterproof the hatches would be, or what the ropes coming from the mast(?) coming back to the cockpit are for.

Maybe not every year.  lol.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 04, 2018, 08:49:53 AM
I had posted this one a while back, maybe. I got an email saying they're dropping the price again, which is now very attractive, for such a good boat. Unlike that recent S2 POS bay boat you and Palloy liked so much, this one would really be worthy of sailing up to AK and back down to Baha every year.

Doesn't hurt to dream, ever.

More than a hundred pics if you log in, and the only downside is that they'll send you an email when the price drops again. It's the "sell your boat" time of year. I'm not the only one deleveraging. It's rampant.

(https://d385tlrw8quush.cloudfront.net/400/300/245252_7d6e4c1cc886ff6654cebbcf9ceb97a9.jpg)

https://portlandoregon.boatshed.com/bruce_roberts_spray_36-boat-245252.html
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 04, 2018, 09:00:07 AM
Just kidding about the S2, really.

They're well built, but that 30 ft center cockpit is an example (like the Catalina 30) of a boat that tries to get too much cabin space into a 30 ft hull by making it really beamy. I wouldn't want to sail offshore in either one, myself, although worse boats are out there.

There have been, this month, both an S2 27 and an S2 28 for sale here on the lake. Either would make a very nice choice for Lake Travis. Nicer lines than the 30.

(https://images.craigslist.org/01414_fA69nIXom1E_300x300.jpg)

https://austin.craigslist.org/boa/d/sailboat/6569060887.html

There weren't pics for the S2 28. It looks much the same as the 27, but I don't like the galley space on the 28. The cabin layout is different. I like the 27 better overall. Very nice micro-cruiser.

Asking just 5K for a boat that has been for all its life on fresh water. Almost free.

Looks like pics are up for the 28 now. More of a bay boat, too, imho. But not bad, other than the galley. There isn't one, really. Just a place to make sandwiches.

The 27 is better.

https://austin.craigslist.org/boa/d/sailboat-sft-sailboat/6574453899.html
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 04, 2018, 01:58:06 PM
Okay, just one more. My lake has so many shoals it'd be frustrating, but I always wanted to sail one of these, and this one looks sweet. And cheap. And close. Not a seastead. A good one to lose yourself on for an afternoon though.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00f0f_6A681kY6Ic5_600x450.jpg)

https://galveston.craigslist.org/boa/d/racing-sail-boat/6576566207.html (https://galveston.craigslist.org/boa/d/racing-sail-boat/6576566207.html)

http://www.youtube.com/v/_CxeIFdFWP4&fs=1
Fast Forward to about 30 seconds. The topography reminds me a lot of Lake Travis.






Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Palloy2 on May 04, 2018, 03:40:03 PM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00f0f_6A681kY6Ic5_600x450.jpg)

Wow !!!  That should go like the clappers and be VERY wet in choppy water.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 06, 2018, 02:23:08 PM
This is a twofer. On my usual random walk through CL looking for good seasteads, I ran across this repeat from a while back, still up for sale.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00z0z_bmBhg5tGh1C_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00404_aRjvj5HlNI4_600x450.jpg)

A Bruce Roberts steel kit boat looks like....a big 56 footer. Looks relatively newish, or at least well cared for. Not quite finished on the interior, but not enough pics to fully evaluate. These BR designs are some of the better owner-built boats, if you can find a good one.

https://juneau.craigslist.org/boa/d/56-roberts-sailboat/6576992089.html (https://juneau.craigslist.org/boa/d/56-roberts-sailboat/6576992089.html)


The boat is listed in Craig, Alaska which happens to be on the fourth largest island that belongs to the United States, cuiously named, for some reason, Prince of Wales Island. (Not to be confused with the OTHER Prince of Wales Island in Canada's frozen (but thawing ) Nunavut.)

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/56/NWCoast1a.png)


 I noticed the home port listed on the stern was Whale Pass, which sounded picturesque, so I checked it out. It's a bay on the inside of the island, looks like 4WD gravel road only.

But not completely uncivilized. It sure does look like a sweet spot, and the yearly winter lows there are only around freezing. Check out the housing market. The first one is listed at $269K (which is what I pay for a shitty suburban rental tract house here with no trees on a .15 acre lot.)

(http://realestateinketchikan.com/wp-content/uploads/wpp_import_files/000000000419000/419015/12932_6-600x480.jpeg)

(http://realestateinketchikan.com/wp-content/uploads/wpp_import_files/000000000419000/419015/12932_7-600x480.jpeg)

(http://realestateinketchikan.com/wp-content/uploads/wpp_import_files/000000000419000/419015/12932_20-600x480.jpeg)


                             --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here's another listed for $299K. Seems to have a separate building with a small apartment, perhaps a precursor to the bigger house.

http://realestateinketchikan.com/properties/nhn-legal-address-only-15/ (http://realestateinketchikan.com/properties/nhn-legal-address-only-15/)

(http://realestateinketchikan.com/wp-content/uploads/wpp_import_files/000000001240500/1240512/16878_2-600x480.jpeg)

(http://realestateinketchikan.com/wp-content/uploads/wpp_import_files/000000001240500/1240512/16878_1-600x439.jpeg)

(http://realestateinketchikan.com/wp-content/uploads/wpp_import_files/000000001240500/1240512/16878_3-600x480.jpeg)

Well off the beaten path, but awfully pretty. Looks like the lots are a steep 2-3 acres. You could no doubt raise a lot of food in a greenhouse there, with 15 hour summer sun and very moderate summer temps.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on May 06, 2018, 03:56:43 PM
Well off the beaten path, but awfully pretty. Looks like the lots are a steep 2-3 acres. You could no doubt raise a lot of food in a greenhouse there, with 15 hour summer sun and very moderate summer temps.

Don't forget the non-stop rain!  Plenty of water coming down from above there!  On the upside, it's very good for setting up a micro-hydro system.

Soil not good as a result though, all the nutrients get washed out and it's pretty rocky anyhow.  So you're going to have to build your own soil in your greenhouse for your raised beds or ship it in, or raise your produce with hydroponics and aquaculture at least for a while until you have soil to work with.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 06, 2018, 04:18:12 PM
Soil not good as a result though, all the nutrients get washed out and it's pretty rocky anyhow.  So you're going to have to build your own soil in your greenhouse for your raised beds or ship it in, or raise your produce with hydroponics and aquaculture at least for a while until you have soil to work with.


Yeah, and no where to get any soil, probably. I thought about that.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on May 06, 2018, 04:26:38 PM
Soil not good as a result though, all the nutrients get washed out and it's pretty rocky anyhow.  So you're going to have to build your own soil in your greenhouse for your raised beds or ship it in, or raise your produce with hydroponics and aquaculture at least for a while until you have soil to work with.


Yeah, and no where to get any soil, probably. I thought about that.

I read somewhere the Irish built up their soil from kelp raised in the ocean shoals.  It would take a few years though I imagine to get a decent amount.

Barges do service that area though, so you just make one big order and ship in a ton or two.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 22, 2018, 06:28:32 PM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00J0J_c1cHU69VuSz_600x450.jpg)

For $1500 you can buy this hurricane damaged Westsail 32, which is hooked to a mooring in Coral Bay that probably goes for $300.year.

It had a chainplate ripped right out and it has some deck and maybe cabin top damage. Looks like the rudder's gone (Oops I was wrong, just hard to see. Score!) 

The engine took on water. It's toast, I'm sure.

Bit of a fixer-upper.

I mention it because I reckon someone WILL move onto it before too long, and no matter how much hassle it is, and how much work the boat needs (but probably won't get done), they'll be getting a good deal on a floating apartment in paradise.

They'll need a dinghy.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 25, 2018, 10:45:24 AM
This is a pretty good one. $50K. I'm pretty sure somebody bought it on the West Coast a few years back, went cruising, and eventually sailed through the canal and it ended up in Houston. It has what looks like up-to-date electronics and some other good cruising gear that wouldn't be cheap to buy new.

Old Allieds were well built, and this is a one-off version built just before the company finally went out of business for good. Supposedly it is the only fixed keel 42XL ever built. They were a Sparkman and Stevens design (if I remember right) and most of them are very traditional centerboard yawls (a very old design based on the old CCA racing rules from the 1960s or before.) This one is a deep keel sloop, with roller jib.

I like the layout below. The galley isn't perfect, but it would make a nice liveaboard.

(https://d2qh54gyqi6t5f.cloudfront.net/boat_images/6/6003/6003025/carousel_allied-42xl-1981-for-sale-kemah-tx-united-states-of-america-001.jpg)

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQfXgnfSSmjCNM7X-mhtYjRaGN9QoSJtt7T36UIjrbODoL-I8ip)

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1981/Allied-42XL-3211312/#.WwhKRdMvwWo (http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1981/Allied-42XL-3211312/#.WwhKRdMvwWo)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 27, 2018, 10:32:46 AM
(https://images.craigslist.org/00Y0Y_7GJT9v8wjBn_600x450.jpg)

As much as I like those big old William Garden designs, I know full well that a more modest boat makes far better common sense for anyone who has to learn the word "budget".

This one is big enough for a couple (barely), and yet small enough to easily single hand. I like the lovely upgrades, although the butterfly hatches and louvered companionway doors make the vessel less seaworthy for offshore sailing, imho. But it's a trade-off. They'd be very nice when you were on the hook or on a mooring somewhere. Maybe the guy who was good enough to do all that nice woodwork was smart enough to rig some way to seal up the cabin better for crossings. The pics aren't good enough to tell.

Somebody fixed up this old boat up to go cruising to the Caribbean or maybe just the Bahamas. It's in Islamorada, which would be a good jumping off point to sail back here, or to go the other way, toward Coral Bay and points south.

https://miami.craigslist.org/mdc/boa/d/ft-pearson-35/6578069549.html

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 29, 2018, 06:10:16 PM
The pics suck. Sounds like a nice old boat. It's pretty. $28K. Price cut in half. Lying in Ft. Myers Beach, which is southern gulf coast.
Hull #1 of the Tartan 37 Blackwatch, which was Tartan's 1st 37 footer. Later 37' models are not the same design. They built these in the late 60's. Fiberglass pioneers.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00a0a_3t1nRhgyaAR_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00H0H_9TZ5045F0Cy_600x450.jpg)

https://fortmyers.craigslist.org/lee/boa/d/37-tartan-1965-blackwatch/6576099128.html

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 30, 2018, 06:18:34 AM
One of the prettiest of the early fiberglass boats was the 44' Pearson Countess, designed by John Alden and built in the mid 1960's. In addition to the factory boats, they built some hulls that were professionally completely by various boatyards of the day. Countesses are very beautiful boats when nicely restored, and sometimes people go crazy and rebuild them from the bottom up. I've seen them go for 150K, in great condition.

The Countess was a motorsailer, but with an emphasis on the sailing part. A sailor's motorsailer.

This one is a 1965 Countess hull that was finished out by the Morse shipbuilding yard, one of the old school Maine yards that built clipper ships back in the day. Not around anymore either, I don't think.

Florida is where old boats go to die. The sailors go to the old sailors home, and the boats end up on the hard somewhere in FL, baked by the sun and subject to ruin from topside leaks and mold in the rainy, humid climate down there.

Once again, the pics are absolutely horrible. Wish they were better. This one looks worth saving. It's on the Atlantic coast, advertised for 50K. The first pic is a factory Pearson, a sister ship. The CL ad pics of the boat exterior are so small you get no idea what you're looking at.


(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ac/5a/04/ac5a04f026ff683b4b85f7668f07bd0e.jpg)

The interior pics are a little better than the others.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00x0x_TmDsLwKrgd_50x50c.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00d0d_itghEw4GXb0_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00X0X_6PdILjOp1NF_300x300.jpg)

https://miami.craigslist.org/mdc/boa/d/foot-john-alden-pearson-and/6596271138.html
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on May 30, 2018, 07:49:10 AM
Found some decent pics of the real boat above, on a different site. Maybe it's still afloat, and not on the hard. Good sign. I don't see any sails though.

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/m/72344/main.jpg)

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/t/72344/Galley_interior.jpg)

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/t/72344/Interior_2.jpg)


http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/72344 (http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/72344)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on June 03, 2018, 10:50:58 AM
I saw this old Bristol 40 on a FSBO site. It's lying in Houston. Another one left behind when the people who cruised her flew home to wherever home is.

That seems to be a fairly common story for people who "sell off and sail away". It's not for good, because they get tired of it, they run out of money, and/or it's a couple who split up because the sailing dream wasn't all it was cracked up to be, and one partner had enough and bailed. Lots of reasons to abandon the live-aboard dream, once you've done it and it isn't your fantasy anymore.

This is another old CCA rule design, and it's a small boat for a 40 footer, by today's standards. But they are well built, and can be had for reasonable money. They're asking $38K and will no doubt end up settling for somewhat less.

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/71524#)

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/m/71524/main.jpg)

http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/71524 (http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/71524)

The bonus for those actually reading this post is that the guy who owns the boat obviously had dreams of powering down and living a simple life, and he had a blog going for a while. I have only just tasted it. Here's an excerpt.

Cost
Original concept:  We’ll do our best to keep up with what we spend on the boat.  It’s just too much effort, with no real purpose as I see it, to track every single penny (cost/benefit ratio is too far out of whack).  We’ll give close general costs for those interested.

New concept:  Well, I did NOT keep track of purchases even in a broad general sense.  Why?  I just didn’t feel like it.  One of the reasons I adopted the lifestyle of living on a sailboat was to escape the mundane and depressing reality of tracking, working for, stressing over, fighting for, arguing about, pining for, putting my hope in, worrying about, and ultimately centering my life around MONEY.  To track money would mean that I once again become slave to it.  And . . .  “cost/benefit ratio” ?!?!  What exactly did I mean by that?  I can only surmise that I was using the term in the traditional accounting sense, because I do not believe that life should be looked at from an accounting perspective.  Additionally, if anyone is actually reading this with the idea or thought of even trying to do the same thing, the “cost” would, or might, give them the thought that “There is no way I/we can do this.”  In my short time of living on the sailboat, I have seen all manners of other liveaboards with distinctly different lifestyles and accompanying monetary budgets.  So, to paraphrase a sign I saw, when it’s important, you find a way, when it’s not, you find an excuse.

It wasn’t important to me, so there’s my excuse.  If it’s important to you, you will find a way.

UPDATE:  I tallied up our major expenses and have listed them here so that others could see what we spent.  We’re not finished yet, so I’ll add to this as necessary.

Item Approximate cost
Boat $26,000
Main sail $3,000
Main sail cover $600
New running rigging $900
Head sail repair $1,200
Standing rigging repairs $300
Fuel tank repair $200
Head repair $400
New anchor $400
Spare anchor $300
New anchor rode (100’ 3/8” chain, 300’ 3/4” 3 strand nylon) $800
WirieAP $400
Refrigeration $1,000
Lazy jacks $175
Boom preventer $190
Dinghy davits $900
Dinghy $1,000
Dinghy outboard $600
Solar panels $575
Charge controller $385
Batteries $1050
iPad $400
Navionics $120
Steering system repairs $1,200
New life lines $380
Water pump/system repairs $330
New engine instruments $275
Handheld VHF radio $130
Binoculars $250
New depth sounder $150
Other miscellaneous $5,000
Forestay/backstay chainplates and backer plates for foredeck cleats $570
Jacklines and safety tethers (homemade) $206
Foulweather gear $150

Costs Total
$49,536


For more pics and more blog, follow the link.

https://www.emet.us/cost/ (https://www.emet.us/cost/)

Like a lot of blogs, it isn't very user friendly, but I did a search with "sailing' as the key word and got a look at what looks like the very first shakedown cruise for this couple, when they were still fixing the boat up. Great local knowledge here for anybody sailing Galveston Bay. Lots of spoils to run aground on. I wonder if they ever got a depth sounder?

CLINT
We went for our first sail in the Gulf of Mexico this past weekend.

The marina channel to the ICW is definitely shallow and we ran into mud twice getting into the ICW.  Fortunately, it’s very soft mud and going slow helps prevent us from wedging ourselves into any bank that we encounter.  We just reverse back into the “deeper” water and then take a different route.  It’s becoming standard operating procedure.

It’s 4 hours of motoring at 4.5 knots to get from the marina to the end of the south jetty at Galveston.  Much better than the 10 to 11 hours from Seabrook.

We also learned that not all bridges that require contact with a bridge operator are named properly, or named at all, on the Navionics charts.  Calling the Galveston Channel Bridge operator on 16 yields you nothing even though the chart says it’s the Galveston Channel; no mention of the bridge name.  We kept getting the Galveston Causeway Railroad bridge operator and we finally said that we were trying to reach the small bridge into the Galveston Channel.  At that point the X bridge operator came on and we were politely informed that, for future reference, it’s called the Pelican Island bridge.  Oh…

We made it to the end of the jetty without incident, raised the sails, killed the engine, and steered a course S/SE.  It’s so much nicer being able to set the sails and just sail out in the Gulf.  In the Bay we had to worry about uncharted pipes and pilings, shallow water, other small vessels, obnoxious speed boaters, The Kemah Beast, and the ship channel traffic.  At 4 NM from the shore, there’s really nothing to worry about.  Just set the sails and sail.  We don’t have a self steering system yet, but I was able to get everything “balanced” and Emet would track and hold her course for 4 to 5 minutes before I had to make a small correction.

To avoid potentially running through some shipping traffic we adjusted course SW and ran parallel with the shore for about 2 NM, then resumed our S/SE heading for about 5 NM.  Nothing like being able to set sail and steer a course for mile after mile after mile knowing that it’s clear.  The water was calm, the winds light, the sun bright.  This is what cruising is supposed to be.

We turned around and headed back with the plan of anchoring out overnight.  We wanted to be able to drop anchor before it got too late.

gulf_sail_3
Sailing. Some friends on a power boat tracked us down and took some pics.
On the sail back we had a broad reach on a port tack.  It was very light air.  We don’t have a boom preventer set up or a whisker pole.  To keep our boom from flogging about I tied a line from one of the boom bails to the mid-ship cleat and cinched it tight.  This worked very well.

gulf_sail_2
Keeping the boom secure with a makeshift boom preventer.
In that same pic you can see that our genoa is also luffing and flogging about.   I was really thinking how nice a whisker pole would be.  I then got the idea that I might be able to keep the genoa from luffing as much by tying a line to the clew and running it to the port stern cleat.

gulf_sail_1
Whisker line in place of a whisker pole.
Not as effective as a whisker pole, but it certainly helped stabilize the sail.  It prevented it from luffing forward, which helped it maintain its shape and more easily recover and fill in the light air.

gulf_sail
Sunset courtesy of Alisa.
So, we sailed on to our anchor spot.  We arrived around 9:00 PM, dropped the Mantus anchor, and let out about 30 to 40 feet of our Maggi chain.  I backed down on it hard and Emet began swinging on the anchor.  It seemed that the anchor was dug in good.  I paid out the remaining chain and about 50 feet of our 300 foot 3/4″ nylon line.  We were now resting on 150 feet of anchor rode in about 15 feet of water.

We killed the engine and fixed dinner.  It was going to be a peaceful night.  Or so I thought.

I was sleeping in the cockpit on the starboard seat because there was a nice breeze and it was a little cooler up there.  At about 1 AM I was literally thrown awake.  I woke up flying off the cockpit seat cushion, looking down at the water, and grabbed the steering pedestal to keep from crashing into it.  I called down to Jodi in the middle of all the racket that was crashing and banging inside:

“Are you OK?”
She said, “Yes.”
“Wow, that was a pretty big one.”
“Yeah, you slept through the other ones.  That was the biggest one, though.”
“The other ones . . .?”
“It’s been like that all night.”

And that was our first rolly anchorage.  It was pretty rolly all night and there was quite a current.  I could hear it clearly rushing past the boat and could see bubbles and light foam created as Emet’s bow split the surging water.  I watched for a while and then went back to sleep.  Every now and then I was awakened by rolling that was a little more intense than the rest.  Occasionally, I would check our position to make sure we weren’t drifting.  We weren’t.  The anchor was holding steady.

We woke up around 7 AM.  Position check showed that we hadn’t moved, but we had swung around.  Coffee and ship watching for an hour or so then the anchor came up and we started motoring back.  Completely uneventful.  We did run into another mud bank right off the ICW into the marina channel, but some folks in a power boat saw us and pulled us free.  As they were pulling us off, I watched the depth sounder and I “think” I know where to go to avoid the mud.  As we reentered the marina channel on this “new” path, we didn’t run into anything.

Looking forward to the next Gulf sail.

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on June 03, 2018, 11:16:14 AM
I wondered what the "Kemah Beast" was, so I looked it up."  I thought he might have been referencing the current in the Clear Lake channel  when the tide is coming in, which is a beast...but I was wrong.

A new one since my days on Galveston Bay.

http://www.youtube.com/v/UeQCKdNvpzs&fs=1
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day ---- The Second Cheapest Apartment in Paradise
Post by: Eddie on June 03, 2018, 12:49:22 PM

(https://www.financialminimalist.com/wp-content/uploads/Craigslist-Logo.png)

 37 foot Tayana Sail Boat FOR SALE - $5000 (Coral Bay, St. John)
condition: fair
length overall (LOA): 37
make / manufacturer: Tayana
propulsion type: sail
year manufactured: 1978
We have a 37 foot Tayana Sail boat with some hurricane Irma damage. It is on mooring, never sunk, would make an excellent live-aboard. It is currently located in Johnson's Bay, outside of Coral Bay, St. John. It's a great boat, but needs a little fixing up to go sailing.

It has a queen sized v-berth forward and convertible double berths in the main salon. 1 head and 1 galley. New awnings, permanent legal mooring with kayak/dingy available.

First $5,000 takes it. Call for further information.





Maybe THE cheapest. The ad for the Westsail appears to be gone.

Cheap rent is hard to find these days. This, in my opinion, would be the best rent deal currently in existence. Or the best floating RV slot, at least.

You could make a lot of boat repairs paying $300/yr for a mooring, and no other bills. It's an off-grid proposition, of course.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on June 07, 2018, 06:48:07 PM
The prices CAN go lower! Well, maybe not much lower on this one.

If only the slips were free.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00Y0Y_hJXrqNCrEq0_1200x900.jpg)


 FREE 1964 SAILBOAT -- Not a scam! You pick it up, it's YOURS (Corpus Christi)
 
condition: salvage
length overall (LOA): 30
propulsion type: sail
year manufactured: 1964


FREE TO GOOD HOME!!!! Tow it home today!!! 30 ft vintage sailboat


Bought this sailboat on eRepairables, low-ball bid and never expected to "win" the auction. Well, it'll take a fortune to get it here to Tennessee. Plus, the wife's less-than-thrilled reaction makes it imperative that it goes, and goes NOW! The auction yard where it's located is closing, so must be gone by 6/14/18. You can have this beauty for the low storage cost (if any)! Our loss is your gain!!!

(from CL)
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on June 07, 2018, 07:51:49 PM
The prices CAN go lower! Well, maybe not much lower on this one.

It probably leaks, the engine doesn't work and the sails are moth eaten.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on June 19, 2018, 09:49:06 AM
It happens sometimes. You run across several examples of some older boat design  for sale at the same time. I think I posted this one, back when it first made landfall in Texas and the owner flew home. Since then, it's price has dropped way down, and it will sell at some price. This is a small, but extremely well-found boat. If memory serves the original asking price was above 20K. There are two or three others out there for sale in various ports, but this one is far and away the best. One of Phil Rhodes many great boats. At some time int he past, somebody who knew what they were doing upgraded this boat a lot. I suspect that person is dead now.


(https://d1h6cla1qbh6o4.cloudfront.net/Listing/119283/3424579L.jpg?2)

(https://d1h6cla1qbh6o4.cloudfront.net/Listing/119283/3424645L.jpg?2)

(https://d1h6cla1qbh6o4.cloudfront.net/Listing/119283/3424648L.jpg?2)

(https://d1h6cla1qbh6o4.cloudfront.net/Listing/119283/3793851L.jpg?2)
The wet/dry vac means the bilge is getting wet. Probably just some topside leaks, but you can bet there's an issue. Hmmm.

At 13K it's still a hell of a deal. Too bad slips aren't free.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on June 24, 2018, 10:17:38 AM
Occasionally, I'm just blown away, when I see a boat that I know was the absolute culmination of a dream. Not just any dream, but the sensible dream of a knowledgable cruiser who knew just what he wanted and managed to bring it into the real world.

I'm impressed sometimes by the ability of some sailors to materialize just exactly what they wanted in a live-aboard boat. This boat is literally built to go anywhere, including inland waterways.  My old sailing buddy is now half way around the Great Loop in his little trawler, and enjoying himself a lot from what I gather. As I said the other day, he took one of my kids out in NY Harbor several days back.

But when fossil fuels are hard to come by, and the trawlers are all docked for good,this little ship will still be capable of crossing oceans and anchoring out in shallow bays. In the meantime it would be just as at home in the European canals or up the mouth of some river in Asia, as it would be in a marina slip.

Not real cheap at $95K, but not a million bucks either. Not the fanciest interior. But a good, well thought out boat, that already probably has many stories that could be told.

I'm pretty sure whomever sailed this boat is dead or dying. I know I'd never willingly part with one like this. I like the name too, which you might recognize as Gaelic. Shin Dera....translates to She Said. LOL.

And yes, it's a Spray replica.

(https://images.atlanticyachtandship.ru/i/63e20c0d2f0eb72a013a2dfbd672fea0/245650/2044644/bruce_roberts-shin_dera-full.jpg)

(https://images.atlanticyachtandship.ru/i/0549383bbd6e25085667736e9e205d13/245650/2044645/bruce_roberts-shin_dera-full.jpg)

(https://images.atlanticyachtandship.ru/i/826602e118d93799cecf858fe0fa111e/245650/2044649/bruce_roberts-shin_dera-full.jpg)

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on June 25, 2018, 09:57:40 AM
The CSY 44 is one of the better production sailboats ever built. It was actually the brainchild of a dentist, a guy named Van Ost. He started a new kind of charter company, inventing a business model that several other companies now still use, although he and his company folded a long time ago now.

He came up with the idea of selling boats to people and then leasing them back to charter them for a few years, which helped the owner make his boat payment and provided Van Ost with boats to rent. The charter company did the maintenance and watched over the boats, which I think were based out of Tortola at that time. It wasn't a bad deal.

He wanted to build boats that were stouter and able to stand up to the slings and arrows of amateur sailors who tend to be hard on rentals. So he found somebody to custom build what he wanted.

The CSY 44 was the flagship boat for Van Ost's fleet, and it ended up being about the best production charter boat of all time. There are a good many still out there, and some of them have been upgraded and re-powered, as is this example. The 75 hp Volvo looks new, and clean enough to eat off of.

One common cabin layout was a two cabin style called a walk-over, where the larger aft cabin is accessed through a cockpit hatch and there is no passageway from the salon to the aft cabin.

One thing that I would be concerned about is that many of these are "shoal draft", and that version was just accomplished simply by cutting off part of the encapsulated keel, the deepest part of which was made from solid concrete. From a design standpoint this "simplified" way of decreasing the draft creates questions of whether the boats' ultimate stability would be affected, especially if the rig and sail area were not reduced proportionally, which was not the case, from what I read.

A lot of these have sailed around the world, and the designers, who are still alive, report that it was never a problem, and that the shoal draft boats sail almost as well to weather as the deep keel version. Still, if I were buying one, I'd look for the deep keel.  But somebody who only wanted to sail in the Gulf of Mexico and the Bahamas might have good reason to go for the short keel instead.

They have nice big tanks, but they're made of glass fiber and integral to the hull, so when they do leak, it's hard to deal with. I looked at several of these. I think this one has had a fuel tank replacement, which for this boat was probably an expensive repair/upgrade.

(http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/m/71278/main.jpg)

At nearly 80K asking, it isn't an el cheapo, but it does have a lot of nice stuff added, and looks to be in sailaway condition. It's a cutter rigged sloop with a self-tending staysail, so it would be comparatively easy to sail short handed, I think. Still a bigger boat than I'd want to sail alone, but that's doable.

http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/71278 (http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/71278)





Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on June 25, 2018, 11:06:18 AM
In my youth I was a fan of center cockpits, but not now.  I like to have as much space as possible in the Main Cabin.  I DEFINITELY don't like the Walkover configuration. Want a snack from the galley? Sailing in cold blustery weather and need to use the head? If I were to buy a Center Cockpit, it would have to be one with a passageway to aft.

At $80K it's not entirely out of budget, but we have looked at nicer ones for $60K.

In any event, at the moment even to buy one just to live-aboard and not sail is out of the question.  I can't walk at all now, much less get myself on and off a boat  or up and down the companionway.  I am lucky I can maneuver my Cripple Cart around the digs to accomplish the necessary daily tasks.  The pain is horrible. 😣  I have to get into the ER and get some Morphine.  Even my scrip Hydro Codone doesn't put a dent in it.  Unfortunately, the phone is still not here.  Hopefully this situation will improve and I can get back to dreaming about the Good Ship Cassandra as my home on the Seven Seas.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on June 25, 2018, 11:36:51 AM
Sorry you're hurtin'.

Your sailing days might be over, but we can always entertain ourselves with online boat shopping. The possibilities are endless.

Walkovers aren't my favorite either, but a lot of CSY 44's are built that way. But not all of them. And where I'd likely sail, passing through the cockpit going to the fridge isn't much of a problem. This one has a full cockpit enclosure anyway, although it's all canvas and clear vinyl. They do that here and in FL so they can air-condition the cockpit when berthed. It gets hot here in the summer time.

In reality, I'd guess most live-aboards end up using the aft cabin for storage in a CSY anyway. LOL.

I'm trying to look at boats now that might be distress sales, in places like the Keys or FL Gulf Coast, because the hurricane took out so many boats here. The website for my favorite Rockport boat broker isn't even up anymore. Maybe they decided to retire. A favorite Houston broker closed too. I don't want a boat that needs a bunch of work before it can be sailed home, and most brokerage boats need something.

I keep looking, with the idea that I might just luck on to a fine deal I cant pass up. If I had a bigger retirement kitty, I'd quit the rat race and sail away.

If the missus steps in front of a bus, I'm done. I'm only working for her old age now. She is very healthy, but her own mother only lived five years longer than her age now, and my father only lived about seven years longer than my age now. Carpe diem for all of us. I wish you were in a little better health, so you could have more fun. Pain sucks. Immobility sucks.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on June 25, 2018, 11:49:48 AM
Center cockpit boats generally aren't as beautiful as aft cockpit boats. But it's the only way you can design a boat of under 40 feet and still get a big aft cabin, with privacy for two couples, which figures into the equation since a lot of these boats are built for bareboat charter when they're new.

A "modern" (1980 or newer)  38 ft center cockpit boat like my old sailing buddy's Endeavor 38 has more room below than a 50 ft Columbia or any of those other old long CCA rule boats. They're beamier and have a longer waterline. The waterline on a Columbia 50 is only 33.25 ft and the beam is only 12 ft.

Those older boats are much saltier looking boats though, and some of them sail to weather better too. But slips get rented by the foot. A small 50 ft boat still takes a 50 ft slip. The difference adds up.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on June 25, 2018, 12:28:14 PM
I did some amateur Interior Cabin design for boats when I was fantasizing reading Cruising World and Sailing Magazines back in the 70s.  Indeed, I found it about impossible to wedge in a passageway to a center cockpit at unde 40" but that boat is 44', so it is doable.

Pain sucks for sure.  This morning was an hour straight, with no morphine.  Not pleasant.  It finally subsided, thank god.  I gotta get into the ER.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on July 14, 2018, 04:03:46 PM
This one is in Galveston. It looks and sounds exceptional. Lots of nice electronics and very well rigged for single handing, not that I'd really want to singlehand this big boat. Not a great pic, but its a cutter sloop with both headsails roller furling and the main a stackpack.

Teak decks removed and replaced. Very spacious below. Check the pics. Really reasonable at 60K asking.

(https://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/30/18/6743018_20180616133937374_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1276097)

(https://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/30/18/6743018_20180616134439088_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1276097)

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1980/Cheoy-Lee-44-3223869/Kemah/TX/United-States?refSource=standard%20listing#.W0lTPthKjVo (https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1980/Cheoy-Lee-44-3223869/Kemah/TX/United-States?refSource=standard%20listing#.W0lTPthKjVo)

https://www.boattrader.com/listing/1980-cheoy-lee-44-103350016/ (https://www.boattrader.com/listing/1980-cheoy-lee-44-103350016/)

Really,really nice looking boat.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on August 07, 2018, 07:33:45 PM
RE, I would like to direct your attention to the interesting rear cockpit extension, which appears to be a place where one or two people can kick back in easy chairs on deck while actually under sail. There appears to be mounted a  table for serving cocktails. Southerners are so decadent. This one is in Bay St. Louis Mississippi.  An easy sail to Texas. Much easier than from NOLA.

C&C's are pretty good boats. They sail well, and the interior is way above average. One of the better deals I've seen lately at 40K asking. New diesel. Well equipped other than needing electronics.

The deck extension has a solar panel for function and shade, would work for dinghy davits, and looks like a good dive platform. The perfect boat for my bucket list trip to the Seven-and-a-Half Fathom Bank.   

(https://images.craigslist.org/00U0U_jOEIBNLSnqw_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00707_e3FmwkCU9nA_600x450.jpg)

https://gulfport.craigslist.org/boa/d/c-41-world-cruiser-liveaboard/6627916704.html

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on August 23, 2018, 01:00:55 PM
This one is on my local CL now. Interesting for a couple of reasons. In both Harvey and the Irma/Maria hurricanes, the most common big problem I saw was boats that got dismasted. Like...at anchor, or tied up in a good slip. It's one thing to get dismasted at sea when under sail but when the wind is bad enough to rip the bare pole off the boat with no sails up?

Shee-it! :icon_mrgreen:

This boat was probably a half million when new, and worth maybe 150-200K last year before the hurricane. Now it can't find a buyer for 25K. I'd look at it but I hate teak decks, which are apt to need replacing. If the decks are good and there are no topside leaks, this is a hell of a deal.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00h0h_3YrPw8PqO35_600x450.jpg)

Its the black hulled boat with the mast down. Other damage was minimal. The mast has been removed and probably could be welded. I've had it done before when I broke my old sailing buddy's mast. A good TIG welder can make it better than new. ;D

The boat is lying in the Corpus Christi downtown marina. Nicest marina in the state, in my view.

(https://images.craigslist.org/01313_izCY1fRNxGt_600x450.jpg)

https://austin.craigslist.org/boa/d/1983-mason-43/6676514884.html

Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on August 23, 2018, 01:19:56 PM
This little jewel gets an honorable mention because it's such a sweet little boat with lots of good gear and rigging. It's got air conditioning, which is important here. It's a Sea Sprite 28. Small, but capable of an ocean crossing, and a very well built boat. Yanmar diesel kicker, At $8500 it's cheaper than my used Donzi and it will fit in a $250/month slip. If the object is to sail the bay or the ocean and keep the budget sensible, you could do a lot worse.

Lying in Kemah (Houston/ClearLake). I'd sail it to Rockport or CC or maybe Palacious (only 2.5 hours from my place, the closest ocean port).



(https://images.craigslist.org/01616_icVoxNyJIdy_1200x900.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00E0E_4bjirK0botb_1200x900.jpg)

https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/sea-sprit-28-sailboat/6675578464.html



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on September 03, 2018, 12:29:31 PM
I'm not sure what it means, but it appears to be a thing in the world of sailboats. Suddenly, I am seeing many SMALLER well-equipped boats hit the block.

Demographics I would expect. Aging boomers, Small ocean capable cruisers are owned mostly not by liveaboard sailors, but just by people who love to sail the nearest waters to their home.

Demographics meets rising slip fees, although slip fees haven't gone crazy here like some places (yet). Perhaps the hurricane created too many empty slips. Supply and demand.

Here''s another S2. It's down in South Padre. Good upgrades but not great electronics. These boats were designed by Great Lakes area designers, most of them sail well and are of good build quality. Caveat emptor, of course.

(https://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/22/94/6712294_20180526065306603_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1277976)

(https://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/22/94/6712294_20180526065307150_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1277976)

https://www.boattrader.com/listing/1984-s-2-9.2-103328419/?refSource=standard%20listing (https://www.boattrader.com/listing/1984-s-2-9.2-103328419/?refSource=standard%20listing)



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on September 03, 2018, 01:42:13 PM
I'm not sure what it means, but it appears to be a thing in the world of sailboats. Suddenly, I am seeing many SMALLER well-equipped boats hit the block.

TOO small IMHO for a live aboard.  I know Ray Jason lives ona 30' boat, but that is just too spartan for me.  If I am full time living on the thing, 35' is about the minimum.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on September 03, 2018, 01:55:26 PM
I'd rather live on a 45-50 ft boat. I'd rather sail one 28-36 feet in most conditions.

For a single person who has pared down his/her possessions to the bare minimum, a 30 foot boat works okay for liveaboard. Not my situtation, of course.

I still dream of something like that big steel junk in Guatemala. Or this nicely rehabbed Gulfstar, lying down in Kemah.

I know I have badmouthed Gulfstar boats, but this one has had lots of remediation. Expensive for a used boat (in Texas, anyway) but not for a house. Cheap for a floating house.

(https://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/7/59/6730759_20180531135739129_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1279295)

https://www.boattrader.com/listing/1983-gulfstar-sailmaster-103385139/ (https://www.boattrader.com/listing/1983-gulfstar-sailmaster-103385139/)

Anchored out it'd be great. In a slip, it's about double the slip rent of one of those smaller boats.



Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on September 03, 2018, 04:17:55 PM
I'd rather live on a 45-50 ft boat. I'd rather sail one 28-36 feet in most conditions.

For a single person who has pared down his/her possessions to the bare minimum, a 30 foot boat works okay for liveaboard. Not my situtation, of course.

I still dream of something like that big steel junk in Guatemala. Or this nicely rehabbed Gulfstar, lying down in Kemah.

I know I have badmouthed Gulfstar boats, but this one has had lots of remediation. Expensive for a used boat (in Texas, anyway) but not for a house. Cheap for a floating house.

(https://images0.boattrader.com/resize/1/7/59/6730759_20180531135739129_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1279295)

https://www.boattrader.com/listing/1983-gulfstar-sailmaster-103385139/ (https://www.boattrader.com/listing/1983-gulfstar-sailmaster-103385139/)

Anchored out it'd be great. In a slip, it's about double the slip rent of one of those smaller boats.

You have the Goldilocks problem.  First you pick one too small, then one too big.  38-44' is JUST RIGHT.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on September 03, 2018, 04:37:36 PM
A lot of midsized boats (probably the most common boats around here on the coast) seem to have been destroyed last year. Almost none for sale right now.

That Cheoy Lee 44 I posted meets your criteria, and it's still listed at 50K. That and the Hardin 42 (also still for sale) and the Formosa 41 here on the lake.

Those two boats (the Formosa and the Hardin) appear to be the same exact design, built under a different name or by a different Taiwan yard back in the day.

(https://www.sailboatlistings.com/sailimg/m/72319/main.jpg)
50K now, down from 70, fairly well set up, lying Kemah

(http://www.sailingtexas.com/Pics8/picformosa41103c.jpg)
35K on the local lake, which is falling fast. Needs sails and electronics
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on September 03, 2018, 04:43:48 PM
Better choices there.  :icon_sunny:

Now we gotta move them out of TX.  Too fucking hot.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on September 09, 2018, 09:14:08 AM
Scandinavian built boats age well. This one is a walk-over, but it's built like a brick shithouse, and it has a mid-life 75 hp turbo Yanmar (about 2X the usual size kicker), and you could motorsail an awful long way, at good speed. Pretty close to the perfect boat for one or two people.

35 footer, a bit pricey maybe at 56K, but not considering the upgrades, new rigging, etc. Lying in Kemah, less than 3 hours drive away. The cabin, the electronics....pretty much ready to go anywhere, anytime.



(https://images.boats.com/resize/1/40/4/6754004_20180625074059222_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1529618275000&w=900&h=900)

(https://images.boats.com/resize/1/40/4/6754004_20180625074101547_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1529618275000&w=900&h=900)

(https://images.boats.com/resize/1/40/4/6754004_20180625074103252_1_LARGE.jpg?t=1529618275000&w=900&h=900)


https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1973/Hallberg-Rassy-Rasmus-35-3223014/Kemah/TX/United-States?refSource=enhanced%20listing&refSource=enhanced%20listing&refSource=enhanced%20listing#.W5VD8pNKjVo (https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1973/Hallberg-Rassy-Rasmus-35-3223014/Kemah/TX/United-States?refSource=enhanced%20listing&refSource=enhanced%20listing&refSource=enhanced%20listing#.W5VD8pNKjVo)
Title: ⛵ Not going Sailing Today
Post by: RE on September 16, 2018, 01:23:24 AM
I guess she came off her moorings...

(https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/180914115424-11-hurricane-florence-0914-exlarge-169.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: ⛵ Not going Sailing Today
Post by: Surly1 on September 16, 2018, 04:23:50 AM
I guess she came off her moorings...

(https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/180914115424-11-hurricane-florence-0914-exlarge-169.jpg)

RE

Ya think?
Title: 🚣 Michael, Row Your Boat Ashore
Post by: RE on September 23, 2018, 12:21:29 AM

When I was very young, perhaps 4 or so before we left for Brazil, I went out with my sister and her friend Michael in a Rowboat at Rockaway Beach in Queens, NY Shity.  We got caught by a rip tide and Michael had to get us rowed back into shore.  He managed it, but what took only around 20 minutes to get offshore took probably 4 hours for him to get us back to the pier.  I was scared out of my wits, I remember that well.  We sang "Micheal Row Your Boat ashore" probably a 100 times.

http://www.youtube.com/v/pd_5-2kCzfs
Mostly we remember Pete Seeger as an Old Man.  But Pete was an amazing and captivating performer when he was young.  Remember also, this was the time Pete was called before the Army-McCarthy hearings and was Blacklisted in the Communist Purge.  Tell me again there was ever a time Amerika wasn't a Fascist State.  I dare you.

I never went offshore in a rowboat again after that.  These guys were just nuts.

RE

https://www.geeky-gadgets.com/the-samson-row-boat-heading-across-the-atlantic-10-10-2014/ (https://www.geeky-gadgets.com/the-samson-row-boat-heading-across-the-atlantic-10-10-2014/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/PjJLmj16ZY4

The Samson Row Boat Heading Across The Atlantic (video)

12:43 pm October 10, 2014 By Julian Horsey

(https://www.geeky-gadgets.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/The-Samson.jpg)
The Samson

Experienced rower Andras Bakos and his teammate are currently in the final preparations to row across the Atlantic in a specially designed rowboat called The Samson.

The Samson has been in development since 2011 and has been built in conjunction with LOMOcean Design, the design firm that also helped designed and created the TURANOR PlanetSolar solar-powered yacht, and the Earthrace alternative fuel-powered boat.

The Samson measures 13.4 x 2.9 meters in size and has a dry weight of 650 kg, but fully laden with all the supplies the team will require for the Trans-Atlantic crossing the boat weighs in at 1.2 tonnes. The rowboat is not equipped with any motors or sales and relies entirely on the two rowing stations and its crew for propulsion.

The team comprises of already mentioned Andras Bakos and New Zealand-based expedition partner Erik Harrewijn who will be rowing 24 hours a day to make the 3,800-mile crossing in somewhere between 60 to 80 days. The team is also looking for help to fund the adventure over on the Indiegogo website. Andras explains a little more :

“I had decided to row across the Atlantic ocean in a way that nobody else did it before,”-“Certainly it is a personal challenge as well (if it would not be, better to not even start) but the main cause is to draw the attention of the widest public possible for the critical need of the environmental preservation, as Earth is the only place where our children can live.”

For more information on the new Trans Atlantic crossing and the futuristic boat the team will use watch the video below or jump over to the official or Indiegogo website for details.

Title: ⛵ Heating & Lighting your Seastead or Roadstead with Oil Lamps
Post by: RE on October 05, 2018, 09:17:48 AM
I have been experimenting a lot with Candle Making and with Oil Lamps lately, it's my new Collapse Prepping hobby.  :icon_sunny:  I'm going to write further articles and make more videos on this topic, but I ran across this Utoob vid while researching how much heat you can get out of candles and lamps as emergency heating and lighting sources.  This Seasteader uses an Aladdin Oil Lamp which I think he fires with Kero, which comes in about 1/4 the price of Liquid Paraffin.  It's a dirtier fuel though, and a bit stinky.  Paraffin burns much cleaner and there is no smell unless of course you add a scent to your mixture.  Aroma Therapy is supposed to be very soothing and good for your state of mind, although for me I find just watching the fire burn is soothing enough.

His result with 1 lamp burning raised his cabin temp from 10C to 21C. Looks like about a 30' Seastead. I'm going to experiment in SaVANnah over the winter to see what it will take to make the cabin space comfortable.

http://www.youtube.com/v/AVBCWe0t5Jg

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on October 07, 2018, 01:38:48 PM
This is an ugly boat that has some beautiful things about it. It is one of those old style CCA rule boats that is small inside for it's length. But it's big enough to be a nice liveaboard.

It's for sale in Houston for $8000. Not a bad price in my view.

https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/1974-columbia-41-center/6716097225.html

They built so many of these Columbias in the early days of mass boat manufacturing, there are lots of them out there, and I've been aboard a couple. They were mostly designed by a guy named Bill Tripp. What I like about them (even the small ones under 30 feet) is that they are built for people to be comfortable in. They all have standing headroom. They have nice berths. They have small but well laid out galleys. This 41 footer is NOT a walkover.

I expect what this boat needs is just some updated rigging and sails and electronics. Some of these boats get some soft spots in their deck cores, but they are easier to fix than some fancy teak decked upscale yacht, which have decks that need to be ripped completely off and rebuilt.

(https://images.craigslist.org/00k0k_apQYJS5es3D_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00i0i_3ycBjYiFIPJ_600x450.jpg)

(https://images.craigslist.org/00Z0Z_2bWiMUDm70J_600x450.jpg)

I like that swim platform add-on. Great for diving.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on October 07, 2018, 01:52:40 PM
It's for sale in Houston for $8000. Not bad price in my view.

Great price!  Right size also for comfortable live aboard.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on October 07, 2018, 02:02:34 PM
It's for sale in Houston for $8000. Not bad price in my view.

Great price!  Right size also for comfortable live aboard.

RE

When RE says the price is great, the price is GREAT! LOL.

I doubt it's ready to go offshore, but it looks like a nice boat, if you aren't too hung up on looks.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on October 07, 2018, 02:26:09 PM
It's for sale in Houston for $8000. Not bad price in my view.

Great price!  Right size also for comfortable live aboard.

RE

When RE says the price is great, the price is GREAT! LOL.

I doubt it's ready to go offshore, but it looks like a nice boat, if you aren't too hung up on looks.

For that price, I got no problem with ugly.  Ad doesn't say how many hours are on the engine though, or what the fuel and water storage capacity is.  Not planning to go offshore even if the legs are miraculously repaired, just coastal sailing around Bar Harbor.  Would have to get the boat up there though.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on October 07, 2018, 02:39:27 PM
There is a reason old boats end up in Texas. It isn't a slam dunk to sail east and north.  You can do it, but it takes time, which people tend to not have an excess of these days.

Almost always better to buy a boat either near where you want to be...or somewhere that it easy to sail towards. Since my fantasies lean toward the Caribbean, from BVI to the east and central America to the west, a boat found in Texas is good..and I can use it on weekends until the day I sail off into the sunset, when and if...and if I don't 8K wouldn't break the bank.

The slip, and making sure the boat is kept clean and in usable condition, is the hard part anyway.

I can look at that boat and already think of some cool things I could do to make it better without spending a lot....which makes looking at it dangerous.

Nice boat for the money.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: RE on October 07, 2018, 02:54:49 PM
There is a reason old boats end up in Texas. It isn't a slam dunk to sail east and north.  You can do it, but it takes time, which people tend to not have an excess of these days.

Almost always better to buy a boat either near where you want to be...or somewhere that it easy to sail towards. Since my fantasies lean toward the Caribbean, from BVI to the east and central America to the west, a boat found in Texas is good..and I can use it on weekends until the day I sail off into the sunset, when and if...and if I don't 8K wouldn't break the bank.

The slip, and making sure the boat is kept clean and in usable condition, is the hard part anyway.

I can look at that boat and already think of some cool things I could do to make it better without spending a lot....which makes looking at it dangerous.

Nice boat for the money.

Gotta hope no more Hurricanes hit Houston until you are ready to sail into the sunset.  Also, gotta put in Air Conditioning down there.

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day
Post by: Eddie on October 07, 2018, 03:13:42 PM
There is a reason old boats end up in Texas. It isn't a slam dunk to sail east and north.  You can do it, but it takes time, which people tend to not have an excess of these days.

Almost always better to buy a boat either near where you want to be...or somewhere that it easy to sail towards. Since my fantasies lean toward the Caribbean, from BVI to the east and central America to the west, a boat found in Texas is good..and I can use it on weekends until the day I sail off into the sunset, when and if...and if I don't 8K wouldn't break the bank.

The slip, and making sure the boat is kept clean and in usable condition, is the hard part anyway.

I can look at that boat and already think of some cool things I could do to make it better without spending a lot....which makes looking at it dangerous.

Nice boat for the money.

Gotta hope no more Hurricanes hit Houston until you are ready to sail into the sunset.  Also, gotta put in Air Conditioning down there.

RE

My fantasy marina is either the CC city marina, which is a really nice place and fairly reasonable, or maybe one (of one or two) in Port Aransas, which cost a bit more and aren't quite as nice, but are close to the beach and the blue water. Houston is an okay place to keep a boat, and has some cheaper marinas that are adequate, from what I hear from other people. CC city marina is good for bay sailing, and Houston, same thing. Rockport is not convenient to anything, but it's quaint and has (or maybe had) good food,

Palacios is on Matagorda Bay, way off the beaten path...a little cheaper and not too far from here. It's more a fishing town, and the town was built by Dow Chemical, which probably means if you swim in the water you grow a tumor of some kind.....

ALL those places are exposed to storms and AC is necessary, at least at dockside. Insurance is a cost of boat ownership, as long as BAU persists.

I lean toward buying a boat in Florida or Mobile and sailing it here.  That one sail would be a worthy adventure, and I only plan to buy one more big boat (if that), so it makes the best sense to me to try to buy something I really love, vs. some kind of compromise that needs a lot of work. Right now the selection there is better than the selection here. None of this will happen unless I sell the stead or have some kind of unforeseen financial windfall.

But I have a feeling it might happen. I'm not obsessing about it.
Title: Seastead of the Day - Titanic II due to set sail in 2022
Post by: azozeo on November 03, 2018, 05:27:23 PM

The Titanic is under construction again - at least a replica of the famous ship - 105 years after the original passenger liner sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton in England to New York City, reported TVNZ.

Titanic II is scheduled to set sail in 2022 and will retrace the original ship’s route, USA Today reports.
The project was first announced in 2012, but was put on hold after a financial dispute.

Now that the issue has been resolved, Blue Star Line has announced construction has re-started.


https://newsonia.com/reader/report/titanic-ii-due-to-set-sail-in-2022/
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day - Titanic II due to set sail in 2022
Post by: RE on November 03, 2018, 05:47:36 PM

The Titanic is under construction again - at least a replica of the famous ship - 105 years after the original passenger liner sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton in England to New York City, reported TVNZ.

Titanic II is scheduled to set sail in 2022 and will retrace the original ship’s route, USA Today reports.
The project was first announced in 2012, but was put on hold after a financial dispute.

Now that the issue has been resolved, Blue Star Line has announced construction has re-started.


https://newsonia.com/reader/report/titanic-ii-due-to-set-sail-in-2022/

What a GREAT idea!  Only an Arab Sheik could exhibit such genius!

RE
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day - Titanic II due to set sail in 2022
Post by: Eddie on November 03, 2018, 05:51:53 PM

The Titanic is under construction again - at least a replica of the famous ship - 105 years after the original passenger liner sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton in England to New York City, reported TVNZ.

Titanic II is scheduled to set sail in 2022 and will retrace the original ship’s route, USA Today reports.
The project was first announced in 2012, but was put on hold after a financial dispute.

Now that the issue has been resolved, Blue Star Line has announced construction has re-started.


https://newsonia.com/reader/report/titanic-ii-due-to-set-sail-in-2022/

So...some people think that there might be more rather than fewer icebergs to dodge now.

I'm way too superstitious to book a crossing on a ship named after the world's most famous shipwreck, one that is bound and determined to try to sail the very same route, at a time when both ice and weather are more random than they were in 1912.

God has a great sense of humor.

Maybe this time a giant methane bubble will come up from below the ship and pop.....the Titanic II will fall thousands of feet to the bottom,  while the passengers are being asphyxiated by the methane. Then the ship will break up and explode when the wreck ignites the gas.

No thank you. I'd rather kayak across.
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day - Titanic II due to set sail in 2022
Post by: Surly1 on November 03, 2018, 06:15:42 PM

The Titanic is under construction again - at least a replica of the famous ship - 105 years after the original passenger liner sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton in England to New York City, reported TVNZ.

Titanic II is scheduled to set sail in 2022 and will retrace the original ship’s route, USA Today reports.
The project was first announced in 2012, but was put on hold after a financial dispute.

Now that the issue has been resolved, Blue Star Line has announced construction has re-started.


https://newsonia.com/reader/report/titanic-ii-due-to-set-sail-in-2022/

What a GREAT idea!  Only an Arab Sheik could exhibit such genius!

RE

What could possibly go wrong? :exp-angel:
Title: Re: Seastead of the Day - Titanic II due to set sail in 2022
Post by: azozeo on November 03, 2018, 06:37:36 PM

The Titanic is under construction again - at least a replica of the famous ship - 105 years after the original passenger liner sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton in England to New York City, reported TVNZ.

Titanic II is scheduled to set sail in 2022 and will retrace the original ship’s route, USA Today reports.
The project was first announced in 2012, but was put on hold after a financial dispute.

Now that the issue has been resolved, Blue Star Line has announced construction has re-started.


https://newsonia.com/reader/report/titanic-ii-due-to-set-sail-in-2022/

So...some people think that there might be more rather than fewer icebergs to dodge now.

I'm way too superstitious to book a crossing on a ship named after the world's most famous shipwreck, one that is bound and determined to try to sail the very same route, at a time when both ice and weather are more random than they were in 1912.

God has a great sense of humor.

Maybe this time a giant methane bubble will come up from below the ship and pop.....the Titanic II will fall thousands of feet to the bottom,  while the passengers are being asphyxiated by the methane. Then the ship will break up and explode when the wreck ignites the gas.

No thank you. I'd rather kayak across.


What a glass pipe experience. HO-LEE sheet, no wonder C5 calls this place his watering hole HAHA  :icon_mrgreen:

I'll lay $20 at the sports book at Caesars on DiCaprio gracing all the minions with his presence on the maiden voyage.