Doomstead Diner Menu => Environment => Topic started by: g on January 14, 2013, 01:23:21 PM

Title: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on January 14, 2013, 01:23:21 PM
62 degrees in Boston and sunny right now, forecast to go down to a high of only 20 with sun by the end of the week. Second winter of crazy weather, something HAS to be going on.   :icon_scratch: :icon_sunny:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 14, 2013, 06:49:09 PM
Santa fe to Siberia in a week. Its everywhere, North Korea looks like the north pole right now, at the time of hurricane sandy there was a freezing wind blowing here at the start of summer, and a record heatwave followed by a really cool swing down to autumn temps on the east coast of oz.

Maybe WHD can tell us what this does to the fruit trees trying to work out whether to hibernate and the rest of the natural cycle of bees and plants when theres 4 seasons in a season.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on January 14, 2013, 07:01:25 PM
Yup.   Tuscon AZ has a hard freeze warning tonight, with forecast low temperature @ 22F.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: luciddreams on January 14, 2013, 07:08:38 PM
yesterday it was 72 degrees in upstate SC.  It's supposed to be in the 20's.  I've got the flu and I don't wonder why.  This sucks. 
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on January 14, 2013, 07:26:39 PM
Quote
Maybe WHD can tell us what this does to the fruit trees trying to work out whether to hibernate and the rest of the natural cycle of bees and plants when theres 4 seasons in a season.

Simple, Uncle Bob. No fruit.

Last spring, it was 80F in March when it was supposed to be 30 and snowing 12 inches at a time. About 11 high temp record breakers in an eighteen day stretch.  Apple and cherry trees all burst out with color; then an April hard freeze (nothing extraordinary) knocked out alot of the apple buds and wiped out the cherries. All over the Midwest. Then there was the drought, of course.

It really does make all those projections about 10 billion in 2050, mostly wishful thinking, if this climate chaos accelerates. If it accelerates, we're going to have a harder time feeding what we have.   
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on January 14, 2013, 08:12:59 PM
Quote
Maybe WHD can tell us what this does to the fruit trees trying to work out whether to hibernate and the rest of the natural cycle of bees and plants when theres 4 seasons in a season.

Simple, Uncle Bob. No fruit.

Last spring, it was 80F in March when it was supposed to be 30 and snowing 12 inches at a time. About 11 high temp record breakers in an eighteen day stretch.  Apple and cherry trees all burst out with color; then an April hard freeze (nothing extraordinary) knocked out alot of the apple buds and wiped out the cherries. All over the Midwest. Then there was the drought, of course.

It really does make all those projections about 10 billion in 2050, mostly wishful thinking, if this climate chaos accelerates. If it accelerates, we're going to have a harder time feeding what we have.

"They say" world population is still growing.  Maybe so. 

But on the track we are on, it would not be surprising to see peak weather volitility, peak food production, peak energy production, peak debt, and yes, peak population, all in this decade.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on January 14, 2013, 08:35:10 PM
Quote
But on the track we are on, it would not be surprising to see peak weather volitility, peak food production, peak energy production, peak debt, and yes, peak population, all in this decade.

Yeah; anybody else feel like Dec 21, 2012 was a turning point? LOL

Permanent crisis.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on January 14, 2013, 08:57:43 PM
Permanent crisis

Some thought it was underway quite some time ago:
 
"Humanity is moving ever deeper into crisis--A crisis without precedent... Brought about by cosmic evolution intent upon transforming humanity into a completely integrated harmonious whole".

Buckminister Fuller -- from the intro to his book "Critical Path" 1981  (edited for brevity)
 
Perhaps 12/21/2012 was a shift to a higher velocity.   ie. We shifted from a linear growth of crises to an exponential growth.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 14, 2013, 09:58:22 PM
"Dark.....Knight..........Rises", released on DVD Blu Ray in Dec 2012, cue spooky music, containing written references of two massacres happening that same year, aurora and sandy, one even being in the premierre of the same movie earlier in 2012. Revelation says about the dark knight, "let him who hath understanding calculate the number of the beast for the number is that of a man, six hundred and sixty six" (666), Rosemary's baby/Jason is a just a sudanese economista, whocoodanode.

But seriously, maybe the end of 2012 will mark a point where the stage was set for the show to start.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on January 15, 2013, 07:36:19 AM
...drifting back to topic  ;)


Record minus 24 in Ely; bitter cold grips Nevada
 

The Associated Press
 
Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 | 2:18 p.m.
 


Weather forecasters warned northern Nevadans to brace for more bitter cold as the temperature dropped to a record minus 24 in Ely early Monday and wind chills were expected to drop to near 40 below as winds pick up Monday night into Tuesday.

The National Weather Service issued a wind-chill advisory for White Pine County on the Utah line effective 9 p.m. Monday through 9 a.m. Tuesday. Ely's record set early Monday blew away the old mark of minus 17 set in 2007.

Winds up to 15 mph will raise the threat of frost bite and hypothermia in the area, including Great Basin National Park. Other lows early Monday:

-21 Winnemucca

-19 Truckee, Calif.

-12 Elko

-12 Lovelock

-11 South Lake Tahoe, Calif.

-7 Fallon

-4 Jackpot

-2 Minden

http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2013/jan/14/nv-cold-nevada/ (http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2013/jan/14/nv-cold-nevada/)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 15, 2013, 04:55:38 PM
SL
Do they have any predictions on what that would do to the wildlife or livestock in the area? Penguins and polar bears etc that are adapted to those temps can overheat at 0C/25F....
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on January 15, 2013, 06:04:52 PM
SL
Do they have any predictions on what that would do to the wildlife or livestock in the area? Penguins and polar bears etc that are adapted to those temps can overheat at 0C/25F....

Haven't seen any such predictions. 

Much of the area will remain below the freezing point for at least another week.  Some valleys subject to inversion will have temps below 0 F at night.  That will keep ranchers w/o frost free hydrants busy watering stock and keeping horses and other cold sensitive stock warm.  Some may be able to move stock to higher south facing slopes for warmth and water.  Cold is normal in January in Northern Nevada, not usually this intense though.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on January 16, 2013, 04:57:11 AM
Remember me stating this thread Monday afternoon writing about the over sixty degree balmy weather in Boston?

Just finished shoveling five inches of snow off my front stairs.   :D   :icon_scratch:


Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on January 16, 2013, 06:30:55 AM
Remember me stating this thread Monday afternoon writing about the over sixty degree balmy weather in Boston?

Just finished shoveling five inches of snow off my front stairs.   :D   :icon_scratch:



Not quite so extreme here:

Temps approached 50 F in the last few days and melted most of the ice off of the driveway.  We even got the two wheel drive car up to the cabin!  Snowcover was reduced to about 70%.

The snow is back! 

Sometime today i'll be plowing it.   There's 3-4" on the driveway now, with 3-5" more forecast by evening. 

Unlikely i'll see mail or UPS today.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 17, 2013, 08:37:19 PM
Just about the whole south east of oz  smashed the hottest day on record today Sydney alone at 46C/117F, unbelievable,  meanwhile bushfires still burn.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on March 20, 2013, 08:33:35 PM
Buried in a foot of snow for first day of spring in Boston, unheard of. It was 60 degrees quite a few days in January. In the thirties for a high today and 20 for tonight again.
Anyone who thinks the weather hasn't changed much recently has got to be just kidding  :laugh:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: In parts of Plains, Drought Fears Nag in 3rd year
Post by: g on May 05, 2013, 06:32:02 AM

 
FREDERICK, Okla.—When Kent Walker walked through his dusty fields one morning this spring, the ominous signs were right there at his feet. His wheat crop that should have been thick, dark green and thigh-high was thin, brown and barely covered the top of his shoes. It looked like the start of an ugly rerun.

Last year, most of his cotton crop was destroyed by drought. In 2011, almost all his cotton and wheat were stunted or shriveled. Walker sold about a third of his cattle then because he didn't have water and feed. Now, more dry months—compounded by four deadly freezes this spring—threaten once again. And after surveying his fields, white cowboy hat shading his eyes, he sums up his frustration.

"Dadgummit," he says. "... It's very trying. It tries your patience. It tries your faith. Bottom line: Every day you just have to go out and trust in God that all will be fine ... and roll on to the next day."

Walker's resilience echoes across the southwest corner of Oklahoma as fears of a third straight year of drought ripple through this vast prairie where the dry spell has left visible scars: Ponds that are nearly or totally empty. Dead cedar trees. Sprouting weeds, fewer cows, bald pastures that resemble dirt roads instead of lush, green fields.

"You always know that there's going to be a year when you have a failed crop or some sort of disaster," Walker says. "Normally you can manage one year, but when you go to two or three years, you're left questioning your choice of occupation. It can set you back on your heels."

Still, he remains an optimist. Though as much as 80 percent of his wheat may be damaged from the drought and freeze, he sees any losses as a temporary setback. "We won't shut down," says Walker, who farms with his father. "We will get through this one way or another."

The merciless drought that ravaged large sections of the Midwest and Plains is over, disappearing this spring in a dramatic weather reversal: heavy rains and floods swamping fields with mud in many areas. But some farmers and ranchers in parts of the West and the Plains, including southwest Oklahoma, are pondering the prospect of another year of a desert-like landscape and a disappointing harvest.

It's far too soon for predictions. Rain this winter and spring blanketed central and eastern Oklahoma, bringing relief to a state that marked its hottest year ever in 2012 and its driest May-through-December on record, according to Gary McManus, associate state climatologist. But the western third of Oklahoma, including the Panhandle, remains gripped by drought, along with stretches of the central Plains from South Dakota down to west Texas and parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and Nevada.

For some, this year may be a tipping point, says Mark Svoboda of the National Drought Mitigation Center. "A drought really tests your coping capacity," he says. "You either adapt or you sell out and move on. .... If you're going on year three—those places that are set up best, they're going to survive it—and the others won't."

Two years of heat and far too little rain already have drained Oklahoma agriculture of more than $1.1 billion in direct losses, according to Oklahoma State University. In that time, farmers and ranchers sold nearly one in five of their cattle as ponds and creeks dried up and feed became scarce.

It's a scenario Oklahomans know only too well and dread—parched earth, blowing dust, burned crops. During the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s, boiling dark masses of dirt, some thousands of feet high, rolled along, blotting out the sun. That ecological disaster, coupled with the Great Depression, triggered a mass migration west. In the 1950s, there was another devastating dry spell.

This time around, it has rained, just not enough.

In Jackson County, northwest of here, a lake that supplies water for irrigation is only 17 percent full, says Jantz Bain, manager of Humphreys Cooperative in Altus. "For virtually 50 years," he says, "the good Lord has been consistent in letting the lake fill up, and now ..."

His cotton gin hasn't made enough money to break even the last two years, he says, and the drought and freeze packed a one-two punch, already dooming a lot of the county's wheat. "So far, everybody is hanging on by their fingernails," Bain says. "We can't take much more of this ... These people want to grow a crop. That's what they do. It's no different than a doctor with no patients."

Keeff Felty, a fourth-generation farmer in Altus, hasn't been able to grow cotton the last two years. "It's getting old, it's really getting old not being able to harvest anything," he says. "You give it everything you have ... and there's nothing more frustrating than spending all day out there and not having anything to haul away."

Like most farmers, he can tick off good and bad years, just like an avid sports fan remembers his team's winning and losing seasons. There were boom times in 2010: That's when the co-op where he's part-owner processed about 122,000 bales at its cotton gin, he says. The next year, there wasn't enough to run the gin. And in 2012, he says, there were a meager 7,000 bales.

Crop insurance is a safety net—and a salvation—for many farmers. "I don't know anyone who could have stood the last two years without it," Felty says. But it doesn't cover the full costs of replacement or measure how a disaster in the fields ripples down Main Street.

Here in Tillman County—a land of big skies, postcard-sized Western silver belt buckles and relatively few people (9 per square mile)—everyone has a stake in the weather. It's more than farmers and ranchers who suffer from drought.

It's the cotton gin workers with little or nothing to do. The truckers who have less grain to haul. The gas station owner who sells less fuel. The tractor dealer who watches his inventory sit on the lot. The banker who makes fewer loans, resulting in less interest. The merchants who cut back on 4-H donations. The hundreds of wheat harvesters who travel here each summer—and now may now cut their stay short.

And on and on until it reaches the door of the Subway shop owned by Jim Ard, who can measure the number of foot-long sandwiches he sells by how wet or dry it is in any planting season.

"It's very much the domino effect," says Ard, who, like almost everyone here, has a hand in farming (he owns a few cows). "The drought touches everybody, whether you're young or old, no matter what you do."

But it's not always obvious in this county 20 miles north of the Texas border. Drive along and you'll see green horizons, but a few inches below, the soil is dry and hard as concrete, says Aaron Henson, the county's agriculture extension agent. If the drought ended tomorrow, he says, it would take another three to five years for the pastures to fully recover.

With the wheat harvest and cotton planting approaching, nerves are frayed. "People wonder how many times will the crop fail again before someone won't give me more money to buy more time," he says.

Henson says that in the past two years, ranchers in the county—which endured 101 days of 100-degree-plus weather in 2011—have sold or moved more than half their cattle to greener pastures, elsewhere in Oklahoma or out of state.

Last year, hay became valuable enough to steal. But with just five deputies to patrol 900-square miles, the sheriff's office turned to technology to find the culprits. A global positioning device was tucked in a 1,200-pound bale. When the hay started rolling off a farm, the sheriff was alerted. He followed a pickup, waited until two men hauled away another bale, then made the arrests.

Those thefts are over, but the hope for rain and the danger of more drought loom everywhere.

This spring, one rural preacher has been holding pray-for-rain services every Sunday night. He frequently turns to the New Testament, 2 Chronicles: "If ... I shut up heaven that there be no rain ..."

The city manager has been warily eyeing two lakes that supply Frederick's water; they're now at 37 percent of capacity.

And Ard, the local merchant, has been thinking about the future of Frederick, where the population, nearly 4,000, has shrunk by about 15 percent since 2000.

"This town could dry up," he says. "We have an opportunity to grow or die. Many communities up and down this highway have already died. They're shadows of what they once were. Everybody is running to the city for a better economy. A drought comes along and it can be another nail in the coffin."

It's a legitimate concern, says Ryan McMullen, state director of USDA rural development. In some counties north of here, the oil and gas boom has helped offset drought-related losses. But in towns solely reliant on agriculture, the outlook is dire.

"Everybody has watched this population decline for generations," he says. "There has been a long-term sense of despair, but it now feels this latest drought might be too much to overcome. That's saying a lot for communities that have maintained a population since the Dust Bowl. These are tough, salt-of-the-earth folks that don't call it quits easily."

Louis Box isn't going anywhere. Sitting in his office in a cowhide leather chair, wearing cowhide boots, watching a cattle auction from a live video feed on his computer, the 74-year-old farm supply store owner isn't worried. In more than a half-century of growing wheat and raising cattle, he's seen it all—tornadoes, droughts, hailstorms, insects—sometimes, he says, all in the same year.

"It hasn't been a death blow. Not at all," he says. "I think it's going to slow things down, definitely. If you come back in six months, I might talk differently. But you've got to be an eternal optimist or you wouldn't be farming. ... People are not selling out and leaving. ... There's greater opportunity to make money AND go broke than there ever has been."

Clint Abernathy is staying put, too. At 54, the fourth-generation farmer now has a fifth—his two adult sons—at his side.

Farming, he says, is all about understanding cycles.

"After a long run of good years, we all expected a bad one," he says. "We just didn't expect anything to be so severe.... I'd be lying if I said I don't worry. I do. But you can't let it get the best of you. If this would have happened in my 20s, I would really be taking it hard. Being a bit older, you realize there's nothing you can do."

With two bad years—and possibly a third—Abernathy presses on.

"It gets in your blood," he says. "We'll do it for nothing. We'd never give up. We'll keep trying. It'll turn around. It always has and it always will."

http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/usnews/ci_23172415/parts-plains-drought-fears-nag-3rd-year (http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/usnews/ci_23172415/parts-plains-drought-fears-nag-3rd-year)  :icon_study:

Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Thousands flee as central Europe flood waters rise
Post by: g on June 03, 2013, 04:23:11 AM
Thousands of people have fled their homes across central Europe as deadly flood waters continue to rise.

Emergency operations are under way in Austria, Germany and the Czech Republic to deal with record levels of flooding in some places.

Landslides and flooding have led to the deaths of at least four people. At least eight people are missing.

In Germany, more than 7,000 people have been moved from their homes in the town of Eilenburg, reports say.

The Czech capital, Prague, is on high alert amid fears that floodwater could swamp its historic centre.

More than 2,500 people have been forced to leave their homes in the capital and the surrounding region, Radio Prague reports. Animals from Prague's zoo have also been moved.

Underground stations have been closed and schools shut as Prague officials wait and see whether the Vltava River will flood its banks.

Czech Prime Minister Petr Necas called a special cabinet session on Sunday to co-ordinate the emergency response, and around 1,000 troops were mobilised to help erect metal barriers and fill sandbags.

"We will do everything to protect people's lives and health," he said. "Tonight and tomorrow will be critical."

The BBC's Rob Cameron in Prague says the city is hoping that the defences it installed after devastating floods in 2002 will work.

At risk is the 14th Century Charles Bridge and other historic buildings close to the river bank, he says.
Disaster zone

Main roads in many areas of central Europe have been closed and rail services cut. In some areas, electricity has been turned off as a precaution.

Outside Prague, two people were killed and four reported missing when a house collapsed. The body of a man in his 50s was found close to swollen river waters north-east of Prague and two people are missing after their raft overturned south-west of the capital.

In Austria, the meteorological service said two months of rain had fallen in just two days.

A man was found dead near Salzburg after being swept away as he worked to clear a landslip, and three further people are missing.

More than 300 people were moved from their homes in Salzburg and the neighbouring Tyrol as the army worked with the civil authorities to clear landslides and make roads passable.

Parts of the Pinzgau region, which includes Taxenbach, have been declared a disaster zone.

In Germany, Bavaria's flood alert service has warned that the forecast of continuing heavy rain is likely to worsen the flooding affecting the Danube and the Inn, among other rivers in the area.

The German cities of Passau and Rosenheim have declared a state of emergency.

Authorities in Passau, which lies at the confluence of three rivers in Bavaria, said waters could rise above the record levels of 2002.

Towns and cities in Saxony, Thuringia and Baden-Wuerttemberg have also been inundated by flooding, and the army has been deployed to help with the emergency effort.

In northern Saxony, water levels on the River Mulde were said to be particularly high.

A large area of Eilenburg north-east of Leipzig was evacuated, reports said, with 7,000 people being taken to emergency shelters.

Chancellor Angela Merkel has discussed the floods in phone-calls with the premiers of Bavaria and Saxony, the paper says.
                                             
67940101 tiger
67940101 tiger
 
Footage shows animals at Prague zoo being moved to higher ground, and submerged emergency vehicles, cars and homes in other parts of Europe
 
                 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22752544#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22752544#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa)  :icon_study:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Thousands flee as central Europe flood waters rise
Post by: RE on June 03, 2013, 04:35:13 AM
Thousands of people have fled their homes across central Europe as deadly flood waters continue to rise.

That's how it goes.  Everybody Knows.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on June 03, 2013, 05:30:26 AM
Have not seen this in the MSM, maybe they only report flooding in europe in winter but not summer.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on June 03, 2013, 05:38:10 AM
Have not seen this in the MSM, maybe they only report flooding in europe in winter but not summer.

Yes Unc, Where BBC is considered MSM, they seem to have a lot of news the MSM here just doesn't report.  :icon_scratch:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on June 03, 2013, 06:30:04 PM
Quote
Yes Unc, Where BBC is considered MSM, they seem to have a lot of news the MSM here just doesn't report.   :icon_scratch:

It will interesting to see what these corporate lackey news services will report when the buildings housing them get partially destroyed from severe storm winds.


Here's a sample:

Quote

June 3, 2016
The New York Times offices have been temporarily moved to the Goldman Sachs office building due to light and variable winds from yesterday's welcome rains, considering our recent dry spell  :icon_mrgreen:, which knocked out 47 windows on the west face.

A complaint with the window manufacturer has been filed for not specifying proper glazing techniques. The NY Times legal department is considering appropriate action. :evil4:

In other news, the Cape Cod offshore wind farm provided 127% of all the electrical power on the East coast yesterday.  :icon_mrgreen:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: CCTV: Missouri tornado rips out doors & walls of warehouse
Post by: g on June 04, 2013, 05:31:29 AM

                                                         http://www.youtube.com/v/yPcQ-WmAMkA&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Germany hit by floods: Dresden braces for rising floodwaters
Post by: g on June 06, 2013, 04:13:31 AM
             
                                                   http://www.youtube.com/v/qGxT8ZOdFDI&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather : Ground crumbles underfoot as Apocalyptic floods sweep India
Post by: g on June 22, 2013, 05:07:34 AM

                                               http://www.youtube.com/v/TMaxPYd2_so&fs=1
   :(
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Temperatures Continue To Hit Record Highs In Eastern China
Post by: g on August 11, 2013, 08:24:15 AM


                                                                http://www.youtube.com/v/iqXVgUesFWw&fs=1    :icon_study:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather : Ground crumbles underfoot as Apocalyptic floods sweep India
Post by: WHD on August 11, 2013, 08:39:09 AM

                                               http://www.youtube.com/v/TMaxPYd2_so&fs=1
   :(

GO,

Sad, don't you think, that about the only place you can get anything like serious reportage on global news any more, in Big Media, is RT (Russia Today) and maybe Al Jazeera. American MSM isn't anything anymore but maintenance and reinforcement of the American Hologram.  :(

Watching that clip, those apartments falling into the water, I'm reminded of a commenter on TBP recently, on Climate Change and rising sea levels; she said some to the effect of, people will just move, what's the big deal. LOL

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather : Ground crumbles underfoot as Apocalyptic floods sweep India
Post by: g on August 11, 2013, 08:42:32 AM

                                               http://www.youtube.com/v/TMaxPYd2_so&fs=1
   :(

GO,

Sad, don't you think, that about the only place you can get anything like serious reportage on global news any more, in Big Media, is RT (Russia Today) and maybe Al Jazeera. American MSM isn't anything anymore but maintenance and reinforcement of the American Hologram.  :(

Watching that clip, those apartments falling into the water, I'm reminded of a commenter on TBP recently, on Climate Change and rising sea levels; she said some to the effect of, people will just move, what's the big deal. LOL

WHD

Denial is one heck of a problem we face Duncan, and then there are the usual bunch that don't give a shit about anything unless it is happening to them, they are real bad news.   :-[
Title: Re: Crazy Weather : Ground crumbles underfoot as Apocalyptic floods sweep India
Post by: WHD on August 11, 2013, 08:57:25 AM

                                               http://www.youtube.com/v/TMaxPYd2_so&fs=1
   :(

GO,

Sad, don't you think, that about the only place you can get anything like serious reportage on global news any more, in Big Media, is RT (Russia Today) and maybe Al Jazeera. American MSM isn't anything anymore but maintenance and reinforcement of the American Hologram.  :(

Watching that clip, those apartments falling into the water, I'm reminded of a commenter on TBP recently, on Climate Change and rising sea levels; she said some to the effect of, people will just move, what's the big deal. LOL

WHD

Denial is one heck of a problem we face Duncan, and then there are the usual bunch that don't give a shit about anything unless it is happening to them, they are real bad news.   :-[

Well, thanks for managing the thread. Thanks for caring.  :)

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Drought spreads across entire state of Iowa
Post by: g on September 01, 2013, 11:44:01 AM
                                                             
                                                                     
5220aec5867f6 preview 300
5220aec5867f6 preview 300

WATERLOO --- The entire state is back in at least some level of drought, according to an update released Thursday.

Portions of Northeast Iowa, the remaining holdouts since heavy spring rains saturated the state, have now joined the dry side, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Other regions in Iowa, meanwhile, slipped deeper into the rankings.

The monitor uses a scale ranging from D0, abnormally dry, to D4, exceptional drought.

With the newest report, about a fifth of Iowa's acres are in D2, or severe, drought.

About 60 percent is in at least D1, or moderate drought.

"In the central part of the nation, above-normal temperatures combined with rapidly worsening drought, resulting in widespread deterioration of conditions especially across the Midwest," according to the update.

Black Hawk, Bremer, Buchanan, Butler and Fayette were among the few remaining counties in Iowa considered drought-free a week ago. Each is now classified abnormally dry, according to the monitor.

The update noted the rapid onset of dry conditions in the Midwest.

"Above-normal temperatures and rapidly deteriorating soil moisture conditions have resulted in what appears to be a late-season flash drought," according to the monitor.

Iowa entered 2013 in dire straits, and some projections forecast grim consequences. January, February, March, April and May, however, delivered 11.46 inches more rain than normal in Waterloo, according to the National Weather Service. Most --- 9.69 inches --- fell in April and May.

Instead of drought, many communities in Northeast Iowa battled flooding rivers, damaged roads and soggy basements.

Consequently, toward the end of April, the eastern half of Iowa was drought-free, according to the monitor, and by the end of June, the entire state was virtually free of dry conditions.

By mid-July, however, the wetter trend was over and drought began creeping in. The month produced slightly more than 4 inches of rain in Waterloo, but most --- 3.09 inches --- fell on July 25.

Through Wednesday, Waterloo has picked up 1.91 inches. Again, most of the total --- 1.07 inches --- fell during a single storm. And that was back on Aug. 5.

The end result is Waterloo falls short nearly 3 inches of rain since July 1, according to the weather service.

Other areas also experienced the schizophrenic rainfall totals, according to the monitor. Burlington, for instance, got 19.23 inches, giving the community its wettest spring since 1898.

"Burlington is now on track to experience its driest summer on record since 1898 with only 3.86 inches of precipitation so far," according to the update.

The total is 8.41 inches below normal.

http://wcfcourier.com/news/local/drought-spreads-across-entire-state/article_3797c80d-b42d-535b-8ee3-b9e58750d748.html (http://wcfcourier.com/news/local/drought-spreads-across-entire-state/article_3797c80d-b42d-535b-8ee3-b9e58750d748.html)  :icon_study: :-\
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on September 03, 2013, 06:48:27 PM
Tornado hits Tokyo suburbs


http://www.youtube.com/v/4gr6EQulnBg?feature=player_embedded
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on October 22, 2013, 02:53:21 PM
a full month into so-called spring and its snowing :icon_scratch:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on October 22, 2013, 02:57:26 PM
a full month into so-called spring and its snowing :icon_scratch:

We didn't have a spring where we are, here in Minnesota. Didn't see the sun hardly for three months, rain and snow - directly to balmy summer in about a week.

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: 74 Degrees in Boston Today- Here we go Again
Post by: g on November 01, 2013, 06:51:01 AM
Yes Diners it is Nov 1 and 74 in Boston today. This used to be a freak and now is common place, been warm all week, mid sixties, and 70's forecast again for tomorrow.

Agelbert has no doubt got it right Diners imo. Know very little about these matters; but I have lived in Boston my entire life and can say with certainty, something is very different and amiss about the weather of the last few years. My trees still have most of their leaves and they are coming down fast now with any sort of wind but they used to be about bare by now. My home heating oil tank is still over three quarters full, and I usually get my first delivery this week. At nearly four bucks a gallon I am not crying but have a feeling I should be.  :'(

Hardly give any more of my time to the Peak Oil arguments, we have a much more serious problem to contend with right now. "Today"   :-\

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on November 01, 2013, 06:59:26 AM
Even in Texas we used to get a little frost on the pumpkin by Halloween. Not this year. It sounds like our weather is not that different than yours at the moment. We are having a wet fall, which is of course quite welcome. The weather here is about like coastal California right now.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on November 01, 2013, 04:29:03 PM
Likely my microclimate is a bit colder than what some of you are seeing.  It is still plenty freaky though. 

My first frost this year was early in the first week of October.   Last Wednesday it barely got above freezing and i ran the wood stove all day.  Today the high temp was a balmy 64F, but last Nov 1 i had almost two feet of snow on the ground from the Haloween storm, but no frost before that storm.  New England weather has always been a bit weird though.

Before today, over at the NOAA records center, heat records were running way below last year to date, and cold records running way above, with the heat records still keeping a slight overall edge.  Today that page (i tried several times) was not accessable, probably because of the overwhelming number of new heat records.

IMO what is going on "big picture" is unclear, with the warming side of things generally getting more press, but actual warming lagging all of the climate models.  The dramatic weather swings are hurting farmers worldwide.  Solar activity is dramatically lower, but there is still more warmth than i can explain, even giving credit to the ocean "flywheel effect" and RE's geotectonic heat transfer idea.  Perhaps we are missing a factor or two?? Perhaps CO2, while not causing the expected runaway heating, is mitigating what might otherwise be global cooling by now??
Title: Haiyan
Post by: Surly1 on November 09, 2013, 06:41:04 AM
Reports: Typhoon Haiyan kills up to 1,200 in Philippines (http://usat.ly/1htegfU)
http://usat.ly/1htegfU (http://usat.ly/1htegfU)

MANILA — Up to 1,200 people are believed dead after Super Typhoon Haiyan — one of the most powerful storms ever recorded — slammed into the central islands of the Philippines, the Philippine Red Cross said Saturday.

That death toll estimate, made by Gwendolyn Pang, secretary general of the Philippine Red Cross, comes from what the relief organization's workers have been reporting in the field, Richard Gordon, CEO of the Philippine Red Cross, told USA TODAY.

As Haiyan heads west toward Vietnam, the Red Cross is at the forefront of an international effort to provide food, water, shelter and other relief to the hundreds of thousands of residents who have lost their homes and livelihood, Gordon said.

"This is a big, full-court press," he said. "We're pulling out all the stops to help."

With widespread power outages, roads blocked, bridges down and debris strewn everywhere, getting life back to some semblance of normal in the region will take time.

"The Philippines are always resilient, and we're going to get back up," Gordon said.

Because communications in the Philippines were cutoff, it remains difficult to determine the full extent of casualties and damage.

"We expect the level of destruction caused by Typhoon Haiyan to be extensive and devastating, and sadly we fear that many lives will be lost," said Anna Lindenfors, Philippines director of Save the Children.

"With this magnitude we know that the destruction is overwhelming," said Emma Amores, who was waiting outside Villamor Airbase in Manila, where a C-130 was loading relief supplies and personnel heading to hard-hit Tacloban. "From the images we saw on TV, it's highly likely our houses are gone. We just want to know that the family are all safe."

Houses destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte in the Philippines.  Noel Celis, AFP/Getty   Fullscreen
                                                                                 
Next Slide
Romil Elinsuv, who is in Manila for work training, worried about his wife and 4-year-old son who are at their home in Palo, a town in the province of Leyte.

"I feel fear. I don't know what the situation is there," Elinsuv said. He said he spoke with his wife the day before. She assured him they were OK, but then the line went dead, and he's been unable to reach her since.

Super Typhoon Haiyan hit Guiuan, on the Philippine island of Samar, at 4:40 a.m. local time Friday. Three hours before landfall, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center assessed Haiyan's sustained winds at 195 mph, gusting to 235 mph, making it the fourth strongest tropical cyclone in world history.

The warning center uses satellites to estimate the wind speed of typhoons and hurricanes.

Satellite loops show that Haiyan weakened only slightly, if at all, in the two hours after JTWC's advisory, so the super typhoon likely made landfall with winds near 195 mph, reports meteorologist Jeff Masters of the Weather Underground, a private meteorology company. This is equivalent to a strong Category 5 hurricane.

Weather officials in the Philippines, using other methods of measuring wind speed, said Haiyan had sustained winds of 147 mph with gusts to 170 mph when it made landfall. By those measurements, Haiyan would be comparable to a strong Category 4 hurricane.


As of early Saturday morning U.S. time, Typhoon Haiyan has winds of 120 mph, gusting to 150 mph, which is equivalent to a Category 3 hurricane. The center of the storm is located well to the west of the Philippines in the South China Sea, about 467 miles from Da Nang, Vietnam. It's expected to hit Vietnam on Sunday.

Vietnamese authorities in four central provinces began evacuating more than 500,000 people from high risk areas to government buildings, schools and other concrete homes able to withstand strong winds.

"The evacuation is being conducted with urgency," disaster official Nguyen Thi Yen Linh told the Associated Press by telephone from central Danang City, where some 76,000 are being moved to safety.

Hundreds of thousands of others were being taken to shelters in the provinces of Quang Ngai, Quang Nam and Thua Thien Hue. Schools were closed and two deputy prime ministers were sent to the region to direct the preparations.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on November 09, 2013, 06:11:40 PM
In pictures: Philippines counts cost of Typhoon Haiyan (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24879004)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24879004 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24879004)

Typhoon Haiyan - one of the most powerful storms ever to make landfall - has carved a path of death and destruction through the central Philippines. Here in Tacloban at least 100 people were reported killed.

Cannot get to the image code to reproduce pix...

 :icon_scratch:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: luciddreams on November 09, 2013, 06:19:05 PM
In pictures: Philippines counts cost of Typhoon Haiyan (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24879004)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24879004 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24879004)

Typhoon Haiyan - one of the most powerful storms ever to make landfall - has carved a path of death and destruction through the central Philippines. Here in Tacloban at least 100 people were reported killed.

Cannot get to the image code to reproduce pix...

 :icon_scratch:

"one of the most powerful storms ever to make landfall"

That is an interesting observation.
Title: SUPERTYPHOON!
Post by: RE on November 09, 2013, 06:37:26 PM


"one of the most powerful storms OF ALL TIME ever to make landfall"



Fixed that.

Did you guys miss my Supertyphoon post from ZH?  Bigger than Katrina and Sandy COMBINED!

We are getting Big now.  REALLY BIG.  BIBLICAL BIG!

RE
Title: Typhoon Haiyan: at least 10,000 reported dead in Philippine province
Post by: Surly1 on November 10, 2013, 04:26:39 AM
Typhoon Haiyan: at least 10,000 reported dead in Philippine province (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/10/typhoon-haiyan-thousands-dead-philippines)
Estimated death toll soars as path of destruction leaves many parts of Philippines inaccessible to government and aid officials


At least 10,000 people are thought to have died in the central Philippine province of Leyte after Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms ever to make landfall, lashed the area, swallowing coastal towns, a senior police official said early on Sunday morning.

About 70-80% of the buildings in the area in the path of Haiyan in Leyte province was destroyed, said chief superintendent Elmer Soria. "We had a meeting last night with the governor and the other officials. The governor said based on their estimate, 10,000 died," he said.

Tacloban city administrator Tecson Lim said that the death toll in that city alone "could go up to 10,000". Tacloban is the provincial capital of Leyte, with a population of more than 200,000. The Philippine Red Cross said in Tacloban bodies had been found "piled up around the roads" and in churches. Between 300 and 400 bodies had been recovered, Lim said.

On Samar island, which faces Tacloban, Leo Dacaynos of the provincial disaster office told Associated Press on Sunday 300 people were confirmed dead in Basey town and another 2,000 were missing.

He said the storm surge caused sea waters to rise 20 feet when the typhoon hit. There were still towns on Samar that had not been reached, he said, and appealed for food and water. Power was knocked out and there was no mobile signal, making communication possible only by radio.

Many corpses hung on tree branches, buildings and sidewalks, Associated Press reported.

"On the way to the airport we saw many bodies along the street," said Philippine-born Australian Mila Ward, 53, who was waiting at the Tacloban airport to catch a military flight back to Manila.

"They were covered with just anything tarpaulin, roofing sheets, cardboards," she said. Asked how many, she said, "Well over 100 where we passed."

The super-typhoon made landfall on Samar and Leyte islands in the eastern Visayas at about 4.40am on Friday local time, with winds up to 315km/h (195mph) tearing roofs off buildings, turning roads into rivers full of debris and knocking out electricity pylons.

With many provinces left without power or telecommunications, and airports in the hardest-hit areas, such as Tacloban, in tatters, experts say it is impossible to know the extent of the storm's damage – or deliver badly needed aid.

(http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2013/11/10/1384060375582/Residents-search-for-belo-008.jpg)
Residents search for belongings in the wreckage of Tacloban. Photograph: Dennis Sabangan/EPA


Roughly 12 hours after the 600km (370-mile)-wide Haiyan blew west towards Vietnam, where it is expected to make landfall early on Sunday, officials and aid workers are only now beginning to piece together details on the number of dead and injured.

Government figures showed that more than 4 million had been directly affected. The World Food Programme has mobilised some $2m (£1.25m) in aid and aims to deliver 40 tonnes of fortified biscuits to victims within the next few days.

Satellite images show normally green patches of vegetation ripped up into brown squares of debris in Tacloban, where local TV channel GMA broadcast images of huge storm surges, flattened buildings and families traipsing through flooded streets with their possessions held high above the water.

The head of the UN Disaster Assessment Co-ordination Team, Sebastian Rhodes Stampa, described "destruction on a massive scale" in the city of 220,000 and said: "The last time I saw something of this scale was in the aftermath of the Indian Ocean tsunami. There are cars thrown like tumbleweed and the streets are strewn with debris."

Al-Jazeera correspondent Jamela Alindogan was trapped in her hotel as the eye of the storm passed overhead and ripped the roof off the building. Evoking scenes of chaos as badly hurt victims wandered the streets without medicine, food or water, and doctors at the local hospital attended to the wounded in the dark without electricity or candlelight, she said: "There is no food, not even in the hotels, and there's no water. The situation is really very desperate."

Other sources told of victims trying to climb out from under rubble to find assistance, and mobs rampaging through the streets looking for food, water or medicine, and looting electrical goods and groceries from malls. "Almost all the houses were destroyed," said Major Rey Balido of the Philippines national disaster agency. "Only a few are left standing."

Relatives of those living in the typhoon's path have had no news from their loved ones and are nervously waiting until power is restored to the area. "I spoke to my mother just a few hours before the typhoon made landfall in my city, Tacloban," said taxi driver Sherwin Martinata, 32, in the capital, Manila. "She was saying she was all right but now I have no idea if my family is safe. There is no power, no phones. I can't get through at all. I'm worried, but I'm powerless."

(http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2013/11/10/1384059928017/A-boat-washed-ashore-sits-008.jpg)
A boat washed ashore sits on destroyed houses in Tacloban. Photograph: Aaron Favila/AP

Those living in the hardest-hit areas, such as the eastern Visayas, are among the poorest in the Philippines, say aid agencies, who warn that there will be little or no savings for many of the victims to fall back on – putting an already vulnerable population at even greater risk of future food and job insecurity.

On Bohol island – where a 7.3-magnitude earthquake toppled colonial-era churches and killed some 200 people last month – residents were successfully evacuated ahead of the storm and as a result many lives were probably saved, said Mathias Eick of the European commission's humanitarian aid department (Echo). However, because the island's main power supply comes from neighbouring Leyte, residents are still without electricity or water.

In Tacloban, where many residents live along the coast, the sheer force of the storm was just too much for the buildings to withstand, with evacuation centres such as stadiums and churches later collapsing. "The sheer magnitude and scale of the disaster sort of overpowered all the contingency measures, and we're fearing that we'll be finding more dead bodies in those evacuation centres themselves," said Alwynn Javier of Christian Aid.

Without information on the ground or access to hard-hit areas, aid agencies have been stuck, not knowing how much aid is needed or which areas need it most.

"The only information we have been able to get so far is from the UN and some from the news," said Javier. "We should have good ground reach, but are really impeded by this lack of access because even our partners on the ground have been hit themselves."

Officials and rescue workers hoped that Sunday would see concerted efforts by authorities to set up command centres and rescue groups, which will in turn help bring supplies to those who need them most. But gaining access to those areas will prove hard, said Richard Gordon of the Philippine Red Cross, who added that without bulldozers or tractors to clear paths, volunteers will have to bring cutting equipment to clear uprooted trees and debris.

The Philippines sees roughly 20 typhoons every year, with some more devastating than others. Last year's Typhoon Bopha killed more than 1,100 people and caused over $1bn in damage.

Haiyan – the 25th typhoon to hit the Philippines this year – is expected to make landfall in several provinces in central Vietnam with winds around 220km/h (137mph). More than 450,000 troops have been deployed, as well as 12 planes, 356 ships and thousands of vehicles, in order to mobilise supplies, with more than 300,000 people evacuated in Da Nang and Quang Ngai provinces.

"It may be the strongest storm to hit Vietnam in history," said Vietnam's director of the Central Hydro-Meteorological Forecasting Centre in Bui Minh Tang. Coastal areas should expect to see waves as high as 5-8 meters (16-26ft) and a wind radius up to 500km wide, officials warned.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather : Boston Mild spell continues through the weekend
Post by: g on November 16, 2013, 08:37:46 AM
It has been a lot like May so far this November in Beantown.  :rain:

The unseasonably warm weather will continue today through most of the weekend before colder, dry air returns next week. The weekend will be mostly pleasant and dry, but some heavy showers could arrive late Sunday, according to the National Weather Service.

“We are looking at temperatures in the upper 50s today through Sunday,” said Alan Dunham, weather service meteorologist. “On Monday, we could be getting into the lower 60s; the normal high for this time is 52.”

Today will be mostly sunny, with a high near 60. A southwest wind will bring gusts up to 25 miles per hour. Winds will slacken through the day and clouds will thicken through the evening, according to the weather service. Temperatures will fall into the low 40s overnight.

Saturday will be partly sunny, with temperatures reaching the upper 50s. A few showers could come to the southern coast. Clouds will dissipate through the day, and skies will be mostly clear overnight, as temperatures fall into the mid-30s.

Sunday will be mostly cloudy, with a high climbing near 60. Conditions will remain dry through the day, but showers are likely late in the day. Temperatures will fall into the low 50s overnight, according to the weather service.

Showers will continue Monday, mainly between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., and temperatures will crest above 60. The day will be breezy and cloudy and shouldn’t clear up much overnight, according to the weather service. Showers are possible overnight Monday, and temperatures will fall to around 40.

http://feeds.boston.com/c/35022/f/646959/s/33bb1681/sc/32/l/0L0Sboston0N0Cmetrodesk0C20A130C110C150Cmild0Espell0Econtinues0Ethrough0Ethe0Eweekend0CQPJaEoU1x26nU6L8owLX7K0Cstory0Bhtml/story01.htm (http://feeds.boston.com/c/35022/f/646959/s/33bb1681/sc/32/l/0L0Sboston0N0Cmetrodesk0C20A130C110C150Cmild0Espell0Econtinues0Ethrough0Ethe0Eweekend0CQPJaEoU1x26nU6L8owLX7K0Cstory0Bhtml/story01.htm)  :icon_study:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather : 65 in Boston Going to Reach Close to 70 by2:30
Post by: g on November 18, 2013, 10:15:03 AM
The heck with the markets and Doom. Going down to the local lake and listen to some music in the auto and take a walk.

Beautiful totally blue sky, no wind, like a day in early June except it will dark at 4:30.  Anyone who doesn't think the weather is crazy sure hasn't been in Beantown this month.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on November 18, 2013, 10:20:39 AM
It was warm and downright muggy here yesterday. I worked in my garden for a change. Carpe diem, Goldfinger.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: JoeP on December 22, 2013, 09:50:46 AM
Finished my daily walk around the neighborhood a while ago - wearing a T-shirt and gym shorts.  Still, I was perspiring a little on the 2nd lap.  Checked the local Newz weather page and it was registering 79 degrees...on December 22nd.  Crazy weather in NC today.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Moscow: warmest weather in a century
Post by: g on December 26, 2013, 05:29:02 PM

                                                                http://www.youtube.com/v/IaQnDl88dGQ&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on January 03, 2014, 08:49:16 AM
Buried in amost two feet of snow, 6 degrees and - 6 tonight in Beantown.

To think I was complaining about sixty degree weather a few weeks back.  :-\

On weeks like this Snowleaopard, your superb postings on weather resonate more clearly with me.  :laugh: :laugh:

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: DoomerSupport on January 03, 2014, 12:41:52 PM
Stay safe, GO!

One of my concerns is that the additional energy retained by the atmosphere is manifesting as the extreme weather we see.  We know the climate basically moves warmth from the equator to the poles, that's the most basic description of the planet's weather.  That energy seems to amplifying weather patterns, particularly those associated with the jet stream.  Amplitude of the jet stream seems to have increased, while it's speed around the country has been reduced.

The result is hotter, longer, dry droughts and colder, longer, wetter storms, not just where they have been for the last century we have records, but pretty much anywhere north of the tropics.

One of the reasons I am actively pursuing concrete dome structures as an opportunity (both for business and for doomsteading) is that they have a long track record of being resilient to the inclemencies of the weather.  No one wants to rebuild a destroyed home a second time. 

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on January 03, 2014, 01:21:07 PM
Quote
Stay safe, GO!

Thanks Haniel, appreciate the thought. Let me tell you it was a doozy. Not in the least bit qualified to discuss weather science, but something real strange is going on, and I get your intensity comment with total clarity after this storm. They seem to last forever and taper off at a snail's pace.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 03, 2014, 04:14:22 PM
Thats real cold GO, you may need a beanie like whd in beantown.

I wondered if SL wasnt exaggerating, -25F  :o. The phrase "30 below" that arctic and antarctic and extreme altitude mountaineers use, is where theres no trees or plants.

Haniel, I was thinking just that earlier this morning, even if the domes dont take off commercially viably, they might or might not I dont know, at least for steaders determined to survive they make a lot of sense.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: DoomerSupport on January 03, 2014, 06:12:40 PM

Haniel, I was thinking just that earlier this morning, even if the domes dont take off commercially viably, they might or might not I dont know, at least for steaders determined to survive they make a lot of sense.

Which is how I first came across them.  I was looking for the most energy-efficient home and domes came up.  They make sense to me, a large multi-tonne rock mass that acts as a heat sink, surrounded by good insulation.  Protection against most natural disasters was for most on my mind, as well as protection from stray fire, so something to learn about regardless of where we end up.

 

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: luciddreams on January 03, 2014, 06:25:13 PM

Haniel, I was thinking just that earlier this morning, even if the domes dont take off commercially viably, they might or might not I dont know, at least for steaders determined to survive they make a lot of sense.

Which is how I first came across them.  I was looking for the most energy-efficient home and domes came up.  They make sense to me, a large multi-tonne rock mass that acts as a heat sink, surrounded by good insulation.  Protection against most natural disasters was for most on my mind, as well as protection from stray fire, so something to learn about regardless of where we end up.

I mean this in all sincerity Haniel.  I know that you have gazed on this topic with precision.  I have not, but I know you have...and I could easily do the same...but I see no reason.  Just what I have read so far tells me you are right...and I haven't read much. 

I'm already convinced that I need one for my families survival.  I mean just the radiation clouds are enough reason to want one...with no windows...and one door that's sealed...I suppose with a hole in it with the best air filtration/purification unit known to man installed.  Especially if that can be achieved for 8 grand...isn't that the figure that us SUN members can expect ;D
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 03, 2014, 06:47:10 PM
  I mean just the radiation clouds are enough reason to want one...with no windows...and one door that's sealed...I suppose with a hole in it with the best air filtration/purification unit known to man installed.  Especially if that can be achieved for 8 grand...isn't that the figure that us SUN members can expect ;D

LD, you ever see "duck and cover" govt ads from the 1950's? Does getting under tha table really do anything if you see a flash from a nuke outside the window. I dont believe taping up windows and wearing paer overalls outside is worth trying.

I have a location for all northern hemisphere radiation refugees to go to, its not where I am now. It can support hundreds of people. If radiation did become a problem all NH diners should go there.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: luciddreams on January 03, 2014, 06:52:59 PM
  I mean just the radiation clouds are enough reason to want one...with no windows...and one door that's sealed...I suppose with a hole in it with the best air filtration/purification unit known to man installed.  Especially if that can be achieved for 8 grand...isn't that the figure that us SUN members can expect ;D

LD, you ever see "duck and cover" govt ads from the 1950's? Does getting under tha table really do anything if you see a flash from a nuke outside the window. I dont believe taping up windows and wearing paer overalls outside is worth trying.

I have a location for all northern hemisphere radiation refugees to go to, its not where I am now. It can support hundreds of people. If radiation did become a problem all NH diners should go there.

sooooo...that's true.

But still...they can withstand tornadoes and possibly a tree falling on them? 

I'm in love with the idea already.  I've never thought about the best way to build shelter before now.  I've thought about how to do it with natural materials in survival situations...and I've read about survival shelters...and I've spent a lot of time in the woods.  But never have I contemplated building a living situation out of concrete and in the shape of a dome.  It's almost hubristic...but not quite...and I love that about it. 

But yeah...radiation clouds they're ain't no damn point really.  Cause we'll just end up eating the clouds...and you can't build a dome to hide from that.  Still...I've gotta build some good chances for my two sons. 
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on January 04, 2014, 04:40:26 PM
Thats real cold GO, you may need a beanie like whd in beantown.

Me, i'm wearing a Siberian fur cap.

I wondered if SL wasnt exaggerating, -25F  :o. The phrase "30 below" that arctic and antarctic and extreme altitude mountaineers use, is where theres no trees or plants.

Quote
"Murphy's Law only fails when you count on it!"

I said:

Quote
As i write this it is -7 deg F here, and my "winter" started over six weeks early.  My firewood use to date is at a new record.  Tomorrow's low is forecast @ -16F and, if it is off the same way and amount as today's forecast, i'll see -25F tomorrow.   These are temps not seen here in January in at least fifteen years.  What is already happening may prompt me to move south.

After a forecast low of +2F turned into -8F (actual),  the next day's forecast for a -16F low was wrong in the other direction and we did not get colder than -10F.

You are partly correct about the trees here.  If temps below -20 F were not quite rare, we would start losing more trees.  Currently we lose some trees to ice storms every 4 or 5 years, but regrowth is vigorous.  Further north at higher altitudes, like in the White Mountains, it gets below -30F most winters;  but many of those slopes still have some trees.  Limited in variety and stunted in growth, but still there.

Despite the freak short warm spurts, which are more common than before;  each month since September has, on balance, had the weather expected in the following month or colder.  ie. this January (so far) is like a cold February.  I hesitate to predict what February will be like, but i have a large stack of firewood!
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: luciddreams on January 04, 2014, 05:24:05 PM
-25 degrees!!!  Holy shit that's cold!  It's gonna be 10 degrees here in a couple of days and that's as cold as I've ever seen it here.  16 degrees is the coldest I remember. 

It appears "Snowleopard" is an appropriate moniker.  You should change it to "colderthanamofoleopard"   ;D
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on January 04, 2014, 06:42:34 PM
-25 degrees!!!  Holy shit that's cold!  It's gonna be 10 degrees here in a couple of days and that's as cold as I've ever seen it here.  16 degrees is the coldest I remember. 

It appears "Snowleopard" is an appropriate moniker.  You should change it to "colderthanamofoleopard"   ;D

They are talking about -65 wind chills here in Minnesota, tonight and tomorrow.

WHD (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQzeUeiCmoaPs2JBCYoSYUMXg0O0qM9jtycAYjWUornhm0q5k-cIx_Rbg)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on January 04, 2014, 06:57:14 PM
-25 degrees!!!  Holy shit that's cold!  It's gonna be 10 degrees here in a couple of days and that's as cold as I've ever seen it here.  16 degrees is the coldest I remember. 

It appears "Snowleopard" is an appropriate moniker.  You should change it to "colderthanamofoleopard"   ;D

They are talking about -65 wind chills here in Minnesota, tonight and tomorrow.

WHD (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQzeUeiCmoaPs2JBCYoSYUMXg0O0qM9jtycAYjWUornhm0q5k-cIx_Rbg)

Balmy +25F or so right now on the Last Great Frontier. :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on January 04, 2014, 06:59:39 PM
-25 degrees!!!  Holy shit that's cold!  It's gonna be 10 degrees here in a couple of days and that's as cold as I've ever seen it here.  16 degrees is the coldest I remember. 

It appears "Snowleopard" is an appropriate moniker.  You should change it to "colderthanamofoleopard"   ;D

They are talking about -65 wind chills here in Minnesota, tonight and tomorrow.

WHD (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQzeUeiCmoaPs2JBCYoSYUMXg0O0qM9jtycAYjWUornhm0q5k-cIx_Rbg)

Balmy +25F or so right now on the Last Great Frontier. :icon_sunny:

RE

PS: I gotta go up to Fairbanks next weekend for a meet.  Last few years I went there this time of year, -30 WITHOUT a Wind Chill.

I shall be interested to see the weather on this trip.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on January 04, 2014, 07:17:28 PM
-25 degrees!!!  Holy shit that's cold!  It's gonna be 10 degrees here in a couple of days and that's as cold as I've ever seen it here.  16 degrees is the coldest I remember. 

It appears "Snowleopard" is an appropriate moniker.  You should change it to "colderthanamofoleopard"   ;D

They are talking about -65 wind chills here in Minnesota, tonight and tomorrow.

WHD (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQzeUeiCmoaPs2JBCYoSYUMXg0O0qM9jtycAYjWUornhm0q5k-cIx_Rbg)

Balmy +25F or so right now on the Last Great Frontier. :icon_sunny:

RE

PS: I gotta go up to Fairbanks next weekend for a meet.  Last few years I went there this time of year, -30 WITHOUT a Wind Chill.

I shall be interested to see the weather on this trip.

RE

I saw a forecast for -30 real temp here in Minnesota earlier today.   :icon_sunny:

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on January 04, 2014, 07:34:09 PM
-25 degrees!!!  Holy shit that's cold!  It's gonna be 10 degrees here in a couple of days and that's as cold as I've ever seen it here.  16 degrees is the coldest I remember. 

It appears "Snowleopard" is an appropriate moniker.  You should change it to "colderthanamofoleopard"   ;D

They are talking about -65 wind chills here in Minnesota, tonight and tomorrow.

WHD (https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQzeUeiCmoaPs2JBCYoSYUMXg0O0qM9jtycAYjWUornhm0q5k-cIx_Rbg)

Balmy +25F or so right now on the Last Great Frontier. :icon_sunny:

RE

PS: I gotta go up to Fairbanks next weekend for a meet.  Last few years I went there this time of year, -30 WITHOUT a Wind Chill.

I shall be interested to see the weather on this trip.

RE

I saw a forecast for -30 real temp here in Minnesota earlier today.   :icon_sunny:

WHD

You got a plug-in for your car?  Starting up the car when it drops that low is tough without a plug-in.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: luciddreams on January 05, 2014, 07:21:32 AM
man, how can you even breath in -30?  I remember the coldest I ever experienced was upstate NY during the winter.  I walked outside of the house and could feel my sinuses freeze on the first breath.  Don't know how could it was, but it wasn't -30!!!

Why would anybody want to live in weather like that?
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: North Dakota Weather Alert!
Post by: g on January 11, 2014, 07:33:35 AM
ALERT ALERT

                                                           http://www.youtube.com/v/GAq1Ml3PlGc&fs=1

 :exp-grin:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: North Dakota Weather Alert!
Post by: Surly1 on January 11, 2014, 02:00:44 PM
ALERT ALERT

                                                           http://www.youtube.com/v/GAq1Ml3PlGc&fs=1

 :exp-grin:

 :emthup: :emthup:

Sounds official, too.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on January 11, 2014, 03:13:23 PM
man, how can you even breath in -30?  I remember the coldest I ever experienced was upstate NY during the winter.  I walked outside of the house and could feel my sinuses freeze on the first breath.  Don't know how could it was, but it wasn't -30!!!

Why would anybody want to live in weather like that?

-30 is definitely unpleasant, but even up here if you are not far inland like Fairbanks you don't get those temps that often.  You don't spend much time outside when it gets that cold.  You hang tough for a few days, it warms up to tolerable levels again.

In return for this, you get VERY pleasant weather from Spring to Fall, and never break a sweat unless you are actually doing physical exercise of the vigorous kind.  I LOVE temps from 40-70F, which is the general range most of the time.  I HATE 90F temps and 90% Humidity like you get in the summer in the lower 48 even more than I Hate the few -30 days I have to bundle up for up here.

BTW, when it is this cold you wear a Balaclava over your mouth and nose, so you don't directly breathe in such frigid air.  You can use old fashioned cotton or wool ones, but the modern versions made from Neoprene are better.  Great Oil Age product there. LOL.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: roamer on January 11, 2014, 03:30:32 PM
Glad i don't live there anymore...., though i just finished a weeklong  tower building trip in illinois during the polar vortex. -15 deg F with a strong wind was no cakewalk .  Still i think its good to develop a tolerance for working through weather extremes, it keeps the fat and softness of oil age living at bay and keeps the survival instincts ready.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: JoeP on January 11, 2014, 03:40:15 PM
man, how can you even breath in -30?  I remember the coldest I ever experienced was upstate NY during the winter.  I walked outside of the house and could feel my sinuses freeze on the first breath.  Don't know how could it was, but it wasn't -30!!!

Why would anybody want to live in weather like that?

-30 is definitely unpleasant, but even up here if you are not far inland like Fairbanks you don't get those temps that often.  You don't spend much time outside when it gets that cold.  You hang tough for a few days, it warms up to tolerable levels again.

In return for this, you get VERY pleasant weather from Spring to Fall, and never break a sweat unless you are actually doing physical exercise of the vigorous kind.  I LOVE temps from 40-70F, which is the general range most of the time.  I HATE 90F temps and 90% Humidity like you get in the summer in the lower 48 even more than I Hate the few -30 days I have to bundle up for up here.

BTW, when it is this cold you wear a Balaclava over your mouth and nose, so you don't directly breathe in such frigid air.  You can use old fashioned cotton or wool ones, but the modern versions made from Neoprene are better.  Great Oil Age product there. LOL.

RE

Isn't much of this really about the climate the individual has been subjected to and adapted to?  Look at New Orleans...there's folks living there that wouldn't think of living elsewhere...and it is one of the hottest and most humid cities in the US.

My father lived in Myrtle Beach, SC for awhile and I remember walking to the beach in April when the ocean temps are still very cold and seeing a bunch of guys swimming in the ocean.  I asked someone WTF is up with that? The answer: They're Canadians down here to play golf. 

It dipped down into the single digits here in NC this past week.  This was extremely uncomfortable for me, but I can still mow the lawn in the summer here when the temp is in the 90s.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on January 11, 2014, 03:52:31 PM
Isn't much of this really about the climate the individual has been subjected to and adapted to?  Look at New Orleans...there's folks living there that wouldn't think of living elsewhere...and it is one of the hottest and most humid cities in the US.

I think it has a lot to do with your metabolic rate.  I tend to "run hot".  I eat a lot of high calorie foods (and Beer!) which would make most folks Obese I think.  I got a paunch but I'm not fat by any means, and since my legs went south I don't do much exercise either.  Still don't get fat though.

So I think I am more comfortable in cold weather because it allows me to dissipate body heat better.  In hot weather, I sweat PROFUSELY.  It practically squirts out of my pores.  Body goes into overdrive trying to cool itself.

I am SOL if Guy McPherson is right.  I'll overheat in no time.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on January 11, 2014, 04:23:41 PM
Isn't much of this really about the climate the individual has been subjected to and adapted to?  Look at New Orleans...there's folks living there that wouldn't think of living elsewhere...and it is one of the hottest and most humid cities in the US.

I think it has a lot to do with your metabolic rate.  I tend to "run hot".  I eat a lot of high calorie foods (and Beer!) which would make most folks Obese I think.  I got a paunch but I'm not fat by any means, and since my legs went south I don't do much exercise either.  Still don't get fat though.

So I think I am more comfortable in cold weather because it allows me to dissipate body heat better.  In hot weather, I sweat PROFUSELY.  It practically squirts out of my pores.  Body goes into overdrive trying to cool itself.

I am SOL if Guy McPherson is right.  I'll overheat in no time.

RE

I certainly have you in weight, and in Norfolk it runs to 90+/90+ plenty of times. But somehow I have managed to acclimate over the years. Still a good idea to cut grass in the cool of the evening though (although what used to take me an hour 25 years ago now takes me the better part of two, with several breaks tossed in.) I sweat as if I come with an internal shower. I consider it a tune-up.

I thought I knew hot... and then I went to New Orleans in June. And although I do not know firsthand, I am told that Houston in the summer is even MORE hot and humid than New Orleans. It would be difficult to imagine what equatorial climes are like in the summer.

Not sure I could ever acclimate to Nairobi, Mombasa-- just shoot me.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: JoeP on January 11, 2014, 04:52:29 PM
For anyone interested -  The Ten Most Humid Cities In The U.S. (http://voices.yahoo.com/10-most-humid-weather-cities-united-states-6880650.html?cat=16) 
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on January 11, 2014, 05:10:05 PM
For anyone interested - The Ten Most Humid Cities In The U.S. (http://voices.yahoo.com/10-most-humid-weather-cities-united-states-6880650.html?cat=16)

That was right on time!!
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on January 12, 2014, 09:39:13 AM
man, how can you even breath in -30?  I remember the coldest I ever experienced was upstate NY during the winter.  I walked outside of the house and could feel my sinuses freeze on the first breath.  Don't know how could it was, but it wasn't -30!!!

Why would anybody want to live in weather like that?

The only thing that sucks about -30, is living in a culture that makes you drive to work on such a day, or by which you are forced into seclusion. -30 on a SUNstead, play with the kids, work in the workshop, tend to the animals, fish, greenhouses, read, write - no problem.

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather:
Post by: g on January 14, 2014, 06:10:38 AM
Fires rage in Chile
More extreme weather. The earth changes are here. :-\

                                                                http://www.youtube.com/v/KbBiOrh2N6Y&fs=1

 Published on Jan 11, 2014

Forest fires in Chile are so severe that the capital Santiago is blanketed in smoke, and health alerts are being issued in four regions of the country.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 14, 2014, 06:46:26 AM


Not sure I could ever acclimate to Nairobi, Mombasa-- just shoot me.

Youd be surprised, nairobi is quite cool being in the highlands and mombasa is typical tropical, but not the worst by any means.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on January 14, 2014, 09:58:54 AM


Not sure I could ever acclimate to Nairobi, Mombasa-- just shoot me.

Youd be surprised, nairobi is quite cool being in the highlands and mombasa is typical tropical, but not the worst by any means.

Then I stand corrected.

As a southern hemisphere guy, where is the most miserable (heat+humidity combo) climate you've ever endured?
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 14, 2014, 03:07:56 PM


Not sure I could ever acclimate to Nairobi, Mombasa-- just shoot me.

Youd be surprised, nairobi is quite cool being in the highlands and mombasa is typical tropical, but not the worst by any means.

Then I stand corrected.

As a southern hemisphere guy, where is the most miserable (heat+humidity combo) climate you've ever endured?

Before climate change was evident it was Dubai, now I think Darwin is about as bad and Ive seen the shift there since the 80's when it was ok and is nowdays for me unbearable. Some spotty skin disease wiped out the entire banana crop due to the higher heat and humidity last year so im not imagining it. People forced to work outdoors or in sheds told me that now in the worst part of the year start work at 5.30am and stop at about 2.30pm to avoid the worst heat.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on January 14, 2014, 10:55:20 PM
I've heard the Northern Territories in Oz are pretty rough for humidity, and I'd bet New Guinea blows chunks for this.

Far as I am concerned, you have past the tolerable level by the time you make it to Virginia.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: California drought: Scientists puzzled by persistence of bloc
Post by: g on January 22, 2014, 02:22:39 AM
California drought: Scientists puzzled by persistence of blocking 'ridge'

Many states have seen an easing of drought conditions, but not California, mired in its worst in more than a century. The culprit, a high pressure ridge parked offshore that is blocking winter storms.

                                                                 (http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/content/2014/0121-california-drought/17880675-1-eng-US/0121-california-drought_full_600.jpg)

A water pipe that normally carries water is shown above the nearly dry Almaden Reservoir near San Jose, California January 21. Gov. Jerry Brown last week declared a drought emergency, and the dry year of 2013 has left fresh water reservoirs with a fraction of their normal water reserves.
(Robert Galbraith/Reuters)

 Los Angeles

While much of the United States has experienced a weather year with fewer extremes and an easing drought, the record-breaking California drought – the worst since 1895 – is not leaving the region anytime soon, according to climatologists.

The unseasonal balmy but dry weather is the result of an equally unprecedented high pressure ridge lurking offshore and blocking the typical winter storms needed to drop precipitation all along the West Coast.

This ridge has persisted for 13 months and the longer it lingers, the less likely it is to leave, points out climatologist Brian Fuchs, from the National Drought Mitigation Center in Lincoln, Nebraska. This high pressure ridge system is feeding on itself, “creating a sort of perfect environment for perpetuating the dry conditions” it creates, he says.

High-pressure systems are not uncommon, but it is abnormal for them to hang around uninterrupted for so long. “This makes it even harder as winter storms approach for them to break through and change that pattern,” he adds.

This recent dry spell accentuates a continuing background condition of prevailing drought across much of the Southwestern US, notes Christopher Williams, a specialist in US drought conditions and an assistant professor at Clark University’s Graduate School of Geography in Worcester, Mass.

Precipitation is below 20 percent of normal and signs of the drought impact run across the region, including low river flows, low snow packs, low reservoir levels, and out-of-season wildfires.

“Wintertime shortages are particularly worrisome,” adds Mr. Williams via e-mail, “because winter is a key time of year for building up water supplies that carry the West through the rest of the year.” What is worse, he says, “shortfalls extend well beyond the state of California itself, reaching nearly all of the remote regions on which the California water supply network relies, particularly the Colorado River Basin.”

Scientists are uncertain as to why the ridge has stubbornly refused to break down and allow incoming storms to hit land. Climate change may be one of many factors, suggests Mr. Fuchs.                   

“It’s always difficult to know if a specific disaster or storm is tied to climate change,” he says, but over the course of decades it is possible to see large trends moving in a certain direction. “You can’t really pinpoint one thing, but you can say that over a period of decades there is less snow accumulation and warmer temperatures, and climate change is playing a part in that,” he adds.

On Friday, California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency, calling for a 20-percent voluntary conservation effort state-wide.

This is just the beginning, says Doug Parker, director of the California Institute for Water Resources. “We have seen essentially no rain or snowfall this year and short- and long-term forecasts are bleak for California,” says Mr. Parker via e-mail, adding that this means that California will have very low water deliveries to much of its agricultural sector.

This agriculture is an important part of the state’s economy, points out Parker. “This will lead to fallowing of farmland which will reduce output and reduce employment,” he suggests, adding that could drive up the prices of certain commodities. In addition, the dairy and meat sectors will be particularly hard hit, he notes, as those sectors will have to import feed.

The drought throughout the West will impact other states similarly, points out Parker.

The drought will increase pressure on already over-used groundwater supplies, says Parker. “We have seen dropping groundwater levels in many parts of the state. We expect growers to increase use of groundwater, especially for tree and vine crops.  This will accelerate the decline in groundwater,” he adds.

Little currently on the horizon offers much hope for change, says California climatologist Mike Anderson, with the Department of Water Resources.

This offshore ridge is very stable, he says, adding, “this is good news if you want nice weather, but if you want precipitation it is not.”
 
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2014/0121/California-drought-Scientists-puzzled-by-persistence-of-blocking-ridge (http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2014/0121/California-drought-Scientists-puzzled-by-persistence-of-blocking-ridge) :icon_study: :'(
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on January 22, 2014, 02:33:43 AM
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.
Title: Alaska-Springtime in January
Post by: RE on January 22, 2014, 02:43:09 AM
I have lived in Alaska for 8 years now.  In that entire time, there was NEVER a January without Sub-Zero temps in the Mat Valley.

Not only have there been no Sub-Zero days, over the last 2 weeks we have had numerous days above Freezing, to the point now that all the Snow we got through the early part of the winter is now almost all melted.  Parking Lots show PAVEMENT, not SNOW on the Surface!

Not predicting for sure this trend will continue through February, maybe a Cold Snap finally comes.  However, as of right now, the temps here are fucking BALMY.  Anyone afraid of super cold temps up here in Alaska anymore probably has little to worry about unless this is just an "anomaly".

Why do I not think it is an anomaly?   :icon_scratch:

RE
Title: Re: Alaska-Springtime in January
Post by: Surly1 on January 22, 2014, 03:51:57 AM
I have lived in Alaska for 8 years now.  In that entire time, there was NEVER a January without Sub-Zero temps in the Mat Valley.

Not only have there been no Sub-Zero days, over the last 2 weeks we have had numerous days above Freezing, to the point now that all the Snow we got through the early part of the winter is now almost all melted.  Parking Lots show PAVEMENT, not SNOW on the Surface!

Not predicting for sure this trend will continue through February, maybe a Cold Snap finally comes.  However, as of right now, the temps here are fucking BALMY.  Anyone afraid of super cold temps up here in Alaska anymore probably has little to worry about unless this is just an "anomaly".

Why do I not think it is an anomaly?   :icon_scratch:

RE

Wonder if Alaska is being affected by that persistent high causing the California drought?
Title: Re: Alaska-Springtime in January
Post by: WHD on January 22, 2014, 01:20:49 PM
I have lived in Alaska for 8 years now.  In that entire time, there was NEVER a January without Sub-Zero temps in the Mat Valley.

Not only have there been no Sub-Zero days, over the last 2 weeks we have had numerous days above Freezing, to the point now that all the Snow we got through the early part of the winter is now almost all melted.  Parking Lots show PAVEMENT, not SNOW on the Surface!

Not predicting for sure this trend will continue through February, maybe a Cold Snap finally comes.  However, as of right now, the temps here are fucking BALMY.  Anyone afraid of super cold temps up here in Alaska anymore probably has little to worry about unless this is just an "anomaly".

Why do I not think it is an anomaly?   :icon_scratch:

RE

2F today, in Minneapolis. -9 tonight. With tomorrow, that will make 15 days in January, sub-zero. There were 14 in December. 29 days of subzero weather out of 49, since Dec 04. About 10 of those twenty other days, got down into the 0-9 range. They aren't making a big deal about it here, on the news, but that is unprecedented. Sort of like, don't want to stir up the natives. Going to be close to 40 Friday, then right back into the sub-zero this weekend and all next week, they say. If February is like this, it will be the coldest winter here ever, NO QUESTION. I remember a few years ago, the temp didn't get above 32 for like three weeks, in January. It was otherwise comparatively moderate. That seemed like a big deal then.

Spring in Alaska. No snow pack in Cali. Hot as Hell in Aussie land, unlike anything seen before there.

NO PROBLEM FOLKS. NOTHING TO SEE HERE. MOVE ALONG...

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on January 22, 2014, 01:28:04 PM
Meanwhile, Texas has also had more freezing and near freezing days than we've had in a lot of years. Down to 25F again tomorrow night.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: DoomerSupport on January 22, 2014, 02:08:39 PM
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.

It's being played down a lot because politicians and business people (particularly farmers in the Central Valley) are scared. 

Fracking will use more water, and I'm pretty sure it's already happening in the Bakersfield area.  That will further reduce agricultural water deliveries and push up food prices.  Expect to see a lot more money flowing into commodities grown in California, with a resultant speculative increase in costs.   

We're working hard on improving the curb appeal of our place, in preparation for selling this year at the best price. I don't want to be stuck with property here once the agricultural money stops flowing, not to mention the water.



Title: Re: Alaska-Springtime in January
Post by: DoomerSupport on January 22, 2014, 02:13:09 PM
I have lived in Alaska for 8 years now.  In that entire time, there was NEVER a January without Sub-Zero temps in the Mat Valley.

Not only have there been no Sub-Zero days, over the last 2 weeks we have had numerous days above Freezing, to the point now that all the Snow we got through the early part of the winter is now almost all melted.  Parking Lots show PAVEMENT, not SNOW on the Surface!

Not predicting for sure this trend will continue through February, maybe a Cold Snap finally comes.  However, as of right now, the temps here are fucking BALMY.  Anyone afraid of super cold temps up here in Alaska anymore probably has little to worry about unless this is just an "anomaly".

Why do I not think it is an anomaly?   :icon_scratch:

RE

Wonder if Alaska is being affected by that persistent high causing the California drought?

Different weather pattern, but both may be impacted by the changes to the gulf stream over the few decades.




Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on January 22, 2014, 04:24:04 PM
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.

It's being played down a lot because politicians and business people (particularly farmers in the Central Valley) are scared. 

Fracking will use more water, and I'm pretty sure it's already happening in the Bakersfield area.  That will further reduce agricultural water deliveries and push up food prices.  Expect to see a lot more money flowing into commodities grown in California, with a resultant speculative increase in costs.   

We're working hard on improving the curb appeal of our place, in preparation for selling this year at the best price. I don't want to be stuck with property here once the agricultural money stops flowing, not to mention the water.

Hi Haniel, Yes, my thoughts went immediately to the speculative element jumping on the produce markets and causing another vicious price increase in those already expensive items needed for proper health. The produce section of the supermarket has become the scariest around the Boston area, and a lot of the products are coming from Mexico or Chile and just do not seem to have that California grown rich healthy vibrant look and color.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: DoomerSupport on January 22, 2014, 04:35:48 PM
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.

It's being played down a lot because politicians and business people (particularly farmers in the Central Valley) are scared. 

Fracking will use more water, and I'm pretty sure it's already happening in the Bakersfield area.  That will further reduce agricultural water deliveries and push up food prices.  Expect to see a lot more money flowing into commodities grown in California, with a resultant speculative increase in costs.   

We're working hard on improving the curb appeal of our place, in preparation for selling this year at the best price. I don't want to be stuck with property here once the agricultural money stops flowing, not to mention the water.

Hi Haniel, Yes, my thoughts went immediately to the speculative element jumping on the produce markets and causing another vicious price increase in those already expensive items needed for proper health. The produce section of the supermarket has become the scariest around the Boston area, and a lot of the products are coming from Mexico or Chile and just do not seem to have that California grown rich healthy vibrant look and color.

Picked earlier and ripened in the back of a truck using gasses.

 
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on January 22, 2014, 05:24:35 PM
Quote
Meanwhile, Texas has also had more freezing and near freezing days than we've had in a lot of years. Down to 25F again tomorrow night.

Meanwhile, Vermont got what RE was supposed to get! It is -6F and we have been barely above zero for 2 days. We also had a week like that in December when it got to -14F. This cold spell promises to last another 4 days. UGH!  :(
Title: Photo of California from space tells the STORY
Post by: agelbert on January 22, 2014, 05:37:58 PM
Quote
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.

It's bad. REALLY bad.  :emthdown:  :(

(http://o1.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/format/jpg/quality/82/resize/313x295/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/f0ed801e72cd13fa65292c91671818d0)
You can see the obvious lack of snow pack from one year to the next but look closely at the valley where all the fruit and vegetables is grown: IT'S BONE DRY!  :P  :(
Title: Re: Photo of California from space tells the STORY
Post by: Surly1 on January 22, 2014, 05:49:13 PM
Quote
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.

It's bad. REALLY bad.  :emthdown:  :(

(http://o1.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/format/jpg/quality/82/resize/313x295/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/f0ed801e72cd13fa65292c91671818d0)
You can see the obvious lack of snow pack from one year to the next but look closely at the valley where all the fruit and vegetables is grown: IT'S BONE DRY!  :P  :(

IN this case, a picture truly is worth ten thousand words.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on January 22, 2014, 06:11:10 PM
 
California Drought Could Trigger Food Inflation

Wednesday, 22 Jan 2014 06:49 AM

By Michael Carr

A lack of rainfall in California could have a nationwide impact on food prices. According to the California Department of Food and Agriculture, the state produces almost half of U.S.-grown fruits, nuts and vegetables.

California produces about one-eighth of the nation's total farming output. The state accounts for more than 90 percent of the U.S. production of artichokes, broccoli, celery, almonds, grapes, walnuts and other crops.


http://www.moneynews.com/MichaelCarr/California-drought-fruit-vegetable/2014/01/22/id/548289#ixzz2rBQw2jp5 (http://www.moneynews.com/MichaelCarr/California-drought-fruit-vegetable/2014/01/22/id/548289#ixzz2rBQw2jp5)

Title: Re: Photo of California from space tells the STORY
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 22, 2014, 06:12:57 PM
Quote
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.

It's bad. REALLY bad.  :emthdown:  :(

(http://o1.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/format/jpg/quality/82/resize/313x295/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/f0ed801e72cd13fa65292c91671818d0)
You can see the obvious lack of snow pack from one year to the next but look closely at the valley where all the fruit and vegetables is grown: IT'S BONE DRY!  :P  :(

IN this case, a picture truly is worth ten thousand words.

There I was thinking the big blizzard must have broken the drought. That blizzard surely must also affect produce too on the eastside. About a year ago the pharmacist we had there told me there was 40C in alaska and I said it was impossible, didnt believe it.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on January 22, 2014, 06:28:36 PM
UB,
If you haven't done it, check out this web site. The global wind pattern anywhere on earth (only three hours from REAL TIME!) can be observed. You can see what is happening down under, the wind patterns around that volcano that just erupted in Indonesia and the wavy, drunk, ox bow making jet stream in the northern hemisphere giving us all those extremes in temperature. I believe the same thing is happening with the jet stream in the southern hemisphere when it is winter down there but I will have to see when your winter starts. 

You can zoom in or zoom out from the globe and look from directly above the poles as well. Notice the huge low pressure area southwest of Alaska pumping warm air up to Alaska while arctic air is pouring into the plains and northeastern states from a double oxbow tongue formed from the weak jet stream.

http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/1000hPa/orthographic=-83.50,45.38,460 (http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/1000hPa/orthographic=-83.50,45.38,460)

It's going to be hotter than hell this year up here. I expect some nasty hurricanes will hit us too. Forewarned is forearmed, I say.  8)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on January 22, 2014, 06:45:16 PM
Stock up on canned veggies. Make arrangements with a nearby CSA. Grow your own.

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 22, 2014, 07:01:40 PM
'Grow your own' means something else here Bill,  ;)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on January 22, 2014, 07:03:59 PM
'Grow your own' means something else here Bill,  ;)

It would, where there hardly isn't any economy otherwise. Beware mr Tony deciding it's a freedom thing.  :D

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on January 22, 2014, 08:54:37 PM
'Grow your own' means something else here Bill,  ;)

It would, where there hardly isn't any economy otherwise. Beware mr Tony deciding it's a freedom thing.  :D

WHD

Well overall we have much higher wages and much lower unemployment, and no truly homeless, YET. But if you mean tasmania, yeah wider divide. Growing happens mostly from the state with the lax law, 200$ fine for a growroom. There goes about 5% or less of the profit. But tony and the feds leaning on that state for it would hurt their economy big. I half expect sooner or later for govt to want that revenue.
Title: Re: Photo of California from space tells the STORY
Post by: DoomerSupport on January 23, 2014, 01:08:43 PM
Quote
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.

It's bad. REALLY bad.  :emthdown:  :(

(http://o1.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/format/jpg/quality/82/resize/313x295/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/f0ed801e72cd13fa65292c91671818d0)
You can see the obvious lack of snow pack from one year to the next but look closely at the valley where all the fruit and vegetables is grown: IT'S BONE DRY!  :P  :(

I got back from a road trip recently, commented to the wife that it seemed a lot browner and a lot less green than I remembered from previous road trips this time of year.  She assured me that California didn't get green until Feb or March and the brown was normal.

Normality bias can affect even the doom-aware.





Title: Re: Photo of California from space tells the STORY
Post by: RE on January 23, 2014, 04:46:35 PM
Quote
Was not aware the drought was this bad. thanks for posting, GO.

It's bad. REALLY bad.  :emthdown:  :(

(http://o1.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/format/jpg/quality/82/resize/313x295/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/f0ed801e72cd13fa65292c91671818d0)
You can see the obvious lack of snow pack from one year to the next but look closely at the valley where all the fruit and vegetables is grown: IT'S BONE DRY!  :P  :(

I got back from a road trip recently, commented to the wife that it seemed a lot browner and a lot less green than I remembered from previous road trips this time of year.  She assured me that California didn't get green until Feb or March and the brown was normal.

Normality bias can affect even the doom-aware.

With that thin a snowpack, hard to imagine how CA makes it throught he summer without going bone dry.

You think people will wake up here if FEMA is bringing in in Water Trucks for people to fill up their 1 Gallon/Day Ration?

I wonder if this summer is the one Lake Mead drops below the turbine cavitation point and they have to shut down the Hoover Dam?

(http://www.nolandalla.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Hoover-Dam-Drought.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather/Alaska-style
Post by: Surly1 on January 29, 2014, 01:38:00 PM
Looks to me like the Pacific high that seems locked in place, causing the california drought, is affecting weather from Alaska to Florida.

(https://fbstatic-a.akamaihd.net/rsrc.php/v2/y4/r/-PAXP-deijE.gif)

Climate Denial Crock of the Week
with Peter Sinclair
Alaska All Time High for This Date: Warmer Than Alabama
(http://climatecrocks.com/2014/01/28/alaska-all-time-high-for-this-date-warmer-than-alabama/)
January 28, 2014

(http://cci-reanalyzer.org/DailySummary/output/T2_anom_satellite1.jpg)

On the graph above, orange and red stuff is warmer than average, “average” being defined as the average on this date between 1979 and 2000. Blue/purple stuff is colder.

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FAIRBANKS AK
1156 AM AKST MON JAN 27 2014

…ALL-TIME JANUARY HIGH TEMPERATURES SET IN NORTHERN ALASKA…

A RECORD WARM AIRMASS HAS RESULTED IN MANY LOCATIONS TYING OR
SETTING RECORD DAILY TEMPERATURES ACROSS NORTHERN ALASKA THE PAST
SEVERAL DAYS. SOME LONG TERM STATIONS HAVE BROKEN ALL-TIME
JANUARY HIGH TEMPERATURES…INCLUDING DENALI NATIONAL PARK
HEADQUARTERS AND NOME. JANUARY RECORDS WERE LIKELY SET AT SOME
OTHER LOCATIONS BUT THEY EITHER LACK A LONG PERIOD OF RECORD OR
OBSERVED TEMPERATURES.

ON SUNDAY THE 26TH THE TEMPERATURE CLIMBED TO A SCORCHING 52
DEGREES AT DENALI NATIONAL PARK HEADQUARTERS. THIS IS THE WARMEST
TEMPERATURE EVER RECORDED AT THE PARK HEADQUARTERS IN JANUARY
DURING THE PAST 92 YEARS OF OBSERVATIONS. THE PREVIOUS RECORD FOR
THE MONTH WAS 51 DEGREES SET ON JANUARY 21ST 1961. FOR
REFERENCE…52 DEGREES IS THE NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE IN MID MAY
AT THE PARK HEADQUARTERS. THE NORMAL HIGH FOR JANUARY 26TH IS 11
DEGREES ABOVE ZERO.

(http://climatecrock.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/accujet0125.jpg?w=480&h=333)


AT NOME…THE TEMPERATURE HAS SOARED TO 48 DEGREES THIS MORNING.
THIS IS WARMEST TEMPERATURE EVER OBSERVED IN JANUARY AT NOME SINCE
RECORDS BEGAN IN 1906. THE PREVIOUS RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE FOR
THE MONTH OF JANUARY WAS 46 DEGREES SET ON JANUARY 7TH 1942. FOR
REFERENCE…48 DEGREES IS THE NORMAL HIGH TEMPERATURE IN LATE MAY
AT NOME. THE NORMAL HIGH FOR JANUARY 27TH IS 13 DEGREES ABOVE
ZERO. IT IS POSSIBLE THE RECORD COULD BE FURTHER BROKEN TODAY.

Accuweather:

Parts of the Arctic are currently warmer than at any time going as far back as 44.000 years…

Ancient Polytrichum mosses that have been trapped under the ice for thousands of years on Baffin Island in northern Canada are becoming exposed due to the warming temperatures that is melting the ice.


Since the moss samples would have been destroyed by erosion had they been previously exposed, the authors of a new study suggest that the temperatures in the Arctic now must be warmer than during any sustained period since the mosses were originally buried.

Scientists from the University of Colorado then radiocarbon dated these ancient moss and found that most of the samples date from the past 5,000 years, when a period of strong cooling took place in the Arctic. However, the team also found much older samples that ranged in age from 24,000 to 44,000 years old.

Based on this information, the records suggest that in general, the eastern Canadian Arctic is warmer now than in any century in the past 5000 years, and in some places, modern temperatures are unprecedented in at least the past 44,000 years. The observations, the authors suggest, show that modern Arctic warming far exceeds the bounds of historical natural variability. (from the Geophysical Research Letters)

Key excerpts from the Geophysical Research Letters press release.

“Our findings add additional evidence to the growing consensus that anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases have now resulted in unprecedented recent summer warmth that is well outside the range of that attributable to natural climate variability,” said Gifford Miller of the University of Colorado.

Miller also states that this is the first direct evidence that present summer warmth in the Eastern Canadian Arctic now exceeds the peak warmth there in the Early Holocene era.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: DoomerSupport on January 29, 2014, 02:03:21 PM
Thanks, Surly.  The wife is off to Nome in a couple of weeks for some contract work. She sent the California weather ahead of her. 

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on January 30, 2014, 08:02:12 AM
As a transplanted northerner, I know most of the gibes about how southerners can't function in snow. We just got a foot in SE VA, and while Buffalonians like Contrary shrug that off as another day in the office, that's a good bit almost anywhere, and pretty much shut things down here yesterday.

Yet what's going on in Atlanta is far beyond the usual. Just found this article.

This Is The Best Explanation We've Seen For Why All Of Atlanta Is Stuck In Traffic
(http://www.businessinsider.com/why-all-altanta-is-stuck-in-traffic-2014-1)
Alex Davies

Jan. 29, 2014, 10:06 AM

What Everybody From The North Needs To Understand About The Traffic Disaster In Atlanta
Atlanta's Hell Commute Is Still Going On
Light Snow In Atlanta Causes Baby To Be Born In Traffic

(http://static5.businessinsider.com/image/52e917dc6da8112f666a4c94-480-/atlanta-traffic-dark-1.jpg)
A few inches of snow in Atlanta have led to gridlock, hundreds of accidents, and a baby born on the side of a highway in the past 24 hours.

The City knew the storm was coming, and has a new fleet of snowplows and vehicles to spread sand. So what went wrong?

Atlanta-based designer Thomas Strickland spent eight hours in traffic, and offered up a great explanation of the problem on Metafilter.

He gave us permission to publish his take:

---

Considering I just spent upwards of eight hours in this mess as a driver, then an additional mile and a half on foot, let me tell you what it is like.

It isn't just snow. In fact, if it was merely snow, we'd all be mostly fine. Admittedly, this is Atlanta, where even rain can lengthen an evening commute. On certain days, we'll even have something the traffic reporters call a "sunshine slowdown" because the glare is the only explanation for it. But for the most part, we're all used to what effect weather has on our getting to and fro.

But imagine this scenario: The weather service has been calling for severe snow for a few days, but the predictions only promise an inch or less. Now, it is one thing for you the commuter to scoff at the weather, but what if your municipal powers-that-be took the same attitude? No preparation, no salting or sanding before hand, and (this is the big one) no planned municipal closures.

So high noon rolls around and the snow arrives, and hey, that stuff is coming down pretty hard, like something seriously worth considering. It is at this time that the powers-that-be decide to close several offices and multiple schools.

Schools. Schools containing children whose parents haven't planned to fetch them until much later. So all of those parents now have to go rushing from wherever to their school of choice. Atlanta is a driving city, not a walking city or especially a rail or bus city, so thus commences a volley of unexpected traffic volume.

As the snow falls, several businesses catch the same idea, so they too decide to roll up the carpet and send their employees home a few hours early. This is a second unexpected volley of traffic.

Oh, and the sand trucks? They're heading out for their first run. We've about 30 or 40 such trucks to serve all of Atlanta, by the way.

Now this whole time, the snow is still falling and since the temperature has been hovering right around 27 degrees, the stuff is sticking to the streets. All of these commuters are crowding these streets, and while some are lucky to have found some roads favored by that first run of sanding, most are just plowing through and keeping the streets mostly ice-free by friction alone.

But with added volume, because the number of cars keeps increasing, these streets are getting crowded and the traffic is slowing and the snow melt that used to work so well isn't nearly so effective. Now that melted snow is refreezing under the tires of all of these stacked motorists. Those tires manage to melt a little of the top layer, but it freezes right back quickly. The result is a particularly Southern phenomena that looks and feels like cold glass.

What about the sand trucks? Well, they've made it through their first run, but now they can't so quickly get back to the warehouses to get more of that precious sand.

And all of those commuters? They're getting to know one another quite well, with run-ins and rear-endings and side-swipes that make it necessary for the police to be involved, and occasionally a fire truck, sadly an ambulance.

A few of those commuters just say "Screw it" and leave their cars where they get stuck, stomping off into the snow in hopes of stumbling home.

Did I mention the school buses that were still trying to get kids home at 10pm or later?

It is a horrible and dreadful and disastrous situation, and while it is easy to mock, please take a moment to consider just how quickly this escalated and how it could've been prevented. This is more than your typical case of "The South can't deal with a little snow."

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/why-all-altanta-is-stuck-in-traffic-2014-1#ixzz2rtjLUW7z (http://www.businessinsider.com/why-all-altanta-is-stuck-in-traffic-2014-1#ixzz2rtjLUW7z)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on January 30, 2014, 10:35:17 AM
More crazy weather--

How much snow does it take to cancel school in different parts of the United States? (http://theatln.tc/1gtXQDO) A map-loving Reddit user decided to find out.


(https://scontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1/1507956_10152247042513487_138441719_n.png)

Weather-related school closings are a constant source of anxiety this time of year. Sometimes the anxiety is generational: "They never canceled school in my day," parents and grandparents complain when a new snow day gets announced. Sometimes it's regional. D.C. isn't as "flinty" as Chicago, President Obama sighed when schools closed during his first winter in the capital. Northerners watched in puzzlement as two inches of snow crippled Atlanta earlier this week.

A new map from Reddit user atrubetskoy is sure to stoke this regional competition. Using data "taken from hundreds of various points from user responses...interpolated using NOAA's average annual snowfall days map," Trubetskoy made a map showing how much snow it typically takes to close schools in the U.S. and Canada. Notice that for much of the southern U.S., all it takes is "any snow" to shut schools down. For the Upper Midwest and Canada, two feet of snow are required for a closure.
Click on map to enlarge

Trubetskoy includes the following clarifications:

        In much of the Midwest and Great Plains, school closing often depends more on wind chill and temperature than on snow accumulation ("cold days"). Thus, this map may be misleading in those areas.

        Many jurisdictions in California and other western states have significantly varied snowfall, depending on elevation. This makes it difficult to find an "average" number, or often makes it misleading.

        Urban areas like Chicago and New York have more resources to clear snow and often need more to cause closings.

        Clarification: The lightest green says "any snow" but also includes merely the prediction of snow.

        Clarification II: This is snow accumulation over 24 hours/overnight.

        Hawaii does get snow! Just... not where people live.

Before this map gives Midwesterners a superiority complex, it's worth remembering: School closures say more about an area's infrastructure than the toughness of its citizens. Schools in the South close at the mere hint of snow not because the people who live there are wimps, but because snow is such a rare event—and most cities there don't have a fleet of snow plows the way Northern ones do.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on February 05, 2014, 04:37:41 AM
Three inches on the ground already in Beantown and a foot expected. :'(

I am not a happy camper, "Spring Where Art Thou"?

Another blizzard being forecast for this weekend. :-\ :-\ :-\ :-\

Hang in there Snowleopard, better days are coming.  :icon_sunny: :icon_sunny:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on February 05, 2014, 05:49:55 AM
Since our typical "snow day" is really about sleet and freezing rain more than snow, the decision to close the schools happens when we have road icing conditions. Although it typically doesn't even last all day, the early mornings can be problematic. Last week we had a little ice, mostly bridges...the schools elected NOT to close...and police responded to more than 270 wrecks in town. Most of them were caused by people driving too fast across icy bridges.

I made it to work...and then  at about 8 am, after the damage was done, they called off school because so many students stayed home anyway.

These ice days ruin a day's work for me, because generally people don't show up for appointments. Even after the roads are passable, which is usually sometime before noon.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on February 05, 2014, 05:57:35 AM
Since our typical "snow day" is really about sleet and freezing rain more than snow, the decision to close the schools happens when we have road icing conditions. Although it typically doesn't even last all day, the early mornings can be problematic. Last week we had a little ice, mostly bridges...the schools elected NOT to close...and police responded to more than 270 wrecks in town. Most of them were caused by people driving too fast across icy bridges.

I made it to work...and then  at about 8 am, after the damage was done, they called off school because so many students stayed home anyway.

These ice days ruin a day's work for me, because generally people don't show up for appointments. Even after the roads are passable, which is usually sometime before noon.

Hi Doc, becomes total bedlam in my area, cars stuck everywhere is what causes most of the problems. They can't get up hill, fender benders, plows can't get through. It is a big time mess, only the kids love it because there is no school.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Winter Weirdness: Is Arctic Warming to Blame?
Post by: g on February 09, 2014, 06:59:46 AM
Winter weirdness: Is Arctic warming to blame?

This winter has brought unseasonable warmth to Alaska, frigid temperatures to much of the Eastern US, and more drought to California. The jury is still out on whether a warmer Arctic is behind the extreme weather.

                                                              (http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/content/2014/0217-weekly/0217-avortex-usa-weather_/18012489-1-eng-US/0217-AVORTEX-USA-WEATHER__full_380.jpg)

Ice from her breath forms around the face of a woman in Minneapolis. Temperatures plunged in early January as the polar vortex enveloped much of the Eastern US.
(Eric Miller/Reuters)



For Alaskans who have basked in record warmth, Atlantans who abandoned cars during a January snowstorm, or Californians enduring drought, this winter's extremes have been nothing if not memorable.

Drought or unusual warmth is in sync with the effects that climate scientists expect from global warming. But what about wintertime invasions of Arctic air into the US Deep South or into China, where, a new study indicates, record cold events became more frequent over the past 10 to 20 years?

For some climate scientists, January's extremes and the atmospheric patterns that nurtured and sustained them are fresh bits of information to apply to these intriguing questions: Has global warming's effect on the Arctic set the stage for persistent weather patterns that lead to extremes? If so, is the decline in Arctic sea ice the stage manager for the wintry events?

Nearly two years ago, two researchers identified atmospheric features that appear to tie a warming Arctic to mid-latitude weather extremes. Since then, when persistent weather patterns have brought drought or heat waves or repeated invasions of cold air to usually mild locations in winter, these links to the Arctic have become a go-to explanation among many commentators and policymakers.

Researchers working on the issue, however, caution that while they are uncovering intriguing hints of this tie-in, it is far from ironclad.

Nor is it merely an arcane debating point. If the proposition holds up, in principle it could help improve seasonal forecasts for temperature and precipitation.

"That would have huge economic implications," says Cecilia Bitz, a climate scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle who specializes in the role that Arctic sea ice plays in the climate system.

The state of this science today is comparable to that of tropical cyclones and global warming following hurricane Katrina in 2005, suggests Jennifer Francis, an atmospheric scientist at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J. For those phenomena, dueling studies appeared, and evidence for an existing fingerprint of global warming on patterns of tropical cyclone activity was equivocal.

"We are in the same situation," says Dr. Francis, who, along with colleague Stephen Vavrus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, published the hypothesis about Arctic links to weather extremes in the journal Geophysical Research Letters in March 2012.

The duo starts by noting that warming in the Arctic has occurred at two to three times the pace of warming for the rest of the Northern Hemisphere, reducing the temperature difference between the Arctic and mid-latitudes. As the contrast shrinks, the jet stream slows.

The jet stream is a river of high-altitude winds that steers and spawns storms and in effect serves as an atmospheric boundary for cold Arctic air. A slower jet stream produces longer meanders, the pair says. This would bring cold air farther south and warm air farther north than otherwise would be the case.

At the same time, the two say, circulation patterns that block the migration of these meanders appear more frequently and persist. This would cause specific weather patterns to either creep along or dally for days to weeks.

Other researchers have connected a warming Arctic to weather extremes in specific regions. At a two-day workshop on the topic at the University of Maryland in College Park last September, climate scientist James Screen of the University of Exeter in England pointed to studies that link shrinking sea ice to cold winters in North America and Eurasia, wet summers in Europe, extreme rainfall in the Mediterranean, and the behavior of the East Asian monsoon.

But Dr. Screen also cautioned against claiming too much for the connections – at least at this point. An apparent link doesn't say much about cause and effect, he and others noted.

The case for the link between the shrinking extent of Arctic sea ice and cold winters in Eurasia was the strongest, he offered. Even here, however, the influence is barely detectable and often not statistically significant.

The caution that he and others express centers in no small part on the radically different effects that Francis and Dr. Vavrus see compared with a decade's worth of modeling studies.

These studies suggest that a warming Arctic will draw the jet stream's average track north. Blocking patterns will decrease. Moreover, the models indicate no "robust" decrease in the jet stream's speed, notes Elizabeth Barnes, a climate scientist at Colorado State University in Fort Collins who focuses on the jet stream's behavior and the factors affecting it.

To be sure, the models could be wrong, she acknowledges. But when different teams with different models converge on the same answer, that inspires more confidence in the result.

The scientists' caution also hinges on the relatively short time that the Arctic has undergone rapid warming, Francis adds, noting that it has occurred only in the past 10 or 15 years. Model projections can help, but "it's going to take maybe another decade" before any signs of an Arctic influence can be confidently detected, she says.

Francis and colleagues also have looked specifically at sea ice loss and winter weather extremes, finding a link.

In effect, the ever-shrinking amount of sea ice in the fall makes more moisture available for snow. Increased snowfall over the North American or Eurasian Arctic earlier in the fall-winter season cools the air more quickly than a later snowfall would.

This more southerly mass of cold air affects pressure patterns in ways that boost the likelihood of blocking patterns and cold snaps.

This idea appears to draw some support from modeling work that was published last August and conducted by Yannick Peings and Gudrun Magnusdottir of the University of California, Irvine.

When they plugged the average Arctic sea ice decline between 2007 and 2012 into the model, it yielded cold conditions at mid-latitudes, mainly over Asia. The model also produced some increase in the depth of the jet stream's meanders, although the statistical significance was small. All this tended to take place in February.

But by 2090, according to their model projection, the Arctic warmed so much that wintertime cold extremes at mid-latitudes remained only as frequent as they were in 2010.

Further work by Dr. Magnusdottir and colleagues has added another wrinkle. Long-term swings in Atlantic sea-surface temperatures, known as the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation, appear to have the same effect on the jet stream's meanders and blocking patterns that Arctic warming and sea ice are purported to have.

When the AMO enters its warm phase – its condition since the 1990s – the jet stream tends to weaken and buckle. Blocking patterns increase, and colder temperatures prevail at mid-latitudes.

"This also supports the colder winters of recent years," Magnusdottir says, adding that the results seem robust, since they show up in real-world data as well as in computer simulations.

Others looking for predicted circulation patterns have a hard time finding anything. In a study published last month in Geophysical Research Letters, Dr. Barnes of Colorado State and colleagues used three independent approaches to identifying blocking patterns in climate data. They reported finding trends in isolated regions and at specific periods, but no trend was significant and common to all three approaches.

"Blocking is so variable from year to year that there's no evidence that anything out of the ordinary is occurring," Barnes says. Nor has she found trends in changes to the jet stream's meanders or travel time around the hemisphere.

Does this mean that Francis and Vavrus are wrong? "Not at all," Barnes says.

The evidence may be masked for now by the "noise" of natural variability. And other factors affect the jet stream. Perhaps "you have a tug of war going on" between the influence of sea ice and something else, Barnes says.

For her part, Francis acknowledges that for now, several of the links tying Arctic warming to patterns that foster bouts of extreme weather are still weak. On the other hand, no one is finding that the meanders in the jet stream are getting any smaller, she adds.

"Everybody's seeing a hint that this is happening," she says, "but we can't say it's definitely happening yet."

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2014/0209/Winter-weirdness-Is-Arctic-warming-to-blame (http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2014/0209/Winter-weirdness-Is-Arctic-warming-to-blame) :icon_study:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on February 09, 2014, 07:17:38 AM
44 of the last 65 days in Minneapolis, we have had temperatures below 0F. Two hours north and west, in Alexandria MN, 49 of 65.

WHD
Title: Memories of the Lindsay Snowstorm
Post by: RE on February 09, 2014, 04:18:35 PM

Hi Doc, becomes total bedlam in my area, cars stuck everywhere is what causes most of the problems. They can't get up hill, fender benders, plows can't get through. It is a big time mess, only the kids love it because there is no school.  :laugh:

I LOVED Snow Days as a kid.  I would stand by the front door of the RE House watching the snow come down and PRAYING for school to be called off the next day.

The ULTIMATE was the Lindsay Snowstorm of 1969. The Sanitation Dept was embroiled with Union Grievances with Mayor Lindsay, and the streets didn't get plowed.  We didn't have school for a WEEK!

(http://www.womansday.com/cm/womansday/images/u7/snow-blizzard-Feb-1969-lifestyle-4-2.jpg)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/72/John_Lindsay_NYWTS_3.jpg)

I need to write an article about the Lindsay Snowstorm.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on February 11, 2014, 05:33:16 PM
Crazy weather night here. Streets iced up after work. The beloved is stranded on a freeway flyover, has been stuck for over an hour. Adventurer daughter's BF also stuck in iced conditions on the road.

We were supposed to go see Gordon Lightfoot tonight at ACL Live. Oh, well. I may have to get the truck out and go rescue people.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on February 11, 2014, 05:34:58 PM
Crazy weather night here. Streets iced up after work. The beloved is stranded on a freeway flyover, has been stuck for over an hour. Adventurer daughter's BF also stuck in iced conditions on the road.

We were supposed to go see Gordon Lightfoot tonight at ACL Live. Oh, well. I may have to get the truck out and go rescue people.

Good luck, Eddie.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on February 11, 2014, 06:39:03 PM
All home safe. No concert for us tonight. Thanks, Surly.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Global Warming and Random Walk Theory are Both Nuts
Post by: g on February 13, 2014, 12:00:43 PM
Global Warming & Random Walk Theory Have a Lot in Common – They are Both Nuts   ::)

                                                              (http://i2.wp.com/armstrongeconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/gore-hot-air.jpg)


Global Warming is clearly a bunch of hot air. It seems to be a theory made up by a bunch of guys that got drunk one night and said – Hey man! It is warmer this season than last! Wow! We must have caused that man! Word! This is the coldest year day after day on a consistent basis I can remember in my life. Environmentalists and Democrats love to claim that there is a “97 percent” consensus among climate scientists about global warming. However, they choose to ignore the fact that 95 percent of those climate models predicting global temperature rises have been wrong.

This entire theory is nonsense and it arises from the same idiotic concept that fails to recognize that there is a cycle to everything from the way your thoughts are formed in your brain (brain waves), the beat of your heart, to the 4 seasons. This is up there on the list a really stupid ideas like the random walk hypothesis that was devised because the markets went up and down rather than in a straight line and people could not predict that.

The Random Walk Theory stating that stock market prices evolve according to a random walk like a drunk staggering down the street making them unpredictable was the theory to explain total failure to understand how the economy functions. The concept can be traced to French broker Jules Regnault who published a book in 1863, and then to French mathematician Louis Bachelier whose Ph.D. dissertation titled “The Theory of Speculation” (1900). These same ideas were later developed by MIT Sloan School of Management professor Paul Cootner in his 1964 book The Random Character of Stock Market Prices. The theory was then popularized by the 1973 book, A Random Walk Down Wall Street, by Burton Malkiel, who was a Professor of Economics at Princeton University. This was used earlier in Eugene Fama’s 1965 article “Random Walks In Stock Market Prices”, that was the foundation for his Ph.D. thesis. The theory that stock prices move randomly was earlier proposed by Maurice Kendall in his 1953 paper, The Analytics of Economic Time Series, Part 1: Prices

Both theories of Random Walk and Global Warming are failures to understand the cyclical nature of the universe and that we oscillate between two extremes in everything. We have even male and female. There are two opposites that make everything function right down to our concept of God and the Devil, good and evil, etc.. These crazy people actually proposed that the government spend money to create a machine to reverse global warming. Simply breathtakingly brilliant.  :exp-grin: :exp-grin:

http://armstrongeconomics.com/2014/02/12/global-warming-random-walk-theory-have-a-lot-in-common-they-are-both-nuts/ (http://armstrongeconomics.com/2014/02/12/global-warming-random-walk-theory-have-a-lot-in-common-they-are-both-nuts/)  :icon_study: :icon_study:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Global Warming Why It's Nonsense
Post by: g on February 13, 2014, 12:08:59 PM

Global Warming Why it is Nonsense
   

A few people have written to say I have a closed mind with respect to the impact humans can have on the environment. I dare say flip the coin – you are assuming we have the capacity to alter the planet as if we were God. I have investigated this very carefully. Like markets, yes you can manipulate them within the trend, but you cannot change a bear market into a bull market at will.

                                                                  (http://i1.wp.com/armstrongeconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Earth-Hand.jpg)


We can poison a local area, dump garbage in the river, and we can even meltdown nuclear power plants. However, this is like cutting your finger – it is cutting you head off and you will survive. We cannot look at local pollution which is nasty and can make the air hard to breath in an industrial city. However, that does not rise to the level of altering the environment of the entire planet. Granted, we should be clean and respectful. As the old saying goes – you do not shit where you eat. But there is ABSOLUTELY no evidences whatsoever that the planet is going through some warming stages created by mankind. That is total nonsense. This is like the Precession of the Equinox that takes 25,800 years to complete and to move just one degree takes 72 years and this is why one person could never have made such an observation.

                                                             (http://i0.wp.com/armstrongeconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/baliunas-sallie-2.jpg)
 have reviewed the cyclical discoveries of Sallie Baliunas. Ice core samples were taken going back thousands of years and what was discovered is that the sun is indeed a thermal dynamic system that beats like your heart and there is a 300 year cycle between maximum and minimum. Do not confuse short-term trends or local observations for a few decades and assume we have altered the entire planet.

I attended the dinner in Washington that was a political bash. I went with my friend Dick Fox who was Chairman of Temple University at that time.  The person in charge of seating put the two of us at the table with the environmental group heads. They assumed we were with a university and spoke freely. The conversation was frank and it was all about how to use the environmental movement to reduce population. They fought for wetlands to stop construction. We listened to this revelation and Dick egged them on pretending to be on their side. They even want harsh prison terms for minorities to stop them from have children. Dick finally asked them – Whose grandchild are you trying to prevent from being born? Your’s or mine? The farce was then up.

There is a difference from wanting a clean environment and using this as a tool for a hidden agenda. It is no different from taxing the rich that ends up as always the middle class while they borrow from the poor and do not even pay them interest with their annual tax refund.

To top it off, people ASSUME that we even have the power with nuclear bombs to destroy then planet. That is probably not even likely. They also assume that if we set one-off all like will be dead forever. They make a lot of assumptions based upon a guess that is NOT even EDUCATED.

Wildlife has defied Chernobyl radiation. It appears that living creatures do evolve and adapt in an amazing manner. The radiation area that has been abandoned by humans has turned into a natural animal preserve. The the Black Plague killed more than 50% of the European population at the time, the survivors were immune. The same has been shown with radiation. Some animals have evolved and adapted to the radiation levels (see BBC report).

We can impact a local area, but we CANNOT alter the course of the entire planet. On that score, we are but a pimple on a flies ass. So until I see HARD evidence beyond assumptions for a few decades, I will keep it real. We can not alter the trend of a market anymore than we can change the environment of the entire world.

http://armstrongeconomics.com/2014/02/13/global-warming-why-it-is-nonsense/ (http://armstrongeconomics.com/2014/02/13/global-warming-why-it-is-nonsense/)  :icon_study: :icon_study:
 
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on February 13, 2014, 12:21:25 PM
Quote
But there is ABSOLUTELY no evidences whatsoever that the planet is going through some warming stages created by mankind.

AS always, GO is 1,000% RIGHT! What's more, he is certain, sure, convinced. and has no doubts whatsoever. Listen to GO. He KNOWS how to pick a winning side and STAY ON IT.

The fossil fuelers and climate change deniers have won the energy battle. Congratulations.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Global Warming Why It's Nonsense
Post by: JRM on February 13, 2014, 01:49:23 PM
But there is ABSOLUTELY no evidences whatsoever that the planet is going through some warming stages created by mankind. That is total nonsense.

Empirical evidence that humans are causing global warming
http://www.skepticalscience.com/empirical-evidence-for-global-warming.htm (http://www.skepticalscience.com/empirical-evidence-for-global-warming.htm)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on February 14, 2014, 03:22:05 AM
 Renewable Rubbish, Globull Warming, and next in the trilogy will be a Rabid Racist Rant, all of course in the spirit of serious study, by way of kicking all agb's sacred cows when hes down. You said you were taking the high road but this is the low road, turning the other ass cheek mooning the man.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Global Warming and Random Walk Theory are Both Nuts
Post by: Surly1 on February 14, 2014, 03:41:31 AM
Global Warming & Random Walk Theory Have a Lot in Common – They are Both Nuts   ::)

                                                              (http://i2.wp.com/armstrongeconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/gore-hot-air.jpg)


Global Warming is clearly a bunch of hot air. It seems to be a theory made up by a bunch of guys that got drunk one night and said – Hey man! It is warmer this season than last! Wow! We must have caused that man! Word! This is the coldest year day after day on a consistent basis I can remember in my life. Environmentalists and Democrats love to claim that there is a “97 percent” consensus among climate scientists about global warming. However, they choose to ignore the fact that 95 percent of those climate models predicting global temperature rises have been wrong.

This entire theory is nonsense and it arises from the same idiotic concept that fails to recognize that there is a cycle to everything from the way your thoughts are formed in your brain (brain waves), the beat of your heart, to the 4 seasons. This is up there on the list a really stupid ideas like the random walk hypothesis that was devised because the markets went up and down rather than in a straight line and people could not predict that.

The Random Walk Theory stating that stock market prices evolve according to a random walk like a drunk staggering down the street making them unpredictable was the theory to explain total failure to understand how the economy functions. The concept can be traced to French broker Jules Regnault who published a book in 1863, and then to French mathematician Louis Bachelier whose Ph.D. dissertation titled “The Theory of Speculation” (1900). These same ideas were later developed by MIT Sloan School of Management professor Paul Cootner in his 1964 book The Random Character of Stock Market Prices. The theory was then popularized by the 1973 book, A Random Walk Down Wall Street, by Burton Malkiel, who was a Professor of Economics at Princeton University. This was used earlier in Eugene Fama’s 1965 article “Random Walks In Stock Market Prices”, that was the foundation for his Ph.D. thesis. The theory that stock prices move randomly was earlier proposed by Maurice Kendall in his 1953 paper, The Analytics of Economic Time Series, Part 1: Prices

Both theories of Random Walk and Global Warming are failures to understand the cyclical nature of the universe and that we oscillate between two extremes in everything. We have even male and female. There are two opposites that make everything function right down to our concept of God and the Devil, good and evil, etc.. These crazy people actually proposed that the government spend money to create a machine to reverse global warming. Simply breathtakingly brilliant.  :exp-grin: :exp-grin:

http://armstrongeconomics.com/2014/02/12/global-warming-random-walk-theory-have-a-lot-in-common-they-are-both-nuts/ (http://armstrongeconomics.com/2014/02/12/global-warming-random-walk-theory-have-a-lot-in-common-they-are-both-nuts/)  :icon_study: :icon_study:

Really?

I'd say Martin Armstrong is nuts. Of course, if you want to get your climate science from an investment tout, you're free to do that.

Saying that climate is cyclical like most natural phenomena does nothing to address the effects of what we have already done, including toxic loading, ocean acidification and the real effects of climate change. In fact, I can't believe I'm even writing this.

You would do well to read the article provided by JRM.
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/global-warmings-terrifying-new-math-20120719page=2#ixzz2tINNhi5m (http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/global-warmings-terrifying-new-math-20120719page=2#ixzz2tINNhi5m)

Quote
We have five times as much oil and coal and gas on the books as climate scientists think is safe to burn. We'd have to keep 80 percent of those reserves locked away underground to avoid that fate. Before we knew those numbers, our fate had been likely. Now, barring some massive intervention, it seems certain.

Yes, this coal and gas and oil is still technically in the soil. But it's already economically aboveground – it's figured into share prices, companies are borrowing money against it, nations are basing their budgets on the presumed returns from their patrimony. It explains why the big fossil-fuel companies have fought so hard to prevent the regulation of carbon dioxide – those reserves are their primary asset, the holding that gives their companies their value. 
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on February 14, 2014, 03:55:25 AM
Quote
I'd say Martin Armstrong is nuts. Of course, if you want to get your climate science from an investment tout, you're free to do that.

Surly, I think you will find my explanation that this was not my view but Mr Armstrong's in a posting to JRM. I interjected both his pieces on the matter in response to the arguments that have been prominent on the diner about the current weather situation. One of the postings did have more than this investment touts view, he quoted people with some credentials in the field. 

Sorry for the misunderstanding. In the future I will be more precise about posting a view on a subject under discussion that is pertinent to it, but not necessarily my personal view.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on February 14, 2014, 04:19:32 AM
Quote
I'd say Martin Armstrong is nuts. Of course, if you want to get your climate science from an investment tout, you're free to do that.

Surly, I think you will find my explanation that this was not my view but Mr Armstrong's in a posting to JRM. I interjected both his pieces on the matter in response to the arguments that have been prominent on the diner about the current weather situation. One of the postings did have more than this investment touts view, he quoted people with some credentials in the field. 

Sorry for the misunderstanding. In the future I will be more precise about posting a view on a subject under discussion that is pertinent to it, but not necessarily my personal view.

Oh.

I was going through the "recent posts" and was up to about #75 when I found yours. I guess I missed the context. Sorry about that.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on February 14, 2014, 04:23:07 AM
No Problem Surly, do the same thing myself.  Feel overwhelmed with the volume of material lately, better than having a quiet dull forum, but keeping up can be a task.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: jdwheeler42 on February 14, 2014, 06:32:37 AM
[ satire ]
The Germ Theory of Disease is a bunch of baloney!!  It was made by a bunch of guys who got drunk one night and said hey, we find these germs on sick people, it must be what is making them sick!  Pharmacists and doctors love to claim that there is a 99% consensus among biological scientists on the germ theory.  However, they choose to ignore the fact that the FDA allows drug companies to just not report unsuccessful trials.

This entire theory is nonsense and it arises from the same idiotic concept that fails to recognize that there is a balance to everything from the way your thoughts are formed in your brain (brain waves), the beat of your heart, to the 4 seasons.  This is up there on the list a really stupid ideas like the random walk hypothesis that was devised because the markets went up and down rather than in a straight line and people could not predict that.

Both theories of Random Walk and Global Warming are failures to understand the dual nature of the universe and that we try to balance the two extremes in everything. We have even male and female. There are two opposites that make everything function right down to our concept of God and the Devil, good and evil, etc.. These crazy people actually proposed that the government spend money to create a drugs to fight germs. Simply breathtakingly brilliant.

A few people have written to say I have a closed mind with respect to the impact germs can have on people.  I dare say flip the coin – you are assuming germs have the capacity to alter the body as if they were God. I have investigated this very carefully. Like markets, yes you can manipulate them within the trend, but you cannot change a sick person into a healthy person at will.

Germs are too small to have an impact on a person.  You need a microscope to see bacteria, and an electron microscope for viruses.  They might be able to have some local effects, but nothing that small is going to seriously affect a body as large as a person.  People get sick for their own reasons, and the germs take that as an opportunity to multiply, so you can find more of them on sick people, but that is not because they caused the sickness.  And when people take an antibiotic to kill germs, it is just a placebo; it is their belief in the medicine that causes them to get better, not the medicine itself.

The whole germ theory of disease is just a massive conspiracy between the government and the drug companies to take away our freedoms, sell their products, and keep us poor.
[ / satire ]
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on February 14, 2014, 07:29:06 AM
Quote
Granted, we should be clean and respectful. As the old saying goes – you do not shit where you eat

This one sentence - in a few thousand words in two articles about why pollution is good for you, BAU is glorious and no limits of ANY kind are necessary for the rapacious bastards who control Industry, military, etc.

Both these articles can be summed up as: Do whatever you want, the earth can take it.

At the same time, I know many enviro-lib types blame the poor for the polluting of the earth. No way could it be the assumptions that we deserve the amount of energy we consume.  Just as bad as this Armstrong prick, just as certain in their righteousness. Just as doomed.

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on February 14, 2014, 07:43:06 AM
Quote
We can poison a local area, dump garbage in the river, and we can even meltdown nuclear power plants. However, this is like cutting your finger – it is cutting you head off and you will survive. We cannot look at local pollution which is nasty and can make the air hard to breath in an industrial city. However, that does not rise to the level of altering the environment of the entire planet.

Another thing. Death by a thousand cuts. Notice how he says "we can" "we can" "we can". Carte Blanche: Go ahead, do as you will, no matter what. A few million Armstrongs WILL destroy the capacity of the biosphere to sustain humans, far worse than liberal egghead idiots conspiring to force poor people to have fewer babies.

That, and some radical population reduction is inevitable if we don't find an exact replacement for hydro-carbons.

WHD
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on February 14, 2014, 05:02:21 PM
 :'(

                                                              http://www.youtube.com/v/aImfSEa9QIY&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Another Snow Storm Today
Post by: g on February 18, 2014, 05:05:40 AM
Yes a different one from two days ago. At least six solid inches of the wet heavy unmanageable stuff predicted.

This really Sucks, BIG TIME.  :-\ :-\ :-\ :emthdown:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on February 18, 2014, 05:21:25 AM
Back up in the low 80's yesterday here. The gardens have been uncovered since Thursday. Such a change a week makes. Hang in there.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on February 18, 2014, 06:04:20 AM
Back up in the low 80's yesterday here. The gardens have been uncovered since Thursday. Such a change a week makes. Hang in there.

Thank's Doc,  Like you said in another posting, nothing we can do about it but grin and bear it.  :-\

"Spring, Where Art Thou?"  :D
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: WHD on February 25, 2014, 06:34:22 PM
Hey! Awwwweeeeesome! (From Minneapolis MN)

-13F tonight!  Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014

-18 Wednesday night.

-15 Thursday night

-8 Friday

-7 Saturday

-6 Sunday

-5 Monday

-9 Tuesday

-6 Wednesday

+1 Thursday, March 06  :emthup: :emthup: :emthup: :emthup: :emthup:

(average low temp March 6, Minneapolis? +20. Average high? 36. Highest temp expected next ten days? 20. Average high around 10.)

http://www.wunderground.com/weather-forecast/US/MN/Minneapolis.html (http://www.wunderground.com/weather-forecast/US/MN/Minneapolis.html)

WHD  (https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRa9SnrwJwsFUeCwWwZGZr8-Nsdih9B-XGMR2vw1fMFpUykgGGK)

Title: Re: Crazy Weather: Praise The Lord, I Haven't Gone Mad Yet!
Post by: g on April 16, 2014, 03:11:31 AM
Just woke up to two inches of snow on my front lawn and driveway. I thought I had gone mad or was delusional. Turned on the weather station and they confirmed it so I am celebrating my sanity :icon_sunny:

It was 75 degrees over the weekend and this was predicted by no one, unusually strong wind gusts also.   :icon_scratch:

Crazy Weather
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on April 16, 2014, 03:14:30 AM
Speaking of weather, where you been Snowleopard, time to drop in and say hello and let us know you are ok. What a winter that was Snow, glad it's over, or am I speaking too soon. :laugh:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Snowleopard on April 17, 2014, 10:05:06 PM
Speaking of weather, where you been Snowleopard, time to drop in and say hello and let us know you are ok. What a winter that was Snow, glad it's over, or am I speaking too soon. :laugh:

Hi GO.

Still lurking here abit. 

I noticed you've been detrolled.  I tried to figure out how you got the troll designation, but gave up.

I've also (mostly) given up trying to educate or warn folks, and decided to spend most of my limited time where it does some good.

Is there more snow coming this year?   No clue, but i'd not be surprised.  Still running the wood stove most mornings here.

Yes.  Latest start to maple sugar season in my lifetime and "Coldest fall-winter in over 100 years",  officially caused by global warming climate change via "polar vortex".  BUT....If you look at the area in North America most impacted by polar vortex shift and compare it to last glacial extent maps, it might suggest something.

IMO the probability of near term global cooling has increased significantly.  As for what's ahead medium term, if you'd like my guesses, (and they are guesses or opinions, despite my long study) here they are:

Snowleopard's climate ~odds assessment for the decades (20-30yrs) ahead:

40%  Return to "little ice age" conditions.

30%  Return to 1885-1915 climate conditions

19%  Return to 1948-1978 climate conditions

9%  Cessation of the current instability with little further temperature change.

1%  Quick return to full glaciation (- 8-12 C)

.5% Return of 1978-98 "global warming" trend.

.1%  Quick return to warm "climactic optimum" (+ 2 C)

The longer and sharper the instability in the weather, the colder it is likely to get.

The above assumes the following are possible but highly unlikely within the time period:  Super or major volcanic eruptions.  Severe asteroid or comet strikes.  Nearby supernovas.  The solar system entering a major dust cloud.

Hundreds of weirder things (Examples: Major change in Earth's orbit or axial tilt.  Physical pole shift.  The atmosphere absorbing heat from the local fluff or the infrared Saggit M stars.) are either too unlikely to consider and/or their odds are unknown to me.

Happy Easter, (or maybe we move Springfest to Beltaine / Mayday?)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on April 17, 2014, 10:25:57 PM
Speaking of weather, where you been Snowleopard, time to drop in and say hello and let us know you are ok. What a winter that was Snow, glad it's over, or am I speaking too soon. :laugh:

Hi GO.

Still lurking here abit. 

I noticed you've been detrolled.  I tried to figure out how you got the troll designation, but gave up.

I've also (mostly) given up trying to educate or warn folks, and decided to spend most of my limited time where it does some good.

Is there more snow coming this year?   No clue, but i'd not be surprised.  Still running the wood stove most mornings here.

Yes.  Latest start to maple sugar season in my lifetime and "Coldest fall-winter in over 100 years",  officially caused by global warming climate change via "polar vortex".  BUT....If you look at the area in North America most impacted by polar vortex shift and compare it to last glacial extent maps, it might suggest something.

IMO the probability of near term global cooling has increased significantly.  As for what's ahead medium term, if you'd like my guesses, (and they are guesses or opinions, despite my long study) here they are:

Snowleopard's climate ~odds assessment for the decades (20-30yrs) ahead:

40%  Return to "little ice age" conditions.

30%  Return to 1885-1915 climate conditions

19%  Return to 1948-1978 climate conditions

9%  Cessation of the current instability with little further temperature change.

1%  Quick return to full glaciation (- 8-12 C)

.5% Return of 1978-98 "global warming" trend.

.1%  Quick return to warm "climactic optimum" (+ 2 C)

The longer and sharper the instability in the weather, the colder it is likely to get.

The above assumes the following are possible but highly unlikely within the time period:  Super or major volcanic eruptions.  Severe asteroid or comet strikes.  Nearby supernovas.  The solar system entering a major dust cloud.

Hundreds of weirder things (Examples: Major change in Earth's orbit or axial tilt.  Physical pole shift.  The atmosphere absorbing heat from the local fluff or the infrared Saggit M stars.) are either too unlikely to consider and/or their odds are unknown to me.

Happy Easter, (or maybe we move Springfest to Beltaine / Mayday?)
 

Same to you Snow, great to hear from you.

The Troll stuff isn't worth talking about, grade school stuff from the bullies. Spring is finally here. :icon_sunny: :icon_sunny:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - Tornado Alert in Boston
Post by: g on July 07, 2014, 04:23:31 PM
What a horror. Sitting here at my computer on a quiet July afternoon, all of a sudden it turns pitch black an my wife and I are in a state of complete turmoil.

Gallons of water flying through the windows, power out, shattered lamps an vases throughout the house. Huge tree branches down on the street and my yard. Power comes back on and we turn on the TV and Tornado Alert is blaring in red on all the stations, take shelter in your cellar.

Never witnessed anything like it in all my years. It is all quiet now, my wife and I were staring at each other dumbfounded for five minutes a while ago, and she breaks down and starts crying from all her damaged vases and flowers and the sheer madness of it all.

Things are getting back to normal and the MSM is all about the Red Sox game and the fans being evacuated to shelters in Fenway Park.

Believe me, the weather changes are here already. Boston has tornado alerts as frequently as Miami has snow storms.  :new_shocked: :rain:

Title: Re: Crazy Weather - Tornado Alert in Boston II
Post by: g on July 07, 2014, 04:44:26 PM

                                                      (http://www.necn.com/gallery_images/14994_239664.jpg)
                                                        Lightning strike over Fenway Park


                                                      (http://www.necn.com/gallery_images/14994_239668.jpg)


                                                      (http://www.necn.com/gallery_images/14994_239656.jpg)


                                                      (http://www.necn.com/gallery_images/14994_239654.jpg)

                                                     
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - Tornado Alert in Boston
Post by: Randy C on July 07, 2014, 07:47:05 PM
What a horror. Sitting here at my computer on a quiet July afternoon, all of a sudden it turns pitch black an my wife and I are in a state of complete turmoil.

Gallons of water flying through the windows, power out, shattered lamps an vases throughout the house. Huge tree branches down on the street and my yard. Power comes back on and we turn on the TV and Tornado Alert is blaring in red on all the stations, take shelter in your cellar.

Never witnessed anything like it in all my years. It is all quiet now, my wife and I were staring at each other dumbfounded for five minutes a while ago, and she breaks down and starts crying from all her damaged vases and flowers and the sheer madness of it all.

Things are getting back to normal and the MSM is all about the Red Sox game and the fans being evacuated to shelters in Fenway Park.

Believe me, the weather changes are here already. Boston has tornado alerts as frequently as Miami has snow storms.  :new_shocked: :rain:

Things can be replaced.  Good thing you and the Mrs. didn't get hurt.  That was a nasty experience to say the least!
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on July 07, 2014, 10:11:26 PM
You should have pulled out your Ipad or Camera and shot some Video!

At least you don't have to worry about your McMansion flying off to Oz.  With all that Gold in the Basement Safe, its way too heavy for the typical F2-F4.  Your probably safe through to F5.  lol.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on July 08, 2014, 03:03:35 AM
Quote
Things can be replaced.  Good thing you and the Mrs. didn't get hurt.  That was a nasty experience to say the least!

Thanks for the kind and wise words Randy.

Believe me, Nothing brings out your own fragility and insignificance in the grand scheme of things like a little reminder from Old Mother Nature. She is no lady to mess with.

It's 5AM next morning in Beantown, it all seems like a bad dream now, but it's a nightmare I will never forget.

                                                          (http://dbfc82a97cf0266279f0-5a5a24e61c4cbc28d76008185a3c1feb.r67.cf1.rackcdn.com/454b5d75-4e5f-417b-9bea-a74b063f2553.jpg)

                                about 5 miles from my home

                                                           (http://dbfc82a97cf0266279f0-5a5a24e61c4cbc28d76008185a3c1feb.r67.cf1.rackcdn.com/a79e614b-4b54-42b1-9e64-30bed3396049.jpg)

                       
                                             (http://dbfc82a97cf0266279f0-5a5a24e61c4cbc28d76008185a3c1feb.r67.cf1.rackcdn.com/4ff22f73-c76b-431b-af78-235812b81d62.jpg)


                                         (http://dbfc82a97cf0266279f0-5a5a24e61c4cbc28d76008185a3c1feb.r67.cf1.rackcdn.com/b4000554-626c-43cd-85ac-92e57de731d8.jpg)


                                                 (http://dbfc82a97cf0266279f0-5a5a24e61c4cbc28d76008185a3c1feb.r67.cf1.rackcdn.com/8a85cc2e-43b6-4c2f-8ef0-7d602c9acaab.jpg)

                                                 
                                                               
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on July 08, 2014, 04:03:00 AM
You should have pulled out your Ipad or Camera and shot some Video!

At least you don't have to worry about your McMansion flying off to Oz.  With all that Gold in the Basement Safe, its way too heavy for the typical F2-F4.  Your probably safe through to F5.  lol.

RE

Believe me RE, when Mother Nature pays you an unsuspected visit like that, picture taking is the last thin on your mind, unless perhaps you are a trained professional photographer on the look for such an opportunity.

While I realize you are most likely ribbing me, I really would think after a few years you know me better than to surmise I would be foolish enough to have gold in my home. While living in what is generally considered to be a civilized place where educated people live, Boston. There are reports daily in the local papers of break inns and thefts of objects of little value like used TV'S, laptops, etc. You can't possibly think I would put a stash of gold in a cellar with robbery being as common as speeding tickets. I just went through another you "cannot eat gold session" on the forum, you cannot leave it lying around your home either. ;D

My Gold is in  a vault at the bank, as are my rare stamps. It rather sucks because collectors like myself love to peruse their items on occasion. Thank you modern technology and my computer and photo files, where I can enjoy my collectables without hiding them in my home and worrying about robbers when I go out, or for that matter, when I am at home, the poor sick junkies come in when your sleeping they say looking for anything the can sell quickly.  :(           

                                                 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/CSA_Davis-5c.jpg)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on July 08, 2014, 04:22:33 AM


Believe me RE, when Mother Nature pays you an unsuspected visit like that, picture taking is the last thin on your mind, unless perhaps you are a trained professional photographer on the look for such an opportunity.

While I realize you are most likely ribbing me, I really would think after a few years you know me better than to surmise I would be foolish enough to have gold in my home. While living in what is generally considered to be a civilized place where educated people live, Boston. There are reports daily in the local papers of break inns and thefts of objects of little value like used TV'S, laptops, etc. You can't possibly think I would put a stash of gold in a cellar with robbery being as common as speeding tickets. I just went through another you "cannot eat gold session" on the forum, you cannot leave it lying around your home either. ;D

My Gold is in  a vault at the bank
, as are my rare stamps. It rather sucks because collectors like myself love to peruse their items on occasion. Thank you modern technology and my computer and photo files, where I can enjoy my collectables without hiding them in my home and worrying about robbers when I go out, or for that matter, when I am at home, the poor sick junkies come in when your sleeping they say looking for anything the can sell quickly.  :(           


You just have to tune into doing vids. I keep my El Cheapo camera in my pocket all the time.  I gotta start wearing the Looxcie more often too.

Far as having the Gold and Stamps in the Bank Vault are concerned, I have 3 Words for you here.

EXECUTIVE ORDER 6102 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_6102)

You really think when a Bank Holiday is declared you will be able to get to you Safe Deposit Boxes before the IRS does?  The Bank doors will be closed, you won't get anywhere near that stuff.

When the ATMs go down and the Dollar Hyperinflates to the Moon, you'll never get to the bank in time to get that stuff out.

I suggest pulling it out now and burying it in Undisclosed Locations.  That is how I have my final stash sequestered.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on July 08, 2014, 05:05:06 AM
Quote
You really think when a Bank Holiday is declared you will be able to get to you Safe Deposit Boxes before the IRS does?  The Bank doors will be closed, you won't get anywhere near that stuff.

When the ATMs go down and the Dollar Hyperinflates to the Moon, you'll never get to the bank in time to get that stuff out.

I suggest pulling it out now and burying it in Undisclosed Locations.  That is how I have my final stash sequestered.

RE

Yes, I realize that and you are correct if it comes to that.

As I have tried repeatedly to explain to you and others I am light doom and a believer in inflation as being inevitable, Ihave witnessed it daily my entire life.

Also a BAU Libertarian, with a view that we are in for a rude awakening financially and from resource limitations and fiat currency fantasy credit based money. This is why I buy Gold.

When or if the system breaks down I have the view that KA recently described so well as a possible outcome, namely a return to some sort of normalcy eventually. I do not own gold for Doomsday.

It is my view that when that day arrives a prayer book is the only thing you will need. I know positively that GO cannot exist in a world of total chaos and mayhem, without laws, order, food, medicine, power, etc.

While admiring your will and determination to survive such an event, I honestly feel you are living a total fantasy, notwithstanding your enviable position to pack up and screw in a moment into the Alaskan frontier for a while.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on July 08, 2014, 05:28:37 AM
Quote
You really think when a Bank Holiday is declared you will be able to get to you Safe Deposit Boxes before the IRS does?  The Bank doors will be closed, you won't get anywhere near that stuff.

When the ATMs go down and the Dollar Hyperinflates to the Moon, you'll never get to the bank in time to get that stuff out.

I suggest pulling it out now and burying it in Undisclosed Locations.  That is how I have my final stash sequestered.

RE

Yes, I realize that and you are correct if it comes to that.

As I have tried repeatedly to explain to you and others I am light doom and a believer in inflation as being inevitable, Ihave witnessed it daily my entire life.

Also a BAU Libertarian, with a view that we are in for a rude awakening financially and from resource limitations and fiat currency fantasy credit based money. This is why I buy Gold.

When or if the system breaks down I have the view that KA recently described so well as a possible outcome, namely a return to some sort of normalcy eventually. I do not own gold for Doomsday.

It is my view that when that day arrives a prayer book is the only thing you will need. I know positively that GO cannot exist in a world of total chaos and mayhem, without laws, order, food, medicine, power, etc.

While admiring your will and determination to survive such an event, I honestly feel you are living a total fantasy, notwithstanding your enviable position to pack up and screw in a moment into the Alaskan frontier for a while.

Well, thing is here, a Banking Collapse is not necessarily complete Doomsday.  Ka gave a brief synopsis of one sort of Command Economy solution that might be undertaken in such a situation.

So, if you want to try to sequester some "wealth" for a Banking Collapse followed by Command Economy, then you have to remove your assets from the control of the banks.

Right NOW, all your Gold and Stamps are really in the possession of Banksters, not yourself.

I am just advising for the relatively Doom Lite scenario of Banking Collapse, that you get your pile of Gold OUT from the control of banksters and the IRS, and into your OWN possession.

Not that I think there will be much to buy with it in this scenario, but at least you will still HAVE it, instead of the IRS taking it from you.

Far as my plan goes, it's all about having FRIENDS.  Friends in Glacier View, friends in Soldotna, friends even in fucking NOME. whereIi sure hope not to end up because that really is the end of the earth. LOL.

The money maybe works for a bit here.  In the end though, only your friends can see you through.  Friends are REAL WEALTH.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather Tornado Conformed in Boston..
Post by: g on July 28, 2014, 09:31:56 AM
Total horror again in Boston. Just sat out a total deluge with power outages. Tornado landed in Revere next to Logan Airport. No deaths reported but extensive damge. Everybody scared to death, sever disturbances forecast for this afternoon.

This all comes out of the clear blue from nowhere. Crazy terrible weather getting worse and worse. Tornado alerts in Boston, two in a month, whoever heard of such crazy weather. It is really frightening.  :'( :'(
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on July 28, 2014, 10:42:48 AM
Yes on the friends part. You've got that goin' for you. Now if we could get you to get into the warm pool and start working that arm. Maybe cut back on the smokes and beer.

Sorry to hear about your storms,GO.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather Photos of Revere Tornado Damage
Post by: g on July 28, 2014, 10:50:11 AM

                                            (http://cbsboston.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/torn3.jpg)


                                             (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Bto7NpbCQAAYVID.jpg:large)


                                              (http://cbsboston.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/reveresign.jpg?w=348)


                                              (http://cbsboston.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/revere11.jpg?w=620)


                                               (http://cbsboston.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/wellesley.jpg?w=620)


                                               
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on July 28, 2014, 10:54:03 AM
Quote
Sorry to hear about your storms,GO.

Thanks Eddie, Nothing makes you realize how fragile and insignificant you are like a reminder from Mother Nature of who the boss is.  :'(
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on July 28, 2014, 10:31:47 PM
Good night Diners.

Three tornado alerts today and one hit ground and demolished three square miles of Revere about 10 miles away from me. Never saw rain like it. Could not see through it,lasted about a half hour with earth shaking booms.

The weather changes are here, it's no joke, they have arrived.   :( :(
Title: It's a TWISTA! A TWISTA!
Post by: RE on July 28, 2014, 10:44:01 PM
Good night Diners.

Three tornado alerts today and one hit ground and demolished three square miles of Revere about 10 miles away from me. Never saw rain like it. Could not see through it,lasted about a half hour with earth shaking booms.

The weather changes are here, it's no joke, they have arrived.   :( :(

See you in OZ, GO, on the Yellow Brick Road.  :icon_mrgreen:

http://www.youtube.com/v/5YLW2MeZCks?feature=player_detailpage

RE
Title: Re: It's a TWISTA! A TWISTA!
Post by: RE on July 28, 2014, 11:12:17 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/D49Mb7s5XhY?feature=player_detailpage

http://www.youtube.com/v/VmCQirsl1FA?feature=player_detailpage


100 homes damaged as tornado jolts Revere (http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/07/28/severe-thunderstorm-warning-issued-boston-area/niu44DD0yg1PiTCbOsVyXL/story.html)

By Peter Schworm
 | Globe Staff   July 28, 2014

REVERE — A rare tornado roared through this seaside city with terrifying force Monday, uprooting hundreds of trees, ripping roofs off houses, and spurring an intensive recovery effort that could last weeks.

Carrying winds as high as 120 miles per hour, the powerful storm cut a destructive path through Revere’s central business district. It damaged more than 100 homes and turned a quiet residential neighborhood into a scene of stunned confusion in just a few minutes.

The first tornado to hit Suffolk County in at least 60 years, the twister snapped large oak trees and sent large sections of metal guardrails flying through the air, but no serious injuries were reported, officials said.
Related
Photos
7/28/2014 - Medford, MA - Ryan Navarro, cq, 10, worked to unclog the storm drain on Charnwood Street in Medford, MA after a downpour moved through the region. Severe weather struck the Boston metro region on Monday morning, July 28, 2014. Many areas in Medford and West Somerville flooded. Dina Rudick/Globe Staff.
Storms bring flooding to Boston area

    More reports on the storm
    Map: Reports on damage in the area
    Video: Flooding in Somerville

“Given the magnitude of the storm, it’s really a miracle,” said Mayor Dan Rizzo.

PHOTOS: Storms hit the Boston area

Officials said it was too soon to put a dollar figure on the damage, but insurers were going door to door to help residents tally their losses. Within an hour of the tornado, residents were out collecting branches and sweeping up debris, while utility crews began the painstaking work of clearing roads and repairing downed wires.

The tornado struck as severe thunderstorms swept through much of the Boston area, causing flash flooding from Framingham to the North Shore.

It touched down just after 9:30 a.m. in Chelsea and moved north across the Chelsea River into Revere, ripping a path 2 miles long and nearly a half-mile wide.

The speed and scope of the damage, which covered the neighborhood in debris, left many residents dazed.

“Are we in Kansas?” asked Judy Lane-Grech, 54. She said the tornado arrived so quickly, she hardly had time to take cover as the windows on her Taft Street home smashed around her. “It happened so fast,” she said.

IN REVERE: Residents say tornado was brief, destructive

On Revere Beach Parkway, which was blocked by a tangle of trees, poles, and metal railings, Jose Quintana, 27, said the winds shook his entire house and uprooted large trees. Seconds later, the winds were gone.

“Ten seconds, max,” he said, making sure his children stayed close. “It was just surreal.”

Late Monday night, Revere Fire Chief Gene Doherty said cleanup crews were expected to continue their work overnight.

He said 65 homes had “substantial damages” and 13 homes and businesses were uninhabitable. The city set up a shelter at a local school for displaced residents.

Jake Navarro, a spokesman for National Grid, said that 500 homes were without power as of 9:30 p.m.

Outages peaked during the morning, with over 3,000 homes affected, but as utility crews continued repairs, Navarro said, power was expected to be restored to the majority of customers by midnight Monday.

Emergency officials canvassed the area, saying the recovery would take time, and urged residents to be patient.

“This is going to be a little bit of a process as we try to dig ourselves out of this,” Rizzo said.

He said the timing of the tornado was fortuitous, since many people already had left their homes for work. He said a baby sustained a minor injury from flying glass, and an elderly woman also suffered a laceration.

RELATED: More reports on the storm

In certain areas, most houses sustained some damage.

“Pick a street,” Deputy Fire Chief Michael Viviano said.

Throughout the afternoon, crews hauled large trees into chippers, filling the street with the smell of sawdust. Up and down debris-strewn streets, residents took stock of the damage and began the daunting task of cleaning up.

“I don’t even know where to start,” said Steve Capano, who rushed home from work after hearing about the storm. “It looks like a war zone.”

Across the street, two large pieces of metal lay on the sidewalk. They had blown across the highway from the roof of an ice skating rink, neighbors said.

No tornado had hit Suffolk County, which comprises Revere, Boston, Winthrop, and Chelsea, since weather officials began keeping records in 1950, according to the National Weather Service. The last confirmed tornadoes in Essex County, north of Boston, and Middlesex County, north and west of Boston, were in 1991 and 1986, respectively.

In 2011, a tornado tore through Central Massachusetts, killing three people and damaging 1,400 buildings across the region.

Monday’s storm also dumped as much as 2 inches of rain per hour in some parts of the region.

RELATED | Map: Reports on damage in the area

In Boston, several people were trapped in their cars by floodwaters on Spring Street, and police in Wellesley rescued a man from his car on Route 9.

“The man was standing on top of his car, which was in four feet of water,” said Wellesley Police Lieutenant Scott Whittemore.

In Revere, the tornado arrived with frightening speed and force. Nicole DeFeo was at the drug store when she heard a long bang, followed by screams.

“People were screaming, ‘What’s going on?’ ” DeFeo said.

“One lady ran in crying, another woman ran in saying she got hit in the head with a metal plate, and another guy was screaming because he left his kid in the car.”

At Master Auto on Broadway, co-owner Anthony Cincone was walking into his office when the storm peeled off the roof and blew it away.

“It was scary, because you didn’t know when it was going to stop,” he said. “Within 20 seconds, the wind picked up and you just heard this howling; you could see everything moving . . . glass shattering, flying everywhere.”

Carol Cappola, 71, said she was sipping her coffee when “everything went dark” and her house began to shake. A deafening roar filled the air, followed by the sound of glass shattering.

“It sounded like a bomb,” she said. “It was so scary. I didn’t know what was happening.”

As the wind intensified, Gerry Iovanna looked out her front door to see tree limbs flying through the air.

“I’ve seen a lot of storms and I’ve seen a lot of damage,” said Iovanna, whose house was struck by a falling tree. “But I’ve never seen this.”

Iovanna, 59, said the tornado seemed to arrive out of nowhere and turned the sky an ominous gray. Worried about flying glass, she retreated to the hallway, where she huddled on the floor until the storm passed.

“It was really scary,” she said, blinking back tears and falling into her brother’s waiting embrace.

“We’ll get through this,” he said.

After the storm, Elaine Hardy, 75, walked out back to see the damage. The storm had left its mark but had largely spared her house, and her statue of the Virgin Mary.

“She protected me,” she said.

More on the tornado in Revere:

    Photos: Revere tornado leaves destruction in its wake
    Before and after images of the tornado's destruction
    Video appears to show tornado ripping through Revere
    More videos from the scene
    Twister began in Chelsea, then crossed Chelsea River into Revere
    Witnesses describe damage from tornado
    Town-by-town reports on the storm
    Images, reports from the scene
    Photos | From the Archives: Tornadoes in Mass.
    More thunderstorms on tap for region
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Randy C on July 29, 2014, 07:48:22 PM
Meanwhile, SW VA is having fall like weather.  Dry and cool.  Good to make hay but the pastures could use more rain, and yes GO, the climate is changing and more and more people are beginning to notice.... :o
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - Hawaii, which Rarely gets Hurricanes, now Faces Two Back-to-
Post by: g on August 06, 2014, 10:17:30 AM
Hawaii, which rarely gets hurricanes, now faces two back-to-back  :-\

 Hawaii is bracing for hurricanes Iselle and Julio, which could hit within two days of each other – a potentially unprecedented event for a state that doesn't get many hurricanes.                             (http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/content/2014/0806-usa1/18819308-1-eng-US/0806-usa1_standard_342x228.jpg)
By Noelle Swan, Staff writer August 6, 2014   


 

A rare convergence of two hurricanes heading for Hawaii has prompted school closures and sent residents scrambling to collect emergency supplies. Hurricane Iselle could hit the islands Thursday with Julio following two to three days later. Though both storms are now hurricanes, they are expected to weaken to tropical storms by the time they make landfall.

While the East Coast is no stranger to hurricanes, Hawaiians have not had to contend with a major hurricane in more than 20 years. The last hurricane to cause significant damage in the state was Iniki, which killed six people and caused $2.4 billion in damage on Kauai in 1992. Before that, the last recorded hurricane to hit the Hawaiian Islands was the 1871 Kohala cyclone.

The West Coast doesn't experience many hurricanes either. Tropical cyclones and hurricanes form in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. So, why do hurricanes seem to be an East Coast phenomenon in the United States?

For one thing, hurricanes that form in tropical and subtropical latitudes tend to follow a west-northwest path. That means that storms that form in the Atlantic tend to travel toward the Eastern seaboard. Those that form in the Pacific, however, most frequently travel away from the West Coast.

On the rare occasion that Pacific hurricanes do track back toward the West Coast, they tend to peter out before they touch land, due to relatively cool water temperatures. The Atlantic is typically much warmer than the Pacific. Warm waters the Gulf Stream make the Atlantic much more conducive to sustaining hurricanes. Along the East Coast, ocean waters can top 80 degrees Fahrenheit. On the West Coast, however, water temperatures rarely get much higher than lower 70s, even in the middle of summer.

Of course, neither of these trends are absolute rules. On the East Coast, hurricanes can change trajectory at the last minute, sparing coastal residents. On the West Coast, El Niño events can trigger unusually warm air and water temperatures. Climatologists suspect that an El Niño may have been at play in 1858, when the only recorded hurricane ever to hit California battered the coast of San Diego.

While full-blown hurricanes on Hawaii are rare, the islands’ mountainous terrain can accelerate winds and promote torrential rains and flash flooding. The convergence of two major storm systems could bring flooding far beyond what residents are accustomed to. Authorities are recommending that residents prepare a seven-day emergency kit, because the islands’ remote location could hamper relief efforts.
 
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/USA-Update/2014/0806/Hawaii-which-rarely-gets-hurricanes-now-faces-two-back-to-back (http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/USA-Update/2014/0806/Hawaii-which-rarely-gets-hurricanes-now-faces-two-back-to-back)  :icon_study:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on August 08, 2014, 04:29:37 AM
Hi Ka, Just read an article how the hurricanes intensified a bit down your way . Hope all is well and you are OK.

Two tornadoes in Boston in a week and two hurricanes back to back in Hawaii and the weather being crazy is just supposed to be our imagination according to some folks.  ::)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Ka on August 08, 2014, 11:58:45 AM
Hi Ka, Just read an article how the hurricanes intensified a bit down your way . Hope all is well and you are OK.

Two tornadoes in Boston in a week and two hurricanes back to back in Hawaii and the weather being crazy is just supposed to be our imagination according to some folks.  ::)

I'm fine, thanks for the concern. We had a three or four hour power failure, but that seems to be it. There were shelters for homeless people or those worried that their houses couldn't take it. In any case, Iselle was just barely still a hurricane when it hit. Julio, meanwhile, looks like it will pass to the north. So we'll probably get more rain from it, but Hilo being the rainiest city in the US, shouldn't be a problem.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on August 28, 2014, 04:01:31 AM
Latest video on Canada & Siberia on fire
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uK66pBjz-s&list=UUye7OVKZjiI-OJ_4bW_VcYA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uK66pBjz-s&list=UUye7OVKZjiI-OJ_4bW_VcYA)
Stay safe everyone
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on August 30, 2014, 12:16:24 PM
Here's the latest data regarding the hottest sea surface temps for 2014
http://robertscribbler.wordpress.com/2014/08/29/world-ocean-temps-spike-to-1-26-positive-anomaly-as-antarctic-polar-amplification-ramps-up/ (http://robertscribbler.wordpress.com/2014/08/29/world-ocean-temps-spike-to-1-26-positive-anomaly-as-antarctic-polar-amplification-ramps-up/)
The El Nino event has been downgraded by 5% from 70% chance to 65% chance since spring of 2014
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on August 31, 2014, 07:30:32 PM
Snow in August & September in the lower 48.
http://www.youtube.com/v/arsgJxFntLQ&list=UUpPGJXgbwBmkIp291W0PCMw#&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - Twister in Los Angeles
Post by: azozeo on December 13, 2014, 01:04:29 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/_F-M6Ly3Jqw&fs=1

It's on like Donkey Kong !

Nature DOES bat last !
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: JoeP on January 25, 2015, 02:37:40 PM
Hey GO, I saw from a news source that Boston might get a couple of feet of snow tomorrow. Good luck and best wishes.  I'm sure you have everything battened down and warmers on those gold bars.   :laugh:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 05, 2015, 04:14:02 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/IpGOVbDUuJI&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 17, 2015, 07:05:00 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/AO3k_Bg0p88&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - California Drought Plagues Entire West Coast
Post by: g on May 17, 2015, 05:05:15 PM
Published on May 16, 2015

With more than two-thirds of Washington state experiencing abnormal dry conditions and more than half of the state experiencing moderate drought, Governor Jay Inslee on Friday declared a statewide drought emergency.
According to the Washington state department of agriculture, about $1.2bn of crops could be lost as a result of the drought this year.
At the beginning of the month, the Natural Resources Conservation Service found that of 98 snow sites measured in Washington, 66 were snow-free, 11 for the first time ever. According to Inslee’s office, snowpack in Washington’s mountains has dropped to just 16% of normal levels.
 
                                                      http://www.youtube.com/v/FMwZpv5gCDQ
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - Central US Bracing Biblical Storms
Post by: g on May 17, 2015, 05:08:44 PM

Published on May 17, 2015

Thunderstorms and flash floods were predicted for several central U.S. states on Sunday after a tornado series hit large parts of the area a day earlier.
Parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee and Kansas were either under a flash flood watch or flash flood warning on Sunday morning as thunderstorms battered several central states, the National Weather Service said.
There were 29 reported tornadoes on Saturday that hit states ranging from Louisiana to Wyoming, it said.
Texas and Oklahoma were the hardest hit but there were no reports on Sunday morning of major damage or deaths. Thousands were without power due to the storms.
Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Keli Cain told the Dallas Morning News "Right now we haven’t had any reports of injuries or fatalities, and we hope it will stay that way,"

                                                    http://www.youtube.com/v/3fSMuWpG9z0

                                                     
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on June 12, 2015, 03:52:31 AM
Record heat, record cold, record rain, fires, floods, drought, etc. The earth changes are here.   :-\


                                                 http://www.youtube.com/v/0crE0c6LRCU

     Published on Jun 11, 2015

Japanese authorities urged more than 300,000 residents to evacuate their homes on Thursday as torrential rains battered the south of the country.


                                                http://www.youtube.com/v/y58d4BPQ4R0

Published on Jun 10, 2015
California's historic drought has National Park officials worried that one of the State's treasured nature reserves could face disastrous consequences as water supplies dwindle. :-\



                                               



 
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - Thailand is suffering from the worst drought in four decades
Post by: g on July 16, 2015, 09:44:09 AM

                                                Published on Jul 15, 2015

With practically no rain in months, farmers in central Thailand are in crisis mode with their livelihood at stake.

                                   
                                                     http://www.youtube.com/v/xLNbfd-abfw
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: MKing on July 16, 2015, 10:59:05 AM
Record heat, record cold, record rain, fires, floods, drought, etc. The earth changes are here.   :-\

Yes...records....over what infinitesimal fraction of the human existence? And all those other things were happening before you were born GO, and will be here long after you are gone.

Locally it was a beautiful spring, it has been a cool and wet summer (in an otherwise semi-arid area), droughts have disappeared in places they were reigned, and the world...well...it continues to do what it does, and that includes not even being able to generate much in the way of hurricanes in the GOM....claims by those who need, want and pray for different results because otherwise how are they supposed to maintain their budgets, parasites on the American taxpayer?

http://wqad.com/2014/10/10/reasons-behind-the-quietest-hurricane-season-in-30-years/ (http://wqad.com/2014/10/10/reasons-behind-the-quietest-hurricane-season-in-30-years/)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on July 17, 2015, 03:52:19 AM
Record heat, record cold, record rain, fires, floods, drought, etc. The earth changes are here.   :-\

Yes...records....over what infinitesimal fraction of the human existence? And all those other things were happening before you were born GO, and will be here long after you are gone.

Locally it was a beautiful spring, it has been a cool and wet summer (in an otherwise semi-arid area), droughts have disappeared in places they were reigned, and the world...well...it continues to do what it does, and that includes not even being able to generate much in the way of hurricanes in the GOM....claims by those who need, want and pray for different results because otherwise how are they supposed to maintain their budgets, parasites on the American taxpayer?

http://wqad.com/2014/10/10/reasons-behind-the-quietest-hurricane-season-in-30-years/ (http://wqad.com/2014/10/10/reasons-behind-the-quietest-hurricane-season-in-30-years/)

I get your drift Mking, and not being the scientific type, will have to admit I'm a novice and know little on the topic.

Everything in my being however screams out to me that the weather has all of a sudden, in the last decade or so, gone absolutely friggin Bonkers relative to my prior half century of experience.

Not very scientific, realize that fully, but from just one citizen gabbing with another, something has disrupted normal weather BIG TIME. It is just a personal observation based on my personal experience of late.      :dontknow:

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on July 17, 2015, 12:25:22 PM
There is one reason & one reason alone for the change in climate.
Most folks don't have a clue as to the real reason for a solar system
wide climate change. If moriarty want's to be living with his head placed
where the Sun doesn't shine, that's his business. I'll p-mail you Ox on the
absolute truth behind why our solar system has had a sudden change in
climate.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on August 02, 2015, 07:51:15 PM
Today was a services shutdown because of weather Warning. Its not a cold day, im home with no fire going  and no coat on i could be comfortable in a t shirt. No frost outside in the morning thats normal in winter... but its been snowing hard for quite a while now but all melts straight away.

Hmmm  Daboo 7 out.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - All Time Record Heat Forecast for Beantown Next Two Days
Post by: g on September 08, 2015, 05:54:36 AM
Talk about Crazy Weather forecast over 95 today record temp since records were kept, same tomorrow. ::)

Anyone who can't see the weather has gone Bonkers in the last decade is most likely residing in a casket.

Schools are closing at noon, power outages feared, this is Fourth of July weather.

Hunkered down with cool water and chilled can fruit and waiting for the forecast return to normalcy Friday. Not leaving the house until then.

A salute and heartfelt THANK YOU, to whomever it was that invented air conditioning.  :laugh:

Title: Re: Crazy Weather - All Time Record Heat Forecast for Beantown Next Two Days
Post by: Surly1 on September 08, 2015, 09:57:26 AM
Talk about Crazy Weather forecast over 95 today record temp since records were kept, same tomorrow. ::)

Anyone who can't see the weather has gone Bonkers in the last decade is most likely residing in a casket.

Schools are closing at noon, power outages feared, this is Fourth of July weather.

Hunkered down with cool water and chilled can fruit and waiting for the forecast return to normalcy Friday. Not leaving the house until then.

A salute and heartfelt THANK YOU, to whomever it was that invented air conditioning.  :laugh:

Thanks Willis Carrier for modern electrical HVAC, although adding salt to water and experments with ammonia have been around for centuries.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - All Time Record Heat Forecast for Beantown Next Two Days
Post by: azozeo on September 08, 2015, 01:34:00 PM
Talk about Crazy Weather forecast over 95 today record temp since records were kept, same tomorrow. ::)

Anyone who can't see the weather has gone Bonkers in the last decade is most likely residing in a casket.

Schools are closing at noon, power outages feared, this is Fourth of July weather.

Hunkered down with cool water and chilled can fruit and waiting for the forecast return to normalcy Friday. Not leaving the house until then.

A salute and heartfelt THANK YOU, to whomever it was that invented air conditioning.  :laugh:



Welcome to my world. 100 ish for the past month & humidity
Here's the kicker.... It's 92 out right now & raining hard with slushy hail  :icon_scratch:
That tells you how cold the air is up off the desert floor.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on September 29, 2015, 10:31:33 PM
Good night all.

80 degrees in Beantown today after a week of perfect sunny calm weather.

Out of the blue yesterday severe rain and wind forecast for tomorrow, 3 inches in some areas lasting an entire week with a plunge in temps to the mid 50s from mid 80s

Not that unusual I guess for this time of year, but it just never seemed to change so violently in the past, and so sudden. :icon_scratch:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on September 30, 2015, 03:14:19 AM
Out of the blue yesterday severe rain and wind forecast for tomorrow, 3 inches in some areas lasting an entire week with a plunge in temps to the mid 50s from mid 80s

Not that unusual I guess for this time of year, but it just never seemed to change so violently in the past, and so sudden. :icon_scratch:

Keep yer weather eye on Joaquin, GO. Now predicted as a hurricane.
We just came off a weekend of severe tidal flooding, and now the promise of another weekend of this:

http://www.weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/tropical-storm-hurricane-joaquin-atlantic-east-coast-2015 (http://www.weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/tropical-storm-hurricane-joaquin-atlantic-east-coast-2015)

Interesting how the meteorologists these days all look like middle school students...

Joaquin another reason to remember that reaching October doesn't mean you're out of the weeds for hurricane season.

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on September 30, 2015, 03:22:12 AM
Out of the blue yesterday severe rain and wind forecast for tomorrow, 3 inches in some areas lasting an entire week with a plunge in temps to the mid 50s from mid 80s

Not that unusual I guess for this time of year, but it just never seemed to change so violently in the past, and so sudden. :icon_scratch:

Keep yer weather eye on Joaquin, GO. Now predicted as a hurricane.
We just came off a weekend of severe tidal flooding, and now the promise of another weekend of this:

http://www.weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/tropical-storm-hurricane-joaquin-atlantic-east-coast-2015 (http://www.weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/tropical-storm-hurricane-joaquin-atlantic-east-coast-2015)

Interesting how the meteorologists these days all look like middle school students...

Joaquin another reason to remember that reaching October doesn't mean you're out of the weeds for hurricane season.

I believe the Atlantic Hurricane Season officially goes until November.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on September 30, 2015, 03:41:25 AM
Out of the blue yesterday severe rain and wind forecast for tomorrow, 3 inches in some areas lasting an entire week with a plunge in temps to the mid 50s from mid 80s

Not that unusual I guess for this time of year, but it just never seemed to change so violently in the past, and so sudden. :icon_scratch:

Keep yer weather eye on Joaquin, GO. Now predicted as a hurricane.
We just came off a weekend of severe tidal flooding, and now the promise of another weekend of this:

http://www.weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/tropical-storm-hurricane-joaquin-atlantic-east-coast-2015 (http://www.weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/tropical-storm-hurricane-joaquin-atlantic-east-coast-2015)

Interesting how the meteorologists these days all look like middle school students...

Joaquin another reason to remember that reaching October doesn't mean you're out of the weeds for hurricane season.

I believe the Atlantic Hurricane Season officially goes until November.

RE

Technically you are correct, Mr. Know-it-all, (http://www.jenniferboylan.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/bullrocktote-01.jpg)but come October without a hurricane landfall on the Atlantic coast, you start to breathe a sigh of relief that maybe you can get through another season without moving and storing every piece of outdoor furniture, moving every potted plant, and moving vehicles to higher ground.

And then November heralds nor'easter season, which can last all winter. Winds from the northeast blow in and pile up tides, making for tidal flooding. Accompanying rains exacerbate.

TWC describes the "cone of uncertainty" as very wide, meaning that they don't have a fucking clue where this thing is going or what it will do. What is almost assured that it will dump a shitload of rain on already soaked ground.

"Cone of uncertainty." Pah. This from the same assholes who started the trend of naming winter storms for hype/marketing purposes.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on September 30, 2015, 03:51:31 AM
Technically you are correct, Mr. Know-it-all, (http://www.jenniferboylan.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/bullrocktote-01.jpg)but come October without a hurricane landfall on the Atlantic coast, you start to breathe a sigh of relief that maybe you can get through another season without moving and storing every piece of outdoor furniture, moving every potted plant, and moving vehicles to higher ground.

And then November heralds nor'easter season, which can last all winter. Winds from the northeast blow in and pile up tides, making for tidal flooding. Accompanying rains exacerbate.

TWC describes the "cone of uncertainty" as very wide, meaning that they don't have a fucking clue where this thing is going or what it will do. What is almost assured that it will dump a shitload of rain on already soaked ground.

"Cone of uncertainty." Pah. This from the same assholes who started the trend of naming winter storms for hype/marketing purposes.

It is still pretty uncertain in the models, but from Jeff Masters it looks like Norfolk gets a bye on this one.

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)

The track however looks like a dead on bullseye for...NEW YORK SHITY!

Sandy Deja Vu all over again?

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on September 30, 2015, 04:42:33 AM
Technically you are correct, Mr. Know-it-all, (http://www.jenniferboylan.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/bullrocktote-01.jpg)but come October without a hurricane landfall on the Atlantic coast, you start to breathe a sigh of relief that maybe you can get through another season without moving and storing every piece of outdoor furniture, moving every potted plant, and moving vehicles to higher ground.

And then November heralds nor'easter season, which can last all winter. Winds from the northeast blow in and pile up tides, making for tidal flooding. Accompanying rains exacerbate.

TWC describes the "cone of uncertainty" as very wide, meaning that they don't have a fucking clue where this thing is going or what it will do. What is almost assured that it will dump a shitload of rain on already soaked ground.

"Cone of uncertainty." Pah. This from the same assholes who started the trend of naming winter storms for hype/marketing purposes.

It is still pretty uncertain in the models, but from Jeff Masters it looks like Norfolk gets a bye on this one.

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)

The track however looks like a dead on bullseye for...NEW YORK SHITY!

Sandy Deja Vu all over again?

RE

Believe me gents, ever since last winter the weather channel has become an integral part of my life and go to place.

Never in all my years have I witnessed such crazy weather. Over 80 everyday in Beantown, in the last week of September. :WTF:

It is raining so hard now that I cannot see much of anything but a grey downpour out my window and the lights are on in the house at 7:30 AM it is so dark and foreboding. This is after an 80 plus degree calm sunny day yesterday with forecast of much the same for the week when the forecast changed suddenly to a week of this. Temp on its way to 50 as well.  :icon_scratch:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on September 30, 2015, 05:06:30 AM
Technically you are correct, Mr. Know-it-all, (http://www.jenniferboylan.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/bullrocktote-01.jpg)but come October without a hurricane landfall on the Atlantic coast, you start to breathe a sigh of relief that maybe you can get through another season without moving and storing every piece of outdoor furniture, moving every potted plant, and moving vehicles to higher ground.

And then November heralds nor'easter season, which can last all winter. Winds from the northeast blow in and pile up tides, making for tidal flooding. Accompanying rains exacerbate.

TWC describes the "cone of uncertainty" as very wide, meaning that they don't have a fucking clue where this thing is going or what it will do. What is almost assured that it will dump a shitload of rain on already soaked ground.

"Cone of uncertainty." Pah. This from the same assholes who started the trend of naming winter storms for hype/marketing purposes.

It is still pretty uncertain in the models, but from Jeff Masters it looks like Norfolk gets a bye on this one.

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)

The track however looks like a dead on bullseye for...NEW YORK SHITY!

Sandy Deja Vu all over again?

RE

Believe me gents, ever since last winter the weather channel has become an integral part of my life and go to place.

Never in all my years have I witnessed such crazy weather. Over 80 everyday in Beantown, in the last week of September. :WTF:

It is raining so hard now that I cannot see much of anything but a grey downpour out my window and the lights are on in the house at 7:30 AM it is so dark and foreboding. This is after an 80 plus degree calm sunny day yesterday with forecast of much the same for the week when the forecast changed suddenly to a week of this. Temp on its way to 50 as well.  :icon_scratch:

If Jaochin follows Jeff Master's track, Beantown is gonna get soaked even more.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on September 30, 2015, 05:22:27 AM
Quote
If Jaochin follows Jeff Master's track, Beantown is gonna get soaked even more.

RE

Have already kissed my dreams of a nice Indian Summer bye bye RE. Their all chiming in now on the weather clips and newscasts.

Feel like I'm Noah without an Ark the way they are all singing, " The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore."

             
                                           
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on September 30, 2015, 10:44:27 AM
Quote
If Jaochin follows Jeff Master's track, Beantown is gonna get soaked even more.

RE

Have already kissed my dreams of a nice Indian Summer bye bye RE. Their all chiming in now on the weather clips and newscasts.

Feel like I'm Noah without an Ark the way they are all singing, " The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore."
                                           

Get some galoshes, bud. Even AG may get a soak form this one.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on September 30, 2015, 10:49:55 AM
Joaquin latest track estimate:
(http://vortex.accuweather.com/adc2004/pub/includes/columns/newsstory/2015/650x366_09301451_hd32-1.jpg)

From Accuweather:
(http://cdn.abclocal.go.com/content/wpvi/images/cms/1009746_630x354.jpg)

TWC models, which as you will see are all over the place:
(http://i.imwx.com/images/maps/truvu/map_specnewsdct-55_ltst_4namus_enus_650x366.jpg)

My weekend is going to suck. Mine and about 20 million others.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on September 30, 2015, 11:17:30 AM
Ewww!
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on September 30, 2015, 01:15:55 PM
Joaquin latest track estimate:
(http://vortex.accuweather.com/adc2004/pub/includes/columns/newsstory/2015/650x366_09301451_hd32-1.jpg)

From Accuweather:
(http://cdn.abclocal.go.com/content/wpvi/images/cms/1009746_630x354.jpg)

TWC models, which as you will see are all over the place:
(http://i.imwx.com/images/maps/truvu/map_specnewsdct-55_ltst_4namus_enus_650x366.jpg)

My weekend is going to suck. Mine and about 20 million others.

Welcome to the departure from linear climate change to abrupt climate change.  :P :(


What the IPCC is not telling you about the effects of 400 Parts Per Million or more of CO2 (and still growing over 3 PPM per year!) "gift" from the fossil fuel industry. (http://renewablerevolution.createaforum.com/climate-change/global-warming-is-with-us/msg3919/?topicseen#new)
Title: Joaquin Targets Surly
Post by: RE on September 30, 2015, 09:09:40 PM
Bad Newz for Surly.

Latest from Jeff Masters has Joachin headed for Norfolk.

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)

Good Newz is it is only expected to be Cat 1 on landfall.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Joaquin Targets Surly
Post by: Surly1 on October 01, 2015, 04:15:54 AM
Bad Newz for Surly.

Latest from Jeff Masters has Joachin headed for Norfolk.

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)

Good Newz is it is only expected to be Cat 1 on landfall.  :icon_sunny:
RE

Last Cat 1 that made landfall here was Isabel. As a storm it was no great shakes, but it dumped its rain load on already sodden ground, resulting in the collapse of many trees with shallow root systems, which is what you would expect in an area several feet above sea level. Meaning all trees here have shallow root systems. And what do trees take with them as they fall? Power lines.

Was without power for eight days during Isabel. So if I go radio silent after Sunday, you'll have a clue.
Title: Re: Joaquin Targets Surly
Post by: RE on October 01, 2015, 08:12:52 AM
Bad Newz for Surly.

Latest from Jeff Masters has Joachin headed for Norfolk.

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)

Good Newz is it is only expected to be Cat 1 on landfall.  :icon_sunny:
RE

Last Cat 1 that made landfall here was Isabel. As a storm it was no great shakes, but it dumped its rain load on already sodden ground, resulting in the collapse of many trees with shallow root systems, which is what you would expect in an area several feet above sea level. Meaning all trees here have shallow root systems. And what do trees take with them as they fall? Power lines.

Was without power for eight days during Isabel. So if I go radio silent after Sunday, you'll have a clue.

Don't tell me you don't have a Generator!  :o  I already went through this one with GO!

Any Diner who is not completely broke and does not have a generator just is not paying attention here.

RE
Title: Re: Joaquin Targets Surly
Post by: RE on October 01, 2015, 09:45:35 AM
Latest from JM, Surly gets a Bye again and back on track for the Big Apple & Bean Town

RE

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)
Title: Re: Joaquin Targets Surly
Post by: Surly1 on October 01, 2015, 10:15:14 AM
Latest from JM, Surly gets a Bye again and back on track for the Big Apple & Bean Town

RE

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)

A little early to be spiking the ball in the end zone, tracker accuracy and meteorological predictions being what they are.

GO does look to get soggy, though.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on October 01, 2015, 10:21:15 AM
Looks like the surf's up in the Bahamas today. Talk about your low lying areas primed to go underwater in the next few years.
Title: Re: Joaquin Targets Surly
Post by: RE on October 01, 2015, 06:35:56 PM
Bad Newz for Surly.

Latest from Jeff Masters has Joachin headed for Norfolk.

(http://icons.wunderground.com/data/images/at201511_5day.gif)

Good Newz is it is only expected to be Cat 1 on landfall.  :icon_sunny:

RE

Bad Newz: Joaquin now up to Cat 4, which was not projected yesterday.

Good Newz: Latest track is more offshore, Norfolk looking better now.

RE
Title: Joaquin Targets LD & GM
Post by: RE on October 01, 2015, 07:01:25 PM
Looks like a massive Rain Event rather than a landfall event, with SC set to get hit hardest.

Hope GM & LD have Umbrellas handy.

RE

(http://icons.wxug.com/hurricane/2015/5day-wpc-0Z-10.2.15.jpg)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on October 01, 2015, 07:13:50 PM
RE,
This might have something to do with why Joaquin is getting stronger...


(http://www.createaforum.com/gallery/renewablerevolution/3-011015221039.png)

And YEAH, that is a lot hotter than it's supposed to be and was throughout the 20th century. CO2, the gift that keeps giving while the fossil fuel industry profits keep coming in.  :evil4:
Title: Joaquin Whacks the Bahamas
Post by: RE on October 02, 2015, 05:49:04 AM
Although at the moment it looks like Joaquin is going to miss the East Coast of the FSoA, it has thoroughly WHACKED the Bahamas.


(http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/1xb0rx/picture37314393/ALTERNATES/FREE_960/8am%20update)

They are expecting another FULL DAY  of 130 mph+ winds there.

Any Sea Gypsies with their boats in the Bahamas are in the Deep Doo Doo.  :o

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on October 02, 2015, 06:49:15 AM
Terrible place to be a sea gypsy in a storm. Shallow water and no protection much.

One of the kids is headed to DC today for the weekend. Hope they don't get hammered.
Title: LD & GM Get SOAKED in the Carolinas
Post by: RE on October 02, 2015, 09:03:49 PM
While it looks like Joaquin will not make an east coast landfall, historic rainfall amounts are hitting the Carolinas.

Historic Rain/Flooding Heading for Carolinas (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/wundergroundlive/comment.html?entrynum=17)

RE
Title: Re: LD & GM Get SOAKED in the Carolinas
Post by: WHD on October 02, 2015, 10:18:35 PM
While it looks like Joaquin will not make an east coast landfall, historic rainfall amounts are hitting the Carolinas.

Historic Rain/Flooding Heading for Carolinas (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/wundergroundlive/comment.html?entrynum=17)

RE

Clear as a bell for days and days, here in MN
Title: Damp Days in Dixie
Post by: RE on October 03, 2015, 06:45:23 AM
While it looks like Joaquin will not make an east coast landfall, historic rainfall amounts are hitting the Carolinas.

Historic Rain/Flooding Heading for Carolinas (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/wundergroundlive/comment.html?entrynum=17)

RE

Indoor Showers are now Obsolete south of the Mason-Dixon line.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CQXZXCNWIAArJik.png:large)

RE
Title: Re: LD & GM Get SOAKED in the Carolinas
Post by: jdwheeler42 on October 03, 2015, 08:28:15 AM
While it looks like Joaquin will not make an east coast landfall, historic rainfall amounts are hitting the Carolinas.
Clear as a bell for days and days, here in MN
Joaquin has given western PA well over an inch, maybe even two  ;D

You know, RE, the Alleghenies might not be an impressive a range as the Mat-Su, but they still are a nice wall against hurricanes.
Title: Re: LD & GM Get SOAKED in the Carolinas
Post by: RE on October 03, 2015, 08:50:13 AM

Joaquin has given western PA well over an inch, maybe even two  ;D

You know, RE, the Alleghenies might not be an impressive a range as the Mat-Su, but they still are a nice wall against hurricanes.

Not a bad wall there, and apparently a spot you should get a fairly steady supply of Fresh Water too!  If I had to pick a hole on the Eastern Half of the Lower 48, that would be a good choice.

However, since I am where I am and the Mountains are BIGGER and there still are glaciers melting out fresh water all the time, I'm good with this hole.  Good fishing too.

Mountains. Really BIG MOUNTAINS. The GREAT WALL that GOD BUILT to protect the independent souls of the world.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1b/Matanuska_Valley_farm,_NIOSH.jpg/640px-Matanuska_Valley_farm,_NIOSH.jpg)
A farm in the Matanuska-Susitna River Valley of Alaska

RE
Title: Historic Rainfall Pummels the Carolinas and Floods Charleston
Post by: RE on October 05, 2015, 01:05:12 AM
Historic Rainfall Pummels the Carolinas and Floods Charleston (http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/10/03/carolinas_and_charleston_flooded_with_rain_from_hurricane_joaquin.html)

(http://www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/uploads/2015/10/04/491256134-charlene-stennis-takes-her-son-christian-hoo-fong-from.jpg.CROP.promo-xlarge2.jpg)
Title: Getting Worried about LD, GM, Ayden and Zen
Post by: RE on October 07, 2015, 01:33:29 AM
It looks like LD & GMs county got hit hard in the flooding.  Hoping to hear from them soon.

RE

http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-south-carolina-flood-door-to-door-searches-swamped-roads-2015-10 (http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-south-carolina-flood-door-to-door-searches-swamped-roads-2015-10)

http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/30158845/reports-of-flooded-roadways-following-overnight-rain (http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/30158845/reports-of-flooded-roadways-following-overnight-rain)
Title: Re: Getting Worried about LD, GM, Ayden and Zen
Post by: RE on October 07, 2015, 04:41:58 AM
It looks like LD & GMs county got hit hard in the flooding.  Hoping to hear from them soon.

RE

http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-south-carolina-flood-door-to-door-searches-swamped-roads-2015-10 (http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-south-carolina-flood-door-to-door-searches-swamped-roads-2015-10)

http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/30158845/reports-of-flooded-roadways-following-overnight-rain (http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/30158845/reports-of-flooded-roadways-following-overnight-rain)

I sent LD a text last night, still no response.  Getting more worried.

They are almost certainly without power, and drinking water is scarce around there in many areas.  Some areas are pretty well cut off because roads and bridges were washed away.

I sure hope I hear from him today.

RE
Title: Re: Getting Worried about LD, GM, Ayden and Zen
Post by: g on October 07, 2015, 05:16:46 AM
It looks like LD & GMs county got hit hard in the flooding.  Hoping to hear from them soon.

RE

http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-south-carolina-flood-door-to-door-searches-swamped-roads-2015-10 (http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-south-carolina-flood-door-to-door-searches-swamped-roads-2015-10)

http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/30158845/reports-of-flooded-roadways-following-overnight-rain (http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/30158845/reports-of-flooded-roadways-following-overnight-rain)

I sent LD a text last night, still no response.  Getting more worried.

They are almost certainly without power, and drinking water is scarce around there in many areas.  Some areas are pretty well cut off because roads and bridges were washed away.

I sure hope I hear from him today.

RE

Might be in a shelter with the kids, Lucid is a real strong physical specimen, and wouldn't get too concerned just yet.

The kids are no doubt out of school for a while, and there must be big problems with getting around and obtaining groceries. Lucid is as strong as an ox, not overly concerned.
Title: Re: Getting Worried about LD, GM, Ayden and Zen
Post by: RE on October 07, 2015, 05:26:06 AM
It looks like LD & GMs county got hit hard in the flooding.  Hoping to hear from them soon.

RE

http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-south-carolina-flood-door-to-door-searches-swamped-roads-2015-10 (http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-south-carolina-flood-door-to-door-searches-swamped-roads-2015-10)

http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/30158845/reports-of-flooded-roadways-following-overnight-rain (http://www.foxcarolina.com/story/30158845/reports-of-flooded-roadways-following-overnight-rain)

I sent LD a text last night, still no response.  Getting more worried.

They are almost certainly without power, and drinking water is scarce around there in many areas.  Some areas are pretty well cut off because roads and bridges were washed away.

I sure hope I hear from him today.

RE

Might be in a shelter with the kids, Lucid is a real strong physical specimen, and wouldn't get too concerned just yet.

The kids are no doubt out of school for a while, and there must be big problems with getting around and obtaining groceries. Lucid is as strong as an ox, not overly concerned.

Yea, physically not worried about them LD can handle any of that no problem.  It's what condition the house is in and economics.  Assuming everything is OK, he will have a lot of work coming his way with his chainsaw.

RE
Title: LD, GM, Ayden and Zen Flood Alert Cancelled
Post by: RE on October 07, 2015, 08:46:41 AM
Got a text back from LD, they are fine, his neighborhood did not get hit too bad.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on October 07, 2015, 03:31:55 PM
LD commented on ASC latest post in the last 2 days. Remember ages ago he dug water capture swales and a pond. That means he has some slope and therefore probably at least a little elevation.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on October 07, 2015, 04:11:08 PM
Glad to hear LD and family are okay.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Fenixor on October 14, 2015, 02:16:36 AM
Monster El Niño is "too big to fail" says NASA

(http://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/86000/86776/pacificssha_js2_2015277.jpg)
(http://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/86000/86776/elnino_sst_1950-2015_chart.png)

October sea level height anomalies show that 2015 is as big or bigger in heat content than 1997.

“Over North America, this winter will definitely not be normal. However, the climatic events of the past decade make ‘normal’ difficult to define.” (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=86776&src=iotdrss (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=86776&src=iotdrss)). If El Nino is strong enough to overwhelm the atmospheric and ocean inertia generated by the hot blob, storms running into that region could be extremely intense. On the other hand, if the hot blob holds or deflects the moisture stream northward, California may not see a drought-busting delivery of rainfall (http://robertscribbler.com/2015/10/13/nasa-monster-el-nino-climate-change-means-not-normal-winter-is-on-the-way/ (http://robertscribbler.com/2015/10/13/nasa-monster-el-nino-climate-change-means-not-normal-winter-is-on-the-way/))

El Niño could leave 4 million people in Pacific without food or drinking water (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/oct/12/el-nino-could-leave-4-million-people-in-pacific-without-food-or-drinking-water (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/oct/12/el-nino-could-leave-4-million-people-in-pacific-without-food-or-drinking-water))
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on October 14, 2015, 05:33:30 AM
We have a history of el Nino bringing torrential rains, which we could really use about  now.
Title: Muddy Mess Left in Wake of Southern California Storms
Post by: RE on October 17, 2015, 03:24:48 AM
Looks like El Nino has arrived.

RE

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/muddy-mess-left-wake-southern-california-thunderstorms-34537877 (http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/muddy-mess-left-wake-southern-california-thunderstorms-34537877)

Muddy Mess Left in Wake of Southern California Storms

(http://a.abcnews.go.com/images/US/WireAP_bb46ce4c7b7f48408cf8243e207aa769_16x9_1600.jpg)

Title: Typhoon Koppu Could Bring 6 Feet of Rain to Philippines
Post by: RE on October 17, 2015, 03:57:44 AM
6 FEET!  That's a big number even for Snow!  :o

RE


http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/typhoon-koppu-could-bring-6-feet-rain-philippines-n446061 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/typhoon-koppu-could-bring-6-feet-rain-philippines-n446061)

Typhoon Koppu Could Bring 6 Feet of Rain to Philippines

(http://i.imwx.com/images/maps/truvu/map_specnewsdct-17_ltst_4namus_enus_650x366.jpg)
Title: Typhoon Koppu Kills 9 in Philippines; Officials Fear Mudslides
Post by: RE on October 19, 2015, 10:10:11 AM
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/typhoon-koppu-kills-9-philippines-officials-fear-mudslides-n446901 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/typhoon-koppu-kills-9-philippines-officials-fear-mudslides-n446901)

Typhoon Koppu Kills 9 in Philippines; Officials Fear Mudslides

The death toll from a typhoon churning at an agonizingly slow pace over the Philippines reached nine Monday as emergency officials warned that entire communities were at risk of being swept away in mudslides.
Image: Wading typhoon victims in northern Manila
Typhoon victims wade in Cabanatuan city, northern Manila, on Monday. FRANCIS R. MALASIG / EPA

Typhoon Koppu knocked out power to entire provinces and left dozens of roads impassable as it toppled buildings and trees in the north of the country.

Although less powerful than originally thought, parts of the Philippines were under three feet of water early Monday and around 20,000 people remained in emergency shelters.

"There's no other weather features to move it along so it's just kind of drifting about," Weather Channel lead meteorologist Kevin Roth said, explaining why the storm wasn't budging.

    The expected deluge has begun in Baguio City – 138mm (5.43”) #rain from 8-11am (8-11pm US EDT). #LandoPH #typhoon pic.twitter.com/MR3m3vAOLW
    — Nick Wiltgen (@WxNick) October 19, 2015

On Sunday, a 62-year-old woman was killed and her husband was injured in Subic, northwest of Manila, when a wall of their home collapsed while they slept, the country's disaster agency said. A teenager was killed on the same day by a falling tree that injured four other people in Quezon.

The country's coast guard said seven people died at sea, according to Reuters.

The army was deployed to help government agencies and volunteers rescue people from the waist-high water.

Richard J. Gordon, chairman of the country's Red Cross, told NBC News that water was rising particularly in the province of Pangasinan, aided by heavy rains and dam water being released.

0:43

"We are sending rescue teams there now. We will be busy rescuing people from the tops of roofs - they have no place to go," he said. "A lot of people can drown or be displaced from their homes. This is a developing tragedy."

The typhoon, known as Lando in the Philippines, was crawling northwest at around 3 mph early Monday, the disaster agency said.

Gallery: Philippines Battered by Typhoon Koppu

The storm weakened from a category 5 storm to category 1 after smashing into land on Saturday, its maximum sustained winds down to 80 mph from 120 mph.

Despite the slightly calmer winds, some areas were inundated with more than 15 inches of rain in the 30 hours to Monday morning, according to the U.K.'s state-run Met Office weather service.

    Tropical Storm #Koppu weakening, but has produced 399mm (15.7") rain in 30 hours at Baguio in the Philippines pic.twitter.com/G8KEzQqXam
    — Met Office Storms (@metofficestorms) October 19, 2015

"The storm will have been producing rain in some areas for five-and-a-half days before it moves on — that's a long time to build up a large rainfall total," Roth said.

It was forecast to finally move back out over the sea on Tuesday or Wednesday, with some models predicting it would then travel north and take aim at Taiwan.

An average of 20 typhoons hit the Philippines each year. More than 7,300 people died after the country took a direct hit from Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record.
Title: 3 killed, thousands without power in Northwest wind storm
Post by: RE on November 18, 2015, 02:31:05 AM
http://www.seattlepi.com/news/texas/article/Inland-NW-braces-for-high-winds-6638277.php (http://www.seattlepi.com/news/texas/article/Inland-NW-braces-for-high-winds-6638277.php)

3 killed, thousands without power in Northwest wind storm

(http://ww1.hdnux.com/photos/42/16/74/8974132/5/920x920.jpg)
A wind-blown wave comes up and over the seawall and into traffic Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, in the West Seattle neighborhood of Seattle. Rain and high winds snarled the morning commute in the Puget Sound area and the Inland Northwest braced for severe weather that could include wind gusts to 70 mph.
Photo: Elaine Thompson, AP


(http://ww2.hdnux.com/photos/42/16/46/8972721/5/1024x1024.jpg)
Wind-blown waves batter houses Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, in Seattle. Rain and high winds snarled the morning commute in the Puget Sound area and the Inland Northwest braced for severe weather that could include wind gusts to 70 mph. The National Weather Service says a Pacific storm system arriving Tuesday may include sustained winds of 45 mph that could topple trees and cause power outages.
Photo: Elaine Thompson, AP
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Fenixor on November 18, 2015, 04:10:37 AM
Monster strong El Niño will bring havoc

(http://assets.climatecentral.org/images/made/11_16_15_Brian_ElNinoWeekly2_720_480_s_c1_c_c.jpg)
Weekly data published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows that the region of the Pacific generally used to gauge El Niño’s strength has officially surpassed the 1997-98 super El Niño in terms of warmth.

Indonesia’s fires, heavy precipitation in the southern tier of the U.S., and record warmth around the globe are all telltale signs of how El Niño usually influences weather.

In the U.S., the winter outlook also further shows El Niño is likely to continue exerting its influence with the increased likelihood of cool, unsettled weather from the Southwest to the Southeast and warm conditions in the northern portion of the country.

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/one-graph-shows-el-ninos-new-record-19693 (http://www.climatecentral.org/news/one-graph-shows-el-ninos-new-record-19693)
Title: Crazy Weather: GO BUY A GENERATOR!
Post by: RE on November 18, 2015, 04:45:25 AM
Monster strong El Niño will bring havoc

Should make last year's Boston Snowstorms look like a Sunday Picnic.

GO, before it starts falling I suggest the following Preps

Sportsman 4000 W Propane Generator (http://www.walmart.com/ip/16944957?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&adid=22222222227008143361&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=40873545272&wl4=&wl5=pla&wl6=78766224032&veh=sem)

(http://ll-us-i5.wal.co/dfw/dce07b8c-c460/k2-_5be71d36-eedc-499d-bc34-968a55904c29.v1.jpg-6272971acff1aeec6a180a7fcacfbe8feb35666d-optim-450x450.jpg)

Mr. Buddy Big Propane Heater (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mr.-Heater-MH18B-Big-Buddy-Portable-Propane-Heater-with-Big-Buddy-Carry-Case/41508685)

(http://i5.walmartimages.com/dfw/dce07b8c-34d4/k2-_af7bd3a6-ce69-47f6-9764-bd508d5055d4.v1.jpg)

Coleman Folding 2 Burner Stove (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Coleman-5442-Series-PerfectFlow-InstaStart-Fold-N-Go-2-Burner-Propane-Stove/21156003)

(http://i5.wal.co/dfw/dce07b8c-d0d0/k2-_c4495f4a-b2b8-4d7e-bbb5-bb5a0fc1455c.v1.jpg-7c4ce16307891b5e827f9c4f5fd13052ba6a8bc9-optim-450x450.jpg)

3 20 lb (5 gal) Propane Tanks (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Bernzomatic-334669-Propane-Gas-Steel-Tank-20-Lb./39923245)

(http://i5.wal.co/dfw/dce07b8c-c158/k2-_539aa81f-dd02-41c9-8458-50532d399726.v1.jpg-d51a7f58e42308739a1a66ed69cdf2cf97142f88-optim-450x450.jpg)

3 Propane Tank Adapter Hoses (http://www.walmart.com/ip/AZ-Patio-Heater-Portable-Heater-Adaptor-Hose/19342746)

(http://i5.walmartimages.com/dfw/dce07b8c-ffbd/k2-_7dec940d-3d75-4d61-a83d-2d6e153a7221.v1.jpg)

This setup should get you through at least 2 weeks without electricity or heat.  Less than $1000 in Insurance. One Ounce of Gold buys it all.  Now you have no excuse  and I will not feel sorry for you if you are freezing and snowbound in your McMansion.  You have the money.  You can prepare at least for a temporary disruption.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on November 18, 2015, 06:25:30 AM
Most McMansions in the NE have oil heat, so (for heat) it's just a matter of getting your tank fully filled and not letting it get low. (Unless the line freezes, which happened to my friends in CT once when I went up for a mid-winter visit.)

Running electric heat off a generator is horribly inefficient, offends the 1% of my brain associated with good engineering. You could run straight propane heat, but of course then you have the CO problem, and the potential asphyxiation problem in an airtight house.

Frankly, on short term generator needs, you can't beat a Honda. None of those high speed ICE engines has any potential for a long life though. They spin too fast. I like the propane, though. Easier to store and handle than gas or diesel.

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on November 18, 2015, 06:35:50 AM
Most McMansions in the NE have oil heat, so (for heat) it's just a matter of getting your tank fully filled and not letting it get low. (Unless the line freezes, which happened to my friends in CT once when I went up for a mid-winter visit.)

Running electric heat off a generator is horribly inefficient, offends the 1% of my brain associated with good engineering. You could run straight propane heat, but of course then you have the CO problem, and the potential asphyxiation problem in an airtight house.

Frankly, on short term generator needs, you can't beat a Honda. None of those high speed ICE engines has any potential for a long life though. They spin too fast. I like the propane, though. Easier to store and handle than gas or diesel.

No idea what GOs heat system is, but in NY Shity ours was NG, and if the pipes got compromised, no NG.  Besides, you want to be able to go Mobile if necessary.

I did not recommend running heat off a Generator.  Mr. Buddy's run straight off the Propane. They have built in CO detectors and shut offs for indoor use.

Yamaha Generator is better than the Honda.  Quieter and more reliable by all reports I read. However, it is about 2X the price of the Sportsman I recommended here, and only half the wattage.  It's big advantage is how small it is compared to the Sportsman, which makes it possible to fit in your stealth van and still have room to sleep.  In a McMansion though, a unit the size of the Sportsman goes in the corner of the garage with 100' of extension cord and you are good to go for a couple of weeks at least.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on November 18, 2015, 06:43:07 AM
I did not recommend running heat off a Generator.  Mr. Buddy's run straight off the Propane. They have built in CO detectors and shut offs for indoor use.

Oops. Just glanced at that and thought it was radiant electric. shoulda read the caption.

Want to bet your life on their CO detector? I wouldn't. But then my house is far from airtight, so it wouldn't be an issue, i don't think. CO is lighter than air.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on November 18, 2015, 07:07:59 AM
I did not recommend running heat off a Generator.  Mr. Buddy's run straight off the Propane. They have built in CO detectors and shut offs for indoor use.

Oops. Just glanced at that and thought it was radiant electric. shoulda read the caption.

Want to bet your life on their CO detector? I wouldn't. But then my house is far from airtight, so it wouldn't be an issue, i don't think. CO is lighter than air.

Well, if the choice is freezing to death or dying by CO poisoning, I'll go with the CO.  LOL.

However, this is relatively simple to overcome.  First off I think the CO detector probably does work pretty well.  Second, in discussions over on the Stealth Van forum, these folks use them inside Vans and they are not dying in great numbers from using them.  Third, simply place the heater near window and crack it open a bit.  Fourth, have a good sleeping bag and don't leave it on while you are asleep.

I would also supplement with some 12V Electric systems I used in the truck. A 12V sleeping pad is GREAT, and efficient.  Slip it inside your sleeping bag and you can cook yourself.  Throw it over your chair and sit on it, and plenty of heat will go straight up your ass! Very little loss here. LOL.

RE
Title: Fresh windstorm knocks out power to thousands in Washington state
Post by: RE on November 25, 2015, 12:38:49 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/weather/2015/11/25/fresh-windstorm-knocks-out-power-to-thousands-in-washington-state/ (http://www.foxnews.com/weather/2015/11/25/fresh-windstorm-knocks-out-power-to-thousands-in-washington-state/)

Fresh windstorm knocks out power to thousands in Washington state

(http://a57.foxnews.com/global.fncstatic.com/static/managed/img/876/493/Northwest%20Storms_Cham(2)640360112515.jpg?ve=1&tl=1)
Nov. 21, 2015: Fallen trees lie across downed power lines on a street in Spokane, Wash., in the aftermath of a windstorm that hit the area on Tuesday, Nov. 17. (Jesse Tinsley/The Spokesman-Review via AP)

Title: Severe Flooding in India’s Chennai Kills 40
Post by: RE on December 03, 2015, 05:07:36 AM
http://www.wsj.com/articles/severe-flooding-in-indias-chennai-kills-40-1449145492 (http://www.wsj.com/articles/severe-flooding-in-indias-chennai-kills-40-1449145492)

Severe Flooding in India’s Chennai Kills 40

Hundreds of soldiers and sailors join relief effort as 40 die in southern Indian city

http://www.youtube.com/v/QTNk9wefw54

Flooding caused by record rainfall in southern India has cut off several roads and highways near Chennai and forced the closure of the city’s international airport. Photo: AP
By Aditi Malhotra
Dec. 3, 2015 7:24 a.m. ET
0 COMMENTS

NEW DELHI—Floods caused by torrential rains in southern India have killed more than 40 people since Tuesday, authorities said, and left large parts of Chennai, the country’s fourth-largest city and an important auto-manufacturing hub, inundated.

Hundreds of soldiers and sailors joined in relief efforts as rescuers sought to reach residents stranded by severe flooding in the port city formerly known as Madras. Chennai’s international airport, its runway under 7 feet of water, has been closed since Wednesday.

Disaster-management officials said the flooded airport and roads and disrupted telecommunications links were hampering recovery work. Weeks of heavy rains in and around Chennai have taken a serious toll, killing more than 250 people since the start of November.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who visited Chennai on Thursday, attributed the bad weather to global warming. “We are feeling climate change’s fast-growing impact now,” he said.

(http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/BN-LN829_indflo_M_20151203071333.jpg)
People used a makeshift boat to transfer to safer areas in Chennai, capital of southern Indian state Tamil Nadu, Dec. 2, 2015. Flooding has killed more than 40 people there since Tuesday. Photo: Xinhua/Zuma Press

Anil Kumar Gupta, head of policy planning at India’s National Institute of Disaster Management, said that a construction boom and poor urban planning contributed to the damage in the city of 4.6 million, many parts of which are just above sea level.

“Development in the city has not taken into account that many parts are low-lying,” Mr. Gupta said.

Ford Motor Co. , Hyundai Motor Co. and BMW AG said their Chennai factories have been closed temporarily because of the flooding. Hyundai is India’s second-largest car maker and its largest auto exporter. The company’s two Chennai plants have a combined capacity of 680,000 cars a year.

Two of the country’s largest tire makers, Apollo Tyres Ltd. and JK Tyre & Industries Ltd. , also said they had suspended production in Chennai.

The rains have also left more than 30 aircraft stranded at the airport, the Airports Authority of India said. The authority said the airport would remain closed until at least midday on Sunday.

—Santanu Choudhury contributed to this article.
Title: Keswick Residents Evacuate As Storm Desmond Hits
Post by: RE on December 05, 2015, 07:36:06 AM
http://news.sky.com/story/1600420/keswick-residents-evacuate-as-storm-desmond-hits (http://news.sky.com/story/1600420/keswick-residents-evacuate-as-storm-desmond-hits)

Keswick Residents Evacuate As Storm Desmond Hits

(http://media.skynews.com/media/images/generated/2015/12/5/434192/default/v1/cegrab-20151205-135904-824-1-736x414.jpg)
Heavy rain prompts severe 'red' warnings as parts of Cumbria are evacuated and Scottish roads see landslides and floods

Cumbria Police are helping residents in some parts of Keswick to evacuate their homes and travel to a local reception centre.

Cumbria Police said they and mountain rescue teams were helping to take people from their homes to the centre in a local school.

They added that all roads surrounding Keswick are now closed, having been badly affected by the flooding - especially the A66.

In a statement they said: "Motorists are advised not to travel unless absolutely necessary as it would pose a major risk to personal safety and the safety of other members of the public."

Severe flood warnings, which warn of a danger to life, have been issued by the Environment Agency for the town - along with Appleby in Cumbria and Corbridge in Northumberland.
1/19

    Clear-up on the A82 at Altura after a landslide @NWTrunkRoads
    People watch waves close to the harbour wall at Porthcawl, South Wales

    Gallery: Storm Desmond Brings Flooding And Landslides
    A man is helped out of his van after flooding at the River Teviot in Hawick, Scotland
    Flood defences breached at Keswick
    Roads to Keswick are closed
    Clear-up on the A82 at Altura after a landslide @NWTrunkRoads
    People watch waves close to the harbour wall at Porthcawl, South Wales

    Gallery: Storm Desmond Brings Flooding And Landslides

The Met Office said "in excess of 150 to 200mm" of rain could fall on Cumbria as Storm Desmond swept in.

"In view of flooding and further disruption to transport being expected take action to remain safe and protect property," it said in its red warning.

:: Send your video and images to news@sky.com or tweet them to @skynews

Police also warned drivers to avoid all roads in and around Kendal.

Seventy-seven flood warnings for elsewhere in the north of England have also been issued by the Environment Agency.
Flooding in Keswick, Cumbria. Pic: Wayne Turner/Twitter
Video: Water Flowing Through Keswick

In Scotland, Desmond has already caused flooding and a landslides, closing roads some roads. Flood warning have been issued for the majority of its rivers.

A 15-mile stretch of the A82 was shut after at least 200 tonnes of debris slipped from a hillside above Altura in the Highlands. Several areas of the road were also flooded.

Sky's weather presenter Nazaneen Ghaffar said Scotland, northern England, Ireland and northwest Wales would "remain wet all day".

"The winds will be disruptive and damaging today as well, with gusts up to 60mph for inland areas, and maybe in excess of that around exposed coasts and across hills."

Bear Scotland, which operates trunk roads in the region, said staff were out overnight dealing with numerous reports of flooding, debris on the road and fallen trees.
Flooding In Waterhead
Video: Flooded Streets In Waterhead

RAC spokesman Simon Williams saying that anyone driving in Scotland on Sunday may continue to be faced with "extremely challenging conditions" - possible flooding, wind damage debris and more high winds.

"Motorists encountering floodwater on the road should think twice before trying to drive through. Water getting sucked into engines can cause catastrophic damage which could lead to a frightening repair bill at the most expensive time of year or even an insurance write-off.

"If you are at all unsure how deep a flood is, the best advice is to err on the side of caution and take another route."

Highways England issued a severe weather alert for high-sided vehicles, caravans and motorcycles in the north.

The A66 was closed to high-sided and vulnerable vehicles between junction with the A67 near Bowes in County Durham and the A685 at Brough in Cumbria.
Generic windy weather
Video: The Latest UK Weather Forecast

The A19 Tees Viaduct in Middlesbrough was closed to high-sided traffic in both directions between the A66 and A1046 after reports of strong winds. There are local diversions.

In Dublin, some UK and international flights were cancelled and customers were advised to visit airline or Dublin Airport websites for further flight information.

Travel disruptions are expected along Scotland's west coast on Scottish ferry network Caledonian MacBrayne.

Trains have also been affected between Preston and Carlisle, Newcastle and Carlisle, Skipton and Carnforth, Skipton and Carlisle, Carlisle and Whitehaven, Preston and Barrow-In-Furness, Oxenholme Lake District - Windermere.
Title: Second round of heavy rain swamps parts of Northwest
Post by: RE on December 09, 2015, 07:12:07 AM
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/second-round-of-heavy-rain-swamps-parts-of-northwest/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/second-round-of-heavy-rain-swamps-parts-of-northwest/)

Second round of heavy rain swamps parts of Northwest

PORTLAND, Ore. -- People in the Northwest kept a wary eye on rising rivers and faced another messy morning commute as rain and wind that have caused flooding and landslides kept up the onslaught.

Officials advised residents in affected areas to avoid traveling and to watch for flash floods, mudslides, falling trees and power outages and to avoid driving through high water.

A second barrage of heavy rains Tuesday hit the Portland area and western Washington, and the rain soaked already saturated ground, pushing many area creeks and rivers to flood stage as residents in some communities stacked sandbags prevent further flooding.

Record-setting rainfall this week caused a number of problems throughout the Portland metro area, including flooded businesses, damaged vehicles and roads that washed out, reports the CBS affiliate in the city, KOIN-TV.

Cowlitz County, Washington declared an emergency in each of its cities Tuesday night in response to major flooding.

Several landslides were reported. One wiped out a residence and trapped the homeowner. The victim was taken to the hospital after being rescued by emergency crews.

Business owners in downtown Kalama, Washington used sandbags to protect their property as water rushed through the streets, KOIN says.

Andy Haner, meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Seattle, said Tuesday night that every major river in western Washington is either already at or will rise to at least a minor flood stage over the next few days.

"This is a pretty significant flood event," he said, due to what the service is calling a parade of storms.

Major flooding was predicted for the Snoqualmie, Snohomish and Skykomish rivers north of Seattle, Haner said.

In Kent, Washington, the American Red Cross said in a news release that it had responded to apartment flooding that affected two families.

Many roadways were closed Tuesday night and passenger rail service was halted in the Portland and Seattle areas.

Amtrak closed tracks between Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, because of high waters north of Portland Union Station. Passengers using the Amtrak Cascades service will be taken by bus around the closed areas. Coast Starlight and Empire Builder trains will be rerouted through the area.

Earlier Tuesday, commuter train and Amtrak services were cancelled between Seattle and Everett because of a landslide on the tracks.

The National Weather Service's flood watch for much of northwest Oregon and western Washington remains in effect through Thursday afternoon.

The Oregon Department of Transportation said Tuesday night landslides and high water have been reported on most of the major state highways including U.S. Highway 30, U.S. Highway 101 and Oregon Route 47, making travel hazardous.

Officials were also trying to figure out how to repair massive sinkholes that opened up on Monday - one in front of Mount Hood Community College in Gresham, a Portland suburb, and another on Highway 22 in Yamhill County. The college remained closed on Tuesday.

In the Portland area, nearly 5,200 customers were without power Tuesday night while the number had dropped in the Puget Sound region to about 1,500 customers.

Several school districts cancelled classes or evening activities. The Oregon Zoo remained closed for the second day in a row. Officials in Gladstone issued a health alert after raw sewage overflowed into the Clackamas River.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department also issued a beach safety alert on Tuesday for coast visitors, as strong winds and extremely high waves are in the forecast. A high wind warning remains in effect until early Wednesday morning, with gusts on beaches and headlands potentially reaching up to 70 mph, the National Weather Service reports.

The service predicts waves could break on shore at up to 40 feet high - higher than a two-story building - tossing logs and debris on shore. Already, several beach areas have been closed because of flooding and winds. A flood watch is also in effect on the central coast through Thursday.

The heavy rains didn't stop the Portland Timbers' victory parade celebrating the team's MLS Cup championship.

Even more rain was expected to fall in the region Wednesday and into Thursday. The rains are the result of several low-pressure systems moving through the region, forecasters said.
Title: Storms hit southern US killing 10 ahead of Christmas celebrations
Post by: RE on December 24, 2015, 12:20:33 PM
http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/12/24/deadly-storms-hit-southern-us-ahead-of-christmas-celebrations.html (http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/12/24/deadly-storms-hit-southern-us-ahead-of-christmas-celebrations.html)

Storms hit southern US killing 10 ahead of Christmas celebrations

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/12/24/article-urn:publicid:ap.org:8aa839e98896476987a31cb745489a04-AMhGPVrfj2eceea63ab9c9f6eee-297_636x382.jpg)
Six people were killed in Mississippi and 40 were injured. Three people died in Tennessee and one in Arkansas

December 24, 2015 9:58AM ET Updated 11:24AM ET

Emergency crews were assessing damage on Thursday after a storm system packing high winds and spawning tornadoes tore through the southern and central United States, killing at least 10 people and injuring scores.

The stormy weather scrambled holiday plans in Florida while northeastern states expected unseasonably warm temperatures. Forecasts indicated New York City would be warmer than Los Angeles on Christmas Day.

More than 20 tornadoes were reported on Wednesday in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, according to the National Weather Service.

A large tornado struck a 100-mile stretch of northern Mississippi on Wednesday, demolishing or heavily damaging dozens of homes and other buildings in a six-county area before plowing into Tennessee, authorities said.

"The devastation is just unreal," Master Sergeant Ray Hall, a spokesman for the Mississippi Highway Patrol, told CNN.

Six people were killed in Mississippi and 40 were injured. Three people died in Tennessee and one in Arkansas, according to authorities.

Emergency crews in Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee were searching for several people reported missing and assessing damage from the destructive winds.

Isolated severe thunderstorms were expected to continue early Thursday from Louisiana through Kentucky, up to Washington, D.C. and eastern Pennsylvania, the National Weather Service said.

An 18-year-old Arkansas woman died and a toddler was injured when a tree crashed into a house after being uprooted by powerful winds, according to emergency officials.

More than 100 million Americans were expected to travel during the holiday period beginning on Wednesday, 91 million of them by car, according to the American Automobile Association.

Reuters
Title: Hottest Xmas Eve EVAH in NY Shity
Post by: RE on December 24, 2015, 05:14:40 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/US/bizarre-winter-weather-yorkers-wearing-shorts-arizona-prepares/story?id=35940642 (http://abcnews.go.com/US/bizarre-winter-weather-yorkers-wearing-shorts-arizona-prepares/story?id=35940642)

Northeast Cities Make History With Warmest Christmas Eve Ever



It's not going to be a White Christmas in New York City this year, but it will be in Arizona.

As unseasonably warm weather hits much of the Northeast, many cities had their warmest Christmas Eve on record today. Amazingly, the temperature on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day will be higher in New York City than in Los Angeles and Phoenix.

Here are some of the stunning cross-country statistics you need to know, according to the National Weather Service.

New York City

(http://a.abcnews.go.com/images/US/AP_weather_new_york_2_jt_151224_4x3_992.jpg)
PHOTO: Joggers dressed in shorts and T-shirts run in Brooklyn Bridge Park, in New York, as the Lower Manhattan skyline is seen behind them, Dec. 24, 2015. Kathy Willens/AP Photo

New York City had its warmest Christmas Eve on record.

The high was 72 degrees in New York City today -- perfect weather for ice skating in Bryant Park in short-sleeves, or running in the Brooklyn Bridge Park in shorts. The average temperature on Christmas Eve is 41.

Many other Northeast cities had their warmest Christmas Eve on record today, including Boston at 68 degrees, Philadelphia at 71 degrees and Washington, D.C. at 71 degrees.

The mercury is expected to hit the mid-60s in New York City on Christmas Day.

Last-Minute Deals for Last-Minute Christmas Shoppers

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2015 Last-Minute Holiday Gift Ideas

Buffalo, New York

(http://a.abcnews.go.com/images/US/AP_weather_new_york_kayaker_3c_jt_151224_4x3_992.jpg)
PHOTO: Taking advantage of the unseasonable weather, a kayaker paddles along the Buffalo River, Dec. 24, 2015, in Buffalo, N.Y. Mike Groll/AP Photo

It's also the warmest Christmas Eve on record in Buffalo, New York.

The temperature was in the lower 60s this morning in Buffalo, where a kayaker took advantage of the warm weather along the Buffalo River. The average Christmas Eve temperature in Buffalo is 34.

A slightly lower high of 47 is anticipated tomorrow.

Los Angeles

(http://a.abcnews.go.com/images/US/AP_weather_los_angeles_jt_151224_4x3_992.jpg)
PHOTO: Pedestrians walk under a light rain downtown Los Angeles, Dec. 22, 2015.Nick Ut/AP Photo

In Los Angeles, locals are breaking out their winter coats, scarves and umbrellas this week instead of sunglasses.

It will be 11 degrees cooler in Los Angeles than New York today, with a high of 61 degrees.

The temperature is expected to reach 61 tomorrow, too.

Arizona

(http://a.abcnews.go.com/images/US/AP_weather_arizona_jt_151224_4x3_992.jpg)
PHOTO: David Rutter shovels on his driveway after snow fell covering the area with a few inches in Payson, Ariz., Dec. 14, 2015. Tom Tingle/The Arizona Republic via AP

In Phoenix, Arizona, it's only 64 degrees -- chilly for a state that boasts year-round sun and warm weather.

And the temperature is expected to drop even more on Christmas, with a high of 56.

This photo was taken in Payson, Arizona, a town about 90 miles from Phoenix, where the high today is 46. Snow showers are expected in Payson on Christmas Day.

Why has it been so warm on the East Coast? Is this related to El Nino, or is it something else? On Dec. 10, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued its El Nino forecast update for this winter. Mike Halpert, deputy director at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, said that the warm weather in the Eastern U.S. cannot be tied to El Nino just yet. Moreover, he said that an atmospheric phase known as positive North Atlantic Oscillation (+NAO) is responsible for the current mild pattern in the Eastern U.S.
Title: Tornado Alley in TX Hammered AGAIN!
Post by: RE on December 26, 2015, 07:38:50 PM
Wind Turbines capable of handling 100 mph Winds could be a good source of power in TX in the future.  ::)

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/26/us/severe-weather/ (http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/26/us/severe-weather/)

At least four people have been killed in Garland, Texas, during Saturday's outbreak of storms, police say.

 (CNN)[Breaking news update, posted at 10:17 p.m. ET]

At least four people were killed in Garland, Texas, during Saturday's outbreak of storms, police spokesman Mike Hatfield tells CNN. Hatfield indicated the death toll was a preliminary figure.

[Previous story, posted at 9:38 p.m. ET]

Tornado sirens blared in Texas and Oklahoma on Saturday night as an ugly system of storms barreled through the region.

Dallas-area residents took cover as strong winds blasted the Metroplex, bringing at least one tornado.

Law enforcement officials and trained weather spotters reported a large tornado near DeSoto, just south of downtown Dallas, moving north at 40 mph, just after 6 p.m.

About an hour later, there was also a report of a tornado in eastern Ellis County, the next county to the south, the Fort Worth office of the National Weather Service said.

There is significant damage in Garland, Dallas County Emergency Manager Clay Jenkins said.

There was also damage to a church in Glenn Heights, a neighborhood in Ovilla, and homes in DeSoto, Jenkins said.

There was no immediate information about injuries or fatalities, he added.

Other parts of the state were dealing with other types of hard winds and precipitation, the weather service said.

An arctic cold front will swoop down to the Rio Grande area of west Texas, bringing a nasty mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain from there to New Mexico on Saturday and Sunday, forecasters predicted.

"By Sunday morning, the snow, sleet and freezing rain will expand northeast across the southern Plains," the NWS said.

"Heavy snowfall amounts of 10 to 18 inches are forecast through Sunday evening across much of western/northwestern Texas, with 18 to 24 inches forecast across portions of New Mexico."

Throw in some fierce winds, and parts of the Southwest could see blizzard conditions, the weather agency said. The blizzard conditions could affect people from New Mexico toward the Oklahoma and Texas Panhandles, with 1.2 million under a blizzard warning.

In addition to snow, icy conditions are expected from central Oklahoma up into Kansas with ice accumulation and strong winds, making the roads dangerous for driving.

The weather service office in Norman, Oklahoma, reported a possible tornado in the southern town of Burneyville.

The Deep South

In southeastern Alabama, residents of Elba are anxiously waiting to see what will happen to the Pea River.

After a day of epic rainfall, the river reached 39.3 feet Friday night, the U.S. Geological Survey said. It could rise to 41 feet Saturday evening, Coffee County Emergency Management Director Larry Walker said.

The levee protecting the city is 44 feet tall.

Already, at least 117 homes have been significantly flooded in the county, Walker said. CNN affiliate WFSA said dozens of roads in the county have been shut down.

The city has dealt with massive flooding before. In 1990, Elba was nearly destroyed when the old levee around the town broke.

About three hours north in Birmingham, a possible tornado hit the city, officials said. Three homes collapsed, but only one person was injured.

The NWS corrected a precipitation report from Gadsden, Alabama, saying only 3.65 inches had fallen between 6 a.m. Friday and 6 a.m. Saturday, not 20 inches as previously reported. The weather service cited a glitch with their observation equipment.

Parts of Mississippi are trying to clean up from the 10 inches of rain they got for Christmas. Many roads and homes are flooded, Monroe County Sheriff Cecil Cantrell said.

"We're just a mess here," the sheriff said. "It's a really serious situation. We've got all our deputies out. We've got all the fire departments out. I wasn't expecting this."

On Saturday, the sheriff says they will need a lot of patience from everyone to deal with the impact of the weather conditions on the roads and to keep people safe.

"Severe storms and heavy rain are possible in parts of the Gulf Coast region through the southern Plains to Ohio Valley on Saturday and Sunday, where flooding is possible," the weather agency said.

In the past week, at least 17 deaths in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas have been linked to the severe weather.

A spokesman for the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency said 54 people were injured in the state and more than 400 homes were damaged.

The Northeast

After dumping 5 to 10 inches of snow in parts of the Upper Midwest, a weather system will move east and slam central and northern Maine, the NWS said.

Parts of the state could get walloped with 5 to 10 inches of snow.

It will be a wild contrast to the record-breaking high temperatures in the Northeast on Christmas Day.

Record high temperatures ranging from 15 to 25 degrees above normal continue for the East today. More more seasonable temperatures are not expected until late next week.

Midwest

Four people died in a weather-related car accident in Aitkin County, Minnesota, on Saturday, State Trooper Lt. Tiffani Nielson said.

The accident was one of 204 that happened on snow-covered roads Saturday, she said.

CNN affiliate WCCO reported the accident involved a Mazda SUV and a Chevy Suburban. Three of the people in the Suburban were seriously injured in the crash, the Minneapolis station said.

CNN's Chuck Johnston, Michael Guy, Dave Alsup, Chandler Friedm
Title: More Wild & Wacky Weather Follies
Post by: RE on December 28, 2015, 09:36:36 AM
Looks like Eddie got off EZ with the hailstorm.

RE

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/12/28/week-severe-weather-leaves-at-least-43-dead-across-seven-states.html (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/12/28/week-severe-weather-leaves-at-least-43-dead-across-seven-states.html)

Week of severe weather leaves at least 43 dead across seven states
Published December 28, 2015 FoxNews.com

(http://a57.foxnews.com/images.foxnews.com/content/fox-news/us/2015/12/28/week-severe-weather-leaves-at-least-43-dead-across-seven-states/_jcr_content/article-text/article-par-7/images/image.img.jpg/880/558/1451310902012.jpg?ve=1&tl=1)
Damage of a house is seen after Saturday's tornado spread out in Rowlett, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 27, 2015. At least 11 people died and dozens were injured in apparently strong tornadoes that swept through the Dallas area and caused substantial damage this weekend. (AP Photo/David Warren)

Garland, Texas recovering after 'horrific' tornadoes

Blizzard conditions and flash flood warnings hit the already-ravaged residents of the heartland Monday after a string of severe storms left at least 43 people dead across seven states during the previous four days.

Parts of 11 states were under a winter storm warning Monday morning as the weather system that spawned tornadoes in Texas and flooding in Missouri moved on.
Related Image
Spring river floods homes in Kendricktown, Mo., Sunday, Dec. 27, 2015. Missouri's governor has declared a state of emergency because of widespread flooding that has led to multiple fatalities. (Willie Brown/The Joplin Globe via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT Expand / Contract

Spring river floods homes in Kendricktown, Mo. (Willie Brown/The Joplin Globe via AP)

The National Weather Service issued flash flood warnings for southern and eastern parts of Missouri, including St. Louis, and a small section of northern Arkansas. Most of Arkansas, eastern Oklahoma, central Missouri and central Illinois were under a flood warning. Authorities said more than 180 Missouri roads and several bridges in the state were closed following heavy rainfall during the weekend, and more expected Monday.

Forecasters said Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan and parts of Minnesota, Illinois, Missouri, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas would see winter weather conditions ranging from heavy snow to ice, accompanied by gusty winds.

Parts of the Southeast would see rain, while more severe weather was possible in Mississippi.

The gloomy forecasts came as residents of the Dallas area began to assess the damage from Saturday's string of at least nine tornadoes that swept through the region, killing at least 11 people.

Local officials estimated as many as 1,450 homes were damaged or destroyed. Vehicles were mangled, power lines fell and trees were toppled. Heavy rain, wind and falling temperatures hampered cleanup efforts Sunday afternoon.

"This is a huge impact on our community, and we're all suffering," Garland Police Lt. Pedro Barineau said of the suburb about 20 miles northeast of Dallas, where eight people died, 15 were injured and about 600 structures, mostly single-family homes, were damaged.

The National Weather Service said an EF-4 tornado, which is the second-most powerful with winds up to more than 200 mph, hit the community at about 6:45 p.m. Saturday. It was near the intersection of Interstate 30 and George Bush Turnpike, which is a major route in the region. At least three people who died were found in vehicles, said Barineau, who also noted that some cars appeared to be thrown from the interstate, though it wasn't known whether that was how the people found in the vehicles died.

Barineu described the scene in the town to the Dallas Morning News as "total devastation."

The destruction in Garland was so overwhelming that Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins declared the city a disaster within mere minutes of seeing the toll firsthand.

"I don't declare local disasters lightly," Jenkins said. "But I looked at the scene for 10 minutes, spoke to the incident commander and then called the lawyers to bring the paperwork."

In the nearby town of Rowlett, City Manager Brian Funderburk said Sunday morning that 23 people were injured, but that there were no deaths and no reports of missing people. The weather service said damage indicated it was likely an EF-3 tornado, which has winds up to 165 mph.

Jenkins said in a statement Sunday night that as many as 600 homes were damaged in Rowlett.

Three other people died in Collin County, about 45 miles northeast of Dallas, according to sheriff's deputy Chris Havey, although the circumstances were not immediately clear.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott made disaster declarations Sunday for four counties — Dallas, Collin, Rockwall and Ellis — and warned that the number of victims could rise.

Meanwhile, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin declared a state of emergency as there were blizzard conditions and an ice storm warning out west and flood warnings in the east, where one community had received 9 inches of rain. The state Department of Emergency Management said eight storm-related injuries were reported. About 60,000 homes and businesses were without power.
Related Image
Gov. Greg Abbott talks about the severe weather in Texas at the DPS State Operations Center in Austin, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 27, 2015. Chief Nim Kidd of the Texas Division of Emergency Management, left, listens. Abbott warned that the number of victims from a deadly outbreak of storms and tornadoes in the Dallas area could still rise. Abbott made disaster declarations for four counties, following the severe weather that killed at least 11 people. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT Expand / Contract

Gov. Greg Abbott talks about the severe weather in Texas. (AP)

In neighboring Arkansas, officials said it appeared that a tornado touched down in Bearden, tearing roofs off buildings and uprooting trees. There were no immediate reports of injuries.

Further north, rain caused dangerous driving conditions and flooding in Missouri, where Gov. Jay Nixon also declared a state of emergency, and Illinois.

Six people died overnight when two separate vehicles drove into flooded roadways in south-central Missouri, Pulaski County Sheriff Ronald Long said. Among them were four international soldiers based at Fort Leonard Wood, he said. Greene County authorities said two fatalities there were associated with the flooding.

In southern Illinois, authorities said three adults and two children drowned Saturday evening when the vehicle they were riding in was swept away and sank in a rain-swollen creek.

The death toll in the Southeast linked to severe weather rose to 19 on Sunday when Alabama authorities found the body of a 22-year-old man whose vehicle was swept away while attempting to cross a bridge; a 5-year-old's body was recovered for that incident Saturday. Ten people have died in Mississippi, and six died in Tennessee. One person was killed in Arkansas.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on December 28, 2015, 09:51:12 AM
There are some really good videos of the Garland/Rowlett tornado.

http://www.youtube.com/v/3T_LCvx6ahw&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Petty Tyrant on December 28, 2015, 01:20:55 PM
They say theres nothing quite like going down the street in your boat passing 20 foot crocs. The road mama lives on is cut off from town, hopefully she wont get flooded again like 98 when they winched her off the roof, but that was a 500 yr flood.

http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/northern-territory/daly-river-residents-alarmed-after-spotting-crocodiles-in-town-during-flood/news-story/60938c772be90190094ba0212986a02f (http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/northern-territory/daly-river-residents-alarmed-after-spotting-crocodiles-in-town-during-flood/news-story/60938c772be90190094ba0212986a02f)

http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/northern-territory/road-closed-between-mataranka-and-elliott/news-story/7e246c06c554917de529611d0f305304 (http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/northern-territory/road-closed-between-mataranka-and-elliott/news-story/7e246c06c554917de529611d0f305304)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on December 28, 2015, 01:52:50 PM
They say theres nothing quite like going down the street in your boat passing 20 foot crocs.

Gives "Jaws" a whole new meaning!  :icon_mrgreen:

RE
Title: The Sun Never Rises on the British Empire
Post by: RE on December 29, 2015, 07:46:57 AM
The Brits are getting positively HAMMERED!  Frank is due in today.  ::)

How many weeks can a major city be under 5 feet of water and still keep functioning?  :icon_scratch:

RE

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-35192138 (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-35192138)

UK floods: Storm Frank threatens more misery

(http://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/13647/production/_87413497_0aa8fcdc-3698-4e6f-9db0-fa9b3ce20a8a.jpg)
At the scene - Jorvik Viking Centre, York
Title: Branson, MO goes Under
Post by: RE on December 29, 2015, 08:40:52 PM
New Country Music Song coming from Toby Keith, "There were Gators on Main Street".  :icon_mrgreen:

http://www.youtube.com/v/pd76OyM3Ycg

RE
Title: Storm Frank batters Ireland leaving thousands without power
Post by: RE on December 29, 2015, 10:43:59 PM
Plus another one right behind!  :o

RE

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/storm-frank-batters-ireland-leaving-thousands-without-power-1.2479412 (http://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/storm-frank-batters-ireland-leaving-thousands-without-power-1.2479412)

Storm Frank batters Ireland leaving thousands without power

Met Éireann warns a second, more powerful storm will immediately follow Frank

about 22 hours ago Updated: about 8 hours ago
Ciarán D'Arcy

Conditions in Salthill, Galway are blustery as the west coast prepares for the arrival of Storm Frank. Video: Gary McMahon/Galway City Council
 
(http://www.irishtimes.com/polopoly_fs/1.2479437.1451427434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_620_330/image.jpg)

Thousands of homes are without power on Tuesday night, there is widespread spot flooding on local roads and flights and ferry sailings have been disrupted as Storm Frank sweeps across the country.

An estimated 5,000 homes are without power, mainly in counties Donegal, Mayo, Kerry and Cork, as power lines and trees are felled by the storm.

The powerful winds are hampering repair efforts by ESB Networks crews.

There has been widespread spot flooding across the country, causing havoc on local roads and motorists are being urged to exercise caution.

The storm has also prompted exceptionally high seas and in Galway city roads adjacent to Salthill promenade have been closed after waves came over the seafront wall and flooded car parks and roads shortly after high tide at 8pm.

The storm has forced the cancellation of a number of flights and ferry sailings.

Intending passengers are advised to check with their airline or ferry company for travel updates.

There has also been disruption to rail travel, with lines closed between Tralee and Killarney due to subsidence.

Second storm

Met Éireann has warned that the most severe part of the weather front is likely to cross Ireland tomorrow, with forecasters saying this second storm is due to lash Ireland immediately after the deep Atlantic depression known as Storm Frank clears.

Forecaster Evelyn Cusack said that while Storm Frank remained the main weather event over the coming 24 hours, there will be a “sting in the tail” for western coastal counties for a period of about two hours tomorrow, which may require further weather warnings to be issued.
Title: Crazy Weather: MO getting HAMMERED!
Post by: RE on December 30, 2015, 01:33:20 PM
My old stomping grounds will need SCUBA Gear soon.  ::)

Favorite quote, the Tag Line:

"AccuWeather senior meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said it is highly unusual to have this kind of flooding in winter and more trouble could come in the spring."

(http://rs39.pbsrc.com/albums/e195/PrimroseSue/scooby.jpg~c200)
"Highly Unusual".  LOL.

More Trouble in the Spring?!?!  Ruh Roh.

RE

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-weather-storm-idUSKBN0UC0PD20151230 (http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-weather-storm-idUSKBN0UC0PD20151230)

Widespread flooding hits Midwest with rivers still rising

Rain-swollen rivers rose across the U.S. Midwest on Wednesday, forcing the evacuation of hundreds of people, threatening crops and livestock and putting scores of buildings underwater after days of unusual winter flooding that has killed 24 people.

Several major rivers, including the vital Mississippi, were poised to crest at or above record levels, creating floods as the waters surged toward the Gulf of Mexico, the National Weather Service said.

Flooding has closed multiple roads and sections of Interstate 44, a major highway that runs from west Texas to St. Louis. Homes and businesses had water up to their roofs in Missouri, while crews in other areas put up sand bag barriers in hopes of keeping out water. Missouri Governor Jay Nixon called the flooding "very historic and dangerous."

Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal declared a state of emergency to prepare for inevitable flooding as the waters move south toward his state. Flash flood warnings also were issued farther east for parts of the Carolinas and Georgia, the NWS said.

At least 24 people have died in Missouri, Illinois, Arkansas and Oklahoma in holiday season flooding after days of downpours that brought as much as 12 inches (30 cm) of rain to some areas. Almost all of the deaths have been caused by people driving into flooded areas.

Along the Meramec River in Eureka, Missouri, Mayor Kevin Coffey, said a man had to be rescued from atop the cab of his pick-up truck after spending the night in a parking lot to watch over his gun shop business and then trying to drive away.

"This is 4 feet (1.2 meters) above the worst flood we ever had," said Coffey, warming up in a police car after helping to place sandbags around a school. "The town looks like one huge lake."

Past historic floods on the Mississippi in 1993, 1995 and 2011 occurred during warm weather, after snow melts up north. AccuWeather senior meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said it is highly unusual to have this kind of flooding in winter and more trouble could come in the spring.
Title: Cataclysms from the North Pole to South America
Post by: RE on December 30, 2015, 09:27:44 PM
Nothing to see here, Climate Change is a Lefty Myth.  ::)

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/freakish-weather-runs-from-top-of-the-world-to-the-bottom/2015/12/30/61203efa-af2c-11e5-b711-1998289ffcea_story.html (https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/freakish-weather-runs-from-top-of-the-world-to-the-bottom/2015/12/30/61203efa-af2c-11e5-b711-1998289ffcea_story.html)

Cataclysms from the North Pole to South America

Missouri governor declares state of emergency amid widespread flooding

(https://img.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_606w/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2015/12/30/National-Enterprise/Images/Midwest_Flooding-0202a.jpg)
Rising water forces road closures and threatens homes

By Darryl Fears and Angela Fritz December 30 at 8:18 PM

From the top of the world to near the bottom, freakish and unprecedented weather has sent temperatures soaring across the Arctic, whipped the United Kingdom with hurricane-force winds and spawned massive flooding in South America.

The same storm that slammed the southern United States with deadly tornadoes and swamped the Midwest, causing even greater loss of life, continued on to the Arctic. Sub-tropical air pulled there is now sitting over Iceland, and at what should be a deeply sub-zero North Pole, temperatures on Wednesday appeared to reach the melting point — more than 50 degrees above normal. That was warmer than Chicago.

Only twice before has the Arctic been so warm in winter. Residents of Iceland are bracing for conditions to grow much worse as one of the most powerful storms ever recorded blasts through the North Atlantic. This rare “bomb cyclone” arrived with sudden winds of 70 miles per hour and waves that lashed the coast.
ADVERTISING
 

Thousands of miles south, in the center of Latin America, downpours fueled by the Pacific Ocean’s giant El Niño pattern have drenched regions of Paraguay, Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay.

In what’s described as the worst flooding in a half-century, more than 160,000 people have fled their homes. The Paraguay River in that nation is within inches of topping its banks, and the Uruguay River in Argentina is 46 feet above normal, according to a BBC News report.

The dramatic storms are ending a year of record-setting weather globally, with July measured as the hottest month ever and 2015 set to be the warmest year.

Up and down the U.S. East Coast, this month will close as the hottest December ever. In much of the Northeast into Canada, temperatures on Christmas rose into the 70s — tricking bushes and trees into bloom in many locations. In the Washington area, forsythia, azaleas and even cherry blossoms were suddenly in full color.

“I see this as a double whammy,” Michael Mann, a professor of meteorology at Penn State University, said in an email. “El Niño . . . is one factor, human-caused climate change and global warming is another. You put the two together, and you get dramatic increases in certain types of extreme weather events.”

The impact is more and more devastating.

In rain-soaked Missouri, where more than a dozen people have died because of the flooding, Gov. Jay Nixon (D) has declared a state of emergency.

Almost two dozen levees along the Mississippi River are considered at risk, and forecasts are calling for record or near-record crests of the river and tributaries that feed it. Nearly 450 river gauges have hit flood stage since Monday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

From Illinois to Texas, 6 to 12 inches of rain have fallen since Dec. 26. Dozens of new precipitation marks were set last weekend, in some cases doubling or even tripling old records.
Social videos show rising flood waters in Midwest
Play Video1:18
Rivers are rising to dangerous and historic levels in the Midwest after crushing rainfall swept through the area. Residents in Ill., Mo. and Ark. documented their experiences in the flood. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

“Major to historic” river flooding is predicted in St. Louis through Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. The Mississippi River, which cuts through the heart of the city, is expected to hit 13 feet above flood stage — one of the top three crests ever.

And downstream in Chester, Ill., the river is likely to reach just below the 50-foot level of the Great Flood of 1993 — which, as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric and Administration’s Office of Hydrology recounts, “simply overwhelmed everyone and everything.”

What is most remarkable about this week’s flooding through the nation’s midsection is not the magnitude, but the timing. Under normal circumstances, this degree of wintertime flooding is not possible because there is not enough moisture in cold winter air to support such rainfall totals.

Although river levels will begin to drop over the weekend, the floodwaters will continue to move downstream on the Mississippi through mid-January. There they will meet runoff from excessive rain in the Southeast. Memphis; Vicksburg, Miss.; and Baton Rouge, La., are all braced for significant flooding.

In England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, the scenes have been similar much of this week as storms made the month the wettest December in some locations. Hundreds of people were evacuated in York, where rushing water engulfed cars. Rescue operations were needed to remove some residents from flooded homes and to deliver food and medical supplies to others.

Homes in Yorkshire were left without power, and downed telephone lines halted phone service. BBC News reported that 100 people spent Tuesday night in barracks usually used to house security personnel who guard the queen during visits to Scotland.

Ben G. Kopec, a researcher at Dartmouth University who recently authored a study on how the loss of Arctic ice contributes to precipitation, acknowledged Wednesday that it is impossible to know specifically what is causing the radical weather swings.

Yet balmy Arctic temperatures are exceptionally rare in December, when sea ice is normally expanding in an unbearably cold climate so that it can endure through hotter months. “These temperatures are keeping sea ice from growing to set up for summer months,” when it is needed as a counterbalance to the sun’s radiation and to offset warming, Kopec said.

Whether the latest events can be linked to climate change will remain a question mark until research can be done, said Jeff Masters, the founding meteorologist of the weather website Weather Underground.

“We have trouble making that connection in real time, because we have trouble teasing out the natural variability from the human-caused forcing,” Masters said Wednesday. “It’s really hard to scientifically say that’s what’s going on.”

Yet after decades of studying and analyzing global weather extremes, Masters thinks the shift is obvious. “This isn’t the climate I grew up with,” he said. “We didn’t see this kind of weather in the 20th century. It’s just a continuation of the crazy weather we’ve seen over the course of the 21st century so far.”

At the moment, the pattern being exacerbated by El Niño, a naturally occurring cycle of very warm water in the equatorial Pacific. It typically triggers heavy rain in some areas and unseasonable warmth in others. By some measures, this year’s El Niño is already the strongest on record.

Nicola Maxey, a press officer from the United Kingdom’s national weather service, the Met Office, also noted that it is “still too early to say definitively” whether global climate change produced December’s record rainfall.

However, she added via email, “all the evidence from fundamental physics and our understanding of our weather systems suggests there may be a link.”

Chelsea Harvey contributed to this report.
Title: Latest: Flooding causes oil pipeline, terminal disruptions
Post by: RE on December 31, 2015, 02:31:06 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/latest-flooding-makes-travel-difficult-through-st-louis/2015/12/31/0e7d65fe-afc4-11e5-b281-43c0b56f61fa_story.html (https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/latest-flooding-makes-travel-difficult-through-st-louis/2015/12/31/0e7d65fe-afc4-11e5-b281-43c0b56f61fa_story.html)

Latest: Flooding causes oil pipeline, terminal disruptions

 By Associated Press December 31 at 2:26 PM

(https://img.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_1484w/2010-2019/Wires/Online/2015-12-31/AP/Images/APTOPIXMidwestFlooding-08056.jpg?uuid=9X7_Jq9REeWygUPAtW9h-g)
In this aerial photo, flood water covers Interstate 44, Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015, in Valley Park, Mo. A rare winter flood threatened nearly two dozen federal levees in Missouri and Illinois on Wednesday as rivers rose, prompting evacuations in several places. (Jeff Roberson/Associated Press)

The latest developments on flooding in the Midwest (all times local):

1:15 p.m.

Record flooding is causing oil pipeline and terminal disruptions near St. Louis.

The rising Mississippi River has prompted Enbridge Inc. to shut down its Ozark oil pipeline, which transports oil from Cushing, Oklahoma, to the Wood River Refinery in Roxana, Illinois. Company spokesman Michael Barnes says the pipeline runs along the bottom of the river in an area stretching from West Alton, Missouri, to Hartford, Illinois. Barnes says the shutdown “ensures the safety of everyone.”

Meanwhile, Kinder Morgan Inc. suspended operations at its Cahokia terminal in Sauget, Illinois, and its Cora terminal in Rockwood, Illinois, earlier this week because of flooding. Cahokia handles chemicals, coal, cement and metals while Cora handles coal and petcoke, a byproduct of oil refining.

Spokesman Richard Wheatley says the company hopes to resume operations as soon as possible once water levels recede.

____

12:10 p.m.

Record-high water levels are disrupting train traffic in Missouri and Illinois.

Union Pacific says two sections of track in Missouri and two in Illinois are out of service because of rising waters. The Missouri stretches span from Jefferson City to St. Louis and from St. Louis to De Soto. The Illinois stretches span from Mount Vernon to Percy and from Springfield to Nelson.

The Jefferson City to St. Louis closure has disrupted an Amtrak route, forcing passengers to be rerouted on buses.

Omaha, Nebraska-based Union Pacific says in a statement that 70 trains in the St. Louis area have been held or rerouted because of high water levels.

Crews have put rock ballast, heavy machinery and generators in several areas near flooded tracks to assist with repairs when water levels fall.

____

11:40 a.m.

The flooding in Missouri is causing raw sewage to flow into a second location on the Meramec River.

The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District says the sewage treatment plant in Valley Park was shut down Thursday after water from the Meramec River flowed over a wall of sandbags built around the plant.

Spokesman Sean Hadley says sewage normally treated at the plant is going into the Meramec. Residents are urged to stay away from the water.

On Monday, floodwaters caused a power outage that shut down the wastewater treatment plant in Fenton, another St. Louis-area town, diverting raw sewage into the Meramec.

And a sewage treatment plant in the southwest Missouri town of Springfield also closed earlier this week, allowing raw sewage to escape.

___

10:35 a.m.

Searches have resumed in southwest Missouri for two men who are missing after recent flooding.

One of the men is a duck hunter who disappeared this weekend from the Four Rivers Conservation Area in Vernon County.

Sgt. John H. Lueckenhoff, of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, says the hunter is thought to be somewhere in 3,500-acre field in 10 feet of water. Crews are focusing on an area where the hunter’s boat and belongings were found.

Volunteers also are searching for a motorist who disappeared Saturday night as he prepared to cross a bridge over the Pomme de Terre River in Polk County. Guardrails kept the man’s vehicle from washing away.

Lueckenhoff says search teams and cadaver dogs are being used to look for the motorist.

____

10:20 a.m.

Massive flooding in the St. Louis area has caused another wastewater treatment plant to shut down.

The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District says the sewage treatment plant in Valley Park closed Thursday after water from the Meramec River flowed over a wall of sandbags built around the plant.

It wasn’t immediately clear if the shutdown was causing raw sewage to flow directly into the Meramec.

On Monday, floodwaters caused a power outage that shut down the wastewater treatment plant in Fenton, another St. Louis-area town, diverting raw sewage into the Meramec.

A water plant also flooded in High Ridge, south of St. Louis. Tanker trucks were bringing in water, but customers were urged to conserve.

And a sewage treatment plant in the southwest Missouri town of Springfield also closed earlier this week, allowing raw sewage to escape.

___

8:20 a.m.

Amtrak has suspended traffic on a route that runs from Kansas City to St. Louis because of flooding in Missouri.

Amtrak spokesman Craig Schulz says the cancellations started Wednesday.

He says passengers with tickets on the River Runner will be bused on Thursday, though that service will bypass the two cities that are popular because of nearby wineries.

Train service from Kansas City to Jefferson City will resume Friday. People going on to St. Louis will have to ride a bus.

The Amtrak route shares a line that is also used for freight traffic.

____

8:05 a.m.

The Meramec River has crested at a record level in the partially evacuated St. Louis suburb of Valley Park, but the shored-up levees held back the waters.

The National Weather Service says the river hit its peak of 44.11 feet around 3 a.m. Thursday — that’s 4.39 feet higher than the record set in 1982.

Forecasts call for water levels to gradually fall over the next several days.

The town of about 7,000 residents has flooded frequently over the years, but the Army Corps of Engineers built a levee in 2007 and the community had been dry since.

Welders added additional metal to the top of the levee flood gates Wednesday as the river rose.

Even with the levee holding, a railroad bridge, roads, some homes and soccer fields flooded.

___

7:40 a.m.

The St. Louis area is increasingly difficult to drive through, as floodwaters have poured over two interstate highways and hundreds of other spots on smaller roads.

The Missouri Department of Transportation closed a 24-mile stretch of Interstate 44 southwest of St. Louis on Wednesday, and shut down three miles of Interstate 55 south of St. Louis about 1:30 a.m. Thursday.

With I-55 closed, the only north-south alternative is Highway 231. But traffic there is backing up with cars and trucks that would normally be on I-55.

MoDOT spokeswoman Marie Elliott says motorists who can stay home should do so.

___

6:40 a.m.

Flooding along the Meramec River in Missouri is setting records.

The U.S. Geological Survey says field crews have recorded 18 preliminary record flood measurements along the river, which originates near Salem in south-central Missouri and empties into the Mississippi River near St. Louis about 220 miles later.

Crews also are measuring high flood flows in other river valleys.

The U.S. Geological Survey says additional historic peaks are expected throughout the southern part of the state over the next few days.

___

6:30 a.m.

Authorities were searching floodwaters for two 18-year-olds from the central Illinois community of Taylorville.

Police say the two were last seen Monday and divers concentrated their search Wednesday near flooded areas of Sangchris Lake and Pawnee, where one of the teen’s cellphone was tracked.

Christian County emergency services director Mike Crews told the State Journal-Register that “it’s going to be difficult to find them” because the water is so high and that authorities may have to wait for it to recede.

Seven people have died in Illinois flooding since last week.

Gov. Bruce Rauner declared five more counties disaster areas on Wednesday for a total of 12. Christian County is among them.

Rauner is scheduled to return to Springfield on Thursday evening and planned to survey flood damage.

___

5:35 a.m.

The Missouri Department of Transportation has closed Interstate 55 in both directions at the Meramec River due to historic flooding.

Officials said in a tweet early Thursday morning that Rte. 231 remains open.

They had been preparing for the possible closure of the major interstate highway south of St. Louis Wednesday night due to the flooding.

An aggressive sandbagging operation had been underway to keep the lanes open. Other connections between St. Louis and Jefferson counties already are closed, including I-44 over the river.

___

1:30 a.m.

Crews are trying to keep a major interstate highway south of St. Louis open amid historic flooding.

The Missouri Department of Transportation said Wednesday night that I-55 at the Meramec River near Arnold could close overnight or Thursday.

An aggressive sandbagging operation was underway to keep the highway from closing. Other connections between St. Louis and Jefferson counties already are closed, including I-44 over the river.

Local media report the traffic has been rerouted. But a spokeswoman for the Department of Transportation told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (http://bit.ly/1YTOKkk (http://bit.ly/1YTOKkk) ) the detours are temporary to move in more equipment for flood-fighting.

Marie Elliott says, “The goal is to keep the highway open.”
Title: Tornado-Affected Tenants Must Still Pay Rent: Texas Law
Post by: RE on January 01, 2016, 09:05:07 PM
This is ridiculous.   It's the landlord's responsibility to fix the place up and make it livable before you should pay rent.

RE

http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Tornado-Affected-Tenants-Must-Still-Pay-Rent-Texas-Law-363985401.html (http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Tornado-Affected-Tenants-Must-Still-Pay-Rent-Texas-Law-363985401.html)

Tornado-Affected Tenants Must Still Pay Rent: Texas Law

Many residents of a Garland apartment complex are still homeless after tornadoes damaged their homes Dec. 26. But even though some don't have a place to live, they complain the on-site apartment manager still asked them pay rent on Jan. 1.

Monique Russell is among the tenants who is now cleaning a tornado-damaged apartment. She pointed to the mess the twister left behind. Glass shards and rain-soaked walls worry the single mother of two.

    RespondsDeadline Approaches for Verizon, Sprint Refunds

"It's unsafe for my kids," she said. "I have a baby, a 2 year old and a 6 year old."

Russell and her children crouched in a bathtub as the tornadoes tore trees and toppled cars. Her Garland apartment complex, Ray Hubbard Ranch One, was in the path.

    RespondsBeware of Crooks When Selling Goods Online

"I haven't slept," Russell said.

The tornado's toll was emotional and financial. All residents lost any perishable food because the electricity was out for two days. Some lost belongings and others, like Russell, also also suffered damage to their cars parked in front of the complex.

    RespondsWaiting to Christmas Shop Could Pay

When Russell questioned her apartment manager about having to pay the rent, she says the manager insisted rent was due Jan. 1.

"She said she can't do nothing about God's work," Russell said.

    RespondsRealty Company Optimistic About Dallas Housing Market

The manager said repairs were underway to make the apartment livable.

Hannah Kearns lives in the same complex. The tornado ripped away her chimney and rain poured in soaking her carpet.

    RespondsState Removes Some Unclaimed Property From Website

"You can smell the stench in here," she said standing in the middle of her living room a week after the storm.

Kearns packed boxes of clothes and essentials and moved in with a relative.

    RespondsBeware of Fake Sweepstakes Schemes

"Everyone was a little confused at how and why we have to pay rent considering the damage to the apartments," she said. "And we were told that they would board them up and tarp them up, and they would be livable for us."

The apartment manager was following state law. A tenant has to pay rent, regardless of the damage to their home. Texas property code states that after a natural disaster, if the apartment is unlivable, a tenant can terminate the lease and ask for a pro-rated refund of the rent. If the apartment is partially unusable a tenant is entitled to a reduction of the rent, but only if a court approves it or the landlord and tenant agree.

    RespondsMoney Monday: Gift Cards, Skip A Payment

Consumer Specialist Deanna Dewberry called the apartments' management company, Class A management. Supervisor Cathy Fontana was adamant that managers would not demand that affected tenants pay rent on Jan. 1.

"Ain't nobody looking at that," she said by phone. "We're looking at human compassion."

    Shipping Tips for the Holiday Season

That's a relief for residents struggling after the storm.

"This was a devastating disaster to everybody, and it's hurt everybody," said Kearns.

    List of Dangerous Toys Includes Dinosaur Claws, Trampoline

At this point, though, it's not clear when rent is due. Fontana said the complex is "in crisis mode" and her priority is finding residents a place to live. She pleaded for food donations for her residents and support from the public.

A valuable resource for tenants is the Texas Tenants Union. The non-profit group provides guidance to tenants and helps them understand applicable property code. The Tenants' Rights handbook is also a valuable resource. It's a free resource published by the Texas Young Lawyers Association and the State Bar of Texas.
Title: Blizzard kills thousands of cows and threatens Texas dairy business
Post by: RE on January 02, 2016, 01:11:22 PM
http://money.cnn.com/2016/01/02/news/dairy-texas-storm-goliath/ (http://money.cnn.com/2016/01/02/news/dairy-texas-storm-goliath/)

Blizzard kills thousands of cows and threatens Texas dairy business
by Ahiza Garcia   @ahiza_garcia January 2, 2016: 11:58 AM ET

(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/150907124803-europe-milk-prices-780x439.jpg)

The Texas dairy business took a big hit from Goliath -- the deadly storm system that wreaked havoc in several states near the end of 2015.

The storm resulted in the loss of "hundreds of loads of milk" that were ready to be processed and many milk-producing cows weren't milked daily, according to Darren Turley, executive director of the Texas Association of Dairymen.

"When a dairy cow goes that long without being milked, her milk supply starts to dry up," Turley said in a statement. "That means the dairy cows in this region will give less milk for months to come. Less milk going to market will be felt by consumers, as well as by dairy farmers."

Half of the state's biggest milk producing counties are located in the region that was affected by the storm. Since thousands of the region's mature cows died in the storm, further strain will be placed on the state's future milk supply.

Turley said farmers are now struggling to dispose of the dead animals and deal with lost profits.

The association is working to help these farmers secure financial assistance from the government.

CNN's Leslie Holland and Joe Sutton contributed to this report.
Title: Rare, out-of-season subtropical storm forms far out in Atlantic
Post by: RE on January 14, 2016, 06:20:05 AM
Another "freak" weather event.  ::)

RE

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-atlantic-storm-alex-20160114-story.html (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-atlantic-storm-alex-20160114-story.html)

Rare, out-of-season subtropical storm forms far out in Atlantic

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-5697994c/turbine/ct-subtropical-storm-alex-hurricane-season-video-20160114/750/750x422)
Title: Re: Rare, out-of-season subtropical storm forms far out in Atlantic
Post by: Eddie on January 14, 2016, 06:46:24 AM
Another "freak" weather event.  ::)

RE

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-atlantic-storm-alex-20160114-story.html (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-atlantic-storm-alex-20160114-story.html)

Rare, out-of-season subtropical storm forms far out in Atlantic

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-5697994c/turbine/ct-subtropical-storm-alex-hurricane-season-video-20160114/750/750x422)

It looks to be a real bonus year for hurricanes. I doubt I'll hit the islands this summer.
Title: Re: Rare, out-of-season subtropical storm forms far out in Atlantic
Post by: Surly1 on January 14, 2016, 07:31:25 AM
Another "freak" weather event.  ::)

RE

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-atlantic-storm-alex-20160114-story.html (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-atlantic-storm-alex-20160114-story.html)

Rare, out-of-season subtropical storm forms far out in Atlantic

It looks to be a real bonus year for hurricanes. I doubt I'll hit the islands this summer.

Contrary and I were discussing this thing this morning.

Apparently January hurricanes are not completely unknown. There was a storm Dec.-Jan. of 1955. Alex is now upgraded, and becomes the first January hurricane to form in the Atlantic since 1938. cnn.it/1mYezUi

So they happen, but are a rarity. Thank El Nino.
Title: Re: Rare, out-of-season subtropical storm forms far out in Atlantic
Post by: RE on January 14, 2016, 03:33:56 PM
It looks to be a real bonus year for hurricanes. I doubt I'll hit the islands this summer.

Good year to visit Alaska & BC and salivate over doomsteads.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Iditarod Sled Dog Race could be hurt by lack of snow
Post by: RE on February 11, 2016, 10:26:56 PM
No worries, according to Roamer the lack of snow here is just a result of Bad Management of Resources.

RE

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/02/11/iditarod-sled-dog-race-could-be-hurt-by-lack-snow.html (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/02/11/iditarod-sled-dog-race-could-be-hurt-by-lack-snow.html)

Iditarod Sled Dog Race could be hurt by lack of snow

(http://a57.foxnews.com/images.foxnews.com/content/fox-news/us/2016/02/11/iditarod-sled-dog-race-could-be-hurt-by-lack-snow/_jcr_content/par/featured-media/media-0.img.jpg/876/493/1455208773170.jpg?ve=1&tl=1)
Dallas Seavey winning his second Iditarod in 2014. (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News)


Published February 11, 2016 Associated Press

Another low snow year in Alaska is playing havoc with the world's most famous sled dog race, at least for the start.

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race always begins with a ceremonial, fan-friendly slow jaunt through the streets and trails of Anchorage, held a day before the start of the competitive portion of the nearly-thousand mile race.

A lack of snow last year north of Anchorage forced the race from the normal start in Willow, about 75 miles north of Anchorage, further north to Fairbanks. The conditions in Willow are much improved this year, but the problem is in Anchorage, where the snowfall in the city for the last two years has equaled only about two-thirds of a normal year.
Related Image
Volunteer Shannan Hunter of Seattle, left,and Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race vet tech coordinator Tabitha Jones hold a dog during a pre-race blood screening and heart check at Iditarod headquarters in Wasilla, Alaska, on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016. Low snow in the Anchorage area may cause havoc for the race's ceremonial start on March 5, 2016, and the race's board of directors will decide Friday, Feb. 12, 2016, whether the race will have to move its official start scheduled the next day in Willow, Alaska, further north to Fairbanks. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen) Expand / Contract

A pre-race blood screening and heart check at Iditarod headquarters in Wasilla, Alaska, on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

"Our real challenge right now is trying to figure out whether we've got adequate snow to make Anchorage and the ceremonial start happen," Iditarod Chief Executive Officer Stan Hooley told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

"We're pretty confident in where we're going to officially start the race. In terms of that all-important ceremonial start, we've got some work to do," he said.

This will be the 44th edition of the sled dog race to Nome, and the ceremonial start has always been held in Anchorage.

That won't change, but Hooley says he's not quite sure how it might look just yet. He said in 1994, there wasn't enough snow to cover the 11-mile route from downtown Anchorage to the race's end in east Anchorage, and it was shortened.

One important aspect of the ceremonial start is fans across the world participate in an auction with the winners -- called Iditariders -- getting to ride with mushers on the Anchorage course. In each of the past few years, the auction has brought in more than $200,000 for the Iditarod.

"It's an important part of our overall fundraiser mix," he said, noting it pays other dividends.

"Those folks (Iditariders) are our very best goodwill ambassadors, because when they go back to their own little corners of the world, they do it with smiles on their faces and talk a lot about that experience. So we need to continue to nurture that program," he said.

Hooley is not ready yet to shorten the ceremonial start, and is hoping Mother Nature will help with some late February snow.

But Luis Ingram, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Anchorage, said there is no significant snow in the seven-day forecast, and confidence isn't high for any after that.

Anchorage set a record for low snow totals last year at 25.1 inches. This year's total so far is 25.8 inches, while a normal snowfall total in Anchorage is 74.5 inches.

Hooley said there is plenty of snow outside the Willow area, and he's pretty sure that is where the race will have its official start on March 6. The board of directors will decide the official start location -- either Willow or Fairbanks -- on Friday.

There's also plenty of snow in traditional dodgy areas like Rainy Pass, the Dalzell Gorge and the Farewell Burn, where mushers have been injured in recent races by crashing sleds on rocky trails.

The snow in those areas is the best it's been in 15 or 20 years, Hooley said.

Meanwhile, preparations continue for this year's race, which has drawn the third-largest field ever with 86 mushers.

Part of those activities are taking place this month in a trailer set up outside Iditarod's headquarters in Wasilla, where vet tech coordinator Tabitha Jones is making sure all the dogs that might be in the race are getting their blood checked and hearts monitored.

Each musher can start the race with 16 dogs, but if they haven't decided on their team yet, that means they could bring in 24 dogs for those examinations. All the dogs also get an identifying chip inserted.

If every musher brought in 24 dogs, there would be more than 2,000 hounds taking part in this program.  "It's the pre-race screening program that all the dogs in the Iditarod or the potential dogs that could be on a team have to go through in order to run," Jones said.
Title: Another Soggy Week in TX & LA
Post by: RE on March 10, 2016, 12:35:06 AM
Looks like Eddie's might have another chance to see his stream overflow the banks.

RE

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/flash-flood-emergency-in-northern-lousiana-over-a-foot-of-rain-in-24- (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/flash-flood-emergency-in-northern-lousiana-over-a-foot-of-rain-in-24-)

Flash Flood Emergency in Northern Lousiana: Over a Foot of Rain in 24 Hours

By: Jeff Masters , 4:26 PM GMT on March 09, 2016

 
 

A Flash Flood Emergency has been declared in Northwest Louisiana, including the city of Shreveport, where over a foot of rain fell in just 24 hours, from Tuesday morning through Wednesday morning. At Shreveports's Barksdale Air Force Base, 13.16" had fallen as of 10 am EST Wednesday, and over 14 inches of rain fell just to the southeast of Shreveport near Bossier City. The heavy rains have led to numerous high water rescues and flooded homes and streets. Near Shreveport, up to 80 homes were flooded and a nursing home had to be evacuated due to rising waters, according to the Associated Press, and evacuations have been ordered in Greenwood, Haughton, Homer, Minden and Rayville, Louisiana. The flooding problems extend into Eastern Texas, where multiple bridges have been washed out northeast of Marlin, Texas. Although the heaviest rains moved out of Eastern Texas and Northern Louisiana late Wednesday morning, near-record levels of atmospheric moisture for this time of year--more than 200% of average--remain in place over the region, and renewed rounds of heavy rain are likely through Friday. Extreme flooding rains were spreading into Southern Arkansas on Wednesday morning, and rainfall amounts of a foot in 24 hours are possible there, as well. Additional major flash flooding over the next few days is also possible in Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Shreveport, Little Rock, Memphis and New Orleans.


Figure 1. Flooding in Bossier Parish, Louisiana on March 9, 2016 submerged some houses up to their roofs. Numerous water rescues were made Tuesday night as high water started to pile up in parts of Louisiana after heavy rainfall. (CBS News Correspondent @DavidBegnaud) 

Although flooding is the major concern from this slow-moving storm system, severe thunderstorms and a few tornadoes are also expected through Thursday in some of the same parts of the Lower Mississippi Valley and Gulf Coast. So, far, the storm had spun up three tornadoes since Monday. An EF1 tornado caused damage near Cool, Texas Monday evening, and an EF1 tornado touched down near Tolar, Texas, southwest of Ft. Worth Tuesday morning. An EF1 tornado also left a narrow path of damage in Stephenville, Texas early Tuesday. Severe thunderstorms hit the Ft. Worth, Texas region, with a 66 mph gust at the Ft. Worth Meacham Airport. Baseball size hail pounded Voca, Texas Tuesday evening, while hail to the size of golf balls covered the ground in both Evant and Jonesboro, Texas. Two drowning deaths have been attributed to the storm system: a man in Broken Bow, OK that drove across a flooded bridge and got swept away, and a man in a canoe on Dickinson Bayou near Hwy 3 in Dickinson, TX where the wind blew him into the water. Thanks go to wunderground members RitaEvac and Skyepony for this info.


Figure 2. Storm damage from early Tuesday in Frisco, Texas. (@NTXStrmTrackers/Twitter.com) 

A "cut-off" low is responsible
A large low pressure system (a "cut-off" low) has separated from the jet stream, and will stay parked over the U.S./Mexico border region during the next few days. The counter-clockwise flow of air around this low is bringing up plenty of warm, moisture-laden air from the tropics along the east side of the low, causing the heavy rains we've observed. By this weekend, when all of this rain has had time to flow into area rivers, expect to see several rivers crest at near-record flood levels. Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) are near average over the Gulf of Mexico, which will keep the amount of moisture available to this week's storms lower than would be the case if SSTs were unusually warm. However, the cut-off low has tapped into a moisture source in the deep tropics over the Eastern Pacific where SSTs are record warm. An "atmospheric river" of water vapor can be seen on satellite images extending from the record-warm El Niño-heated waters south of Mexico directly into the Southern U.S. This warm, moist air is very unstable, which will help contribute to severe thunderstorms with a few tornadoes over the Southern U.S. today through Friday.


Figure 3. Observed 24-hour precipitation for the period ending at 9 am EST Wednesday, March 9, 2016. Portions of northern Louisiana received over a foot of rain, and a large area of 8+" fell over portions of Eastern Texas and Northern Louisiana. Image credit: NOAA/NWS.


Figure 4. Lots more rain on the way: predicted precipitation for the 3-day period ending 7 am EST Saturday, March 12, 2016. Image credit: National Weather Service.

Jeff Masters

 
Magical Mammatus Clouds (BlueSkyGrannie)
After all the thundershowers today, the evening sky was alive with mammatus clouds. What a sight to behold.
Magical Mammatus Clouds
Fence Dam (Madermade)
Fence couldn't hold back the flooding pasture. :)
Fence Dam
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on March 10, 2016, 06:23:10 AM
Just catching the edge of it. Three rainy days in a row, but no flooding this far west and south. After a wet fall, January and February were both pretty dry. The rain is a welcome change here.
Title: Noah's Ark time in Lousiana
Post by: RE on March 11, 2016, 05:23:12 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/11/us/southeast-weather/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/11/us/southeast-weather/index.html)

More rain on the way after massive flooding in Southeast
Catherine Shoichet-Profile-Image

By Joshua Berlinger and Catherine E. Shoichet, CNN

Updated 5:41 AM ET, Fri March 11, 2016
Deadly flood threat remains across the South

Deadly flood threat remains across the South 01:22
Story highlights

    Officials in a Louisiana parish warn levees could overtop
    4 people have died in the storm so far
    Governors in Mississippi and Louisiana declare states of emergency

(CNN)Flash floods hit some areas of Louisiana, with officials urging residents to seek higher ground immediately.

"This is a flash flood emergency for Tangipahoa Parish, including the city of Hammond," the National Weather Service said in a statement early Friday. "Seek higher ground now!"

Up to 14 inches of rain have fallen in some areas, and an additional 1 to 3 inches are possible.

New Orleans shut down some schools because of the flash floods Friday. Officials warned that flood waters could rise above a levee and place thousands of homes in jeopardy.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards declared a state of emergency, and the National Weather Service issued a flash flood emergency for several parishes.

A series of storms have killed four people, flooded homes and wrecked highways in parts of the Southeast.

State offices in 17 Louisiana parishes were closed Thursday, according to CNN affiliates KTAL and KMSS. The northwest part of the state could see another 8 to 10 inches on top of the drenching it received when some isolated locations got more than 14 inches.

That means the region is at risk of further flooding until Monday.

Bossier City

In Bossier Parish, officials said they had closed at least 100 roads.

They issued a mandatory evacuation order for residents of 3,500 homes this week that could be at risk if flood waters keep rising.

They expanded that evacuation order Thursday, warning that levees will likely overtop by Friday morning, putting even more homes in jeopardy.

Some bayous and creeks near Shreveport are expected to crest at levels not seen since 1991, according to CNN meteorologist Michael Guy.

Mississippi, warnings

In Mississippi, officials warned of flash flooding. Gov. Phil Bryant declared a state of emergency.

"The water's still rising," said David Buford, the Washington County emergency management director.

Four people killed

At least four people have been killed in storms across the region, officials said. In Texas, a man died after his kayak capsized in Dickinson Bayou, near Galveston, police said.

Three people have died in Louisiana, Edwards said. In one case, a driver died when his vehicle was swept off the road in floodwaters in Bienville Parish, a spokesman for the state's Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness said.
It doesn't take much water to float a car

It doesn't take much water to float a car 00:46

CNN's Michael Guy, Dave Alsup, Mayra Cuevas, Henry Hanks and Sheena Jones contributed to this report.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on March 11, 2016, 05:35:55 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/1e5IJ85esT8&fs=1

What has happened down here is the winds have changed
Clouds roll in from the north and it started to rain
Rained real hard and it rained for a real long time
Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

The river rose all day
The river rose all night
Some people got lost in the flood
Some people got away alright
The river have busted through clear down to Plaquemines
Six feet of water in the streets of Evangelne

Louisiana, Louisiana
They're tyrin' to wash us away
They're tryin' to wash us away
Louisiana, Louisiana
They're tryin' to wash us away
They're tryin' to wash us away

President Coolidge came down in a railroad train
With a little fat man with a note-pad in his hand
The President say, "Little fat man isn't it a shame what the river has done
To this poor crackers land."

Louisiana, Louisiana
They're tryin' to wash us away
They're tryin' to wash us away
Louisiana, Louisiana
They're tryin' to wash us away
They're tryin' to wash us away
They're tryin' to wash us away
They're tryin' to wash us away


One for my funeral mix tape. I feel their pain.
Title: Re: Noah's Ark time in Lousiana
Post by: RE on March 11, 2016, 05:48:33 AM
This is a LOT of water to drain in a very short time over a very concentrated area.  I will be interested to see the state of the levees in NOLA once this water moves down from Shreveport.

RE
Title: Re: Noah's Ark time in Lousiana
Post by: RE on March 11, 2016, 05:59:18 AM
They are coming up on the 2 foot mark in rainfall, and it ain't ovah.  Yeesh.  That is a LOT of water.

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/recordstrength-upper-low-brings-extreme-rains-to-south-us-thunders (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/recordstrength-upper-low-brings-extreme-rains-to-south-us-thunders)

Record-Strength Upper Low Brings Extreme Rains to South U.S., Thundersnow to Mexico

(http://icons.wxug.com/hurricane/2016/march9-flood-haughton.jpg)

By: Bob Henson and Jeff Masters , 4:51 PM GMT on March 10, 2016

A remarkably rare atmospheric event is unfolding over Mexico and the Southern U.S., where an upper-level low pressure system of unprecedented strength in the historical record for that location has stalled out, bringing multiple days of torrential rain to the Southern U.S. and snow to the mountains of Mexico. The upper low tapped into an atmospheric river of moisture from both the Western Caribbean and the Eastern Pacific, bringing rainfall amounts one would expect to occur only once every 200 years (a 0.5% chance of occurrence in a given year) over portions of northern Louisiana. According to the latest NOAA Storm Summary, as of 9 am EST Thursday, the city of Monroe, Louisiana had received 17.25" of rain since Monday, and Shreveport had picked up 16.70" at Barksdale Air Force Base. The heavy rains led to numerous high water rescues, evacuation of at least 3,500 homes, and closures of hundreds of roads. Portions of two interstate highways in northern Louisiana--I-20 and I-49--were closed on Thursday morning due to flooding, according to KSLA.com. Three drownings have been reported since Monday from the storm system--one each in Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on March 11, 2016, 06:33:15 AM
Today is the fourth and last rainy day here. South By Southwest festival starts today, and Obama is flying in this morning.

The mayor has requested everyone to work from  home today (hah, traffic was just as bad as ever). Word is we're still gaining 50 cars per day, which has been going on for years.
Title: The Rain in Lousiana falls mainly...EVERYWHERE!
Post by: RE on March 11, 2016, 08:13:28 PM
This is just a shit load of water...

RE

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/floods-from-up-to-20-inches-of-rain-create-state-of-emergency-in-louis (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/floods-from-up-to-20-inches-of-rain-create-state-of-emergency-in-louis)

Floods From up to 20 Inches of Rain Create State of Emergency in Louisiana


(http://icons.wxug.com/hurricane/2016/bridge-557-collapse.jpg)

By: Jeff Masters , 4:22 PM GMT on March 11, 2016

A state of emergency has been declared by Governor John Bel Edwards for the entire state of Louisiana after a four-day deluge of rain dumped up to 20" of rain over northern portions of the state. The resulting record flooding has forced a call-up of the National Guard to help evacuate thousands of people from their homes. Five storm-related deaths have been reported since Monday--three in Louisiana and one each in Oklahoma and Texas. Hundreds of roads have been closed, including portions of two major interstate highways. One bridge collapsed on Louisiana Highway 557 in Ouchita Parish...
Title: Flashbacks of Katrina
Post by: RE on March 14, 2016, 01:37:53 AM
I think it's time LA requires Houseboats in the building code.

RE

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/flood-problems-just-beginning-rain-finally-heads-out-south-n537561 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/flood-problems-just-beginning-rain-finally-heads-out-south-n537561)

Flood Problems Just Beginning as Rain Finally Heads Out of the South

(http://media2.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscms/2016_10/1456356/160313-la-national-guard_c879eb0d3f44e72d24193bb65e71de07.nbcnews-ux-2880-1000.jpg)

by Alex Johnson
States of Emergency: Flood Warning in Effect Across 4 States 2:01

The thunderstorms that killed six people and flooded thousands more out of their homes in the South were getting in one last kick Sunday before clearing out overnight, but major river flooding is expected to continue for many days, forecasters said.

Large hail up to 3 inches in diameter and damaging winds were expected in Arkansas and parts of Oklahoma, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, the National Weather Service said Sunday. A tornado was even confirmed near Conway, Arkansas, early Sunday evening.

After five days of rain that has already set March records of as much as 2 feet in some parts of Louisiana and Mississippi, the storm is expected to aggravate flooding in major rivers, especially along the Louisiana-Texas border.

Related: Unusually Widespread Flooding Across Louisiana, Mississippi

As water kept rising near the Toledo Bend Dam on the Texas and Louisiana border, authorities began releasing large amounts of water from the Toledo Bend Reservoir — pouring more water into the Sabine River than it could handle.

The Sabine reached 29 feet Sunday morning in Deweyville, Texas, and by Tuesday, it could hit 35 feet, a good 3 feet above the record flood level set all the way back in 1884, forecasters said.

Deweyville was under a mandatory evacuation order, but "this could keep rising into Tuesday and Wednesday, which means people might not be able to get to their homes until next weekend or possibly even longer," said Danielle Banks, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel.

The town of 1,200 people in Newton County was completely isolated Sunday night — accessible only by boat or helicopter.

"No residents of the town have ever seen a flood in Deweyville like what's coming in the next few days," said Jonathan Erdman, a senior meteorologist for The Weather Channel.

On the Louisiana side of the river, officials pleaded with Calcasieu residents to evacuate, as well.
IMAGE: Louisiana National Guard troops
National Guard troops conduct door to door searches in Bossier City, Louisiana. Staff Sgt. Jerry W. Rushing — U.S. Army National Guard

"This is going to be a terrible flood," Dick Gremillion, Calcasieu's director of emergency preparedness, told NBC station KPLC of Lake Charles.

"We've never seen anything like this, we don't have anything to compare it to," said Jonathan Brazzell, a hydrologist with the National Weather Service. "So the next best thing is the flood record of the past, which is '89 — and then you add 2 to 5 feet to that."

Other rivers that have hit record levels include several other locations along the Sabine River; the Bogue Falaya River at Covington, Louisiana, which broke its 23-year-old record by 3 feet; and the Little River near Rochelle, Louisiana, which broke a 33-year-old record by 4 feet.

A 78-year-old man drowned Saturday night near Clarence, Louisiana, while trying to get to his home in an aluminum boat to retrieve personal items, the Natchitoches Parish Sheriff's Office said.

Two other people in the boat were safely rescued, but the incident brought the death toll from the storms to at least six. Three other people were previously known to have died in Louisiana, along with one each in Texas and Oklahoma.

And "we've still got flash flood watches and warnings up from Texas to Louisiana over into Mississippi," Banks said.

Almost 5,000 homes have already been damaged by flooding in Louisiana alone — a report that doesn't include large areas of the state that haven't been able to assess their damage because they're still responding to emergencies, the state Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness said Sunday.

About 200 homes were floating in Morehouse Parish, NBC station KTVE of Monroe reported Sunday morning, displacing more than 1,000 people.

The Louisiana National Guard said Sunday that 1,405 Guard troops were on duty across the state helping with evacuations, search and rescue, supply of water and meals and security. It said it has rescued 2,415 people and 197 pets so far and has handed out almost a million sandbags in 13 hard-hit parishes.

Eric Anderson, who moved his family to St. Tammany Parish from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina 10½ years ago, said, "It's like flashbacks of Katrina."

"We moved over here, and it's just like it's happening again," Anderson NBC station WDSU.

The St. Tammany Parish Sheriff's Office warned residents to prepare for potential record flooding along the Pearl River, which the National Weather Service said is expected to crest above flood stage some time Monday. The sheriff's office said the flood has the potential for "widespread devastation."

Meanwhile, in Mississippi, more than 800 homes — 185 of them destroyed — have been damaged, the state Emergency Operations Center said Sunday. Two fishermen remain missing in Claiborne County, it said. ://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/flood-problems-just-beginning-rain-finally-heads-out-south-n537561

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on April 03, 2016, 05:25:47 AM
It was 60 degrees all week. Just got bombed with 5 inches of snow and the winds are gusting to 40 mph.

I can't stand anymore of this Crazy Weather!  Totally unreal, just got knocked back int the middle of Winter after 3 weeks of spring.  :WTF:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on April 04, 2016, 07:07:13 PM
Another snow storm today, Only four inches this time.

20 degrees outside two weeks after Easter in Beantown. Some Spring weather.   :-\ :'( :emthdown:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on April 05, 2016, 04:32:21 PM
Another snow storm today, Only four inches this time.

20 degrees outside two weeks after Easter in Beantown. Some Spring weather.   :-\ :'( :emthdown:

We had your weather a few days ago here in N.A.
It's a quick mover Oxie.
It went out to lunch with a honey today & we both had shorts on.
It'll be back in the 80's in a day or 2.


Gotta' luv this global warming.                   :icon_sunny:      :icon_sunny:
Title: Texas governor declares state of disaster in nine counties amid sweeping rainfal
Post by: RE on April 18, 2016, 06:10:08 PM
Texas Swimming again!

At least Eddie's Mangalista piglets will have plenty of water this year!  :icon_sunny:

RE

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/04/18/flash-flood-warnings-in-effect-as-texas-braces-for-severe-downpours.html (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/04/18/flash-flood-warnings-in-effect-as-texas-braces-for-severe-downpours.html)

Floods
Texas governor declares state of disaster in nine counties amid sweeping rainfall
Published April 18, 2016 FoxNews.com
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Reporter saves man from dangerous floodwaters in Texas
Never autoplay videos

With more than a foot of rain falling in parts of Houston by Monday afternoon and much of the surrounding areas shut down, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott declared a state of disaster in nine counties.

At a late afternoon press conference, Abbott said there had been over 1,000 water rescues. Authorities also were investigating two fatalities to see if they were weather related.

Crews watching the high water on a Houston freeway service road saw an 18-wheeler truck drive directly into high water, Harris County Precinct 5 Sgt. Herbert Martinez said. Workers later found the driver's body inside the truck.

Officials also were trying to determine if the storm was responsible for the death of a contractor working for the city's airport system whose body was found in a submerged vehicle.

The floods turned commuting into a nightmare, forced schools in the nation's fourth-largest city to close and knocked out power to thousands of people who were urged to shelter in place.

Mayor Sylvester Turner told people to stay home to fend off a weather system he called "stubborn." More rain was projected over the next two to three days although heavy downpours had subsided somewhat by midday and only another half-inch was expected through Monday night, he said.

Rain gauges in parts of Harris County, which includes most of Houston, showed water levels approaching 20 inches since late Sunday night. Ten-inch and higher rainfall amounts were common, particularly in west and north sections of the Southeast Texas area.
Flood Alerts for April 18, 2016 | WeatherDB

The Harris County Flood Control District reported 13 bayous and creeks out of their banks, several of them in Houston.

"There is water all over the place, there is flooding all over the place," Turner said.

The counties where Abbott declared a state of disaster were Austin, Bastrop, Colorado, Fort Bend, Grimes, Harris, Montgomery, Waller and Wharton.

Several shelters were established for people forced from their homes.  At least 100 people taken from apartment complexes in the north part of the city were being sheltered at a shopping mall.

Harris County Judge Ed Emmett, the county's chief administrator, said more than 1,000 homes were flooded.

"This is a rain event that's very significant, no question about it," he said. "Many of those homes haven't flooded before."

About 1 million students got the day off, including the Houston Independent School District's 215,000 students, Texas' largest public school district. Most colleges and universities also closed because of the bad weather.

No other major injuries were reported.

Dozens of Houston subdivisions flooded. At least two interstates -- I-10, the main east-west freeway, and I-45, the major north-south freeway -- were under water near downtown.

"We've seen those go under water before and they're under water again," Emmett said.

Other major freeways, plus some feeder roads leading to the highways, were blocked by high water.

"I was trying to get to work," Marcel Gwinn said as he was stranded for more than 90 minutes on an overpass in west Houston. "It kills me because my boss just told me that work's closed for the day."

Fire Department spokesman Jay Evans said the agency had made "numerous, numerous rescues."

"When you get off the freeways and off the main thoroughfares, you could be in water 10 to 15 feet deep," he said. "You do not want to trap yourself in these vehicles."

The storms were part of a wide weather system that left warnings and watches through Tuesday morning for Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, Fort Worth, Tyler-Longview and as far east as Texarkana.

One TV reporter in Houston helped to rescue a man who drove his car into a flooded underpass.

In the incident captured on video Monday, KTRK reporter Steve Campion yells, "Dude, you've got to get out of the car!"

The man opens the passenger door and crawls out into the water as the reporter yells: "Leave the car! Swim!"

The driver swims toward Campion, who wades out into the waist-deep water and extends his hand.

As the car slowly sinks under water, the driver tells Campion that he's OK and that he didn't think the water was so deep.

Houston, at near sea level and known for its "gumbo" soft soil, is no stranger to flooding from torrential rains, tropical storms and hurricanes. Last Memorial Day, heavy rains caused severe flooding in the southwest parts of the city. Bayous there quickly rose and the mayor urged residents to prepare for another round of floods.

"A lot of rain coming in a very short period of time, there's nothing you can do," Turner said. "I regret anyone whose home is flooded again. There's nothing I can say that's going to ease your frustration. We certainly can't control the weather."

George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston reported more than 500 flights canceled. A ground stop was in effect nearly all morning Monday, meaning all traffic in and out was halted. William P. Hobby Airport, the city's other major airport, canceled about 150 flights.

Just north of the airport, emergency crews were trying to rescue several horses trapped by high waters at a stable. Video images showed the animals struggling to keep their heads above water as people driving by on a nearby road yelled encouragement. The fate of the horses wasn't immediately known.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Title: Santiago in chaos: Millions left without water as flooding strikes Chile capital
Post by: RE on April 19, 2016, 12:29:04 AM
Texas is not alone with Floods today!  Speedy Gonzalo Lira is also getting deluged in Chile.  Hope he has some bottled water in his preps.

RE

Title: Texas Lightning Storm for the Record Books
Post by: RE on April 19, 2016, 04:10:56 AM
The lightning that went with the TX deluge was apparently AMAZING.

According to one local (on Reddit Collapse (https://www.reddit.com/r/collapse/comments/4ffkwo/texas_floodsagain_just_another_500_year_aonmaly/)), the lightning was hitting every .2 seconds for HOURS!!!  :o

Here is a vid shot from space:


RE
Title: At Least 5 Dead and Thousands Left Without Power in Texas
Post by: RE on April 19, 2016, 06:22:06 AM
http://www.people.com/article/houston-floods-five-dead-thousands-rescued-severe-weather (http://www.people.com/article/houston-floods-five-dead-thousands-rescued-severe-weather)

At Least 5 Dead and Thousands Left Without Power as Texas Is Hit with Severe Flooding in the Biggest Storm Since 2001

Houston Floods: 5 Dead, Thousands Rescued in Severe Weather

(http://img2.timeinc.net/people/i/2016/news/160502/houston-floods-1024.jpg)
People evacuate a flooded Houston apartment complex on Monday
Melissa Phillip/Houston Chronicle via AP

By Andrea Park @scandreapark

04/19/2016 AT 08:50 AM EDT
At least five people have died from weather-related causes since Houston began experiencing major flooding late Sunday night, according to the Associated Press.

Traffic cameras showed two of the victims driving around barricades in an unsuccessful effort to drive through a flooded underpass, Harris County Judge and chief administrator Ed Emmett said in an afternoon press conference, the AP reports.

Another person was found in a submerged vehicle near one of Houston's airports, while a truck driver was found dead in his truck on a flooded service road. A fifth victim, a 56-year-old man, was found dead in a car filled with water in Waller County, a local judge told CNN.

According to Harris County Emergency Management, crews were dispatched to perform around 1,200 high-water rescues as of Monday afternoon, CNN reports.

Keep up with your favorite celebs in the pages of PEOPLE Magazine by subscribing now.


"There's flooding in every part of Houston," Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said. "We will rescue you."

The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch through Wednesday morning.

"Avoid travel in and around flooded areas," the warning reads. "Most people who die in flash flooding will die in their vehicles. If in a flooded area stay where you are ... at home or at work. Never drive into a flooded roadway. Turn around don't drown!"

Emmett told CNN he estimated 240 billion gallons of rain had fallen on the Houston area as of Monday afternoon, and called this the most significant flood event since Tropical Storm Allison left 41 people dead and caused more than $5 billion in property damage in 2001.

At Least 5 Dead and Thousands Left Without Power as Texas Is Hit with Severe Flooding in the Biggest Storm Since 2001| Natural Disasters, Real People Stories

Melissa Phillip / Houston Chronicle via AP


Besides the fatalities and rescue efforts, the intense flooding has also caused major flight delays and property destruction.

Bush Intercontinental Airport experienced approximately 650 flight cancellations and over 1,100 delays, NBC News reports, and Emmett signed an emergency declaration for Harris County, saying that more than 1,000 homes had already been flooded.

According to NBC News, all city buildings and the Houston Independent School District were closed Monday, and the rest of the city was encouraged to stay home from work and school.

"This is a dangerous situation and I do not want our employees trying to get to work," Turner said. "Do not go out until conditions improve."

Turner told NBC News that 43,000 people in the Houston area had lost power and the situation could get worse as the rains were projected to continue into Tuesday and possibly Wednesday.

"This is an unprecedented amount of rain," he said. "It's been stubborn and it's not moving anytime fast."
Title: This week’s deadly flooding in Houston is just the beginning
Post by: RE on April 21, 2016, 01:15:21 AM
Break out the Ark in Houston.

RE

http://grist.org/news/this-weeks-deadly-flooding-in-houston-is-just-the-beginning/ (http://grist.org/news/this-weeks-deadly-flooding-in-houston-is-just-the-beginning/)

This week’s deadly flooding in Houston is just the beginning
By Xian Chiang-Waren on Apr 19, 2016

(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2016/04/rtr4y6nt.jpg?w=970&h=545&crop=1)

Houston is in the throes of a flood that is, according to recent headlines, “historic,” “deadly,” and “unprecedented.”

None of that is hyperbole. As of Tuesday, the floods had killed at least six people, destroyed miles of homes and highways, and displaced hundreds of residents. More than 17 inches of rain had fallen in Texas’ Harris County since the previous morning, according to ABC News. And it wasn’t over yet: The National Weather Service issued flood warnings into late Tuesday night. (Meanwhile, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner helpfully commented that there was “nothing you can do” in the face of “a lot of rain coming in a very short period of time.”)

Flooding has become an annual hazard in the city, which sits at just 43 feet above sea level. Unfortunately, it’s very likely that the situation will only worsen.

For starters, when floodwaters begin to recede, they bring their own set of hazards and dangers. A spokesperson for the American Red Cross noted the extreme toxicity of floodwater, reports ABC News, which constitutes a sludge of debris from cars, houses, and infrastructure — not to mention overflow from contaminated waterways like Texas’ Blanco River. The rising waters also disrupted wildlife — officials warned that aggressive snakes washing up on people’s properties were a risk factor. During cleanup, Houstonians will be exposed to a Pandora’s Box of mold and airborne toxins that could aggravate asthma or respiratory illness.

Plus, Houston is woefully underprepared for natural disasters, as an investigation by ProPublica and Texas Monthly revealed in March. The investigation, which relied on predictive meteorological models, found that the near-miss of Hurricane Ike in 2008 was a relative blessing for the city that no one should bank on occurring again. According to scientists interviewed for the project, the odds of Houston’s “perfect storm” happening in a given year exceed that of being killed in a car crash or by a firearm in the United States — both of which are fairly common occurrences.

Houston is the fourth-largest American city and a major industrial hub that contains the country’s largest refining and petrochemical complex, NASA’s Johnson Space Center, the Houston Ship Channel, and multiple rapidly expanding residential areas, according to ProPublica and Texas Monthly. If the storm hits at the wrong spot, all of those place would be at risk of being underwater or severely damaged by flooding. That’s a scenario that would halt supply chains all over the country and wreak havoc on the American economy.

But experts told media outlets this week that there was no way that Houston could prepare in time. “Could we have engineered our way out of this?” said Rice University engineer Philip Bedient, quoted in the Guardian. “Only if we started talking about alterations 35 or 40 years ago.”

Bedient went on to say that the best that Houston could hope for for was a good warning system. NASA might want to get on that — if only certain presidential candidates wouldn’t get in its way.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on April 21, 2016, 07:24:33 AM
The sun came out yesterday afternoon, but it's raining again this morning. Still, the rainfall on the stead, which is to the west of the "dry line" formed by the Balcones Escarpment and coincident on maps with the I 35 corridor, has been less than what's come down in Austin. The creek has been just barely over the low water bridge, on Tuesday, and is now back to normal.

Right now the stead is the most beautiful it's been in  a number of years. But I can't help but remember that El Nino years are almost always followed by a dry year. But the Trinity Aquifer is relatively full compared to the Edwards to the south, and our well is a good one. There is no immediate risk for us, and I'm glad of that.

But the long term threat to the stead is not too much  rain, but too little.
Title: Time for an Ark in Texas?
Post by: RE on April 30, 2016, 07:33:31 AM
Texas getting whacked again.

RE

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/storm-weary-south-gears-more-rain-hail-tornadoes-n565091 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/storm-weary-south-gears-more-rain-hail-tornadoes-n565091)


News
Apr 30 2016, 9:37 am ET
Overnight Flooding Kills Five People in Texas


by Erin Calabrese, Elizabeth Chuck and Elisha Fieldstadt
[Large Hail, Dangerous Floods Hit the South]
Large Hail, Dangerous Floods Hit the South 1:45

A grandmother and her four grandchildren were killed amid heavy flooding in the east Texas town of Palestine, police said.

The grandmother was 64 and the children were ages 6, 7, 8 and 9, according to Palestine Police Chief James Muniz.

"The water just came up extremely fast," he told NBC News. "Before they knew it, water was waist high, then chest high, and then it was roof line."

The names of the victims, who were discovered at about 3:45 a.m., were not immediately released. Palestine police said an additional six to eight families on the same block had been displaced by the fast-moving floodwaters.

Sometime after midnight, police received word that the grandmother and her grandkids were missing, Muniz aid.

"We started to get overwhelmed with calls," he said. "We had fire and other city workers out looking for them and once the water receded, we found them."

The children lived with their grandmother and were the only people in the home when the waters began to rise.

Other residents on the block attempted to salvage belongings from their inundated homes.

"All the residences are empty right now. The people are going to go back in a see if they can salvage anything," Muniz said.

The overnight flooding was part of dangerous storms that tore through parts of the Plains and South on Friday and early Saturday, knocking out power and prompting disaster declarations in at least two Texas communities.

A record amount of rain fell on Little Rock, Arkansas, overnight, with the same system expected to drop up to 5 inches in parts of Louisiana and Texas, according to Weather.com. A new round of heavy rain was forecast for the storm-weary South that could linger for two days.

Parts of northeast Texas, southwest Oklahoma, northeast Louisiana and southwest Arkansas remained under flash flood warnings early on Saturday, according to the National Weather Service.

Officials issued a disaster declaration in Texas' Lindale and Smith County — which are between 80 and 100 miles east of Dallas — late Friday due to the dangerous weather. Lindale's fire department reported three minor injures in the town.

Near Dorchester, Texas, a funnel cloud that was called a tornado was spotted Friday afternoon and residents potentially in the path in the nearby town of Sherman were told to take shelter. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.

Hail the size of quarters and golf balls was reported in Tarrant County where Fort Worth is located, according to the National Weather Service, and street flooding of 3 to 4 inches was reported in Hopkins County.

And severe weather and thunderstorms caused delays at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, with arriving flights held up an average of 2 hours and 45 minutes Friday, the Federal Aviation Administration said.
A destroyed home is seen in Fletcher, Oklahoma, Friday, April 29, 2016, after severe weather hit parts of the state. A teenager was taken to the hospital for anxiety but there were no other injuries, officials said. KFOR

There were no injuries reported after two homes — a mobile home in Ninnekah, Oklahoma, and a trailer house in Fletcher — were destroyed, emergency management officials said.

In Ninnekah, the homeowner and his family took shelter at a nearby school and no one was hurt, NBC affiliate KFOR reported. "That's what's important, is all my family members are safe," the homeowner told the station.

In Alabama, power was knocked out to 25,000 customers, with most of the outages in the Birmingham area, Alabama Power said. The National Weather Service warned of a severe thunderstorm in the Birmingham area with 40 mph winds Friday evening.

April has brought a consistent spate of storms to the South and the Plains, and many areas are grappling with clean-up from recent floods, along with swollen rivers and saturated ground. The heavy rain, expected to linger over the South until at least Sunday, will likely trigger flash flooding in areas that have already dealt with widespread flooding damage, according to Weather.com.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on April 30, 2016, 08:02:05 AM
It rained at my house again last night. Beautiful clear day this morning. At the stead, it's just a nice wet spring. Out west of the dry line, we pray for Houston to be washed away, because it takes that kind of weather pattern occasionally  just to keep our trees alive. It's all a matter of perspective.

 I just think of Houston and Dallas as Sodom and Gomorrah, and I feel better.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on April 30, 2016, 08:10:03 AM
It rained at my house again last night. Beautiful clear day this morning. At the stead, it's just a nice wet spring. Out west of the dry line, we pray for Houston to be washed away, because it takes that kind of weather pattern occasionally  just to keep our trees alive. It's all a matter of perspective.

 I just think of Houston and Dallas as Sodom and Gomorrah, and I feel better.

How are the local lakes doing?  Refilling at all?

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on April 30, 2016, 08:16:25 AM
Last I checked, only the most upstream lake was not completely full. That was several days ago. It's probably full now.
Title: The Rain in Sri Lanka falls Mainly on EVERYBODY
Post by: RE on May 18, 2016, 02:32:06 AM
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/sri-lanka-floods-landslides-hundreds-families-feared-buried-mud/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/sri-lanka-floods-landslides-hundreds-families-feared-buried-mud/)

200 families feared buried by flood-triggered landslides

(http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/11/11/sri.lanka.floods/t1larg.sri.lanka.afp.gi.jpg)

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka -- Torrential rains have sent landslides cascading over three villages in Sri Lanka, and at least 200 families were feared buried under the mud Wednesday, the Sri Lankan Red Cross said.

Sixteen bodies have already been recovered and about 180 people have been rescued from the enormous piles of mud and debris unleashed at around 5 p.m. Tuesday, according to military spokesman Brig. Jayanath Jayaweera.

More than 300 soldiers have been deployed to search for survivors in the villages of Siripura, Pallebage and Elagipitya in Kegalle District, about 45 miles north of Colombo, the capital, Jayaweera said. Heavy fog and electricity outages, as well as the instability of the ground, were complicating rescue efforts.

At least 200 families were reported missing on Wednesday, the Sri Lankan Red Cross said in a statement. Officials said the situation was unclear.
A Sri Lankan woman wades through floodwaters inside her home in Kelaniya suburb of the capital Colombo

A Sri Lankan woman wades through floodwaters inside her home in Kelaniya suburb of the capital Colombo, May 18, 2016.
Getty

State broadcaster Rupavahini showed images of huge mounds of earth covering houses, while muddy torrents of water gushed from hilltops above. Villagers said 66 houses had been buried or damaged, according to local journalist Saman Bandara.

Some 1,141 people who escaped the disaster were sheltering and being treated for minor injuries at a nearby school and a Buddhist temple, according to government official Mahendra Jagath.

The same rains that unleashed the mudslides have also caused severe flooding in cities including Colombo. The country's disaster management center had reported 11 deaths from electrocution and smaller landslides elsewhere in the island nation in the past few days.

The Meteorological Department has forecast more rain and rough seas for much of the country.

Schools in many parts of the country were closed Wednesday due to the bad weather. Many schools are being used to provide shelter for the affected people.
© 2016 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Title: MOAR Texas Flooding
Post by: RE on May 27, 2016, 02:21:54 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/05/27/at-least-1-dead-3-missing-in-texas-flooding.html (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/05/27/at-least-1-dead-3-missing-in-texas-flooding.html)

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/news/plains-deadly-severe-weather-outbreak-flooding-tornado (https://weather.com/storms/tornado/news/plains-deadly-severe-weather-outbreak-flooding-tornado)

Floods
At least 1 dead, 3 missing in Texas flooding
Published May 27, 2016 Associated Press
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At least one person has died in Texas and three are missing after torrential rain caused floods that closed roads and schools, prompted evacuations, damaged homes and forced dozens of students to spend the night on campus, officials said Friday as they braced for more rains later in the day.

"It's not going to take very much rain to get us in those flood stages again," said Washington County Judge John Brieden.

Brieden said that in Washington County, located between Austin and Houston, one person has drowned and another person was missing after their vehicle was swept away. An Austin-area official has said two people were missing from a vehicle there.

Brieden, who didn't release details on the circumstances of the drowning, said they had not yet determined if a second person who died in Washington County had died from drowning or a heart attack.

Mobile homes washed away in the flooding and multiple houses had water inside, he said. Brieden said there have been more than 50 water rescues from houses and vehicles since the rains started Thursday morning. He said that at one point officials had nine boat teams out rescuing people.

"We had one guy that got out of his vehicle and managed to hang on to a tree while the vehicle washed away," Brieden said, adding the man was in the tree for a couple of hours before being rescued by a boat crew.

He said some people in homes had to evacuate through windows to be rescued.

The county seat, Brenham, received 16.62 inches of rain on Thursday, breaking the city's daily rainfall record, said National Weather Service meteorologist Wendy Long.

"What we got was more and more rain, harder and harder rain," said Brieden,

He said about 40 children spent the night at a Brenham elementary school after buses were unable to get them home. He said that in some areas buses couldn't get down flooded roads. A couple of buses had to be rescued as one broke down and another that was trapped when waters rose nearby.

Bastrop County Judge Paul Pape said Friday that about 100 homes in the county near Austin were damaged and there could be more. He says more than 100 county roads are barricaded and some roads had washed out. He said about 50 homes were evacuated overnight.

In the Austin area, rescues included five people who were lifted from the roof of a home by a helicopter.

Lisa Block, an emergency services spokeswoman in Travis County, which includes Austin, said up to 9 inches of rain fell in parts of the county overnight. Residents in one neighborhood were asked to evacuate their homes, while those in another were advised to shelter in place, she said.

In Travis County, nine people were rescued by helicopter from homes and vehicles. Block said they included four adults and a child who climbed onto the roof of their Austin-area home as the floodwaters rose and were hoisted to safety.

She said that they began searching for two missing people after a caller reported seeing a person surrounded by floodwaters who was hanging onto a pole and believed that there was also a person in a nearby pickup.
Title: Hot as Hell in India
Post by: RE on May 27, 2016, 02:59:38 PM
This is a good test to see how many people can survive and for how long with extreme temperatures.

RE

http://m.nzherald.co.nz/environment/news/article.cfm?c_id=39&objectid=11645079&ref=rss (http://m.nzherald.co.nz/environment/news/article.cfm?c_id=39&objectid=11645079&ref=rss)

The 51C heatwave that's melting India

Save
 

By Gavin Fernando

A severe heatwave has set off new records in India, so much so that the roads beneath pedestrians are literally melting like wet cement.

Literally.

In the footage above, pedestrians' footwear can be seen actually sinking into the tarmac as they walk due to how hot it is.

For farmers in particular, the effects have been widespread and devastating, worsening poverty and even prompting suicide.

The Indian government has estimated that as much as 25 per cent of the country - 330 million Indians - could be affected by the shortages.

Temperatures in the northern desert province of Rajasthan have soared to 51C, the highest in the country's recorded history, and the third-highest temperature ever documented on Earth.

 

Temperatures across much of northern India have exceeded 40C for weeks. With much of the country densely-populated, this only makes the problem worse.

Murari Lal Thanvi, a man from Phalodi, in Rajasthan, told the BBC the weather alone was hot enough to render his mobile phone unusable.

 

An Indian farmer sits in the front of his destroyed crop of cotton, alongside a road in one of the drought affected region of Marathwada. Photo / APAn Indian farmer sits in the front of his destroyed crop of cotton, alongside a road in one of the drought affected region of Marathwada. Photo / AP

"Even my mobile phone gave up and stopped working when I was trying to take pictures today," he said.

"I was able to switch my mobile phone on after putting a wet cloth on it for about 20-25 minutes."

But this has now gone beyond minor inconveniences and a bit of physical discomfort. The impact of the heat has been devastating, and increasingly fatal, particularly for the hundreds of people dying of starvation due to withering crops in their remote fields.

Tens of thousands of farmers have had no other option but to abandon their land and move into the cities.

Meanwhile, suicide among farmers is on the rise thanks to the extreme environmental conditions. According to the Indian Express, 36 farmers in the drought-ridden region of Marathwada have committed suicide this past week alone.

They reported that over the past four and a half months, the total figure of suicides has been put at 454. Officials said the collective total in the past 16 months has reached 1548.

Officials told the Press Times of India that there is a mere one per cent of water left in the region's dams.

Continued below.

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Love in the time of climate change: More grizzlies, polar bears mating

Watch: 51C heatwave melting roads in India

 

Municipal workers and a roadside snack vendor rest under the shade of a tree on a hot afternoon in New Delhi. Much of India is reeling under heat wave. Photo / APMunicipal workers and a roadside snack vendor rest under the shade of a tree on a hot afternoon in New Delhi. Much of India is reeling under heat wave. Photo / AP

Extreme weather conditions obviously present huge problems for farmers. In this case, withered crops are forcing tens of thousands of them to abandon their land and homes to move to the urban cities.

Extreme droughts, unseasonal rains and poor yields have left them with crippling debt and even greater poverty. For some, it would seem death is the only option.

In other shocking reports, financially-crippled women are forced into prostitution to support their families.

Rama Devi, a now-single mother of three from Kadiri, Anantapur, told News 18 her lack of income as a farm labourer had forced her to take up sex work.

Her husband deserted the whole family when the incessant environmental conditions financially destroyed the family.

"There had been no rain for years, and no work," Ms Devi told News 18. "My friend said how long will you live without work. He said he has a job that can ensure a good future for my children. So I took up the job of a sex worker. I had no other option. Many times clients would beat me, force me to drink alcohol and travel to different cities along with them. But I have to tolerate everything."

She said she loathed her job in the sex trade. She is stigmatised by her community, and her children - who also bear the brunt of discrimination - resent her for it.

In his latest broadcast on the monthly radio program Mann Ki Baat, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has addressed the country's heatwave and droughts.

 

Children jump into a water canal to cool themselves on a hot summer day in Jammu. Photo / APChildren jump into a water canal to cool themselves on a hot summer day in Jammu. Photo / AP

He called on the nation to conserve water amid the harsh drought conditions, stressing the importance of long-term planning and protecting the environment.

"I appeal to all citizens to pledge to not waste water in June, July, August or September," he said, referring to the months where the conditions are expected to ease.

He said in many states, people have started using "sprinkler technology" to successfully improve their agriculture, stressing that "perfect planning" and "proper technology" can yield good results.

 

Six months ago, at a high-stakes United Nations conference in Paris, Mr Modi blamed richer nations around the world for the country's suffering, saying India was suffering the effects of climate change without having necessarily caused it themselves.

"Climate change is a major global challenge. But it is not of our making. It is the result of global warming that came from prosperity and progress of an industrial age powered by fossil fuel," he said.

He criticised affluent nations, saying "those with luxury of choices" had an obligation to help reduce emissions.

"We in India face consequences. We see the risk to our farmers. We are concerned about rising oceans that threaten our 7500km of coastline and 1300 islands. We worry about the glaciers that feed our rivers and nurture our civilisation."

Title: Singing in the Rain in Paris
Post by: RE on June 01, 2016, 08:54:03 PM
On the upside, the strikers don't have to blockade the oil refineries.

http://www.youtube.com/v/w40ushYAaYA

RE

http://www.euronews.com/2016/05/31/france-sees-worst-flooding-since-records-began/ (http://www.euronews.com/2016/05/31/france-sees-worst-flooding-since-records-began/)

News
France sees worst flooding since records began

31/05 18:23 CET

(http://api.ning.com/files/n7ZUxQJY0Yu1I0Roch8Sxncd-NN0l7UAS8FFHFn*G1EJRdbgci4Muu1ggDI4HCNpUn9ji7OhOiukFqT1XIFyKDLHYvvTH5BE/650x366_02101110_ap331723793572.jpg)
Scenes in parts of France looked like something straight out of a Jules Verne novel, with cars and houses under water after a deluge of rain.

Parts of Central and Northern France have been drenched by the downpour with water levels rising to over one and a half metres in some areas, in what is reported as the most rainfall for this time of year since records began.
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A total of seven departments across the country had issued severe weather warnings, with the Loiret, one of the worst affected areas, being placed under red alert, an extremely rare event.

Firefighters and rescue services were only able to make patrols by boat, looking out for those stranded by the muddy water.

In other parts of the country, traffic was disrupted, coming to a complete standstill in some areas and large stretches of motorway have been closed in others.



The capital, Paris, saw the River Seine rise by almost three and a half metres – its highest since 2001 – forcing the closure of some of its banks in the eastern part of the city.

In Bruay-la-Buisserie, over 70 mm of rain was registered, with only a makeshift dam to protect the homes of the town’s 23,000 residents.
Title: Krauts Join the Flood Parade!
Post by: RE on June 04, 2016, 10:37:39 PM
Now this is some SERIOUS flooding!

http://www.youtube.com/v/E-s_LkEeYyM

RE
Title: Re: Krauts Join the Flood Parade!
Post by: Surly1 on June 05, 2016, 06:08:39 AM
Now this is some SERIOUS flooding!

http://www.youtube.com/v/E-s_LkEeYyM

RE

The Dying Earth - extreme weather round the globe

Four times more than the average rainfall for the whole month of June falls in one morning in the Brisbane  area. (http://robinwestenra.blogspot.co.nz/2016/06/the-dying-earth-extreme-weather-round.html)

Flooding has inundated cars and affected more than 30 roads, including the Bruce Highway, in Queensland's south-east as an extreme weather system intensifies and moves south through the state.

The Bruce Highway has since reopened but many roads remain closed across Brisbane, the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast.
The Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) said a dangerous trough had "largely cleared" the Brisbane region by midday and moved to the Gold Coast, where it had the potential to dump heavy rain until around 3:00pm.
BoM said 267 millimetres of rain had fallen at upper Springbrook and Mount Tamborine in the Gold Coast hinterland since Friday morning which is four times above the average rainfall for the whole month of June.


The State Emergency Service (SES) has been swamped with more than 750 calls for help from across the south east, mainly with minor flood damage and leaky roofs.


(read the rest at the link)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Surly1 on June 16, 2016, 02:32:51 PM
Anyone heard or read about this? Stay tuned to see if it in fact comes to pass.

Monster African Thunderstorm Hurls Enormous Haboob at Europe, 100 + Degree (F) Heat to Follow (https://robertscribbler.com/2016/06/15/monster-african-thunderstorm-hurls-enormous-haboob-at-europe-100-degree-f-heat-to-follow/)

An expansion of the Sahara Desert northward into Europe. A scenario that has long been a concern raised by scientists modeling potential extreme weather and climate scenarios related to human-caused climate change. And this week, it appears that Southern and Eastern Europe are going to get a taste of Sahara Desert-type weather conditions. It’s just unfolding a bit more dramatically than scientists at first anticipated.

Haboob the Size of England Ireland and Scotland Combined

(Monster thunderstorm explodes over Northwestern Africa last night, hurling a huge dust storm or Haboob northward toward Europe. Image source: The Met Office.)

Last night, a massive thunderstorm large enough to cover the England, Scotland and Ireland combined blew up over western Africa. The storm, larger than most hurricanes, drew in strong, hot winds from North Africa and the Sahara Desert. These winds bore upon them a great load of dust. Dust which the strong outflow of the storm then turned northward along a frontal boundary draped across the Mediterranean toward Europe.

As of early today, a large mass of dust with a front spanning approximately 600 miles covered sections of Mali, Algeria and Niger even as strong, hot southerly winds gathered to propel it northward. Over the next three days, this dust storm, or Haboob, is expected to rage across North Africa’s Algeria and Tunesia, leap the Mediterranean, roar across Central Italy, and vent its fury on the Balkan states and Poland before finally terminating in the Ukraine.

Dust Storm Forecast

(Large dust storm is now forecast to cross from North Africa and into Southeastern Europe. A high amplitude Jet Stream wave pattern and related strong ridge formation is providing the atmospheric slot that is propelling the dust further north than is typical. Image source:Barcelona Dust Forecast Center.)

From its origin over Northwest Africa, to its termination over the Ukraine, this anomalous dust storm is predicted to travel more than 2,500 miles. The storm will be borne by hot southerly winds. Saharan winds, some could say. And those winds will bring with them not only the choking dusts of North Africa, but also a taste of its heat.

In Sofia, Bulgaria, temperatures are expected to hit 95 (F) degrees over the next few days. In Bucharest, Romania, the mercury is expected to top 96 by Saturday. Sections of central Bulgaria are likely to see readings as high as 104 (F) by Saturday. Athens, Greece may reach 102 F temperatures on Saturday and 100 degree (F) temperatures Sunday. Further up the Balkan Peninsula, Larissa’s forecast is for 107 degree F temperatures by Saturday. All are readings in ranges about 15-20 degree Fahrenheit above average for this European region during this time of year. Record to near record hot temperatures that have more in common with typical North African climates than those usually associated with Southern Europe.

Southeastern European Heatwave

(Dust storms will travel north along a frontal boundary associated with a high amplitude wave in the Jet Stream over the next three days. To the east, sections of Southern and Eastern Europe are expected to experience record or near record heat. Image source: Pivotal Weather. Note, forecast above is in degrees Celsius for Saturday, June 18.)

Very large thunderstorms do tend to fire now and then over Africa. But the typical range is more to the south along a band that feeds into the North Atlantic Inter-tropical Convergence Zone. Over the past day, a big dip in the Jet Stream has run down from Western Europe and into North Africa. This dip created atmospheric instability that fueled the development of the massive thunderstorm and generated the strong southerly winds that are now propelling the resulting Haboob toward Europe.

As has been typical with climate change related high amplitude Jet Stream waves during recent years, the deep trough over Western Europe is encouraging a strong dipole associated ridge to form over Eastern Europe. And it is into this ridge that both the Haboob and the record heat are now rushing.

Africa-originating Haboobs and 95 to 107 degree heat blanketing large sections of Southern and Eastern Europe are not at all typical weather for mid to late June. But weather extremes associated with human-caused climate change will tend to make these kinds of North African hot air and dust storm invasions more and more likely as time progresses.

Links:

The Met Office

Barcelona Dust Forecast Center

Pivotal Weather

Tyler B Roys (Meteorologist)

Title: Severe Winds Drive Bush, Clinton, Blair From Arkansas Ceremony
Post by: RE on July 14, 2016, 06:48:29 PM
Too bad they weren't whisked off to Oz.  :(

http://www.youtube.com/v/RQWSh7Db-_E

RE

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/severe-oklahoma-winds-topple-semi-truck-knock-out-power-tens-n609596 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/severe-oklahoma-winds-topple-semi-truck-knock-out-power-tens-n609596)


Severe Winds Drive Bush, Clinton, Blair From Arkansas Ceremony

by Alex Johnson

Former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair were hustled away from an Arkansas high school graduation ceremony Thursday after severe winds began breaking windows.

A strong storm system sent powerful winds sweeping through Arkansas and Oklahoma, downing trees, toppling a semi-truck on the highway and leaving almost 200,000 customers without power.
IMAGE: Bush, Clinton and Blair in Arkansas
Former Presidents Bill Clinton, second from left, George W. Bush, right, and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, second from right, on stage at a graduation ceremony Thursday for the Presidential Leadership Scholars graduation Central High School in Little Rock, Ark. AP

It wasn't known where Bush, Clinton and Blair were taken as sirens started sounding at a graduation ceremony at Central High School in Little Rock for the Presidential Leadership Scholars.

The program is an elite educational course organized by the presidential libraries of Bush, Clinton and former Presidents George H.W. Bush and Lyndon Johnson.

NBC station KARK of Little Rock reported that none of the three former world leaders was injured. Everyone else was ushered into the high school's basement.

The storm system soaked some areas of Oklahoma with as much as 2 inches of rain in six hours Thursday morning and afternoon. Scattered flash floods were reported, including one that half-submerged a U.S. Postal Service truck.

But the system's winds were the biggest problem. Sustained winds above 50 mph were recorded in many parts of both states, with gusts above 70 mph — approaching hurricane force — in a few spots.

The National Weather Service reported that the roof of a building was blown off near Mazie, Oklahoma, in Mayes County, where some mobile homes were also reported to have been overturned.
IMAGE: Little Rock graduation ceremony disrupted
Attendees at a graduation ceremony for the Presidential Leadership Scholars graduation huddle in the basement of Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., after a severe storm began breaking windows Thursday. Jake Whitman / NBC News

A tractor-trailer rig was blown over on a part of Interstate 44 near Tulsa called the Turner Turnpike about 12:30 p.m., the Oklahoma Highway Patrol said. No one was injured, but traffic was blocked for a time, it said. Reports that another semi was toppled in Muskogee County couldn't immediately be confirmed.

Almost 130,000 customers were without power Thursday night in Oklahoma, in addition to more than 63,000 in Arkansas, electric utilities reported.

The National Weather Service said significant wind damage was possible as the system moves toward the mid-Atlantic. Major cities in the risk area include Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Fayetteville, Ark.

"We're still kind of rocking and rolling across Arkansas [and] Tennessee into Alabama into the evening," said Kait Parker, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel.
Title: "Worse than Katrina"
Post by: RE on August 16, 2016, 11:46:58 PM
I suggest the building codes in LA require mandatory Houseboats.

RE

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-louisiana-flooding-20160816-snap-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-louisiana-flooding-20160816-snap-story.html)

'Like nothing we've ever seen': Flood danger is not over in Louisiana

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-57b3ed27/turbine/la-1471409513-snap-photo/750/750x422)
Cattle are driven through a flooded road as they are herded to trucks to be brought to dry land in Sorrento, La. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images) Jenny Jarvie

Slowly, residents began to return to water-ravaged homes in Baton Rouge on Tuesday after heavy rain submerged large stretches of southern Louisiana, killing 11 people, damaging entire neighborhoods and prompting tens of thousands of rescues.

Yet as floodwater flowed downstream, officials warned that the danger was far from over. Communities to the south — still in rescue mode — urged residents to stay in their homes or evacuate.

The devastation was severe. In Livingston Parish, just east of Baton Rouge, officials estimated that as many as 75% of the area’s 52,000 homes had been damaged by floodwaters. Southeast, in Ascension Parish, water had seeped into one of every three homes.

“We’ve been through Hurricane Gustav, Katrina, Isaac and Rita, but this without a doubt is the roughest we’ve ever had in this parish,” said Livingston Parish Sheriff Jason Ard.
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As many as 20,000 of the parish’s 141,000 residents had to be rescued after the area endured 25 inches of rain in just three days, Ard said. About 5,000 residents were in shelters.

“At least 75 of my deputies no longer have a home,” Ard said. “What do you tell them? It’s heartbreaking to see a man have an emotional moment, wipe his tears away, and then get back on his boat and take off. He knows his people need him.”
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Vietnam veteran bikes 1,550 miles to have names added to Vietnam memorial
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On Tuesday, President Obama expanded the federal disaster declaration for Louisiana to 20 parishes. More than 60,000 people across the state had already registered for federal aid.

“This is a historic flooding event,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said Tuesday. “When you have a storm that is unnamed — it wasn’t a tropical storm, it wasn’t a hurricane — a lot of times people underestimate the impact that it would have.… But this is historic. We are seeing unprecedented flood levels as the waters move south.”

Edwards estimated that more than 40,000 homes had been damaged by the heavy rainfall and floodwater. About 8,000 people were taking refuge in shelters, he said, noting that the number is shifting as residents return home, relocate with family or move into motels.

In many of the worst-hit parishes, emergency teams began to coordinate door-to-door search and rescue operations, checking and marking homes as well as cars that had washed off the roads.

With sporadic looting, dawn-to-dusk curfews, and more than 30,000 homes and businesses without power, it was clear the disaster was not over.

“I want everyone to understand: Nobody has been forgotten,” Edwards said.

Nearly 15,000 homes in Ascension Parish were flooded, said Richard Webre, director of the parish’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness. Residents who lived in low-lying areas near waterways were urged to evacuate Monday night after water breached a 14.5-foot levee along the Amite River.

As the scope of the devastation sunk in, many Louisiana residents took to social media to rail against news outlets for what they believed was their lack of coverage. Why, some wondered, was the displacement of thousands of people less deserving of attention than the Olympics or Donald Trump?

“How the #laflood is not on national news truly amazes me,” Abigail Mawae of Baton Rouge posted on Twitter.

“Why isn’t national media covering the floods in Louisiana?” tweeted Amy Crowe Duhe, a Baton Rouge nursing student. “This is like nothing we’ve ever seen before.”

Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, assured Louisianans his agency was committed to supporting a full recovery across the state — whether or not the natural disaster was commanding front-page national media attention.

“You have the Olympics, you got the election,” he said. “If you look at the national news, you’re probably on the third or fourth page. FEMA understands this is a very large disaster impacting tens of thousands of people. Regardless of what it may be getting in the national coverage, we know there has been a significant impact here in Louisiana.”

The Louisiana flooding is likely the worst natural disaster in the United States since Superstorm Sandy hammered the East Coast in 2012, according to the Red Cross.

Harrowing rescues were posted on social media as emergency teams continued to evacuate residents in East Baton Rouge, Livingston and Ascension parishes. The East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office shared footage taken from a helicopter Monday of rescuers saving a man from waist-high floodwater and two others clinging to a tree.

On Tuesday, floodwater inundated the small town of Sorrento in Ascension Parish, the parish sheriff’s office reported. With several inland waterways unable to drain into their usual channels, Meredith Conger, planning and intelligence officer at Ascension Parish Homeland Security, warned residents living near low-lying areas around Bayou Narcisse, Bayou Francois, New River Canal and Black Bayou that they remained at risk.

“We are not out of danger yet,” Conger said in a video statement. “If you feel threatened and you have the capability of getting out of your homes and to safety — you are encouraged to voluntarily evacuate.”

As of Tuesday evening, local and state officials had reported that 11 people had died as a result of flooding — five in East Baton Rouge Parish, three in Tangipahoa Parish, two in St. Helena Parish and one in Rapides Parish.

Many residents whose homes were damaged by the floods were not covered by national flood insurance, said Rafael Lemaitre, a FEMA public information officer. Just over 20% of Louisiana residences carry flood insurance, and that number is lower in many of the parishes most afflicted by the rainstorms.

Jarvie is a special correspondent.
Title: 'What am I going to do?' Louisiana flooding leaves thousands looking for housing
Post by: RE on August 19, 2016, 03:51:26 PM
Watch.  They'll borrow and spend $20 on cleanup, then next year it happens all over again.

RE

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-louisiana-shelter-20160819-snap-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-louisiana-shelter-20160819-snap-story.html)

 'What am I going to do?' Louisiana flooding leaves thousands looking for housing as losses hit $20.7 billion

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-57b763f9/turbine/la-1471636544-snap-photo/750/750x422)
Sandra Montanaro holds her dog Dixy at an animal shelter set up at the Lamar Dixon Expo Center in Gonzalez, La. The center also houses humans forced to evacuate by this week's flood. (Brendan Smialowski / AFP/Getty Images)

Molly Hennessy-Fiske

After her apartment in this small industrial riverfront town flooded, Mary Green-King ended up with hundreds of other evacuees at a shelter.

Just when it seemed things couldn’t get any worse — she also lost her car and had spent five nights at the shelter — her cellphone rang. It was her landlord of three years.

“I have 48 hours to get my stuff out,” Green-King lamented as she lay on her cot under an American Red Cross logo blanket Thursday. “All they said is, ‘You have 48 hours,’ with no compassion, no love.”

On Friday, an economic development group put flood losses at $20.7 billion. More than 110,000 homes have been damaged.
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A boat motors down a flooded street in Hammond, La. Floodwaters have inundated thousands of homes in the state.
A boat motors down a flooded street in Hammond, La. Floodwaters have inundated thousands of homes in the state. (Max Becherer / Associated Press)

It’s been nearly a week since storms flooded Baton Rouge and surrounding central Louisiana parishes, killing 13 and displacing thousands in what the Red Cross is calling the worst natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy in 2012. So far, 9,000 claims have been filed for flood insurance, and 86,560 individual assistance claims have been made with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. But the assistance process has barely started, and there’s no clear plan for housing the roughly 4,000 residents who remain at 44 shelters statewide.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson and FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate toured the region this week and promised aid.

“The federal government is here. We have been here; we will be here as long as it takes to help this community recover,” Johnson said Thursday, stopping by the Ascension Parish shelter at the Lamar Dixon Expo Center.

Green-King was among 475 evacuees at the shelter here in the town of Gonzalez. She moved to Louisiana years ago from San Francisco, where she worked as a property manager. The retiree can’t understand how her landlord at Gonzalez Gardens can throw her out so quickly in the midst of what’s being called the Great Flood of 2016.

“I don’t have transportation,” said Green-King, 67. “I don’t have nothing in place.”

Beside her, Sharon Bell was passing the time assembling a jigsaw puzzle with a big hole in the middle. Bell, 56, moved to Baton Rouge a decade ago from New Orleans after losing everything in Hurricane Katrina. A local family sponsored Bell, paying her first month’s rent. She paid them back, earned her associate’s, undergraduate and business school degrees, started a taxi company and settled in the suburb of Denham Springs.

That turned out to be one of the hardest-hit areas in the Great Flood.
In a flooded Louisiana parish, a 3-mile journey down the river to answer the question: Did our house survive?
In a flooded Louisiana parish, a 3-mile journey down the river to answer the question: Did our house survive?

Bell’s home was destroyed. She didn’t have flood insurance. She’s seen FEMA officials at the shelter and heard they have promised to provide better temporary housing than they did after Katrina, when new trailers laced with formaldehyde were blamed for injuries and deaths.

“They said they’re bringing in used trailers, not like they did last time,” Bell said. “But I’m asking what are we supposed to do in the meantime? I’m a working individual.”

She worries their safe haven won’t last long, even though “the governor came through the other day and told us they aren’t going to kick us out.”

Beside her, Green-King hailed a passing American Red Cross volunteer and asked, “Are they going to put us out on the street, young man?”

Volunteer Chris Kibodeaux wasn’t sure. He’d lost his home, too, and was staying in a camper with his 13-year-old son.

Green-King, wearing an aqua T-shirt that read “Bonafide Southern,” sighed. She thought of all that she’d lost: china, jewelry, clothing, her laptop left on the floor.

“What am I going to do?”
More than 700 flood victims remain at a shelter in Ascension Parish outside Baton Rouge, La.
More than 700 flood victims remain at a shelter in Ascension Parish outside Baton Rouge, La. (Molly Hennessy-Fiske / Los Angeles Times)

Green-King has renter’s insurance, but the insurance company told her it won’t pay because she didn’t have a flood clause. She already had paid this month’s $675 rent. She doesn’t have enough to rent a new place.

“I think I need to take a plane back to California,” she said.

Her landlord later sent a text: They plan to demolish the building next week. So Green-King found a friend to drive her over Friday and take stock.

She wasn’t optimistic.

“By this time, it’s all gone,” she said.

In Baton Rouge, one of the largest shelters opened at the Celtic Media Centre, which at one time housed 3,500 people. The shelter was down to 802 by Thursday, but many of those who remained faced unique challenges, officials said. Affordable apartments are scarce, especially for those who lack transportation, need to live near work or their children’s schools.

Some evacuees left the shelter only to return after running out of money for hotels or discovering their homes had sustained more damage than they thought.
Hundreds seek shelter from floods

More than 700 flood victims remained at a shelter in Ascension Parish outside Baton Rouge, La., nearly a week after a storm destroyed thousands of homes. More than 86,000 have filed for individual assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Desiree Honore Thomas, assistant commissioner at the state Division of Administration, has been managing the shelter, making the rounds at four cavernous sound stages where sets for the “Twilight” saga and Tom Cruise’s “Oblivion” have been replaced with FEMA cots, pet carriers and playpens.

The facility and another large shelter at the downtown River Center Arena are a stark contrast to the squalor of the post-Katrina Superdome in New Orleans. There’s a beauty salon run by volunteers, a clinic, pharmacy, veterinarian, showers. In one building, they have allowed evacuees to stay with their dogs and cats. This week, three girls whose classes were postponed because of the flood bent over a pile of rainbow blocks, building a school.

All of the air-conditioned halls look and smell clean, thanks to a crew making regular sweeps, Thomas said. City buses stop outside. So do trucks offering free shaved ice or “snowballs.”

Security is tight. Evacuees are issued bracelets corresponding to their assigned studio, children wear masking-tape name tags and the facility is patrolled by the Louisiana State Police and National Guard.

“It’s evolved into a city within a city,” Thomas said.

She said officials will consolidate shelters as evacuees’ ranks thin but have no plans to close them.

See more of our top stories on Facebook »

Faye Knighten, 52, evacuated to the Celtic Media Centre shelter with her 4-month-old poodle, Marley, after her apartment flooded. She’s disabled, moved from the Bay Area seven years ago, doesn’t have family here and will need help starting over.

“I’m hoping our government comes through for us,” she said.

So does Verna Bourgeois. Since floodwaters surrounded her trailer, the 58-year-old Bourgeois and her husband have been staying with a friend and other evacuees, 14 of them in a three-bedroom house. The couple hope to move into a relative’s vacant home — if it survived the flood. Floodwaters still blocked too many roads for them to check.

Bourgeois went to the Gonzalez shelter to register for assistance. She wasn’t even sure how to get her mail: The post office was still underwater. No one could tell her what to do.

“We’re in limbo,” she said.

molly.hennessy-fiske@latimes.com
Title: The Latest: Forecasters issue hurricane warning in Florida
Post by: RE on September 01, 2016, 12:36:19 AM
Daily Double!  Hawaii AND Florida!

RE

http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/32943979/the-latest-forecasters-issue-hurricane-warning-in-florida (http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/32943979/the-latest-forecasters-issue-hurricane-warning-in-florida)

The Latest: Forecasters issue hurricane warning in Florida
Wednesday, August 31st 2016, 7:32 pm AKDT

(http://apmobile.images.worldnow.com/images/11632311_G.jpg)
(AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy). Giuseppe Manone boards up the windows of a store in Hilo, Hawaii as Hurricane Madeline approached the Big Island on Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Drier air and strong upper atmosphere winds are weakening Hurricane Madeline as it a...

(Matt Stamey /The Gainesville Sun via AP). Florida Gov. Rick Scott, center, talks about Tropical Storm Hermine after a briefing at the Alachua County Emergency Operations Center on Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016 in Gainesville, Fla. At left is sign language ...
(Matt Stamey /The Gainesville Sun via AP). Florida Gov. Rick Scott, center, talks about Tropical Storm Hermine after a briefing at the Alachua County Emergency Operations Center on Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016 in Gainesville, Fla. At left is sign language ...
 
(Octavio Jones/Tampa Bay Times via AP). A fallen tree lies on a house Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016, in Tampa, Fla. Florida Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency for 42 counties ahead of an expected landfall by a tropical system in the Gulf of M...
(Octavio Jones/Tampa Bay Times via AP). A fallen tree lies on a house Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016, in Tampa, Fla. Florida Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency for 42 counties ahead of an expected landfall by a tropical system in the Gulf of M...
 
(Octavio Jones/Tampa Bay Times via AP). Andre Anton is stopped from gathering his family's belongings as the rain continues to pour inside his home that was destroyed by a large oak tree, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016, in Tampa, Fla. Florida Gov. Rick Scott...
(Octavio Jones/Tampa Bay Times via AP). Andre Anton is stopped from gathering his family's belongings as the rain continues to pour inside his home that was destroyed by a large oak tree, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016, in Tampa, Fla. Florida Gov. Rick Scott...
 
(Brendan Fitterer/Tampa Bay Times via AP). Steady rain falls as a line of vehicles wraps around the West Pasco Government Center and surrounding buildings Wednesday morning, Aug. 31, 2016, as people wait in line for sandbags filled and distributed by P...
(Brendan Fitterer/Tampa Bay Times via AP). Steady rain falls as a line of vehicles wraps around the West Pasco Government Center and surrounding buildings Wednesday morning, Aug. 31, 2016, as people wait in line for sandbags filled and distributed by P...

HILO, Hawaii (AP) - The Latest on tropical weather systems threatening Hawaii and the Southeast (all times Hawaii local):

5:15 p.m.

Forecasters have issued a hurricane warning for portions of northwestern Florida.

The National Hurricane Center on Wednesday night set the warning from the Suwanee River west to Mexico Beach as Tropical Storm Hermine (her-MEEN) was continuing to strengthen over the Gulf of Mexico.

Hermine was 315 miles (510 kilometers) west-southwest of Tampa with winds of 60 mph (95 kph). It was expected to continue to strengthen through Thursday and be near the coast by the night.

The center also expanded a tropical storm watch from Georgia into South Carolina.

2:20 p.m.

Forecasters have downgraded Hurricane Madeline to a tropical storm as it veers past Hawaii's Big Island.

The storm was downgraded Wednesday by the National Weather Service as its winds decreased to 70 mph.

Its center isn't expected to make landfall on any Hawaiian island.

Still, the Big Island and Maui County were under tropical storm warnings, with officials saying heavy rains and strong winds were possible.

Meanwhile, Hurricane Lester was hundreds of miles behind Madeline and expected to drop to a tropical storm by Sunday.

1:30 p.m.

Florida's governor has added nine more counties to a state of emergency declaration as Tropical Storm Hermine approaches the Gulf Coast.

Gov. Rick Scott said in a news release Wednesday that Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Holmes, Washington, Manatee, Osceola and Sarasota counties are now covered by his emergency order. That brings the total to 51 counties.

Hermine developed into a tropical storm earlier Wednesday with sustained winds of 45 mph. The National Hurricane Center predicts the storm will come ashore as early as Thursday night along Florida's upper Gulf Coast, possibly as a hurricane.

Scott says the emergency declaration eases access to disaster resources and funding, streamlines decision-making and allows the state to seek federal assistance.

11:50 a.m.

The National Weather Service has downgraded a previously issued hurricane warning for Hawaii's Big Island.

The alert regarding Hurricane Madeline was dropped Wednesday to a tropical storm warning.

There's also a warning for Maui County over the next 24 hours.

Madeline was downgraded to the lowest hurricane level early Wednesday and is expected to weaken even more to a tropical storm as it passes to the south of the Big Island.

The eye of the storm is about 95 miles southeast of Hilo with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Ed Teixeira (tuh-SHEHR'-uh) says surf is building, and the waves outside Hilo Harbor were about 12 feet high,

Meanwhile, Hurricane Lester was about 1,000 miles from Hawaii and expected to drop to a tropical storm by Sunday.

11 a.m.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami says Tropical Storm Hermine (her-MEEN) is gaining strength as it rumbles toward Florida's Gulf Coast.

Forecasters say Hermine's top sustained winds have risen to 45 mph (75 kph) and the storm is now centered about 325 miles (525 kilometers) south-southwest of Apalachicola, Florida.

Forecasters say Hermine could be near hurricane strength by Thursday night as it approaches the Gulf Coast. Authorities say they've extended a hurricane watch and tropical storm warning from the Anclote River northwest of Tampa to Destin in the Florida Panhandle.

A tropical storm warning also continues on the Atlantic seaboard from Marineland, Florida, to the Altamaha Sound in Georgia.

10:40 a.m.

Intermittent, heavy rain has fallen in Hawaii ahead of what could be the first hurricane to hit the island in a quarter-century.

The rain fell overnight and early Wednesday then stopped, leaving just a slight wind.

Residents took precautions to protect themselves and their belonging from Hurricane Madeline.

Hilo resident Olivia Guerrero used tape to reinforce her apartment windows amid uncertainty about the storm.

The National Weather Service said Madeline had weakened but remained on track to hit Hawaii's Big Island early Thursday.

Officials urged residents to expect hurricane conditions and to take steps to protect themselves and their property.

Meanwhile, Hurricane Lester was about 1,000 miles from Hawaii and expected to drop to a tropical storm by Sunday.

!0:45 a.m.

North Carolina's governor is warning residents to closely monitor a tropical storm that could bring severe weather to the coast this weekend after passing through Florida.

Gov. Pat McCrory issued a statement on Wednesday noting that the current forecast path for Tropical Storm Hermine shows it could move along the coast of the Carolinas on Friday and Saturday.

McCrory says it's too soon to predict what impact the storm could have, but he wants people to be cautious.

The governor says that if current forecasts hold, areas along the state's coast could get several inches of rain.

Hermine is currently churning in the Gulf of Mexico west of Florida.

8 a.m.

The National Hurricane Center says Tropical Storm Hermine (her-MEEN) has formed from a system swirling in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Miami-based center says a hurricane hunter plane has determined that a tropical depression strengthened Wednesday into the named storm and Hermine now boasts top sustained winds of 40 mph (65 kph).

It says Hermine is centered about 415 miles (665 kilometers) west-southwest of Tampa, Florida and is drifting at 2 mph (4 kph) toward the north.

The center says the tropical storm should turn more toward the northeast with increasing speed on Thursday and is on a forecast track that would approach the northwest Florida coast about Thursday afternoon.

7:35 a.m.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency for 42 counties ahead of an expected landfall by a tropical system in the Gulf of Mexico.

"By declaring a state of emergency in advance of this storm, we are ensuring that state, regional and local agencies can work together to meet the needs of our communities," Scott said in a statement Wednesday.

Scott says the declaration eases access to disaster resources and funding and allows the state to seek federal assistance.

The storm is currently a tropical depression though the National Weather Service says it is expected to strengthen in coming hours.

The storm is forecast to eventually hit north of the Tampa Bay area, a region already beset by heavy rain and thunderstorms.

7:30 a.m.

The National Park Service says it will close Georgia's Cumberland Island to visitors ahead of a tropical system expected to eventually approach the state's Atlantic coast.

The Park Service said in a news release the island will close Thursday afternoon and won't reopen until Saturday morning. The barrier island is home to roughly 15 miles of federally protected wilderness. The decision comes as the busy Labor Day weekend approaches.

Cumberland Island is reachable only by boat and ferry service will shut down during the closure.

The National Hurricane Center has placed the southern half of Georgia's 100-mile coast under a tropical storm watch. A tropical depression in the Gulf of Mexico is forecast to strengthen and cross northern Florida and southeast Georgia between late Thursday and Friday.

7:25 a.m.

Drier air and strong upper atmosphere winds are weakening Hurricane Madeline as it approaches Hawaii.

Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecaster Tom Evans says the storm no longer has the strong, noticeable eye that was seen Tuesday.

Madeline was 140 miles southeast of the Big Island city of Hilo early Wednesday with maximum sustained winds of 80 mph, slower than Tuesday's 120 mph winds.

The storm is on track to skirt or hit the island's southern edge, an area of ranches, small towns and Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park.

Evans says the area could see hurricane-strength winds of up to 80 mph. He noted that even tropical storm-force winds downed trees and power lines when Tropical Storm Iselle hit two years ago.

He says heavy rains could lead to flooding and large surf could damage coastlines.

6:40 a.m.

A tropical storm watch is in effect for the southern half of Georgia's 100-mile coast and a stretch of north Florida's Atlantic region.

The National Hurricane Center issued the watch Tuesday morning for coastal portions of southeast Georgia and northeast Florida. It means tropical storm conditions are possible within 48 hours from south of Darien, Georgia, to St. Augustine, Florida.

The watch area includes the Georgia cities of Brunswick and St. Marys.

A tropical depression in the Gulf of Mexico is forecast to strengthen to a tropical storm before making landfall Thursday night or Friday morning along the northwest coast of Florida. The storm is expected to cross northern Florida and southeast Georgia on Friday.

The hurricane center says coastal Georgia could get 4 to 7 inches of rain, with up to 10 inches possible in some areas.

6 a.m.

Forecasters say a tropical depression has virtually stalled in the Gulf of Mexico but is expected to strengthen and then begin crawling toward Florida's Gulf coast.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said the depression is located about 415 miles (665 kilometers) west-southwest of Tampa, Florida, with top sustained winds of 35 mph (55 kph).

A hurricane watch is in effect from Florida's Anclote River just northwest of Tampa to Indian Pass in the Florida Panhandle and a tropical storm warning is in effect elsewhere from the Anclote River to the Walton Bay County line. Authorities say a tropical storm watch also has been issued for the Atlantic coast from Marineland, Florida, to Altamaha Sound, Georgia.

Meanwhile, a tropical depression that skirted by North Carolina's Outer Banks overnight is now moving northeastward further out into the Atlantic. The tropical depression could become a tropical storm later Wednesday though no coastal warnings and watches are in effect for it.

4 a.m.

Florida officials urged residents to pay attention to a tropical depression that's expected to head toward the state's Gulf Coast.

Bryan Koon, the director of the state's Division of Emergency Management, said at a news conference Tuesday morning that the storm in the Gulf of Mexico is expected to strengthen.

"Tomorrow night is going to be a significant issue since it is going to pass through North/Central Florida," he said. "By the close of business today I expect this to be named storm and for us to be locked and ready."

While parts of the Gulf Coast near Tampa saw heavy rain Wednesday morning, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said people should be prepared for the worst.

"Our teams state wide and locally are ready. This state knows what to do," Scott said.

3:20 a.m.

An emergency management official says North Carolina's Outer Banks were spared from a tropical weather system that had been moving toward the state for two days.

Dare County Emergency Management Director Drew Pearson writes in an email that the tropical depression resulted in "no impacts" on areas such as Cape Hatteras.

A hotel manager on Ocracoke Island says residents and tourists experienced less than an inch of rain. Byron Miller, manager of The Ocracoke Harbor Inn, said in a telephone interview that "it's just a normal day."

2:45 a.m.

North Carolina's Outer Banks apparently will be spared from a tropical system that has been moving toward the state for days.

The National Weather Service said Wednesday morning that the tropical depression was moving away from the state. Highest winds were still 35 mph. The system was about 75 miles east of Cape Hatteras and was moving to the northeast at 5 mph.

A tropical storm warning for the North Carolina coast was dropped Tuesday night.

Only a few clouds were reported and winds were only about 5 mph on the Outer Banks Wednesday morning.

Forecasters earlier had worried the area could get up to 5 inches of rain as the storm passed near the coast.

This item has been corrected to show system is moving to the northeast at 5 mph, not 35 mph.

1:40 a.m.

Heavy rainfall is expected across much of Florida as a tropical depression looms in the Gulf of Mexico.

Heavy rain caused some local street flooding in South Florida on Tuesday, and more is forecast for Wednesday.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Andrew Hagan says the tropical depression that's expected to become a tropical storm later Wednesday is keeping the atmosphere more moist than usual.

Eric Blake of the National Hurricane Center in Miami says the storm will likely dump around 5 inches of rain on areas of central and north Florida as it approaches the state Thursday. Some areas could see up to 15 inches of rain.
Title: Re: The Latest: Forecasters issue hurricane warning in Florida
Post by: Surly1 on September 01, 2016, 01:39:46 AM
Daily Double!  Hawaii AND Florida!

RE

http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/32943979/the-latest-forecasters-issue-hurricane-warning-in-florida (http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/32943979/the-latest-forecasters-issue-hurricane-warning-in-florida)

The Latest: Forecasters issue hurricane warning in Florida
Wednesday, August 31st 2016, 7:32 pm AKDT

Eyeballing Hermine real well. Looks like the track straightened out late Wednesday night, which is a pain in the ass. Probably farther inland means more rain than wind for the moldering urban slum. Right now my expectation is tropical storm overhead with tidal flooding Friday night/Sat.

The tropical storm that's churning toward Florida and could move up the East Coast 'has a mind of its own'
http://www.businessinsider.com/where-will-tropical-storm-hermine-hit-florida-and-the-east-coast-2016-8 (http://www.businessinsider.com/where-will-tropical-storm-hermine-hit-florida-and-the-east-coast-2016-8)

Tropical Storm Hermine projected to hit the east coast
http://wavy.com/2016/08/30/hurricane-watch-issued-for-part-of-floridas-gulf-coast/?utm_campaign=7268&utm_source=11357&utm_medium=863 (http://wavy.com/2016/08/30/hurricane-watch-issued-for-part-of-floridas-gulf-coast/?utm_campaign=7268&utm_source=11357&utm_medium=863)

Title: Taiwan and China Brace for the ‘Strongest Storm On Earth,’ Super Typhoon Meranti
Post by: RE on September 13, 2016, 08:10:38 PM
Track looks like after passing over southern Taiwan it will hit north of Palloy on the east asian coast.

Batten down the hatches PY!

RE

http://time.com/4490712/taiwan-china-super-typhoon-storm-cyclone/ (http://time.com/4490712/taiwan-china-super-typhoon-storm-cyclone/)

Taiwan and China Brace for the ‘Strongest Storm On Earth,’ Super Typhoon Meranti

(https://timedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/h_53016625.jpg?quality=85&w=814)

    Feliz Solomon @felizysolo

10:22 PM ET
Super Typhoon Meranti approaches Taiwan
Jeff Schmaltz—NASA//LANCE/EOSDIS/EPA A handout picture made available by NASA shows a natural color image of Super Cyclone Meranti as it passes the Philippines and travels towards Taiwan at 05:16 GMT on 13 Sept. 2016
Winds are peaking at 230 miles per hour

Super typhoon Meranti will sweep across the island of Taiwan Wednesday morning, before making landfall on China with torrential rains and dangerous winds.

The storm is the strongest since Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippines in 2013, and it is the biggest to near Taiwan since 1959, CNN reports.

Meranti rose quickly from being a Category 1 storm to the highest level of Category 5 in a period of 24 hours early this week, with winds reaching up to 230 mph.

The monster storm is the strongest anywhere in the world this year, and is among the “deepest tropical cyclones ever recorded anywhere on earth,” according to the forecast site Weather Underground.

As of Wednesday morning in Asia the superstorm was nearing the southern tip of the small island of 23.5 million.

The eye of the storm is expected to brush past Taiwan’s southern waters, while rain and winds over 74 mph will likely hit most of the island’s southern land area.

CNN updates show current winds at 189 mph with gusts at 190 mph as the storm closes in on the island and heads northwest toward the coast of China.
Title: Wet Weather in Washington Will Wreak Havoc With Water
Post by: RE on October 13, 2016, 01:33:31 AM
Looks like more major flooding events coming, this time on the West Coast FSoA.

RE

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/10/12/four-thousand-mile-long-river-of-moisture-could-dump-2-feet-of-rain-on-the-pacific-northwest/

Four Thousand Mile Long River of Moisture Could Dump 2 Feet of Rain on The Pacific Northwest

As the U.S. East Coast is still reeling from impacts associated with Hurricane Matthew, the Pacific Northwest is just now confronting its own potential extreme climate event. For a 4,000 mile long river of moisture streaming off ex super typhoon Songda in the Pacific Ocean is now firing a barrage of storms at Northern California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. A series of storms that could, over the next five days, dump as much as two feet of rainfall over parts of this region.

Powerful Atmospheric River May Produce 2 Feet or More of Rainfall This Week

(https://robertscribbler.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/river-of-moisture-takes-aim-at-pacific-northwest.jpg?w=600&h=380)

(A powerful atmospheric river is forming over the record hot Pacific Ocean in a record hot atmosphere. Typhoon Songda is delivering a great deal of tropical moisture to this flow — which is expected to impact the Pacific Northwest and produce very heavy rainfall this week. Image source: Weatherbug.)

Jet stream winds running across the Pacific now range between 180 and 220 mph. These strong winds are producing a powerful storm track even as they are tapping a vast plume of tropical moisture over the Eastern Pacific. Embedded in this moisture plume is the rain-rich ex supertyphoon Songda. As the strong upper level winds pull in Songda and draw on the extreme moisture bleed rising up off the record-hot waters of the Pacific Ocean, forecasters expect a resulting atmospheric river to run 4,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean and deliver storm after powerful storm to the Pacific Northwest.

NOAA model forecasts now show as much as 22 inches of rain falling upon parts of this region over the coming 7 days. However, with so much moisture loading up the atmosphere, it’s possible that locally higher amounts of rainfall will occur.

(https://robertscribbler.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/noaa-rainfall-forecast.gif?w=600&h=450)
(Very heavy rains in the range of 7-22 inches or more are expected to fall over the Pacific Northwest this week in associate with a powerful river of moisture streaming off the record-hot Pacific Ocean. Image source: NOAA.)

Conditions in the Context of Climate Change — Here We Go Again

Over the past year, a record hot atmosphere has helped to generate extreme moisture levels aloft. Such record to near record moisture levels have helped to produce 500 to 1,000 year flood events in places like Louisiana, Texas, North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia and in other parts of the US and around the world. This week, record high moisture levels contributed to flooding rains falling over Virginia and North Carolina in association with Hurricane Matthew. Now, a similar extreme moisture pattern is taking aim at the Pacific Northwest.

So this is kind of a ‘here we go again’ situation. And, unfortunately, these types of extreme weather events are now more likely due to the fact that a world now in the range of 1-1.2 degrees Celsius warmer than 1880s averages is one in which a higher volume of water evaporates from the land and ocean surfaces and into the Earths atmosphere. Such a physical dynamic related to human-forced warming is one that increases rainfall even as it provides more fuel for powerful storms.

Links:

NOAA

Weatherbug

Supertyphoon Songda

Yes, Climate Change Helped Matthew Produce a Massive Swath of Destruction Stretching from Haiti to Virginia

Hat tip to Colorado Bob

Hat tip to DT Lange

Hat tip to Greg
Title: Re: Wet Weather in Washington Will Wreak Havoc With Water
Post by: RE on October 14, 2016, 08:13:36 PM
Wonder how K-dog is doing?

RE

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-tornado-northwest-storm-20161014-story.html (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-tornado-northwest-storm-20161014-story.html)


'Debris flying everywhere' as tornado, rain wallop Northwest
Northwest Storm

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-580161e2/turbine/ct-tornado-northwest-storm-20161014-001/750/750x422)
A man battles windy conditions walking past storm debris on Laneda Avenue after a tornado reportedly touched down on Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, in Manzanita, Ore. (Danny Miller / AP)
Tribune news servicesContact Reporter

A tornado struck an Oregon beach town Friday, sending "debris flying everywhere" and toppling powerlines and trees as strong winds and heavy rain walloped the Pacific Northwest.

Thousands were without power as utility crews in the region prepared for what's expected to be an even rougher storm on Saturday.

The National Weather Service issued tornado warnings Friday morning for southwest Washington and northwest Oregon. A tornado was reported on the northern Oregon coast. Tillamook County Sheriff Andy Long said it touched down in the city of Manzanita at about 8:20 a.m. There were no reports of injuries, but the mayor declared a state of emergency. That's a necessary step for the small town 90 miles west of Portland to be eligible for federal disaster money.

Long said two businesses were confirmed destroyed and one home is uninhabitable. He says other homes have roof damage. The Red Cross opened a shelter for those affected.

Debbie Harmon, owner of the Amanita Galley in Manzanita, said most of the damage is near the beach and downtown.

"It was a normal beach storm, which we get a lot of, and then out of nowhere the wind went 'whoooo,' she said. "Suddenly the whole sky was filled with debris. It was just crazy. And then it just stopped."

She said several fallen trees were in the road and emergency vehicles rushed to the beach area about 90 miles west of Portland.

Julee Ward, who lives between Manzanita and Nehalem, said she awoke to violent thunderstorms and an eerie, dark sky. Her husband went outside to check on things after 8 a.m. and called for her to come out.
Northwest Storm

Storm debris lays along Laneda Ave, on Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, in Manzanita, Ore. A tornado struck the Oregon beach town as strong winds and heavy rain walloped the Pacific Northwest, leaving thousands without power as utility crews prepare for what's expected to be an even rougher storm on Saturday. (Danny Miller / AP)

"Behold there was this big tornado flying about a mile away from our house," she said. "There was debris flying everywhere ... you could see the debris up in the funnel."

Video shot by her husband showed a massive funnel spilling down from dark clouds above.

"You could hear it howling too, which was the crazy part," she added.

The weather service said another twister made landfall about 9 a.m. near Oceanside, Oregon, but no damage was reported. A total of 10 tornado warnings were issued.

The heavy rain created dangerous conditions for the morning commute in the Northwest, as drivers tried to see out rain-pounded windshields and navigate through standing water on the roads.

Several school districts across the region delayed start times because of the weather.

In Oregon, Portland General Electric reported that more than 4,000 customers were without power at 5 a.m. Friday. Pacific Power reported that 2,800 customers in coastal communities had no lights, down from a peak of more than 15,000. At one point Friday 15,000 customers were without power in Seattle.

Portland had the rainiest Oct. 13 in its history. The National Weather Service says a 103-mph wind gust was recorded at Cape Meares.

In Washington, Puget Sound Energy responded to scattered outages affecting thousands throughout the day Friday. Lightning strikes hit the southwest Washington coast Friday morning.

In northern Nevada, winds gusting up to 76 mph are fueled a 750-acre wildfire that burned out of control south of Reno, forcing evacuations.

Meteorologists expect a breezy Friday before the remnants of Typhoon Songda, which wreaked havoc in the western Pacific days ago, hit the Pacific Northwest region Saturday. Forecasters say wind gusts as high as 70 mph could sweep through Seattle. Mayor Ed Murray urged residents to avoid the city's many parks during the wet weekend weather.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was rushing to fix a 300-foot section of a rocky coastal retaining wall in La Push, Washington. The jetty had previously failed and the only thing remaining is a gravel berm, according to spokeswoman Patricia Graesser. A breach of the wall would expose the Quileute reservation, a Coast Guard station, and marina to direct Pacific wave action.

The same weather system is expected to affect Northern California, bringing rain, wind and coastal flooding to the San Francisco Bay Area through part of Saturday.

The storm also carried the potential for flash flooding in central Idaho, where nearly 300 square miles of mountainous terrain burned in a blaze earlier this year.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: K-Dog on October 14, 2016, 11:50:01 PM
I drove into work yesterday and it was a slow crawl, bumper to bumper with speeds up to seven miles an hour.  That was just ordinary rain, accidents everywhere and it seemed people had lost their damn minds.  That was yesterday, a typical day. 

This morning I went out to the car and it was covered with maple tree seeds and leaves but that was from wind overnight I did not even know about.  The tree debris was unusual but it was a normal rainy morning otherwise.  Then I drove into Seattle at full free-way speeds as there hardly seemed to be anyone on the road. 

It has been a normal day for me but half the people are missing possibly influenced in their decision to stay home today and eat chocolate as it is a Friday, and apparently not much is going on today.

Wusses!

It has been a great day and with half the people missing it was very very relaxing and I really felt good!

Maybe the heavy blanketing grey clouds that hung over Puget Sound today ate the people?  The clouds have been serious drama and I have seen shades of grey today I have not seen before.  Yet I have been totally out of sync with experiencing any dramatic rain or wind without even trying and the clouds today were not scary at all but thick and different and for me calming. 

If I'm inside safe the sound of driving rain I find soothing; so life is good today.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Palloy on October 15, 2016, 03:14:31 PM
Quote
Looks like more major flooding events coming, this time on the West Coast FSoA.

RE

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/10/12/four-thousand-mile-long-river-of-moisture-could-dump-2-feet-of-rain-on-the-pacific-northwest/

Four Thousand Mile Long River of Moisture Could Dump 2 Feet of Rain on The Pacific Northwest

Robert Scribbler is an outrageous scaremonger.

As you can see from the 7-day rainfall forecast:
(https://robertscribbler.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/noaa-rainfall-forecast.gif?w=600&h=450)

The highest value is 21.8" at one tiny location, probably smaller than a pixel on your screen, while the vast majority of the Pacific Northwest is forecast to have  5-10", and so Scribbler makes that into his click-bait headline "2 Feet of Rain on The Pacific Northwest". 

Is the current path of the jet stream a weather event or a climate change event?  Every honest weather forecaster would say 'a bit of both', but Scribbler calls it a "potential extreme climate event".   Why? - because he is not interested in giving any responsibility to natural variation (weather), but only to SCARY climate change.  This continual biasing of the evidence with half-truths and exaggerations is Scribbler's trademark style.
Title: Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer is Dead. Blitzen, Vixen & Donner too!
Post by: RE on November 16, 2016, 12:39:03 PM
How will Santa get the Toys to the kids this year?  :o

RE


http://www.sfgate.com/news/science/article/Starvation-killed-80-000-reindeer-after-unusual-10618343.php (http://www.sfgate.com/news/science/article/Starvation-killed-80-000-reindeer-after-unusual-10618343.php)

Starvation killed 80,000 reindeer after unusual Arctic rains cut off the animals' food supply

Ben Guarino, The Washington Post Updated 11:58 am, Wednesday, November 16, 2016

    A reindeer herder catches a reindeer from its horn at Nomad camp, 150 km from the town of Salekhard, Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug in Russia on May 2, 2016. (Photo by Sergey Anisimov/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images) Photo: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Photo: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
Image 1 of 22

A reindeer herder catches a reindeer from its horn at Nomad camp, 150 km from the town of Salekhard, Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug in Russia on May 2, 2016. (Photo by Sergey Anisimov/Anadolu Agency/Getty
... more

In August, a lightning blast claimed the lives of more than 300 reindeer in Norway. The month before, an anthrax epidemic - which Russian officials blamed on microbes that thawed after spending decades frozen inside a reindeer corpse - sickened several indigenous people in Siberia. Anthrax killed a 12-year-old boy, and reindeer died by the hundreds. In the disease's aftermath, the regional government proposed to terminate 250,000 reindeer by Christmas.

Even the Arctic tundra has turned against the animals, so well-adapted to the clime, as the area warms at a faster rate than the rest of the globe.

In November 2013, 61,000 reindeer starved to death on Russia's Yamal Peninsula. It marked the largest regional "mortality episode" of reindeer ever recorded, as ecologists wrote in a new study in the journal Biology Letters. An additional 20,000 had succumbed to famine in November 2006. The immediate cause, according to the team of researchers from Europe, the United States and Asia, was an unusual ice barrier that smothered the reindeer pastures.

Reindeer can stamp through ice about three-quarters of an inch thick, using their feet to access the nutritious lichen and plants below. But in early November 2006 and 2013, the ice was an order of magnitude deeper - up to several inches, too tough even for the reindeer's sharp hoofs. Unable to eat, the animals died.

Study author Bruce C. Forbes, an expert on permafrost ecology at the University of Lapland in Finland, described the weather events that created the ice as "rain-on-snow," or ROS. As anyone who has crunched through snow after a winter rainstorm knows, the rainfall hardens into an icy layer. In northwest Siberia in 2013, rain saturated the entire snow column from top to bottom, Forbes said in an email to The Washington Post. The result was a solid block of ice, frozen to the ground.

"Herders have observed about once per decade these events are intensive and extensive enough to lead to starvation of animals, when herds cannot find soft, diggable snow," Forbes said.

It may seem counter intuitive that warmer weather brings more ice to parts of Siberia like the Yamal Peninsula. But when warming causes the thinning of nearby Arctic sea ice - which wind and waves then fracture - or its complete melting, the warm Atlantic water below is revealed. As Jennifer Francis, a Rutgers University Arctic specialist told The Post in May, the Arctic has reached "record-breaking territory": low Arctic sea ice, high temperatures and fire seasons that start sooner each year.

"As the relatively warm water becomes exposed, vapor forms and air humidity increases," Forbes said. "The more extensive the open water (or with jumbled, fractured ice in loose concentrations), the more moisture available to increase atmospheric humidity."

And with that wetter air comes rain.

In early November 2013, it rained for a continuous and anomalous 24 hours. After the rain, temperatures plummeted. By Nov. 10, more than 10,000 square miles of the southern part of the Yamal Peninsula were blanketed in ice. The temperatures remained below freezing until spring 2014. By that time, the scientists wrote, "the private herders who had lost most or all of their animals to starvation were functionally stranded in the tundra. With no draft reindeer to haul their camps, they resorted to full-time subsistence fishing and borrowed breeding stock to rebuild their herds, a multiyear process."

The new study linked several events into a chain, some of which had previously been observed only as discrete events, the authors noted. As the scientists summarized the sequence, "Warming to Sea ice decline to Increased precipitation and winter temperatures to [Rain-on-snow] events to Reindeer mortality."

Historical observations and models indicate the effect of climate change is more pronounced at the poles. White sea ice reflects sunlight, whereas when ice cover diminishes, the darker Arctic water is able to absorb more energy. The result is a feedback loop known as Arctic amplification. NASA climatologists also note that strong tropical thunderstorms at the equator draw heat into the upper atmosphere, where it is circulated toward poles.

As the Siberian climate warms, Forbes said mathematical models predict rains will become more frequent and intense. "We are recommending in the near future that mobile slaughterhouses could be deployed in time to the herds at risk out on the tundra," he said, "so that reindeer can be slaughtered humanely." At least that way, he pointed out, herders could receive compensation for the loss of their reindeer.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on November 16, 2016, 12:44:03 PM
Why doesn't that evil bastard Putin do something? Don't those atheist/communist Russians love Santa? Don't they want Nintendos and iPhones for Christmas?
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Palloy on November 16, 2016, 04:54:09 PM
I was watching a TV doco about the Arctic Canadian islands last night, which I imagine would be a lot like some of Arctic Russia.  There there are vast regions which don't have any vegetation at all, just snow-covered bare rock in winter and bare rock in summer.  It looks like a film set for the moon landing:

(https://doomsteaddiner.net/palloy/images/arctic.desert.jpg)

So lichens and reindeer and reindeer-herders would have to be a better ecosystem than this, but not much better.  I used to care a lot about degradation of ecosystems, but other people don't even care about polar bears enough to do anything about it.  They don't even care about pandas and tigers and rhinoceroses.  They don't even care about people FFS - there are more people being killed in Syria than all the reindeer herders in the world, and nobody cares about them as long as they don't come here, taking our jobs.  So don't waste your energy being angry about Russian reindeer-herders - it's a recipe for an unhappy, anguished life.
Title: The Latest: Otto Grows Stronger as It Approaches Land
Post by: RE on November 23, 2016, 07:56:06 PM
I wonder how Ray Jason is handling this?  Dmitry also.  This is not good for yachties in that neighborhood  ???  :icon_scratch:

RE

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2016/11/23/world/americas/ap-tropical-weather-the-latest.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2016/11/23/world/americas/ap-tropical-weather-the-latest.html?_r=0)

 Americas
The Latest: Otto Grows Stronger as It Approaches Land

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESSNOV. 23, 2016, 7:39 P.M. E.S.T.
Continue reading the main story
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PANAMA CITY — The Latest on tropical weather in the Caribbean (all times local):

10 p.m.

Forecasters say Hurricane Otto has strengthened slightly as it moves west toward Nicaragua and Costa Rica.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami says Otto is a Category 1 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (140kph) and is moving west at 9 mph (15kph). On Wednesday night, the storm was 100 miles (160 kilometers) north-northeast of Limon, Costa Rica, and 120 miles (195 kilometers east-southeast) of Bluefields, Nicaragua.

A hurricane warning is in effect from Limon to Bluefields. Forecasters say the center of Otto is expected to make landfall in that warning area sometime Thursday and reach the Pacific coast of southern Nicaragua or northern Costa Rica sometime early Friday.

___

7 p.m.

Forecasters say Otto has regained hurricane strength in the Caribbean as it churns closer to Central America.

Otto had fluctuated between tropical storm and hurricane status earlier this week. But the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami says Otto now has hurricane-force winds of 75 mph (110 kph) as it continues toward an expected landfall later this week.

As of 7 p.m. EST Wednesday, Otto was centered about 140 miles (230 kilometers) northeast of Limon, Costa Rica — or about 180 miles (285 kilometers) east-southeast of Bluefields, Nicaragua.
Journalism that matters.
More essential than ever.

A hurricane warning is in effect from Limon, Costa Rica, to Bluefields, Nicaragua. Forecasters say the center of Otto is expected to make landfall in that warning area sometime Thursday and reach the Pacific coast of southern Nicaragua or northern Costa Rica sometime early Friday.

___

7:45 a.m.

An unusually Tropical Storm Otto swirled over the Caribbean just off Central America on Wednesday heading toward a possible landfall as a hurricane in Costa Rica, which hasn't seen such a storm since reliable record-keeping began in 1851.

Heavy rains from the storm were blamed for three deaths in Panama, and officials in Costa Rica ordered the evacuation of 4,000 people from its Caribbean coast.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said the westward-moving storm had weakened slightly overnight down to tropical storm status, with winds of 70 mph (110 kph). But it said the storm would likely recover hurricane force and make landfall Thursday in the border region of Nicaragua and Costa Rica.

Early Wednesday, the hurricane had top sustained winds of 70 mph (110 kph) and was moving westward at 5 mph (7 kph), the U.S. hurricane center said. Otto was centered about 235 miles (375 kilometers) east-northeast of Limon, Costa Rica.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Palloy on November 23, 2016, 10:33:28 PM
Reports from New Caledonia (south Pacific) say they had 400 mm of rain in 12 hours.  Some people killed in floods.

What's the criteria for "crazy"?  A category 1 in Central America can't be that unusual, and not all that dangerous.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on November 23, 2016, 10:41:12 PM
Reports from New Caledonia (south Pacific) say they had 400 mm of rain in 12 hours.  Some people killed in floods.

What's the criteria for "crazy"?  A category 1 in Central America can't be that unusual, and not all that dangerous.

Hi Palloy, My thought on starting the thread was an apparent unusual amount of seemingly major weather disturbances occurring in a condensed period of time. Weird temps and violent rain as well.  :dontknow:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Palloy on November 24, 2016, 10:55:06 PM
Individual incidents of crazy weather don't make much sense, so can only be attributed to "natural variation".  However the rate of crazy weather incidents now, versus the rate of crazy weather in history, could be partly attributed to a long term trend, for example Global Warming. 

GW can produce "cold events" due to the increased wanderings of the path of the jet stream, and is particularly noticeable in the northern hemisphere in winter.  But "the path of the jet stream" is a bit of a vague concept, since the jet stream often splits off tongues that go all over the place, including sometimes crossing the equator, so long as you keep calling this call it "the jet stream".

Thus today's news of snow in Japan in November, hasn't been witnessed since 1962, and of that snow actually lying on the ground, since 1875.  But without an average number of occurrences back then (say over a 30 year period) and the same for today, the GW trend cannot be untangled from the natural variation.

Arctic Sea Ice Extent (where one pixel in a satellite image is 15+% ice), shows of the last 5 years 2012 had the least ice from July to mid-October, but 2016 is the lowest since then.  3 of the years have had summers where some of the time was outside the average for 1981-2010 ±2 standard deviations.

(https://doomsteaddiner.net/palloy/images/arctic.sea.ice.png)

Tweaking the interactive chart could perhaps bring out that some even more extreme "event" is happening.  This is how the SCARY Robert Scribbler manages to confirm how SCARY it all is, generating lots of clicks and cross-posts.  But getting it into proper context, it is not that scary at all, merely worrying IF it continues (and I CAN'T because of Peak Fossils).

Snow in Japan in November!  It hasn't happened since 1875 !  (when GW wasn't an issue at all).

Title: Crazy Weather - Earth's wobble, out of control
Post by: azozeo on December 13, 2016, 12:13:32 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/plllgpQY2PA&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - 0 Zero in Beantown
Post by: g on December 16, 2016, 05:31:09 AM

Not too many zero days in Beantown, especially in December. Came in from nowhere and zooming to 54 by Sunday. Crazy Weather :icon_scratch:

On a brighter note.   ;D

                                                       (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzzBR1hUcAAcL6K.jpg)
Title: ♫I'm Dreaming of a WET Christmas♫ in the Phillipines
Post by: RE on December 24, 2016, 03:43:26 PM
♫"I'm dreaming of a WET Christmas"♫

http://www.youtube.com/v/SvfhoWIPoVw

RE

http://q13fox.com/2016/12/24/typhoon-expected-to-wallop-philippines-on-christmas/ (http://q13fox.com/2016/12/24/typhoon-expected-to-wallop-philippines-on-christmas/)

Typhoon expected to wallop Philippines on Christmas
Posted 9:16 AM, December 24, 2016, by CNN Wire

(https://tribkcpq.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/s073268630-300.jpg?quality=85&strip=all&w=770)

Typhoon Nock-Ten, also known as Typhoon Nina, is expected to make landfall in Philippines on Christmas.   

Typhoon Nock-Ten, also known as Typhoon Nina, is expected to make landfall in Philippines on Christmas.

MANILA – A major typhoon is gaining strength as it draws closer to the Philippines, where it’s expected to make landfall on Christmas Day.

Forecasters warned that Nock-ten, also known as Nina in the Philippines, could bring lashing winds and dump heavy rain throughout parts of the country, including the capital, Manila.

Nock-ten is now a super typhoon with sustained winds of 240 kilometers per hour (149 mph) and gusts at 295 kilometers per hour (185 mph). The storm is expected to maintain this intensity through landfall with relatively minor fluctuations.

It should make landfall over the eastern island province of Catanduanes on Christmas afternoon or evening, according to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center projected that the typhoon would gradually weaken “as the system begins to interact with land” but warned it could still retain typhoon intensity.

The Philippines has been battered by devastating typhoons in recent years, most notably Typhoon Haiyan in 2013 — considered to be among the strongest storms to make landfall. Haiyan killed more than 6,000 people and forced nearly 4 million people from their homes.

Typhoon Nock-ten is expected to approach with rain bands moving onshore, which could cause floods, landslides and storm surges. It is projected to pass through Southern Luzon and could go through Manila.

It could bring flooding to the densely populated urban center during a busy holiday weekend.

Meanwhile, authorities in the Philippines hoisted storm warnings over parts of the eastern Philippines, including Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Catanduanes, Sorsogon, Masbate (including Ticao and Burias Islands), Northern Samar and Eastern Samar.
Title: Crazy Weather - 48 states going below freezing in the first week of 2017:
Post by: azozeo on December 31, 2016, 12:30:25 PM
2016-12-29 - Record cold, 48 states going below freezing in the first week of 2017:
http://www.drroyspencer.com/2016/12/first-week-of-2017-record-cold-48-states-going-below-freezing/ (http://www.drroyspencer.com/2016/12/first-week-of-2017-record-cold-48-states-going-below-freezing/)
http://www.sott.net/article/338034-Record-cold-48-states-going-below-freezing-in-the-first-week-of-2017 (http://www.sott.net/article/338034-Record-cold-48-states-going-below-freezing-in-the-first-week-of-2017)

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on December 31, 2016, 12:31:50 PM
2016-12-29 - Powerful winds blow waterfall upward on the Isle of Skye (Scotland):
http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2016/12/28/Strong-winds-blow-waterfall-waters-upward-in-Scotland/4161482958345/ (http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2016/12/28/Strong-winds-blow-waterfall-waters-upward-in-Scotland/4161482958345/)
http://www.sott.net/article/338045-Powerful-winds-blow-waterfall-upward-on-the-Isle-of-Skye-Scotland (http://www.sott.net/article/338045-Powerful-winds-blow-waterfall-upward-on-the-Isle-of-Skye-Scotland)

Title: Re: Crazy Weather/Sierras Get 7 FEET of Snow, more to come
Post by: azozeo on January 05, 2017, 04:54:59 PM
http://sfist.com/2017/01/05/seven_feet_of_snow_falls_in_the_sie.php (http://sfist.com/2017/01/05/seven_feet_of_snow_falls_in_the_sie.php)

After years of mostly disappointing winter snowfall totals in and around Lake Tahoe, the winter of 2017 is looking to be a sweet one for local skiers and snowboarders — some of whom may have forgotten to keep chains in their car for that last stretch of 80. Traffic out of the Tahoe area was hampered by heavy snow and chain requirements on Monday, and this weekend likely won't be much different as another storm heads into the area. As the Chronicle reports, nearly seven feet of snow fell in parts of Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows between Sunday and Thursday, and everyone with ski rentals heading up tonight and tomorrow will be treated to more fresh powder, with another foot falling at higher elevations between Saturday and Sunday.

After five years of drought and at least three winters with snowfall totals that were pretty dismal for the ski season, everyone should be getting psyched right about now if they haven't made it skiing yet. Many seasonal rentals begin this week, post New Year's, meaning that traffic up 80 should be building starting at about 2 p.m. today, if I had to guess. Not to mention this is the first lull in the snow, and driving conditions should remains steadily OK through tomorrow, though the forecast does call for some isolated snow showers of a couple inches tonight.

Meanwhile, here in the city, feel the sun on your face while you can because the rain picks up again around midnight Friday and into Saturday, with three inches of accumulation predicted throughout the weekend. There are then passing rain showers coming all next week, with a mix of sun and rain every day for the next ten days.

And all that rain here means all that much more snow up north.

Brace for some epic skiing (and/or epic skiing stories, if you do not ski yourself but have the fortune to know some skiers), and be glad that some snow pack is finally building, because even with all that they've gotten, the Sierra snowpack stood at 53 percent of average as of Tuesday.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - N. Cali braces for atmospheric river
Post by: azozeo on January 06, 2017, 04:01:28 PM
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-atmospheric-river-prepare-20170105-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-atmospheric-river-prepare-20170105-story.html)

Public agencies across Northern California are bracing for a weekend of epic rain and snow after meeting with hydrologists from the National Weather Service who warned them that the incoming atmospheric river packs a punch not seen in at least a decade.

“People are definitely in a state of panic right now,” said El Dorado County sheriff’s Sgt. Todd Hammitt. “We’re getting a lot of calls asking if we’re going to be able to deal with everything. It’s the general pandemonium of not knowing what’s coming.”

Up to 12 inches of rain is expected below 8,500 feet, and massive amounts of snow — up to 6 feet — above that elevation across the Sierra Nevada. A colder storm two days behind will drop yet more heavy snow.

“We’re expecting heavy, heavy rain. It starts out as snow then turns to rain then turns to snow again,” Hammitt said. “We’re concerned about the melt increasing waterways and all the lakes.”
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Palloy on January 06, 2017, 11:08:09 PM
WARNING - it rained here yesterday !
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - Wind speed in Cali. hit 175 mph
Post by: azozeo on January 10, 2017, 09:08:55 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/L2mxhowF2c8&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on January 10, 2017, 09:33:52 AM
I saw the Pioneer Cabin Tree in Calaveras bit the dust.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-tree-dead-storms-20170109-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-tree-dead-storms-20170109-story.html)

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on January 10, 2017, 02:46:48 PM
I saw the Pioneer Cabin Tree in Calaveras bit the dust.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-tree-dead-storms-20170109-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-tree-dead-storms-20170109-story.html)

Yup...
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on January 12, 2017, 09:26:32 AM
2017-01-11 - Parts of Russia freeze at -53C -63F, while Australia bakes with temps of +43C +110F:
http://robinwestenra.blogspot.co.nz/2017/01/extreme-weather-globally-01102017.html (http://robinwestenra.blogspot.co.nz/2017/01/extreme-weather-globally-01102017.html)



2017-01-10 - Blizzard dumps 10 feet of snow on Sierra (California), I-80 closed:
http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/I-80-in-Sierra-closed-as-rare-blizzard-warning-10847604.php (http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/I-80-in-Sierra-closed-as-rare-blizzard-warning-10847604.php)
http://www.sott.net/article/339268-Interstate-80-remains-closed-as-blizzard-dumps-10-feet-of-snow-on-Sierra-California (http://www.sott.net/article/339268-Interstate-80-remains-closed-as-blizzard-dumps-10-feet-of-snow-on-Sierra-California)
Title: The Iceman Cometh
Post by: RE on January 13, 2017, 03:55:12 PM
Power already out in Springfield.  Last time they had one of these my sister was without power for a week.  I wonder if she listened to me and bought a generator?

This one looks like a HUGE event with a lot of major cities being hit.

RE

http://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2017/01/13/ice-storm-freezing-rain-central-us-mid-atlantic/96535758/ (http://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2017/01/13/ice-storm-freezing-rain-central-us-mid-atlantic/96535758/)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C2Dd3uTUkAElYDi.jpg)

Some of the big cities likely to be hit by the ice include Topeka, Oklahoma City, Kansas City, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Columbus, Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C., AccuWeather said.

Dozens of flights were canceled at airports in St. Louis and Oklahoma City on Friday as freezing rain moved in across the region. Travel will be hazardous for hundreds of miles along Interstate 35, I-40 and I-70 in the central states, said AccuWeather meteorologist Brett Rossio.

In southern Missouri on Friday morning, some areas already picked up a tenth of an inch of ice on outdoor surfaces, according to Andy Foster, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. An ice storm warning, in place through Sunday in many areas, was already in effect for most of Kansas and Missouri and parts of Oklahoma....
Title: Re: The Iceman Cometh
Post by: RE on January 13, 2017, 04:03:00 PM
Here's a vid of the 2007 Ice Storm in Springfield.

http://www.youtube.com/v/yzoB1jUzp2I

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on January 13, 2017, 04:06:00 PM
Sounds brutal. Chicago to get a bit of it too.
Title: Re: The Iceman Cometh
Post by: RE on January 14, 2017, 04:55:59 AM
Power Outage reports increasing.

This one is supposed to go through Sunday and bring in up to an inch of ice.  Anything above 1/4" is considered "Crippling".  :o

RE

Second Death Reported On Icy Missouri Roads: Winter Storm Jupiter Knocks Out Power, Glazes Roads in Plains, Midwest

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C2EpdOfXgAAIQxG.jpg)

By Ryan Phillips, Eric Chaney and Ada Carr
Published Jan 14 2017 07:27 AM EST
weather.com

Worst is Yet to Come from Ice Storm

Crippling rain is forecast for parts of the middle of the country through the weekend.

Story Highlights

A 35-year-old Missouri man was killed after being ejected from an overturned vehicle on I-29 early Saturday morning

A 33-year-old Missouri woman died in a crash on icy roads Friday morning.

States of emergency have been declared in Oklahoma and Missouri as ice arrives.

Heavy snow closed interstates and damaged buildings in the West earlier in the week.

Winter Storm Jupiter has claimed a second victim in Missouri as the powerful storm treks east.

Freezing rain and ice created dangerous road conditions from Oklahoma and Kansas to mid-Missouri and Southern Illinois and at least two people have been killed as a result of dangerous travel conditions. Several states declared states of emergency ahead of the storm, and accidents have been reported across the region.

These states have been preparing for days for Jupiter, which could cause widespread power outages and leave millions of residents stranded for days. Already, the storm has left thousands without power in the Pacific Northwest and caused major travel problems in the higher elevations.

(MORE: Check the Forecast for Winter Storm Jupiter)
Missouri

A 35-year-old Missouri man was killed early Saturday morning when he was ejected from a vehicle and hit by another motorist in a large pileup in the southbound lane of I-29.

Missouri State Highway Patrol reported that the 2008 Ford Econoline was traveling in the left lane before veering off of the road and overturning, ejecting 35-year-old Maung Hnin. The incident report states that Hnin was then struck by an unidentified vehicle and was pronounced dead at the scene shortly thereafter by deputies from the Platte County Sheriff's Office.

Highway patrol officials would not comment on if the accident was weather-related, but several other vehicles were involved in the incident and as many as six people reported injuries ranging from minor to moderate.

Weather.com meteorologist Chris Dolce said northwest Missouri saw an initial wave of freezing rain late Friday just before midnight.

"Though the precipitation was light, that's all it takes to create very hazardous travel conditions," he said.

A Missouri woman who died in a fatal accident that occurred on northbound I-55 Friday morning has been identified as 33-year-old Tiffany Jackson of Crystal City, Missouri, KMOV reports.

A Missouri Highway Patrol spokesperson told KMOX that Jackson was driving too fast for conditions when she lost control of her vehicle on an ice-covered railroad bridge and slid into a tree. She was not wearing her seat belt.

The Missouri Department of Transportation said roads in the area were partially covered at the time the vehicle slid off the road and into a tree. The Highway Patrol said it responded to about 100 crashes Friday.

Friday Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens thanked the state's residents for heeding warnings to stay off roads during the ice storm but warned that the danger will last in parts of the state through Sunday.

The NFL has pushed back the start time for a playoff game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Pittsburgh Steelers, which was set to kickoff in Kansas City at 1:05 EST on Sunday.

"Due to public safety concerns in light of the forecasted storm this weekend in the Kansas City area, Sunday’s Steelers-Chiefs Divisional Playoff game ... has been moved to 8:20 p.m." the league said in a press release Friday afternoon.

Hundreds of schools were closed Friday, including several college campuses. St. Louis closed all city operations ahead of the storm and several prisons halted visiting hours.

As of 2 p.m., airlines had canceled 83 arriving and 54 departing flights at St. Louis' Lambert International Airport as freezing rain moved into the area.  St. Louis University closed due to inclement weather on Friday and canceled all campus events scheduled for Friday and Saturday.

Ameren Missouri reported about 3,000 customers without power south of St. Louis Friday, while emergency management officials in Springfield reported numerous power outages and transformers blown around the city. KSPR reported that around 2,000 City Utilities customers were without power at one time or another Friday morning.

Gov. Eric Greitens declared a state of emergency and activated the state Emergency Operations Center ahead of of the storm Thursday.
Illinois

Heavy ice coats trees in Carterville, Illinois. (John Chaney)
Energy provider Ameren is reporting more than 5,000 customers without power in Southern Illinois, where heavy ice is already accumulating on trees in Jackson and Williamson counties.

Department of Transportation spokeswoman Kelsea Gurski said Friday that they are closely monitoring the forecast information and that crews have begun pre-treating bridges and intersections in Sangamon and surrounding counties, The State Journal-Register reports.
Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin declared a state of emergency for all counties in the Sooner State as residents prepared for the winter storm's icy side.

"Emergency personnel are coordinating with state and local officials to ensure we are prepared and ready for whatever comes our way," Fallin said in a statement.

(MORE: What Ice Storm Accumulations Mean and How to Stay Safe)

Friday the National Weather Service issued ice storm warnings for almost 30 counties the central, western and northern parts of the state. The warning is in effect until 6 p.m. Saturday.

Across northern and central Oklahoma, stores were packed with customers buying necessities as the potentially crippling storm inched closer. Numerous districts – including Oklahoma City Public Schools – will be closed Friday, according to a list compiled by the Oklahoman.

Energy provider OG&E plans to have more than 1,300 linemen on standby in anticipation of power outages around the state, KFOR reports.

“You want to have a plan, because you should consider you may be out for 2 or more days,” said spokesperson Kathleen O’Shea.

(MORE: Storms End Drought in Much of Northern California)
Kansas

Freezing rain contributed to accidents that left at least three people injured Friday.

A multi-car pileup left two people with minor injuries in Sedgwick Friday. The incident occurred at the off ramp from westbound Kellog to the central Business District.

One person was injured in an accident caused by slick roads in the town of Mulvane on Rock Road and 111th Street. The roadway was shut down.

The Kansas Division of Emergency Management activated the State Emergency Operations Center in Topeka to monitor the severe winter storm that is expected to cover many areas of the state with as much as one inch of ice over the weekend.

About 200 soldiers of the Kansas National Guard have been alerted to mobilize to assist local authorities with emergency response measures across the state, if needed. The soldiers will patrol key roads and hep stranded motorists, as well as provide emergency transportation for first responders. They will also provide warming stations at local armories if necessary.

Sunday's American Football Conference (AFC) divisional playoff game between the Steelers and Chiefs has been moved from an early afternoon kickoff to prime time due to the forecasted ice storm.

The game will now start at 8:20 p.m. to give road crews and public safety officials more time to treat roads and parking lots.
Western Snow

Areas of the West were buried under feet of snow, up to 10 feet in some places in the Sierra Nevada. The sheer mass of snow caused damage to several other buildings in Bend, including a gymnasium roof at an elementary school. The school district said on its website that nobody was in the gym when the roof fell at Highland Magnet at Kenton School in Bend.

Three visitors were rescued after snowstorms forced them to take refuge in a heated restroom at Crater Lake National Park. Park officials told the Associated Press a rotary snow plow cleared a path on the three-mile road from park headquarters to Rim Village to reach the visitors Wednesday. Officials say none of them sustained major injuries.

Heavy snow closed a nearly 250-mile stretch of Interstate 80 in Wyoming Wednesday and Thursday due to dangerous driving conditions. The Colorado Department of Transportation briefly closed Interstate 70 westbound at mile marker 215 due to an avalanche that cut off the road west of the Eisenhower Tunnel. According to the DOT, no cars were caught in the slide.
Title: The Iceman Cometh Sunday Morning Edition
Post by: RE on January 15, 2017, 06:39:39 AM
Now up to 6 Darwin Award Winners DEAD on the roads.  What fucking idiot drives when roads are glazing over? ???  :icon_scratch:

Less power outages than I expected so far.

Biggest issue so far is the Playoff Game between the Steelers and the Chiefs was cancelled.

RE

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/four-dead-ice-storm-wrecks-kansas-missouri-brace-another-round-n707021 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/four-dead-ice-storm-wrecks-kansas-missouri-brace-another-round-n707021)

Six Dead in Ice Storm Wrecks; Kansas and Missouri Brace for Another Round


by Phil Helsel and Mark Hanrahan
[Deadly ice storm could impact millions of people in Midwest]
Deadly ice storm could impact millions of people in Midwest 2:02

Parts of Kansas and Missouri could see another round of freezing rain Sunday as a winter storm that has already coated roads in ice and contributed to accidents that killed six people churns through the Midwest and Plains.

Three people died in three crashes in Missouri thought to be weather-related Friday and Saturday, the state highway patrol said.

In Oklahoma, a truck driver was killed in a crash on an ice-covered highway just before a 3:30 a.m. Saturday. The stretch of road was the scene of nearly a dozen other crashes, the state highway patrol said.

In Kansas, two people were killed in separate car crashes on Saturday night. In both incidents, the vehicles slid on ice-covered roads and into ditches, where they rolled.

Over 20 vehicles were involved in a pileup near downtown Wichita, Kansas, Saturday. Two people suffered minor injuries, authorities said.
Image: A Missouri Department of Transportation salt truck spreads
A Missouri Department of Transportation salt truck spreads ice melt on Interstate 55 as coated tree branches sway overhead as seen from the Main Street Bridge on Friday in Festus, Mo. Robert Cohen / St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP

Parts of Kansas and Missouri could see more ice overnight, while parts of Iowa could see ice Sunday afternoon into Monday, forecasters said.

Widespread freezing rain is expected to continue over much of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri through Sunday, as a result of a winter storm, according to a National Weather Service report issued at 2:55 a.m. ET. There are expansive ice storm warnings, freezing rain advisories and winter weather advisories in effect from northeast New Mexico to central Illinois.

Forecasters expect a quarter to half an inch of ice will be common in the affected area Sunday — with half-an-inch to an inch possible, especially from southeast Nebraska to northwest Oklahoma. This is expected to result in downed trees, power lines and power outages in the affected areas.
[37 Million People Under Weather Alert as Ice Storms Cripple Travel]
37 Million People Under Weather Alert as Ice Storms Cripple Travel 2:59

More than 2,800 flights are expected to be delayed today and over 200 are expected to be cancelled, according to the Weather Channel. Airports in the affected region appeared to be operating largely normally early Sunday.

The Kansas National Guard was mobilized Friday to assist stranded motorists and provide emergency transportation. Oklahoma's governor declared a state of emergency for the entire state ahead of the storm.

Ice storm warnings were in place from northwestern Oklahoma, through Kansas and into much of Missouri and in northeastern Nebraska and southwestern Iowa Saturday night. Parts of southern Kansas got a quarter-inch of ice.

St. Louis forecasters said a last bout of freezing rain could come overnight, but in weather could persist in Nebraska and Iowa through Monday. The Omaha area could get between a quarter-inch to a half-inch of ice by Monday, the National Weather Service said.

"I would recommend that if you don't need to go anywhere or if it's not an emergency to just stay at home," Iowa State Patrol Trooper Jeff Huffman said of the icy weather expected to hit the state Sunday and Monday.

Reports have said residents of the affected areas appear to be taking the warnings seriously, with grocery stores selling out of basic necessities like bread and milk, and hardware stores selling out of generators.

St. Louis' Lambert Airport said Saturday that 38 departures and 17 arrivals were canceled due to the winter storm.

In some parts of Missouri, the ice wasn't as bad as feared. Missouri electricity company Ameren said Saturday afternoon that only around 1,400 people were without power, down from around 30,000 earlier in the storm.

"There's only been a few places where we found that half inch of ice that was predicted," Kevin Anders, assistant vice president of operations and technical services for Ameren.
[California Ski Resort Digs Out From Monster Snowstorm]
California Ski Resort Digs Out From Monster Snowstorm 2:06

But the threat of icy weather caused Sunday's NFL playoff game in Kansas City between the Chiefs and the Steelers to be postponed from 1:05 p.m. ET to 8:20 p.m. ET in order to give road crews a chance to clear streets.

The storm was expected to move northeast, but there was some good news: A freezing rain advisory for central Indiana which had been in place until 1 p.m. was canceled Saturday night.
Title: Monster storm batters California with mudslides, flooding, high surf
Post by: RE on January 20, 2017, 03:55:06 PM
I wonder how much of the water is making it into Lake Mead?

RE

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-la-rains-20170120-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-la-rains-20170120-story.html)

 Monster storm batters California with mudslides, flooding, high surf

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-5882625c/turbine/la-mmartin-1484939926-snap-photo/700/700x394)
Flooding in the Sherpa fire burn area in Santa Barbara has caused several cabins in El Capitan Canyon to wash down the stream Friday morning. (Mike Eliason / Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

The second of three storms hitting Southern California this week deluged areas of Los Angeles and Santa Barbara counties on Friday, forcing authorities to rescue people trapped in a flooded beachside campground and close a major highway leading into the Malibu Hills.

The storm hit the Santa Barbara County coast early Friday, dropping more than 3 and a half inches of rain that quickly overwhelmed the burn areas of last summer’s Sherpa fire. As a result, mud, trees and brush coursed downhill into a creek at El Capitan State Beach.
From Our Partners: Anti-Trump Protests Continue into Second Night

The debris flow formed a dam that flooded a campground and sent cars and wooden cabins floating downstream until they became lodged in a bottleneck. At least a dozen campers had to be rescued by Santa Barbara County firefighters, department spokesman Mike Eliason said.

In the San Fernando Valley, firefighters rescued five homeless people in the Sepulveda basin after about their encampment was hit by flooding.


About the same time, the front of the storm was drenching the edges of Los Angeles County and Ventura counties. Rock slides forced authorities to close Malibu Canyon Road leading into the hills until possibly Monday, the California Highway Patrol said, and forecasters issued a flash flood warning for the Simi Valley.

A tree fell on a house in Beverly Glen, and falling mud and debris forced police to close Santa Monica’s famed thoroughfare, the California Incline.

Northern California was also hit hard. Flood waters caused evacuations in parts of San Benito and Santa Cruz counties. Rockslides were reported on some coastal roads.

It seems that after five years of drought, suddenly California can’t get a break from the rain. Despite the challenges, it’s still a good thing, said state climatologist Michael Anderson.

“It’s great when you get these steady storms that aren’t too much at once but really lets the water soak into the ground, replenish groundwater and get some surface runoff to help with local reservoir conditions,” he said. “Certainly it’s going to help catch up [reservoirs] to average in some places and get above average in others.”

So far, California is on pace for its wettest year on record after five years of drought, according to the Department of Water Resources. Months of above average rainfall have only accelerated in January, with three consecutive weeks of rain from the Sacramento Valley to the Los Angeles Basin with only days of clear skies in between.

The storms have built up the snowpack for the whole Sierra Nevada, with the southern third at nearly 200% above average for this time of year. The state’s biggest reservoirs are brimming and more rain is on the way, forecasters say.

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-5882629e/turbine/la-mmartin-1484939991-snap-photo/750/750x422)
Flooding in the Sherpa fire burn area in Santa Barbara has caused several cabins in El Capitan Canyon to wash down the stream and forced evacuations. (Mike Eliason / Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

“It’s a perfect scenario,” Anderson said of this year’s storms.

The bulk of the storms have flowed south from the Alaskan gulf, carrying with them cold air and moisture from the Pacific. Unlike in previous years, these storms are staying offshore, allowing them to pull in water that the system turns into tons of snow that it then dumps on the Sierra Nevada and rain at lower elevations to fill rivers and creeks.

Most of Northern California is considered to be out of drought conditions because of this year’s and last year’s storms. It could happen for Southern California too, Anderson said.

“String together a couple years like this...that’s really the key to getting out of drought conditions,” he said.

Friday’s rain was falling at a rate of more than an inch an hour, which is the type of downpour that can trigger mud flows and flash floods, said Stuart Seto of the National Weather Service.

Series of storms roll through Southern California

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-588278b3/turbine/la-me-storms-roll-through-southland-pictures-20170120/750/750x422)

The third storm is fueled by warmer, moist air, and could dump up to 3 inches of rain in the valleys and foothills, and up to 5 inches of rain in the mountains.

Because of the rain runoff, health officials advised beachgoers to avoid areas around discharging storm drains, creeks and rivers.

Potentially harmful bacteria, debris, trash and other public health hazards from city streets and mountain areas are likely to enter ocean water through those outlets, according to a Los Angeles County Department of Public Health statement.

The health advisory is in effect until at least 7 a.m. Sunday. It could be extended, officials said.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on January 27, 2017, 04:32:23 PM
2017-01-25 - US tornado outbreak - deadliest January since 1969 and exceeded entire the 2016 death toll in two days:
http://weather.com/storms/tornado/news/january-21-22-tornado-outbreak-death-toll-higher-than-2016 (http://weather.com/storms/tornado/news/january-21-22-tornado-outbreak-death-toll-higher-than-2016)
http://www.sott.net/article/340725-US-tornado-outbreak-Deadliest-January-since-1969-and-exceeded-entire-2016-death-toll-in-two-days (http://www.sott.net/article/340725-US-tornado-outbreak-Deadliest-January-since-1969-and-exceeded-entire-2016-death-toll-in-two-days)
Title: At least 7 tornadoes touch down in Louisiana (New Orleans Whacked Again!)
Post by: RE on February 07, 2017, 03:36:56 PM
New Orleans gets whacked again!

RE

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/02/07/tornado-inflicts-major-damage-in-new-orleans-east-building-collapse-reported.html (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/02/07/tornado-inflicts-major-damage-in-new-orleans-east-building-collapse-reported.html)

At least 7 tornadoes touch down in Louisiana, state of emergency declared

By Travis Fedschun Published February 07, 2017 FoxNews.com
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At least three tornadoes touch down in Louisiana
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At least seven confirmed tornadoes hit southeast Louisiana Tuesday, causing major damage as a wave of severe thunderstorms swept through the region.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said at a news conference at least seven confirmed tornadoes touched down in the state, including two in Livingston Parish, and one in six other parishes. He declared a state of emergency in the wake of the storms.
nola twister Expand / Contract

A funnel cloud spotted in the New Orleans area. (Clemson Buras)

Edwards said while there was a wide range of destruction, "the Lord has blessed us with not a single fatality at this time."

There are at least 20 people reported injured statewide, according to Edwards.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said the city suffered "a terrible blow," and that the tornado that struck the east side of the city traveled around two miles and affected a half-mile swath of land.

"I want to think we've been through many things together, and we will get through this together with prayers," he told reporters.
Raw video: Severe storms generate tornadoes in Louisiana

The large tornado in New Orleans touched down northeast of downtown along Interstate 10 and Chef Menteur Highway, Fox 8 reported.

Images from the area showed severely damaged buildings with downed power lines strewn across the road.

SLIDESHOW: Tornadoes slam New Orleans area

Over 15,000 customers are without power in several areas of the city and surrounding area, according to Fox 8.

James Thomas, a resident of Eastern New Orleans, told the Associated Press his his whole neighborhood shows storm damage, but his house escaped the tornado. 
New Orleans Damage 2 Expand / Contract

The damage after a tornado tore through New Orleans East. (Willie Inman/Fox News)

"It's bad. I've never seen it this bad," he said. "As far as I can see, treetops are off, power lines down."
New Orleans Damage Expand / Contract

The damage after a tornado tore through New Orleans East. (Willie Inman/Fox News)

Thomas said he saw the twister coming, grabbed his motorcycle helmet and ran into his bathroom. The room then went pitch-black, he heard hail on the window, and came outside afterward to see a damage trail or about 20 to 40 feet from his house.

NASA said in a series of tweets the tornado in Eastern New Orleans impacted the Michoud Facility, but only minor injuries were reported and personnel are being accounted for
Title: The Rain in Sydney Falls Mainly on EVERYBODY
Post by: RE on February 08, 2017, 05:27:45 AM
A Wet Week in Oz.  ::)

RE

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/764113/sydney-floods-rain-houses-collapse-buildings-evacuated (http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/764113/sydney-floods-rain-houses-collapse-buildings-evacuated)

SYDNEY FLOODS: Apocalyptic storms causes collapsed houses across city

THUNDERSTORMS have battered Sydney with major floods causing houses to collapse as the Australian city braces itself for even more torrential rain.

PUBLISHED: 09:48, Tue, Feb 7, 2017 | UPDATED: 10:22, Tue, Feb 7, 2017
 

Huge downpours caused flash flooding across the city as a month’s worth of rain hit. 

Around 48mm of rain was dumped in an hour, more than all of January, with another 50mm expected tonight. 

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Roads turned to rivers and motorists were warned not to drive as firefighters rescued people from the floods. 

Related articles

Traffic has been thrown into chaos and light rail services cancelled because of the deluge. 

Weatherzone’s Sam Terry said a second thunderstorm and more flash floods are likely in the next 24 hours. 

It is thought the rain will hit during evening rush hour causing chaos for commuters. 

Sydney Weather: Severe storms batter city causing flash flooding

Mon, February 6, 2017

Severe thunderstorms with heavy falls hit the city, in what media reported as the heaviest rain in six months in Sydney, Australia.

   
   
   
   
Twitter
1 of 7
 

Weather stations say the rainfall has made it the wettest day in Sydney since August 4, 2016. 

Around 48mm of rain fell in Marrickville, 45mm in Canterbury and 35mm in Sydney. 

Observatory Hill had a total of 51mm in a matter of hours, with 35mm falling within an hour.

Residents in a Marrickville apartment block were evacuated over fears the building would collapse after a waterhole overflowed with water. 

In total, 17 residents were moved out of the building as engineers rushed in to check the foundations as heavy rain washed away parts of the ground. 

The administrator of the Inner West Council Richard Pearson said: ”Obviously we need to have a more thorough look into the reasons why this happened in order to prevent it happening again in the future.”

Roads turned to rivers and motorists were warned not to driveTWITTER

Roads turned to rivers and motorists were warned not to drive

Walkers brave the rainEPA

Walkers brave the rain

Floodwater threatens to wash away tables and chairsTWITTER

Floodwater threatens to wash away tables and chairs

It's concerning for us that people are putting themselves in danger. We just want them to stay out of floodwaters

State Emergency Service

The residents were later given the all-clear to return. 

State Emergency Service rescued 13 people trapped in the floods in Marrickville, Alexandria and Zetland and received 135 reports of roofs caving in, homes being flooded and cars trapped in rising floodwater. 

A spokeswoman for the State Emergency Service said: “All of those rescues have involved people caught in their cars in floodwater.

“The water did rise quite rapidly we had quite a downpour over a matter of hours really, causing roads to flood quite quickly.

“It's concerning for us that people are putting themselves in danger. We just want them to stay out of floodwaters."

Heavy thunderstorms have battered Sydney causing flash floodingEPA/ TWITTER

Heavy thunderstorms have battered Sydney causing flash flooding

A roof of a house collapsed as 48mm of rain battered the regionTWITTER

A roof of a house collapsed as 48mm of rain battered the region

A woman walks through the heavy rain in SydneyEPA

A woman walks through the heavy rain in Sydney

Police stand outside an apartment block after it was evacuated following heavy rains in MarrickvilleREUTERS

Police stand outside an apartment block after it was evacuated following heavy rains in Marrickville

Around 2,000 homes and bossiness have been left without power as almost 2,500 lightning strikes hit near Sydney Airport. 

Airport officials said operations are running as normal but there could be delays later today. 

A number of flights were diverted to Melbourne and Canberra as several flights were forced to circle the airport until it was safe to land. 

Traffic came to a standstill on the Anzac Bridge as flooding gripped the city. 

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) has forecast a near 100 per cent chance of rain in Sydney tonight. 

Extreme weather in pictures

Fri, October 28, 2016

The weather across the world is getting wilder and weirder, causing chaos, death and destruction around the globe.

   
   
   
   
These frightening photos of lightning from a hurricane above Miami, Florida in the USA were taken after the storm left a trail of destruction in the Caribbean.
Caters News Agency
1 of 96

These frightening photos of lightning from a hurricane above Miami, Florida in the USA were taken after the storm left a trail of destruction in the Caribbean.

Light rail services have been cancelled between Dulwich Hill and Central with reports of trees falling across tracks near Rooty Hill and Wolli Creek. 

A house in Tennyson Point, in the north-west of the city completely collapsed in the rainfall with firefighters saying nobody was home at the time. 

Debris was seen scattered across the street as firefighters said the house will have to be completely rebuilt. 

The Surpreme Court was also evacuated with dozens of people involved in trials ordered to leave the building on King Street. 

Floodwater was seen leaking into the building as the alarm was trigged.

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 08, 2017, 12:27:56 PM
http://www.theage.com.au/national/welcome-to-hell-on-earth-heatwave-builds-across-eastern-australia-20170208-gu8nip.html (http://www.theage.com.au/national/welcome-to-hell-on-earth-heatwave-builds-across-eastern-australia-20170208-gu8nip.html)

Getting hot down under.

JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on February 08, 2017, 12:47:47 PM
We are having a nice warm summer here, too, except it's still supposed to be the middle of winter.

Record high here yesterday of 88 degrees F.  85 F today. Not off-the-scale weather, but not quite normal, by any means.
Title: Weather Whiplash
Post by: RE on February 09, 2017, 04:48:53 AM
From a record 66F on Wednesday to a Blizzard on Thursday!  ::)

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/09/us/snowstorm-northeast-weather/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/09/us/snowstorm-northeast-weather/index.html)

Northeast braces for snowstorm as airlines cancel flights, cities shut schools

By Madison Park, Kwegyirba Croffie and Ralph Ellis, CNN

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C4K_GJzWIAArVOp.jpg)

Updated 6:00 AM ET, Thu February 9, 2017
northeast winter weather snowstorm

    Northeast could get socked with as much as a foot of snow
    More than 2,600 flights canceled in advance of storm

(CNN)The Northeast is hunkering down for what could be the most significant storm of the season, which is forecast to dump a foot of snow and bring blizzard conditions in some areas Thursday.
Airlines have canceled more than 2,700 flights ahead of the storm. New York, Boston and Philadelphia have closed their public schools for the day. The latter two cities have also declared snow emergencies, which affect city services and parking. All state offices in New Jersey have been closed for non-essential personnel.
More than 60 million people will be dealing with the wintry weather, said CNN meteorologist Pedram Javaheri.

Winter storm warnings are in effect stretching from Pennsylvania, through parts of New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts as well as the New England states.
The storm is expected to bring strong winds, hitting around daybreak with 30-mph winds and creating whiteout conditions at times, CNN meteorologist Dave Hennen said.
Impact on Eastern cities
The National Weather Service estimated that eight to 12 inches of snow in New York and 12 to 15 inches of snow in Boston are possible.
Officials warned residents to avoid morning travel as heavy snow can make roads slick and dangerous. The National Weather Service in New York warned that the conditions will "rapidly deteriorate around daybreak" and that two inches of snow could fall per hour.
Flightaware.com reported that airlines had canceled more than 2,700 flights affecting the United States on Thursday. Most of the cancellations are in Newark, New Jersey; Boston; and New York's LaGuardia and JFK airports.
The good news is that the storm is expected to move out quickly. However, snowfall in Boston could continue into the weekend, and temperatures won't rise above freezing there until Sunday, according to the National Weather Service.
The storm won't cause hardship much below Washington. It will get less than half an inch of snow Thursday morning, according to the National Weather Service.
Schools affected
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted Wednesday night that his city would close its schools. About 1 million students attend the city's 1,800 public schools, making it the largest school district in the US.
Boston Mayor Martin Walsh said the city's public school system would be shut Thursday, and he urged people to be "looking out for your elderly neighbors, disabled neighbors, neighbors who might not be able to help themselves." Boston has 125 public schools attended by about 56,000 students.
The School District of Philadelphia, which has 134,041 students, is also closed for the day.
Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy said state colleges and courts would be closed. "This is a serious challenge when you talk about 8-14 inches" of snow, he said.
Several colleges in the Northeast including all City University of New York (CUNY) colleges, Rutgers in New Jersey and MIT in Massachusetts are closed Thursday.
Don't call it a nor'easter
The storm is expected to pack a punch, but it's not a nor'easter.
Nor'easters get their name from the winds that blow from the northeast ahead of a storm's arrival as it moves up the Eastern Seaboard, remaining offshore.
This storm will move from west to east, from land out to sea, so it can't be classified as a nor'easter.
The region did have a nor'easter on January 24. That storm jammed roads and caused major disruptions in air travel.
Up and down temps
New Yorkers will experience a bit of "weather whiplash" as they enjoyed sunny, warm weather on Wednesday.
Temperatures on Wednesday set a new record high of 65 at JFK International Airport, nearly 30 degrees above average for early February.
But the mild conditions proved to be short-lived as temperatures began plummeting overnight, paving the way for snow.

CNN's Brandon Miller contributed to this report.
Title: I'm Dreaming of a White Valentines Day
Post by: RE on February 09, 2017, 09:37:36 AM
I wish we had more of these when I was a kid. :(  I only got the Lindsay Snowstorm and maybe 2 other decent ones that shut the schools down and I could sled all day.  Now you get at least 2 a year.  Very unfair.  I was born at the wrong time.

RE


http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/new-york-boston-foot-snow-schools-closed-flights-canceled-n718631 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/new-york-boston-foot-snow-schools-closed-flights-canceled-n718631)

Deadly Snowstorm Wallops New York, Boston: Schools Closed, Flights Canceled

by Alexander Smith and Phil Helsel
[Winter storm will bring up to 16 inches of snow in New England]
Winter storm will bring up to 16 inches of snow in New England 1:38

The Northeast has gone from short sleeves to snow boots in less than 24 hours as a deadly storm barreled into the region.

More than 3,600 flights were canceled and all public schools in New York City, Boston and Philadelphia were closed Thursday as some 50 million people braced for a nasty nor'easter that could dump a foot of snow or more — the largest so far this season.

The first reported storm-related death occurred in New York City, where a doorman was killed while shoveling snow around 9:30 a.m. ET and fell through a glass window, officials said during a news conference.
The Latest on the Northeast Storm

    Fifty million people from Maine, along the Interstate 95 corridor, down through Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., are being affected by a winter storm dumping about 2 inches of snow per hour.
    Snow total estimates for major cities: Boston, 12-18 inches; New York City, 8-12 inches; Philadelphia, 3-5 inches.
    A blizzard warning has been issued for southeastern Massachusetts, and eastern and central Long Island, New York. Wind gusts have reached about 50 mph in some areas.
    More than 3,600 flights have been canceled, with at least 185 more already scrapped for Friday, FlightAware reported. Runways were temporarily closed at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport at 11 a.m. and could reopen by noon.
    Schools throughout Boston, New York and Philadelphia are closed, as well as some government institutions.

The winter whiplash comes just a day after states along the East Coast were enjoying record highs in the 60s and 70s.

"It's going to be a big shock to people, no doubt," said Michael Palmer, lead meteorologist at The Weather Channel. "It's quite unusual to have such a change in the space of one day."

The storm will really ramp up around 2 p.m., but will have tapered off a few hours later, forecasters said.

Officials, meanwhile, warned of treacherous travel conditions, and one snow plow on Long Island, New York, appeared to have trouble navigating the roads when it crashed into a pole.

Steven Bellone, the Suffolk County executive on Long Island, said there were 18 car crashes reported Thursday morning amid whiteout conditions. He declared a state of emergency for his county.

There's a "tremendous amount of snow falling at a very high rate with wind gusts up to 50 mph," Bellone told reporters. "Those are conditions that are just not possible to be driving in."

Neighboring Nassau County reported 19 accidents, while Connecticut had about 30, officials said.

The storm began rolling down the heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor as snow in the early hours, hitting Boston at around 6 a.m. ET and New York City an hour later. Several institutions were closed out of precaution, including courts in Massachusetts and the United Nations headquarters in Manhattan.

The storm could undergo what meteorologists call "bombogenesis" — or a "weather bomb" — which is when the system's central pressure nosedives by 24 millibars within 24 hours.
[Watch Out Polar Vortex: Bombogenesis Is Here]
Watch Out Polar Vortex: Bombogenesis Is Here 0:42

This can cause blizzard conditions, sometimes accompanied by lightning, according to The Weather Channel.

Forecasters said heavy snow and high winds were set to slam coastal New York and Massachusetts. Boston could get up to 18 inches of snow and New York City up to 15 inches, according to the National Weather Service, although a foot in each city was more likely. Philadelphia could get more than 6 inches.

"We are asking folks to stay off the roads tomorrow and not travel unless absolutely necessary," Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker warned. "The last time we had a storm of this nature, accumulation turned out to be much higher than originally anticipated."

Anticipating widespread impact from the storm, airlines canceled more than 2,700 arrivals and departures Thursday, according to the flight-tracking website FlightAware.

The winter storm is being caused by a southward plunge in the polar jet stream, causing a low-pressure system that's moving northeast, according to The Weather Channel.

A swath of coast from Maine through New York into Philadelphia was under a winter storm warning and much of Long Island and Cape Cod, Massachusetts, were under blizzard warnings.
Image: Pedestrians walk through blowing snow in front of Radio City Music Hall
Pedestrians walk through blowing snow in front of Radio City Music Hall in Midtown Manhattan, New York, on Feb. 9, 2017. Matthew Nighswander / NBC News

"What may happen is people will get on the road and it's not particularly bad and then suddenly it gets to 8 o'clock [a.m.], and I will tell you an inch and a half to 2 inches of snow an hour is hard for people to handle," Connecticut Gov. Dan Malloy told reporters Wednesday.

The storm system was expected to be a "quick hit — in and out," according to Michael Palmer, with the snow expected to stop in the afternoon.

The fast flurry couldn't be a further cry from the record highs seen on Wednesday, when New York hit a pleasant 62 degrees, Philadelphia reached 66 and it was a balmy 72 Washington, D.C.

"You're seeing people out there on bicycles today. Don't be fooled," New York City Emergency Management Commissioner Joseph Esposito warned Wednesday.
[Watch Live: See Winter Storm Sweep Through Time Square]
Watch Live: See Winter Storm Sweep Through Time Square

Earlier Wednesday, icy conditions were suspected in a 55-vehicle pileup in Wakefield, Massachusetts, north of Boston. Eight people were taken to hospitals, but none of the injuries were considered life-threatening, NBC Boston reported.

"When I tapped my brakes, it was just a sheet of ice, and there's nothing I could really do after that. Everybody just started sliding into each other," Nathan St. Onge told the station.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: JRM on February 09, 2017, 11:57:55 AM
We are having a nice warm summer here, too, except it's still supposed to be the middle of winter.

Record high here yesterday of 88 degrees F.  85 F today. Not off-the-scale weather, but not quite normal, by any means.


I saw blooming crocus here in the high desert of Santa Fe yesterday.  At 7,000 feet elevation.  It's not like your piece of Texas, though, thank heaven.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on February 09, 2017, 12:32:03 PM
Fresh weeds here at the Grand Canyon (south Rim).
Kathy & I were discussing eradication methods just earlier today.
She may hire "the guy" & I said I'll slow dance with the rock rack initially.
The male quail are already starting to chest butt each other & the bunnies are
chasing each other around the living desert.
Buds on the apricot tree as well.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on February 09, 2017, 06:14:08 PM
Lake Tahoe Gained 8.7 Billion Gallons Of Water In Just 2 Days



Trevor Nace ,   CONTRIBUTOR
I cover geology, earth science, and natural disasters. 


Lake Tahoe has had a great past few months, receiving 8.7 billion gallons of water in just two days. It hasn't stopped there; the lake has been receiving tremendous amounts of water lately to fill the lake above its natural rim level.

The sudden rise in lake level is a result of several winter storms that hit the lake in late 2016 and early 2017. The National Weather Service calculated that since Jan. 1 of 2017 the lake has gained over 40 billion gallons of water. The stormy weather and heavy rains don't appear to be slowing down with sequential blizzards hitting the region in almost weekly intervals.

NOAA calculated that in the two-day span from Dec. 9 through 11 Lake Tahoe gained 8,690,131,707 gallons of fresh water. The natural rim of Lake Tahoe is 6,223 feet and on Dec. 11 the height got up to 6,222.97 feet.

Lake Tahoe water level from December 6th through December 13th shows rapid 8.9-billion-gallon increase (Credit: USGS)
Lake Tahoe water level from December 6th through December 13th shows rapid 8.9-billion-gallon increase (Credit: USGS)

That's the equivalent of filling 13,158 Olympic size swimming pools. It is early in the winter season for Lake Tahoe to gain so much water and a good sign for drought conditions in Nevada and Southern California this year.

Lake Tahoe gained 8.9 billion gallons of water in 2 days (Credit: National Weather Service)
Lake Tahoe gained 8.9 billion gallons of water in 2 days (Credit: National Weather Service)

Last year this time Lake Tahoe's level was 6,222.1 feet, whereas this year the level is 6,225.2, over 3 feet higher. With Lake Tahoe's surface area of 191 square miles, adding three feet of water amounts to a tremendous addition to the lake's water storage. In fact, the total Lake Tahoe volume is estimated at 39 trillion gallons of water.

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the United States and is fed by 63 tributaries that drain 505 square miles known as the Lake Tahoe Watershed. Although approximately half of the water entering the lake is from rain or snow falling directly onto the lake surface. The only outlet is the Truckee River, but doesn't tell the whole story of water leaving the lake. In fact, some estimates point to over 100 billion gallons of water evaporates from the lake every year. This is enhanced by the high elevation, low cloud cover and large surface area of the lake.

Lake Tahoe water level since December 1st 2016 has risen almost 2.5 feet. (Credit: USGS)
Lake Tahoe water level since December 1st 2016 has risen almost 2.5 feet. (Credit: USGS)

This recent trend of intense storms is good news for residents of Nevada and southern California who have witnessed one of the most extreme drought seasons in recent memory for the past few years. The Sierra Nevada snowpack and runoff is at its highest level in 22 years. It's going to be a little easier to be a California resident, at least for a short while.


Trevor Nace is a geologist, Forbes contributor, and adventurer. Follow him on Twitter @trevornace


http://www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2017/02/07/lake-tahoe-gained-8-7-billion-gallons-water-2-days/#eceb21d36c63 (http://www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2017/02/07/lake-tahoe-gained-8-7-billion-gallons-water-2-days/#eceb21d36c63)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on February 10, 2017, 08:59:20 AM
I'll see your billions & raise you a TRILLION  :icon_mrgreen:

http://www.youtube.com/v/6NTwjd0t2pU&fs=1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 03:02:56 PM
I've yet to see a North American or European winter.
Only ever been in Summer and early Autumn  to these continents.
I have trouble imagining multiple meters of snow and blizzard conditions talked about.
A blizzard for us is -2 or -3 degrees overnight and maybe 1mm of snow which is gone by lunch time. In the alps, around the ski fields they get some heavier falls but nothing like you guys get of the arctic blasts. No permanent snow in Oz, and getting less and less winter snow as well.

JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on February 11, 2017, 03:17:41 PM
I've yet to see a North American or European winter.
Only ever been in Summer and early Autumn  to these continents.
I have trouble imagining multiple meters of snow and blizzard conditions talked about.
A blizzard for us is -2 or -3 degrees overnight and maybe 1mm of snow which is gone by lunch time. In the alps, around the ski fields they get some heavier falls but nothing like you guys get of the arctic blasts. No permanent snow in Oz, and getting less and less winter snow as well.

JOW

Hit Buffalo sometime in the winter is you really want the full Snow experience.  I don't think there is a bigger snow dump in the world.  When the Lake Effect snow gets rolling, it's simply amazing how much will come down and how fast.  I went up there a few times in the winter to visit friends at SUNY Buffalo and you literally had to walk through CAVERNS of snow to go from one place to another.  I'm talking piled up snow from repeated blizzards that was over your head height, and that is if you are 6' tall.

(http://snowbrains.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/chinookpass.jpg)

About the 4th year I lived up here, we had one incredibly snowy winter.  Plow boys made a lot of money that year!  There were literal MOUNTAINS of snow in every parking lot, 30-40' high from all the plowing.  They had to bring in the front end loaders to pile it up.

Most of the time though, we don't get that much snow, just a few 1' events each year.  Cold air doesn't hold much mositure for big snow events all the time.  Not so in Buffalo though, because of the Lake Effect.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 04:52:40 PM
http://www.theage.com.au/environment/weather/sydney-weather-fire-threat-upgraded-as-nsw-braces-for-unprecedented-conditions-20170211-guavcp.html (http://www.theage.com.au/environment/weather/sydney-weather-fire-threat-upgraded-as-nsw-braces-for-unprecedented-conditions-20170211-guavcp.html)

Sydney was under water one day and getting 46 degrees and fire warnings the next.

As the atmosphere warms it holds more moisture, hence big dumps of rain and snow.
The flip side is more heat gives higher evaporation and the bush dries out quicker, combined with more energy in the atmosphere creating stronger winds.
3 ingredients for the fire storm recipe.

JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 05:19:55 PM
NSW is burning.
Real time data:
http://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/ (http://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/)

Not good.

JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 05:24:51 PM
http://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/fire-information/major-fire-updates/mfu?id=863 (http://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/fire-information/major-fire-updates/mfu?id=863)

Only one out of control so far out of 50 by mid day.
a lot of people holding their breath.

JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on February 11, 2017, 05:27:02 PM
NSW is burning.
Real time data:
http://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/ (http://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/)

Not good.

JOW

Most of the Icons are "Advice" icons, I only see 1 RED "Emergency Warning" Icon, which would indicate an ongoing fire and imminent threat.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 05:53:13 PM
Yes correct. So far minimal damage. A few houses lost. No news of deaths.

Because fires are an annual and natural pert of the landscape here a fire is left to burn if it is not a threat to life or property. Contained can mean it just has not yet got to and crossed containment lines.... Winds are not gusting too high so crews may be able to maintain fire lines.

Walgett in states North is 46 degrees and 50km/h winds.
Area not heavily populated or much dense forest so usually fires are low intensity and can be contained or just left to burn out.

Warambungles State Forrets is out of control. It sa big area with large populations nearby.

If it gets out of control in Walami or Blue Mountains Greater Sydney area is Threatened.

NSW usually does not have the huge bushfire threat like Victoria.
There is usually drier conditions and less annual rainfall inland which means less fuel.
Victoria is cooler, but high spring rainfall means lots of fuel.

JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on February 11, 2017, 06:06:39 PM

If it gets out of control in Walami or Blue Mountains Greater Sydney area is Threatened.


If it gets anywhere near Sydney, I would expect them to start a Backfire.  Backfires are a last resort, but when high population density areas are threatened, they do it.

(http://s.hswstatic.com/gif/fire-with-fire-2.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on February 11, 2017, 06:38:13 PM
It was 60 degrees here Thursday in Beantown.

Now I am buried in over a foot of snow with another foot headed my way Sunday and an undisclosed amount for background weather Wednesday.

Crazy weather indeed. It's gone Bonkers.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Nearingsfault on February 11, 2017, 07:08:07 PM
We usually have a very cold period from mid January to end of feb then just cold after that.  The hard cold has not shown up this year.  With milder days you get more moisture in the air so we are getting more snow and rain... I have wondered if this is the weird twist climate chaos will throw at us; dry summers, crazy snowy winters. Trying to clean off the 20x40 hoophouse before the next storm crushes it. Already amazed its lasted this long. 3 freezing rain events this winter.  More snow then we have ever gotten in 12 years. Attaching a shot from the other day and a july shot from the other side for comparison.
Best regards,    David Baillie
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: g on February 11, 2017, 07:28:04 PM
Good Night Diners, I am knocked out from shoveling snow off the front and back stairs.

Too think I was cheering St Valentines day, a sure sign of Springs soon arrival and May weather a few days ago.

What a Pipe Dream that was.  :laugh: :exp-grin:
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 07:38:09 PM
Back burning is ok if you can contain the back burn fire... Needs to be pretty big to halt these fires.
Have a look at the areas involved. Warumbungles fire is 2000 hectares. 2.5 acres to the Hectare.
Australia is a big country with a relatively small population. About size of lower 48 US states with population of Texas. NSW is one of the smaller states, and it is just under 1 1/2 times the size of Texas. (Everything is bigger and better in Texas?... Amateurs.)
Once you get out of the cities there are not a lot of people. We don't have a huge fire services. Most FRS (Royal Fire Service NSW) and VFA (Victorian Fire Authority) are volunteers from local community.

On black Saturday 2009 the Kilmore East fire came our way over a small 1 or 2 km front until the wind changed 90 degrees to the East. This instantly opened up a running fire front of more than 15km, which ran up over Kinglake etc and eventually ended up combining with other fires to give a running fire 15 or 20km wide and 70km long.... 125000 hectares burnt in the Kilmore East fire that day. That was only one of the fires that day.

A local police sergeant was at flanks when wind changed at Wandong, 10km to my North. He sat on 160km/h heading towards Whittlesea roughly 30km East of me. The fire front beat him to Whitlesea. In the end the crews pulled out of the line as it would have been suicide to stand in the way of the front. My mate is a CFA captain in the Clarkfield brigade (all volunteers). He and his crew took shelter in Wandong Caltex service station of all places as the fire front went through. It was the only place not on fire! He said the winds and heat made the fire too fast to outrun and impossible to attack. All they could do was black out after the front had gone through.

In the end nearly half a million Hectares burnt; More than a million acres, 2000 houses and 173 people.

After Black Saturday I do not take summer fires lightly.. Sorry. Bad memories of that day.
 
JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on February 11, 2017, 07:47:49 PM
NSW is one of the smaller states, and it is just under 1 1/2 times the size of Texas. (Everything is bigger and better in Texas?... Amateurs.)

Alaska is 2 1/2 times the size of Texas, and when we get a real big one going, there is no stopping it until it stops itself.  Population for the entire STATE is less then the population of a suburb in Dallas.  LOL..

RE
Title: Australia: 'Catastrophic' bushfire warning for parts of New South Wales
Post by: RE on February 11, 2017, 08:23:03 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/11/asia/australia-bushfire-risk/ (http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/11/asia/australia-bushfire-risk/)

Australia: 'Catastrophic' bushfire warning for parts of New South Wales
Laura Smith Spark-Profile-Image

By Laura Smith-Spark, CNN

Updated 8:51 AM ET, Sat February 11, 2017

(http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170211081945-03-australia-heatwave-0211-exlarge-169.jpg)
A lifeguard supervises swimmers at Sydney's Bondi Beach on Saturday, February 11.

Story highlights

    Fire chief: "It's not another bad fire weather day. This is as bad as it gets"
    Firefighters are battling 49 fires in New South Wales amid an ongoing heat wave

(CNN)Firefighters warn that Australia's New South Wales region faces "catastrophic" fire conditions Sunday as strong winds push hot air across a region already parched by a heat wave.
Residents are urged to avoid or leave bushfire-prone areas.
"It's not another summer's day. It's not another bad fire weather day. This is as bad as it gets," Rural Fire Services Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said Saturday during a news conference.

"It is simply not a safe environment, which is why we're making it very clear to people that the only safe place to be is not in at-risk areas," he said.
There are 49 fires now burning across New South Wales, including 17 that are not contained, Fitzsimmons said. About 300 firefighters are actively fighting blazes, and thousands more are on standby, he said.
"We need to be clear that in catastrophic conditions, it is the most dangerous of conditions. Fires will start early, and they will spread very quickly," Fitzsimmons said.
He warned that the fire service does not have the resources to knock on every door to warn residents if fires spread quickly, but he said officials would do their best to save lives and homes.
The "catastrophic" fire danger conditions are forecast for the Greater Hunter, Central Ranges and North Western areas, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology said. Half a dozen other areas face "extreme" and "severe" fire danger warnings for Sunday.
A "catastrophic" warning carries the risk of significant loss of life and the destruction of many homes, according to the NSW Rural Fire Service.
'Unprecedented' weather events
The Bureau of Meteorology warned in a news release Saturday that New South Wales "could experience its hottest February day on record tomorrow, as extreme heat wave conditions peak across the state."
The temperature in one Sydney suburb, Penrith, was forecast to reach 45 degrees Celsius (113 degrees Fahrenheit) on Saturday, it said.
A total fire ban is in place across the whole state for the weekend, as authorities seek to prevent new bushfires igniting. Those could prove extremely difficult to control, given the conditions.
Record temperatures
Part of the problem is an approaching weather front to the south that is dragging a buildup of hot air from the interior of the continent down across New South Wales, the Bureau of Meteorology said.
Swimmers jump into the surf at Sydney's Bondi Beach as the city swelters Saturday.
Swimmers jump into the surf at Sydney's Bondi Beach as the city swelters Saturday.
It comes on the heels of a sustained heat wave. January was the hottest month on record for Sydney since 1859, the bureau said, and some places in the state are breaking records for the number of consecutive days at high temperatures.
At the same time, record rainfall in New South Wales last winter led to high plant growth, providing ample fuel for bushfires to spread.
The conditions may spark fears of a repeat of "Black Saturday" in 2009, when soaring temperatures and high winds fanned the flames of a series of bushfires across the state of Victoria. Those fires left 173 people dead, injured 500 more and destroyed thousands of homes.
Some relief from the extreme heat in New South Wales is expected Monday, the Bureau of Meteorology said.

CNN's Hilary Whiteman contributed to this report.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 09:36:55 PM
Alaska is reasonably big.
Double the size of New South Wales, nearly as big as Queensland, and just over half the size of Western Australia.

JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 09:44:51 PM
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-12/people-told-to-leave-properties-as-bushfire-emergency-grips-nsw/8263674 (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-12/people-told-to-leave-properties-as-bushfire-emergency-grips-nsw/8263674)

Getting worse.


JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on February 11, 2017, 10:11:43 PM
Should start another thread on population densities and best places to set up for TEOTWAWKI.
USA has 10 times population density of Oz. I am surprised. Alaska is .5 people per square km, Australia 3.3 and the entire USA 33. The world land mass is 50.

JOW
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on February 11, 2017, 10:58:11 PM
Should start another thread on population densities and best places to set up for TEOTWAWKI.
USA has 10 times population density of Oz. I am surprised. Alaska is .5 people per square km, Australia 3.3 and the entire USA 33. The world land mass is 50.

You can start such a thread JoW.  All members can start threads on topics of interest to them.

We have discussed this topic on many occassions, and I wrote an article Top Ten North American Bugout Locations (http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/2012/04/26/top-ten-north-america-bugout-locations/) quite a while back.

Oz has such a low population density because most of it is desert and uninhabitable.  Desert areas always have the lowest population density looked at in aggregate.  To get a true reading, you have to divide the population not by total landmass, but by landmass that could actually support human life. All of Alaska can support Human Life, because there is water everywhere.  The main limiting factor is getting through the cold winters without much in the way of heating. It also suffers the problem in the interior that the terrain is so rough.  To this day, there are almost no roads beyond the main road which follows the right of way of the Alaska Railroad to Fairbanks, and then the Al-Can which connects Alaska to Canada through the Yukon Territory.  The engineering feat to build the Alaska Railroad when it was first built was an astounding achievement.  You can't get to Juneau (the capital) from Anchorage (main port and commerce center) over roads for instance.  The Al-Can itself only got fully paved over in 1996, and long stretches are still barely 2 lanes wide and no pleasure to drive.  100s of miles between fuel stations in the middle of nowhere.

People here like doctors and dentists making in the mid to high 6 figures all own small single engine float planes to fly to their retreat cabins on a lake in the bush.  You can't get there any other way except in the winter by dogsled or snow machine, or in summer by hiking it or on horseback.  Not even off road motorcycles usually can handle the terrain.

RE
Title: Crews battle New South Wales bushfires amid 'catastrophic' conditions
Post by: RE on February 12, 2017, 12:51:34 AM
https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/feb/12/catastrophic-bushfire-conditions-threaten-nsw-as-heatwave-continues (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/feb/12/catastrophic-bushfire-conditions-threaten-nsw-as-heatwave-continues)

Crews battle New South Wales bushfires amid 'catastrophic' conditions

(http://www.lizzyrose.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Fires-NSW.jpg)

Rural Fire Service says 2,500 firefighters in the field, with the situation most serious around Port Macquarie, Dunedoo, Mudgee, Boggabri and Kempsey
Bushfires are threatening small communities in NSW’s central west near the town of Dunedoo.


Melissa Davey and agencies
@MelissaLDavey

Sunday 12 February 2017 03.20 EST

Conditions rated as “catastrophic” left New South Wales firefighters battling dozens of blazes across the state with fears dozens of properties could be lost.

Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons told reporters late on Sunday there were about 2,500 firefighters out in the field as more than 30 fires burned out of control.

Fires were most serious near Port Macquarie, Dunedoo, Mudgee, Boggabri and Kempsey, with the RFS issuing emergency warnings and telling residents it was too late to leave.

Fitzsimmons said at 4pm that firefighters had many hours of work ahead of them, with a southerly expected to move through. “Southerly changes always present significant challenges and significant dangers for firefighters and those that are in and around fire affected areas,” he said.

Dozens of properties might be damaged or destroyed near Port Macquarie and Dunedoo, Fitzsimmons said, and there may have been one home lost in Boggabri.

“At this stage we have got some unconfirmed reports of homes being lost, sheds being lost and machinery being lost, and other agricultural assets being lost on some of these fire grounds,” he said.

“A soon as it is safe and we are able to do so we will have building impact assessment specialists entering these fire grounds on the ground ... to try and articulate the level of loss.”

The Kamilaroi Highway near Boggabri, the Golden Highway near Dunedoo and Thunderbolts Way near Gloucester were closed due to bushfires, the Transport Management Centre said.

A large blaze was burning in the state’s central west, near Dunedoo, 430km north-west of Sydney, covering 2,000ha and jumping containment lines. Residents of the villages of Uarbry and Turill were urged to leave their homes if their path was clear. Emergency alert telephone messages were sent to people in the area.
Unprecedented fire danger for NSW as heatwaves continue across south-east
Read more

“In these conditions, the fire will spread quickly. It will be difficult for firefighters to contain the fire,” the RFS said.

Large areas of NSW have experienced unprecedented fire danger conditions over the weekend as a trough produced hot, dry and gusty winds.

“This will produce widespread severe to catastrophic fire conditions in central and northern districts,” the Bureau of Meteorology said.

The bureau issued a catastrophic fire danger warning for the Greater Hunter, Central Ranges and North Western regions and extreme or severe danger warnings for many surrounding areas.

Bureau of Meteorology forecaster Gabrielle Woodhouse said conditions may worsen as relative humidity dropped.

“We’ve got the strong, gusty north-westerly winds and they’re already drying things out,” she said.

“It’s just getting hotter and hotter and getting windier.”

NSW rural fire service warns people not to get caught in front of bushfires.

A statewide fire ban is in place amid scorching temperatures. Scone in the upper Hunter region, north of Sydney, hit 44C at midday and Walgett, in northern NSW, reached 46.4C at 2pm. Coonamble in the state’s central west registered 45.5C at 2.30pm.

“The simple message to the community in those areas particularly affected by catastrophic fire conditions is: do not be in a position where you may find yourself in front of a fire because you won’t survive it,” deputy fire commissioner Rob Rogers told ABC TV.

Commissioner Fitzsimmons said conditions were worse than those on Black Saturday in 2009, which claimed 173 lives and has been described as one of Australia’s worst peacetime disasters.

“These are unprecedented conditions not only in NSW but Australia and worse than the forecast for Black Saturday in Victoria,” he said.

Police pleaded with residents to heed warnings from authorities after three teenage bushwalkers were rescued from the Marramarra national park on the Hawkesbury River near Sydney.

The two women and one man set off about 2.30pm on Saturday carrying heavy backpacks and quickly ran out of water. They called emergency services and were rescued after 6pm suffering mild heat exposure and dehydration.

The acting assistant commissioner Kyle Stewart said the actions of the trio jeopardised the safety of both themselves and first responders.

“While the incident had a good outcome, it could have had a very different ending,” he said. “The simple message is stay out of the national parks and state forests and make sure you avoid any outdoor activities that will put you at risk.”

    NSW RFS (@NSWRFS)

    Revised Fire Danger Ratings - Southern Ranges & Eastern Riverina now Very High Fire Danger. Report fires to Triple Zero (000) #NSWRFS pic.twitter.com/Qv5pK9880r
    February 11, 2017

The heatwave across south-east Australia continued to break records. Parts of western Sydney reached 47C on Saturday afternoon, including Penrith, which experienced its hottest day on record.

The outback town of White Cliffs, in NSW’s north-west, broke the record for the hottest minimum overnight temperature. Residents endured a stifling night with a low of only 34.2 degrees.

Canberra recorded its second consecutive 40-degree day for only the third time in its history, while Sydney’s Observatory Hill broke the record for the longest-running spell of days above 35C, which now sits at 10.

Why Australian cities are at risk of power outages

A cooler change was expected to blow into Sydney late on Sunday with temperatures in the city not forecast to rise above 30C and a possible shower.
Queensland swelters
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Records were broken across southern Queensland as the heatwave swept through.
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Brisbane reached a maximum temperature of 37.6C just before noon on Sunday, shy of the sweltering 39C predicted by the Bureau of Meteorology.

But a reprieve from blazing conditions was not found in the remote town of Thargomindah, about 1,100km west of the capital, which took the crown for hottest February day on record at 47.2C.

All time maximum temperature records were also broken at Applethorpe, Warwick, Oakey, Gatton and Kingaroy.

Toowoomba in the Darling Downs not only had its hottest day but also reached 40C for the first time since records began.

The small town of Birdville on the south-eastern border still holds title for the state’s hottest day of 49.5C on 24 December 1972.

More than 35,000 Queenslanders took to the beach to cool off but Surf Life Saving lifeguards had to perform dozens of rescues, mostly swimmers who were outside the red and yellow flags.

A 49-year-old man was taken to Gympie Hospital in a critical condition after he attempted to rescue two boys whose inflatable toy had blown away at Norman Point beach near Tin Can Bay, south of Fraser Island.

A nine-year-old died at the scene while an eight-year-old was airlifted to Nambour hospital in a critical condition.

In Brisbane a young boy was taken to Lady Cilento gospital as a precaution after he was left alone in a hot car in a New Farm shopping centre’s underground car park.

Police urged parents not to leave their children unattended in a car, especially during such extreme weather conditions.

Paramedics have suggested swapping caffeinated drinks for water, eating small and regular meals and wearing light-coloured cotton clothing in a bid to keep hydrated.

RSPCA Queensland urged people to keep their pets cool after a dog died on Saturday morning when it was left tied to a clothes line without water.

Relief from the heat is not expected until Tuesday following the arrival of a south-easterly change.

With AAP
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: luciddreams on February 12, 2017, 06:40:59 AM
Should start another thread on population densities and best places to set up for TEOTWAWKI.
USA has 10 times population density of Oz. I am surprised. Alaska is .5 people per square km, Australia 3.3 and the entire USA 33. The world land mass is 50.

You can start such a thread JoW.  All members can start threads on topics of interest to them.

We have discussed this topic on many occassions, and I wrote an article Top Ten North American Bugout Locations (http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/2012/04/26/top-ten-north-america-bugout-locations/) quite a while back.

Oz has such a low population density because most of it is desert and uninhabitable.  Desert areas always have the lowest population density looked at in aggregate.  To get a true reading, you have to divide the population not by total landmass, but by landmass that could actually support human life. All of Alaska can support Human Life, because there is water everywhere.  The main limiting factor is getting through the cold winters without much in the way of heating. It also suffers the problem in the interior that the terrain is so rough.  To this day, there are almost no roads beyond the main road which follows the right of way of the Alaska Railroad to Fairbanks, and then the Al-Can which connects Alaska to Canada through the Yukon Territory.  The engineering feat to build the Alaska Railroad when it was first built was an astounding achievement.  You can't get to Juneau (the capital) from Anchorage (main port and commerce center) over roads for instance.  The Al-Can itself only got fully paved over in 1996, and long stretches are still barely 2 lanes wide and no pleasure to drive.  100s of miles between fuel stations in the middle of nowhere.

People here like doctors and dentists making in the mid to high 6 figures all own small single engine float planes to fly to their retreat cabins on a lake in the bush.  You can't get there any other way except in the winter by dogsled or snow machine, or in summer by hiking it or on horseback.  Not even off road motorcycles usually can handle the terrain.

RE

You make it sound like heaven on earth RE.  I'd love to live somewhere like that. 
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on February 16, 2017, 05:52:35 PM
2017-02-14 - Temperature hits almost 100 degrees in winter in Mangum (Oklahoma):
http://thinkprogress.org/its-been-45-above-normal-in-oklahoma-this-february-ba30f7bde27a (http://thinkprogress.org/its-been-45-above-normal-in-oklahoma-this-february-ba30f7bde27a)
http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2017/02/oklahoma-temperatures-hit-nearly-100f.html (http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2017/02/oklahoma-temperatures-hit-nearly-100f.html)
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10028657061 (http://www.democraticunderground.com/10028657061)
http://newsok.com/article/5537866 (http://newsok.com/article/5537866)

Quote: "Oklahoma just endured a spell of exceptionally hot weather. Mangum, Oklahoma saw temperatures close to 100º F, setting a state record. The average February high in Mangum is 56º F."

Note: Holy sh#t, that's crrrazy! Only one state over from me. If that happened here in Misery in the middle of winter, I'd be freaking out. Kinda freaking out anyway!
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: luciddreams on February 17, 2017, 05:49:13 AM
2017-02-14 - Temperature hits almost 100 degrees in winter in Mangum (Oklahoma):
http://thinkprogress.org/its-been-45-above-normal-in-oklahoma-this-february-ba30f7bde27a (http://thinkprogress.org/its-been-45-above-normal-in-oklahoma-this-february-ba30f7bde27a)
http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2017/02/oklahoma-temperatures-hit-nearly-100f.html (http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2017/02/oklahoma-temperatures-hit-nearly-100f.html)
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10028657061 (http://www.democraticunderground.com/10028657061)
http://newsok.com/article/5537866 (http://newsok.com/article/5537866)

Quote: "Oklahoma just endured a spell of exceptionally hot weather. Mangum, Oklahoma saw temperatures close to 100º F, setting a state record. The average February high in Mangum is 56º F."

Note: Holy sh#t, that's crrrazy! Only one state over from me. If that happened here in Misery in the middle of winter, I'd be freaking out. Kinda freaking out anyway!

That is crazy!  Looks like SoCal is getting another walloping of rain.  It will be a miracle if the Oroville dam makes it through their new "wet season" without a catastrophic failure resulting in death and mayhem for months to come. 

Here in the Upstate of SC we are having an exceptionally warm winter.  It's typical for it to warm up around Valentines day and then the temperature drops back down and we usually get a snow in late Feb to early March.  However, the next ten days the temps are in the high 60's and 70's with lows barely down into the 40s.  This shit keeps up it's going to play hell on the peaches. 

This silver lining for me is that the bermuda grass will wake up early and I'll be making good money again earlier than I otherwise would.  However that could backfire.  If it comes out of dormancy, and it goes getting cold as hell again towards the beginning of spring, it could be July before the grass is growing again. 

Title: Re: Crazy Weather-Storm Lucifer pounds Cali...
Post by: azozeo on February 17, 2017, 01:54:42 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/4YV9Qv2yRCI&fs=1
Title: Live updates: Strongest storm in years moving into L.A. area
Post by: RE on February 17, 2017, 06:44:50 PM
http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-live-powerful-storms-moving-l-area-monster-storm-set-to-dump-whopping-4-1487340451-htmlstory.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-live-powerful-storms-moving-l-area-monster-storm-set-to-dump-whopping-4-1487340451-htmlstory.html)

Live updates: Strongest storm in years moving into L.A. area
Feb. 17, 2017, 6:17 p.m.

The strongest storm to hit Southern California in several years is expected to bring torrential rain, flash flooding and powerful winds Friday.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C43RMRRW8AAveaa.jpg)

    A flash flood watch has been issued for Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties from Friday morning through Saturday morning.
    Evacuations have been ordered in some burn areas.
    High surf could cause coastal flooding.
    Powerful winds could result in downed trees and power lines.

Feb. 17, 2017, 6:07 a.m.
Monster storm could dump record-setting rain across Southern California
Joseph Serna
Get Flash Player

What forecasters say may be the strongest storm in years could dump record-setting rain across Southern California and Los Angeles.

The storm, part of a warm “atmospheric river,” is swollen with moisture and poised to pour rain onto burn-scarred areas in local mountains and foothills.

“It’s arriving now. It’s on our doorsteps,” meteorologist Kurt Kaplan of  the National Weather Service said just before 6 a.m. “It will be in Ventura in an hour … in Los Angeles probably during rush hour.”

Between two and six inches of rain can be expected to fall over the next 24 hours, depending on the area, with some seeing rainfall at a pace of an inch an hour -- the kind of isolated, heavy downpour that can send mud and debris flows cascading into neighborhood streets.

“This will be the worst we’ve had in a while,” Kaplan said. “Today is the worst of it.”

High surf and high winds are also forecast.

Ventura could see five inches or rain, forecasters said, and Pasadena nearly that amount. Voluntary evacuations were issued for Ventura County early Friday.
Latest updates
Feb. 17, 2017, 6:13 p.m.
Video: Mudflow in the Sand fire burn area in Santa Clarita
Robert St. John
Get Flash Player
Feb. 17, 2017, 6:17 p.m.
Flooding shuts down 5 Freeway in San Fernando Valley and 110 Freeway in South L.A.
Michael Finnegan

Flooding shut down the 5 Freeway in the San Fernando Valley and the 110 in South Los Angeles on Friday, forcing rush hour motorists to seek alternatives to the two transit arteries.

Water pooled more than 2½ feet deep on both sides of the 5 in Sun Valley. The flooding stopped traffic in both directions, just south of the 170 Freeway, said Officer Stephan Brandt of the California Highway Patrol.

“People were going through and getting stuck,” he said.

Television stations showed video of abandoned cars submerged to the top of their hoods in the middle of the freeway.

In the 8600 block of San Fernando Road, 10 vehicles were stuck in the water. More than a dozen firefighters had to rescue at least eight people trapped by the fast moving water, according to the city fire department.

Flooding also blocked traffic on the southbound 110 at Slauson Avenue and the northbound 110 at Vernon Avenue, Brandt said.

Feb. 17, 2017, 5:50 p.m.
Union Station jammed; trains delayed by storm

Union Station has been hit hard by the storms.

Metrolink said many trains were being delayed for 30 minutes due to bad weather.

Feb. 17, 2017, 5:46 p.m.
110 Freeway flooded; all lanes blocked at Slauson Avenue

Add the 110 to the traffic nightmare: All lanes blocked at Slauson Avenue in South L.A. due to flooding.

Feb. 17, 2017, 5:36 p.m.
Alhambra
Tree smashes car in Alhambra
Feb. 17, 2017, 5:32 p.m.
Downed power line kills man in Sherman Oaks
Michael Finnegan

A 55-year-old man was shocked and killed by a downed power line on Friday in Sherman Oaks, police said.

The incident occurred just before 1 p.m. on Sepulveda Boulevard, just south of Burbank Boulevard. Police did not immediately identify the man.

The Los Angeles Fire Department responded to nearly 150 reports of downed wires between noon and 4 p.m. Authorities urged the public to stay away from power lines and avoid touching any person or thing that has come into contact with one.
Feb. 17, 2017, 5:29 p.m.
Flood warning for large swath of L.A. County

The National Weather Service issued flood warning for a large swath of Los Angeles County including Long Beach, Lakewood, southeast L.A, the San Gabriel and Pomona valleys, Pasadena and Burbank. The alert lasts through 8 p.m.
Feb. 17, 2017, 4:55 p.m.
Freeways and major roads flooded by rainwater
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

A powerful storm slammed into Southern California on Friday, creating a miserable evening commute.

Among the freeways and roads flooded:

    101 Freeway at Seacliff in Ventura County
    405/90 Freeway interchange in West L.A.
    5 Freeway near Sheldon Street in Sun Valley
    Highway 33 in Ojai
    Portions of Highway 138 in Antelope Valley

Title: California storm wreaks havoc, causes at least 2 deaths
Post by: RE on February 18, 2017, 12:14:16 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/02/18/southern-california-storm-floods-mudslides-accidents/98083354/ (http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/02/18/southern-california-storm-floods-mudslides-accidents/98083354/)

California storm wreaks havoc, causes at least 2 deaths
USA Today Network Charles Ventura and Chris Woodyard , USA TODAY Published 12:58 a.m. ET Feb. 18, 2017 | Updated 1 hour ago

(http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/6396456d9c64b32271ba281facbc93eb30f07301/c=199-0-3302-2333&r=x404&c=534x401/local/-/media/2017/02/18/USATODAY/USATODAY/636229728372859333-GTY-642471602.jpg)
A firefighter carries a woman from her car after it was caught in street flood as a powerful storm moves across Southern California.
(Photo: David McNew, Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES — The latest and one of the most powerful in a string of deadly storms marched through California, killing at least two people, flooding freeways, triggering mudslides and raising new fears whether the Oroville Dam will hold.

Unlike some of the past deluges to engulf what had been the drought-parched Golden State, the latest was accompanied by winds that whipped upwards of 70 miles per hour in some locales, which caused much of the damage.

In the Sherman Oaks section of Los Angeles, the winds and rain were blamed for downing power lines along a busy stretch of Sepulveda Boulevard that fell on a car underneath. The driver was electrocuted, Los Angeles police said.

Interstate 5, the major north-south artery through California, was flooded near Los Angeles with water as deep as about five feet. Rush-hour traffic came to a crawl as California Highway Patrol officers guided motorists to offramps  But drivers of big-rig trucks, taking advantage of their high clearance, waded through waters that almost rose to their hoods at times.

As the worst of the storm struck in the early afternoon, work crews — from fire departments, Caltrans and public works departments — were deployed throughout the region to respond to traffic accidents, downed trees and power lines and flooding as a result of the heavy rain.

In Victorville, a desert community east of Los Angeles, several vehicles were swept away by rushing water. One motorists was rescued from atop their vehicle. But San Bernardino County firefighters say one motorist died when their car was submerged.

Read more:

Oroville reservoir level drops as storm approaches

'Biggest storm of winter' to slam southern California

Billed as one of the most powerful storms to hit the Southland in years, residents were evacuated in some areas due to concerns of mudslides and heavy wind currents. In total, the storm had been predicted to dump four to six inches of rain in a region that had seen water restrictions after years of drought.

“This is a powerful storm that is going to have a big impact over a short amount of time,” National Weather Service meteorologist Derek Schroeter said. “The rain and wind will diminish by Saturday morning with scattered showers throughout Saturday.”

The rain could cause flooding and the Riverside County Fire Department cautioned all to avoid areas with high water and adhere to road closure signs. “Do not attempt to cross flooded roads or waterways on foot or in vehicles,” Cal Fire/Riverside County Fire Chief John Hawkins said.
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Gallery: Friday storm photos from Ventura County
 Fullscreen
Mud and debris flows near La Conchita closed down northbound Highway 101 on Friday.  CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/VENTURA COUNTY FIRE

On Interstate 15, the freeway that connects Las Vegas to Southern California, a fire engine went off the side when the water undercut the roadway beneath it. The firefighters were able to escape unhurt.

Some of the hardest hit spots in Friday storms were the mountains and hills around Ojai and the Ventura River basin, swelling rivers and creeks that have had a string of dry years.

In Studio City, two cars were swallowed by a massive sinkhole, leaving at least one person injured, ABC7 reported. Rescue crews were able to pull one person from the car and rushed the woman to a nearby hospital, the Los Angeles Fire Department said.

The Associated Press reported that more than 300 arriving and departing flights from the Los Angeles International Airport were delayed or canceled due to the storm.

In Westlake Village, the water in the Las Virgenes reservoir could reach its spillway for the first time in more than 40 years. The reservoir has never spilled since it was first filled in 1974, but the system was designed to work this way and the dam is not at risk, officials said. The water is mostly imported from Northern California. But rain Friday and over the weekend could push the water level past capacity.

While southern and central California took the brunt of the storm, emergency crews kept a close eye on the Oroville Dam in northern California, which earlier this week appeared weakened by damage to its spillways. The fear had been that the dam could fail, inundating the town of Oroville.

A massive effort, however, had shored up the spillways with trucks and helicopters hauling in boulders. In addition, more water was drained from behind the dam, raising the hopes that the structure could handle additional rainfall without being topped.
Title: California 'bombogenesis', biggest storm in years, kills two
Post by: RE on February 18, 2017, 01:26:27 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39010887 (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39010887)

California 'bombogenesis', biggest storm in years, kills two

(http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/D036/production/_94720335_aef3f826-3f99-40da-8a11-2646844dc0a7.jpg)

    48 minutes ago
    From the section US & Canada

Share
Media captionTwo cars fell into sinkhole in Los Angeles, in the Studio City neighbourhood

One of California's strongest storms in years - dubbed a "bombogenesis" or "weather bomb" - has hit the state, killing two, and bringing torrential rain and flash floods.

More than 100 homes have been evacuated amid fears of mud slides near Los Angeles.

Hundreds of flights have been delayed or cancelled at Los Angeles International Airport.

The weather has also brought car-swallowing sinkholes and power cuts.

One man was killed after a tree fell and pulled a power lines on to his car in the Sherman Oaks area of Los Angeles.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption A firefighter carries a woman from her car after it was caught in street flooding in southern California.

A second person died in a vehicle when it was submerged by a flash flood in the town of Victorville.

Another motorist at the same junction was saved after climbing on to the roof of his car.

Ryan Maue, a meteorologist for WeatherBell Analytics, told the Los Angeles Times that 10 trillion gallons of rain would fall on California in the next week, enough to power Niagara Falls for 154 days.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption A man tries to cycle through the flooded streets of Sun Valley, southern California

Two cars fell down a sinkhole in LA neighbourhood Studio City, with the drama of the second one, teetering on the edge and then tumbling down, shown on live television.

Firefighters saved one person from the first car, and the driver got out of the second before it fell. No-one was injured.
Image copyright AP
Image caption Waves crash against a pier in Seal Beach

Meteorologists describe the "bombogenesis" as an intense extra-tropical cyclonic low-pressure area, or "a weather bomb".

"The storm looks to be the strongest storm to hit southwest California this season," the National Weather Service said.

"It is likely the strongest within the last six years and possibly even as far back as December 2004 or January 1995."
Image copyright AP
Image caption Schoolchildren caught in heavy rain in Los Angeles

After five years of drought, a series of storms have filled state reservoirs.

California's Sierra Nevada mountain range is also loaded with snow. Runoff from its snowpack normally supplies about a third of the state's water.
Image copyright AP
Image caption A large eucalyptus tree toppled on to a carport in Goleta

Gusts of 87mph (140km/h) have been reported on the Big Sur scenic coastal highway.

Evacuations have been recommended at hundreds of homes in the city of Duarte, in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains east of Los Angeles, and in parts of Camarillo Springs in Ventura County.
Image copyright AP
Image caption A lorry lies on its side after it was blown over by strong winds in Marina

Earlier in the week, heavy rain and melting snow caused fears of flooding at the tallest dam in the country, Oroville Dam, in northern California. More than 180,000 residents were evacuated.
Media captionWhat went wrong at Oroville Dam?

Are you in the affected regions? Let us know about your experiences. Email haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk with your stories.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: K-Dog on February 18, 2017, 02:20:24 AM
I was in an L.A. rain once.  When it happens it can be very intense so if they are saying this was unusually strong it must have been really something.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on February 18, 2017, 02:32:31 AM
I was in an L.A. rain once.  When it happens it can be very intense so if they are saying this was unusually strong it must have been really something.

My main interest is how this "atmospheric river" is affecting the Oroville Reservoir? ???  :icon_scratch:

How much of this water is flowing in there and how fast from the watershed?  How much is dropping as snowfall in the Sierra Nevada to come down later as melt water?

I also wonder how much of this water is making it to Lake Mead?  ???   :icon_scratch:   Is it refilling at all?

There's another one due next week too.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on February 18, 2017, 09:26:08 AM
I'm due east of Cali. by 300 miles & we've had sprinkles & intermittent wind gusts.
Loads of storm clouds.
Looking northward towards the canyon 30 miles away there are isolated showers.
No big deal yet. I'll update if Armageddon breaks out. Carry on...
Title: More rain in store after 2 killed in California storms
Post by: RE on February 18, 2017, 01:48:20 PM
The next one hits in the Oroville Dam  Neighborhood.  :o

Read it at the link, it's more legible and you can see all the slideshows and vids.

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/18/us/southern-california-storm/ (http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/18/us/southern-california-storm/)

More rain in store after 2 killed in California storms

(http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170218133643-10-california-storms-0217-exlarge-169.jpg)

By Steve Almasy, Azadeh Ansari and Kelly McCleary, CNN

Updated 1:17 PM ET, Sat February 18, 2017
Deadly storm slams Southern California

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NASA grabs stunning footage of three hurricanes
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Story highlights

    Another round of rain expected near Oroville Dam in Northern California
    At least two deaths are linked to storms in Southern California

(CNN)Northern California is bracing for an onslaught of rain beginning late Saturday as the southern part of the state dries out and assesses damage from downpours that left at least two people dead.
The rain headed for Northern California could pose a threat to Oroville Dam, where rising water levels may test the limits of its damaged spillway.
Storms are due to start overnight Saturday and linger through Monday, with 2 to 4 inches of widespread rain expected, CNN meteorologist Allison Chinchar said. Some areas may get up to 10 inches.

A bicyclist tries to maneuver through a flooded street in the Sun Valley area on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A bicyclist tries to maneuver through a flooded street in the Sun Valley area on February 17.
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Large waves pound the shore at El Porto in Manhattan Beach as storms slam the Los Angeles area on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
Large waves pound the shore at El Porto in Manhattan Beach as storms slam the Los Angeles area on February 17.
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A man attempts to board a bus on a flooded street near the Sun Valley area of Los Angeles on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A man attempts to board a bus on a flooded street near the Sun Valley area of Los Angeles on February 17.
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The downpour doesn't deter a pedestrian in Los Angeles on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
The downpour doesn't deter a pedestrian in Los Angeles on February 17.
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Pacific Coast Highway is reduced to one lane at the California Incline after mud and other debris washed down from bluffs in Santa Monica on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
Pacific Coast Highway is reduced to one lane at the California Incline after mud and other debris washed down from bluffs in Santa Monica on February 17.
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A woman with her dog stops to look at a fallen tree that crushed a car Saturday, February 18, in the Sherman Oaks section of Los Angeles. <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/18/us/southern-california-storm/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/18/us/southern-california-storm/index.html)">One of Southern California's most powerful storms</a> in recent years is causing flooding, power outages and blackouts across the region.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A woman with her dog stops to look at a fallen tree that crushed a car Saturday, February 18, in the Sherman Oaks section of Los Angeles. One of Southern California's most powerful storms in recent years is causing flooding, power outages and blackouts across the region.
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Inspectors check out a sinkhole that formed in Los Angeles' Studio City neighborhood on February 18 after the severe storm hit.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
Inspectors check out a sinkhole that formed in Los Angeles' Studio City neighborhood on February 18 after the severe storm hit.
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A Los Angeles apartment building is damaged after a 75-foot-tall tree crashed into it on Friday, February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A Los Angeles apartment building is damaged after a 75-foot-tall tree crashed into it on Friday, February 17.
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A firefighter carries a woman after floodwaters engulfed her car on a street in Los Angeles' Sun Valley neighborhood on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A firefighter carries a woman after floodwaters engulfed her car on a street in Los Angeles' Sun Valley neighborhood on February 17.
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A bicyclist tries to maneuver through a flooded street in the Sun Valley area on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A bicyclist tries to maneuver through a flooded street in the Sun Valley area on February 17.
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Large waves pound the shore at El Porto in Manhattan Beach as storms slam the Los Angeles area on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
Large waves pound the shore at El Porto in Manhattan Beach as storms slam the Los Angeles area on February 17.
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A man attempts to board a bus on a flooded street near the Sun Valley area of Los Angeles on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A man attempts to board a bus on a flooded street near the Sun Valley area of Los Angeles on February 17.
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The downpour doesn't deter a pedestrian in Los Angeles on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
The downpour doesn't deter a pedestrian in Los Angeles on February 17.
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Pacific Coast Highway is reduced to one lane at the California Incline after mud and other debris washed down from bluffs in Santa Monica on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
Pacific Coast Highway is reduced to one lane at the California Incline after mud and other debris washed down from bluffs in Santa Monica on February 17.
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A woman with her dog stops to look at a fallen tree that crushed a car Saturday, February 18, in the Sherman Oaks section of Los Angeles. <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/18/us/southern-california-storm/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/18/us/southern-california-storm/index.html)">One of Southern California's most powerful storms</a> in recent years is causing flooding, power outages and blackouts across the region.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A woman with her dog stops to look at a fallen tree that crushed a car Saturday, February 18, in the Sherman Oaks section of Los Angeles. One of Southern California's most powerful storms in recent years is causing flooding, power outages and blackouts across the region.
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Inspectors check out a sinkhole that formed in Los Angeles' Studio City neighborhood on February 18 after the severe storm hit.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
Inspectors check out a sinkhole that formed in Los Angeles' Studio City neighborhood on February 18 after the severe storm hit.
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A Los Angeles apartment building is damaged after a 75-foot-tall tree crashed into it on Friday, February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A Los Angeles apartment building is damaged after a 75-foot-tall tree crashed into it on Friday, February 17.
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A firefighter carries a woman after floodwaters engulfed her car on a street in Los Angeles' Sun Valley neighborhood on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A firefighter carries a woman after floodwaters engulfed her car on a street in Los Angeles' Sun Valley neighborhood on February 17.
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A bicyclist tries to maneuver through a flooded street in the Sun Valley area on February 17.
Photos: Severe storms pound Southern California
A bicyclist tries to maneuver through a flooded street in the Sun Valley area on February 17.
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10 California storms 0217
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Driving rain could dramatically reduce visibility, Chinchar warned.
Meantime, power is still out and cars still submerged across Southern California, which experienced one of the most drenching storms to hit the region in recent years.
More than 131,000 customers lost power Friday night, officials said. Sinkholes, localized floods, and downed trees and power lines also were reported.
In Victorville in San Bernardino County, one person was found dead Friday in a flooded vehicle, firefighters said. A second storm victim, a 55-year-old man, was electrocuted when a power line fell Friday in the Sherman Oaks area of Los Angeles, the fire department said.
Skirting death as storm rages
The storm proved harrowing for one Los Angeles driver on Friday night, when the road beneath her car gave out, plunging her to the bottom of a 20-foot sinkhole, CNN affiliate KTLA reported.
Watch: Car teeters over sinkhole edge

Watch: Car teeters over sinkhole edge 00:46
"My car kept turning and turning upside down, and I was just like, 'I got to stay calm,'" Stephanie Scott told the TV station.
Scott managed to climb out of her car and yell for help. When firefighters arrived, they used ladders to free her from the sinkhole.
"It's totally a miracle," Scott told KTLA. About ten minutes after she was pulled to safety, a van teetering on the edge of the hole crashed down on top of Scott's car, KTLA reported.
In San Bernardino County, CNN affiliate KABC captured the breathtaking moment a fire truck plummeted off a washed-out roadway.
Rescuers were responding to a report that a semi-trailer had fallen over the edge of the southbound I-15 freeway. KABC's exclusive video shows the fire truck's right rear tire dangling over the edge.
Suddenly, more pavement gives way, and the truck tumbles over the side.
No one was in the fire truck when it fell, and no one was hurt, fire officials told KABC. The driver of the semi-trailer was also OK, KABC reported.
The rain was so furious, a parking garage in Los Angeles turned into a waterfall.
Rainfall totals by the National Weather Service showed parts of Santa Barbara County have seen more than 7 inches of rain in two days. Parts of Ventura County have seen totals of more than 6 inches.
The storm has also blanketed higher elevations with snow.
Winter storm warnings were posted Saturday morning. National Weather Service said snow showers and gusting winds were expected.
Oroville Dam 'is holding up'
Oroville is the best warning that infrastructure matters
Oroville is the best warning that infrastructure matters (opinion)
Officials near Oroville Dam are watching the incoming rain after evacuations were ordered earlier this week when a swollen Lake Oroville and a damaged spillway at the dam led to a flash-flood threat.
The new round of rainfall brings more worries for communities south of the dam.
On Tuesday, officials downgraded the evacuation order to a warning, allowing 188,000 evacuees from Butte, Sutter and Yuba counties to return home.
On Friday, officials voiced optimism that the dam and lake could handle the upcoming rain.
"We have generated a large volume of storage space so we can take on a very big storm," said Bill Croyle, acting director of the California Department of Water Resources
The threat level has been reduced for residents living near the dam, but Butte County officials advised those returning to their homes to "remain vigilant and prepared."
"The dam is holding up, it's structurally sound," said Jay Smith, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

CNN's Dottie Evans, Cheri Mossburg, Rachel Aissen, Emma Shapiro and Carma Hassan contributed to this report.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather - No. Cali. PREPARE NOW N.W.S.
Post by: azozeo on February 18, 2017, 04:45:27 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/Mm6n9tjZFHU&fs=1
Title: Cleanup begins after powerful storm slams Southern California
Post by: RE on February 18, 2017, 09:40:02 PM
Life in Sunny California not so Sunny lately.

RE

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-la-rain-cleanup-20170218-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-la-rain-cleanup-20170218-story.html)

Cleanup begins after powerful storm slams Southern California
Major rainstorm rolls through Southern California
Melissa Etehad, Sonali Kohli and Michael FinneganContact Reporters

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-58a8a40d/turbine/la-me-major-rainstorm-socal-pictures-20170217/1050/1050x591)
Richard Walker clears mud accumulated on his drive on Melcayon Road caused by last night's heavy rain in Duarte.

Cleanup was beginning across Southern California on Saturday after a storm that forecasters billed as the most powerful in years caused flooding on multiple freeways, triggered dramatic mudslides and downed hundreds of trees and power lines.

The storm was moving out Saturday after dumping record rain in some areas and leaving havoc in its wake. Preliminary 48-hour rainfall totals through 5 a.m. Saturday include 2.05 inches in downtown Los Angeles, 2.17 in Long Beach, 4.19 in Woodland Hills and 4.83 in Malibu Canyon, according to the National Weather Service.
From Our Partners: Dads can legit carry their babies like kangaroos with this pouch shirt

Tens of thousands of Los Angeles County residents remained without power on Saturday, while road crews scrambled to repair sinkholes throughout the area, including one in Studio City that swallowed two vehicles Friday night. No one was injured in that incident.

Live updates: Strongest storm in years moves into L.A. area »

Evacuation orders were lifted early Saturday in Duarte, where mudflows threatened dozens of homes Friday night. The city erected concrete and wood barriers to protect neighborhoods after wildfires last summer made the area vulnerable to mudslides.

All lanes were reopened on the 5 Freeway in the Sun Valley area after heavy flooding caused a shutdown that lasted through early Saturday morning, the California Highway Patrol said.

Also Saturday, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power crews were scrambling to restore service to about 50,000 customers, down from about 82,000 customers Friday afternoon. Some of the hardest hit areas that remain without power were Lincoln Heights, Koreatown, East Hollywood and Harvard Heights.

“There was a lot of downed wires, and that kind of operation does take time,” said L.A. Department of Water and Power spokeswoman Kim Hughes. “We’re working as quickly ... as possible, with safety in mind.”

In Ventura County, authorities recovered the body of an unidentified man who was swept away in the Arroyo Conejo Creek in Thousand Oaks on Friday. The man, described as being in his 20s, was hiking with three other friends along the creek when it began to swell, authorities said.

Three of the men were rescued about 2:45 p.m. Friday, and authorities continued their search for the fourth man until about 8:30 p.m. due to weather conditions, officials said.

The search resumed Saturday morning, with Sheriff’s Department aviation officers locating the man in the river bottom around 8:45 a.m., said Ventura County sheriff’s Det. Tim Lohman.

In Orange County, Santa Ana police rescued four people from the Santa Ana River, authorities said. Officers arrived at the scene near 1st Street about 12:30 p.m. Saturday and managed to pull three people out of the water, including an 8-year-old child, the child’s mother and a male adult, who had jumped into the water to rescue the woman and her child.

Police learned that a 12-year-old boy was also missing, but officers managed to located the child uninjured near 5th Street and the river, authorities said. The woman told police that she and her two children had fallen into the water, but no other details were available.

Meanwhile, Amtrak suspended service Saturday morning between Los Angeles and San Luis Obispo because of mudslides in the Santa Barbara area, officials said.

A spokesman said service could resume Saturday night.

“Due to mudslides and other weather related factors, we have crews out there now removing debris from the tracks,” Union Pacific Railroad spokesman Justin Jacobs said in an email. “We will follow up with inspections once debris removal is complete to ensure they are safe to resume operations and then hope to restore service.”

Friday’s storm arrived with wind gusts that topped 80 mph in some parts of Los Angeles County and intense bursts of heavy rain, a potent combination that at one point Friday evening had forced closures on more than half a dozen major freeways and highways around the region.

The deluge created surreal scenes: cars trapped by rising waters along the 5 and 110 freeways, churning mudflows ripping through canyon and high-desert roads, and a massive landslide in the San Bernardino Mountains captured on video.

In San Bernardino County, two lanes of the southbound 15 Freeway near Highway 13 in the Cajon Pass remained closed after a section of the road weakened by rushing water collapsed, toppling a firetruck into the creek below.

A crew of three firefighters was driving in the lane closest to the shoulder around 8:30 p.m. Friday when they felt the engine’s back tires sinking into the roadway, San Bernardino County Fire Capt. Mike McClintock said. The crew managed to escape before the road gave way.

In the San Fernando Valley, two cars fell into a giant sinkhole. One occupant was briefly trapped but was rescued unharmed by Los Angeles firefighters.

Maggie Prvinic, who lives near the sinkhole, was out grocery shopping with her 5-year-old son when the first car fell into the hole. She was stunned to find the road blocked off and crowds of people surrounding her street when they returned home.

“It was dark, around 8:30, and we heard the choppers, we thought it was just electricity issues,” she said.

She said she was looking out the window of her family’s second-floor apartment when the second car fell into the sinkhole. 

“I saw the car go inside and I was wondering if anyone was inside it. I said, ‘Oh, my gosh, is it just a parked car?’ ” Prvinic recalled.

Prvinic, who is expecting another child in two weeks, said she was concerned that the sinkhole might threaten her apartment building. “Do I need to evacuate? I’m scared the ground is fragile and the sinkhole will expand,” she said.

City officials said the sinkhole, at Woodbridge Street and Laurel Canyon Boulevard in Studio City, was probably caused by a combination of excessive rain and a possible sewer failure.

City crews and emergency contractors were working Saturday to shore up the sinkhole, which could take several days to repair.

Laurel Canyon Boulevard remains closed between Moorpark Street and Valley Spring Lane, and Woodbridge Street is closed east of Laurel Canyon. Drivers are advised to avoid the area.

At least four fatalities have been attributed to the storm.

A 55-year-old man was electrocuted by a downed power line Friday in Sherman Oaks on Sepulveda Boulevard just south of Burbank Boulevard.

In Victorville, where many motorists were stranded on flooded streets, rescuers found a person dead inside a submerged vehicle, according to the San Bernardino County Fire Department.

Two passengers died in separate crashes on rain-slick Interstate 15 in Mira Mesa and City Heights on Friday, the CHP said.

The drivers involved in the collisions were suspected of driving too fast in the rain, CHP Officer Jake Sanchez said. “In these types of conditions, speed plays a huge factor because if you drive fast it’s very easy to lose control,” he said.

In a sign of the power of the winds, the Los Angeles Fire Department responded to more than 150 reports of downed electrical wires. Authorities urged the public to stay away from power lines and avoid touching any person or thing that has come into contact with one.

More than 100,000 people across Southern California lost power.

There also were multiple swift-water rescues. Several homeless people were rescued along the Los Angeles River, while in the Inland Empire, firefighters plucked motorists stranded in floodwaters.

Evacuation orders were issued Friday for areas where brush fires hit last summer, with officials worried about the potential for mudslides.

Among the areas evacuated was a section of Duarte.

But some residents, like Mike Shane, decided to remain.

Shane started hearing mud flow down his street on Opal Canyon Road on Friday night. “It sounded like a rushing river,” he said.

But he never considered leaving his home, despite the city’s evacuation order. He’s lived in the area 17 years and has seen his share of mudslides, he said.

“There’s no need to go," said Shane as he stood in front of his house Saturday morning and watched as crews scooped up the thin layer of mud that covered his sidewalk. “I want to be here with my house and dog.”

Shane’s neighbor Rochelle Carpio, standing next to him in white-and-pink pajamas, nodded in agreement.

Carpio and her husband, Yvan, said that this storm wasn’t as bad as previous ones but that in general, they usually don’t listen to evacuation orders.

The Carpio family did, however, have an escape car packed with their 4-month-old baby’s essentials and emergency food in case they had to leave immediately. They said their property isn’t damaged.

About a block away, Cecilia Cruz was bent over her flowers, lifting the sandbags that had guarded them from Friday’s rains. Her hands and shoes were covered in thick mud as she worked.

Cruz went outside at 7:30 a.m. and didn’t find any damage to her house. Previous mudslides from the month prior have been worse, said Cruz, who has lived in the area for eight years.

“The tractors do a good job and are able to remove the mud,” she said, pointing to the layer of wet dirt that covered her drive

The Duarte evacuation order was lifted Saturday morning.

But on Friday night, it was a different scene. The street adjacent to Valley View Elementary School was overflowing with mud, rock and other debris.

As night fell, Austin Fuentes and his mother, Susan, heard the mudslide outside their front door.

“When we started getting heavy rain, we heard the mud flowing outside our house. You hear rocks tumbling and water rushing,” he said. “We’re just crossing our fingers we don’t have to clean up much more mud.”

Fuentes’ father and grandparents evacuated and were staying at a hotel just to be on the safe side.

“My grandparents have heart issues, and we felt it was safer for both of them not to be here,” Fuentes added.

In the San Bernardino County mountains, a landslide the size of three football fields threatened several homes, a fire station and a major road used by hundreds of residents, fire officials said.

Four homes and a San Bernardino County fire station in the unincorporated community of Forest Falls were directly in the path of the hillside, which started moving about 10 a.m. Thursday, fire spokesman Eric Sherwin said.

Two homes were vacant, and residents in the other two homes voluntarily evacuated. Fire officials have removed equipment from the station to protect it from damage, he said.

San Bernardino County road crews were placing concrete barriers along the drive to help divert mud and debris, he said.

Snow levels were anticipated to be 8,000 feet Friday night, lowering to 6,000 feet on Saturday, according to the National Weather Service. Because of the heavy precipitation, 1 to 2 feet of snow could fall above 8,000 feet in Los Angeles and Ventura counties, and 6 to 12 inches above 6,000 feet.

Coastal waters will be dangerous through the weekend. High waves off the coast of Los Angeles County are expected to peak Saturday at 8 to 13 feet.

After a brief respite Sunday, another storm system is expected to move into the region on Monday, bringing several more days of rain, forecasters said.
Title: Cry Me an Atmospheric River
Post by: RE on February 19, 2017, 03:09:45 PM
Another 10" of rain possible coming in to the Chico area around Feather River where the Oroville Dam is.  Lots of levees under stress already.

At least they should have plenty of water for this year's lettuce growing season.

RE

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-flood-risk-20170219-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-flood-risk-20170219-story.html)

 High risk of flooding in Northern California as waterways reach their limits

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-58a9e6ab/turbine/la-me-lake-oroville-spillway-pictures/650/650x366)
Crisis at the Oroville Dam

Live updates >>
Louis Sahagun and Sonali Kohli Contact Reporters

Officials said Sunday there is a high risk of flooding in parts of already-saturated Northern California as the latest “atmospheric river” storm moves in.

The National Weather Service said the highest risk for flooding was in a large swath of the region from Monterey to Marin County on the coast, then into the Sacramento Valley and Sierra Nevada. The storm is expected to put added stress on levees, streams, creeks and rivers that are already approaching dangerously high water levels.
From Our Partners: 188,000 Told to Evacuate in California Over Warnings the Country's Tallest Dam …

The heaviest rain is expected to hit on Monday and Tuesday. Parts of Northern California are already on track to have the wettest winter ever recorded.

On Sunday, the weather service warned that the San Joaquin River at Vernalis “has reached danger stage. Greater risk for levee problems.” Officials also said several other waterways were at major risk of flooding including the Yolo Bypass, Clear Lake, and the Sacramento, Cosumnes, Mokelumne, Merced  and Tuolumne rivers.

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-58aa1973/turbine/la-1487542715-kjap5bkqxo-snap-photo/672/672x378)
Flood warning (NWS)

On Saturday, water stood a foot high in Maxwell, a small rural town in Northern California’s Colusa County. Crews had to evacuate 100 people, some by boat, about 2 a.m. because of flooding,

Maxwell is about 50 miles from Oroville, which for the last week has been the scene of a national drama as both spillways at the Oroville Dam were damaged, sparking fears of a catastrophic flood and forcing the evacuation of more than 100,000 people.

 
Flooding in Maxwell, Calif.

About a hundred residents in the small town of Maxwell in Northern California were evacuated from their homes, some by boat, early Saturday morning. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Flooding expected in Northern California. What's next for the Southland? »

Officials were able to reduce the water levels in the reservoir, and say they are prepared for the new storms.

With reduced flows still surging down Oroville Dam’s main spillway on Sunday morning, the extent of the damage it has sustained was clearly visible.

The long, concrete chute was buckled and riven with deep cracks above and below an immense jagged hole engineers discovered earlier this month. Nearly all the water being pumped out of the reservoir at 70,000 cubic feet per second was slamming into the hole, then cascading out into a fissure carved into an earthen slope next to the nation’s tallest dam.

California Department of Water Resources officials had been pumping water at 100,000 cubic feet per second for several days to absorb storm runoff and prevent the reservoir from overflowing, as it did a week ago. The tremendous force of that torrent and the debris it carried contributed to the growth of the hole.
Government severely misjudged strength of Oroville emergency spillway, sparking a crisis
Government severely misjudged strength of Oroville emergency spillway, sparking a crisis

Over the weekend, agency engineers incrementally decreased the flow of water in the spillway to about 55,000 cubic feet per second in order to give construction crews room to begin removing an estimated 150,000 square yards of debris that has accumulated in a pool at the bottom, forcing the closure of a nearby underground hydroelectric plant.

It is all part of the effort to pump enough water out of the lake to absorb runoff from incoming storms and to keep the lake from overflowing.

As of Sunday, the estimated costs of shoring up the dam’s main spillway and adjacent emergency spillway had climbed to more than $10 million, according to a report reviewed by The Times.

The area will be under a flood watch Monday and Tuesday, when the new storm is forecast to dump as much as 10 inches of rain on the Feather River Basin. The National Weather Service also warned that the storm is expected to be packing strong winds that could hurl waves in the reservoir toward the 700-foot-tall dam.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Eddie on February 20, 2017, 05:46:51 AM
The tale end of the Cali storm came through Central Texas last night, spawning storms, high winds, and a string of tornadoes along a hundred mile line from San Antonio up the I-35 corridor all the way to the north and east of Austin.

https://twitter.com/cpsenergy/status/833663209123020801/photo/1
Title: Re: Crazy Weather-Heavy snowfall kills another 25 people in Afghanistan:
Post by: azozeo on February 21, 2017, 06:08:49 AM
2017-02-19 - Heavy snowfall kills another 25 people in Afghanistan:
http://aa.com.tr/en/life/heavy-snow-kills-25-in-northern-afghanistan/753764 (http://aa.com.tr/en/life/heavy-snow-kills-25-in-northern-afghanistan/753764)
http://www.sott.net/article/343059-Heavy-snowfall-kills-another-25-in-northern-Afghanistan (http://www.sott.net/article/343059-Heavy-snowfall-kills-another-25-in-northern-Afghanistan)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on February 22, 2017, 04:08:04 AM
2017-02-20 - First fires, then storms and now snow in the summer for New South Wales (Australia):
http://www.9news.com.au/national/2017/02/20/14/22/fire-storms-now-snow-more-extreme-weather-hits-nsw (http://www.9news.com.au/national/2017/02/20/14/22/fire-storms-now-snow-more-extreme-weather-hits-nsw)
http://www.sott.net/article/343130-Fires-storms-and-now-snow-More-extreme-weather-hits-New-South-Wales-Australia (http://www.sott.net/article/343130-Fires-storms-and-now-snow-More-extreme-weather-hits-New-South-Wales-Australia)
Title: Indiana Gets Weather Whacked
Post by: RE on March 01, 2017, 06:49:46 AM
Not a good day for TDoS.

RE

http://www.indystar.com/story/weather/2017/02/28/nws-widespread-severe-storms-likely-into-overnight/98537332/ (http://www.indystar.com/story/weather/2017/02/28/nws-widespread-severe-storms-likely-into-overnight/98537332/)

Storms cause scattered power outages
Holly V. Hays and Vic Ryckaert , IndyStar Published 5:25 p.m. ET Feb. 28, 2017 | Updated 2 hours ago
Presto graphic severe weather storm

(http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/9f148f9879d4541cbe802015b6491608d35cfb85/c=473-271-1466-1595&r=537&c=0-0-534-712/local/-/media/2015/04/09/INGroup/LafayetteIN/635641705583925988-presto-graphic-weather-thunderstorm.jpg)
(Photo: Welcomia, Getty Images/iStockphoto)
7:30 a.m. UPDATE: Central Indiana was spared the worst of the damage from the overnight storms, but high winds battered communities in Southern Indiana.

More than 20,000 Duke Energy customers were without power throughout the state. Most of the outages were scattered across Southern Indiana.

The heavy storms moved through the Evansville area, which was under a tornado watch until 8 a.m.

There were widespread reports of damage in Southwestern Indiana, the Evansville Courier and Press reported. Homes were reportedly damaged or destroyed in southern Gibson County.

6:45 a.m. UPDATE: About 1,200 homes and businesses in Carmel, Westfield, Noblesville and Fishers were without power Wednesday morning, according to Duke Energy.

Another 289 Duke Energy customers were without power in Zionsville.

Statewide, more than 20,000 Duke customers were without power this morning. The hardest hit areas were in Southern Indiana.

In Indianapolis, IPL was working to restore power to about 500 customers.

6:30 a.m. UPDATE: A severe thunderstorm rolled through Shelbyville and Greensburg this morning and continued on a path southeast of Central Indiana. A severe thunderstorm warning for North Vernon and nearby communities ends at 6:45 a.m.

11:20 p.m. UPDATE: Interstate 70 westbound has been reopened to drivers, according to the Indiana Department of Transportation.

11:00 p.m. UPDATE: The National Weather Service is reporting wind gusts of up to 46 miles per hour at Indianapolis International Airport as severe weather continues to move through the area.

At 10:48 p.m., there were nearly 2,500 Indianapolis Power and Light customers without power, while Duke Energy reported more than 4,400 customers without power. The Boone County Sheriff's Office tweeted the outage was in part due to a blown transformer.

Interstate 70 westbound near mile marker 78 were closed around 10:30, according to the Indiana Department of Transportation, due to a traffic hazard. Fox59 reports downed power lines have caused the closure.

9:30 p.m. UPDATE: A tornado watch has been issued for much of the southern half of Indiana, including Marion County, until 5 a.m. Wednesday.

The National Weather Service continues to monitor severe storms that are expected to move into Central Indiana during the overnight hours.

Since the evening rush hour, temperatures have increased to 64 degrees shortly before 9 p.m., with wind speeds hitting nearly 20 mph.

NWS hydrometeorological technician Brad Herold said he expects that trend to continue as a cold front approaches the state.

“We’re expecting the atmosphere to continue to become increasingly unstable," he said.

A cold front will enter northwest Indiana around 1 a.m., Herold said, bringing with it severe storms that will likely linger in the state until 5 a.m.

By 9 p.m. ET Tuesday, the NWS Storm Prediction Center had received 14 tornado reports, including reports of one fatality, from storms in Missouri and Illinois, as well as reports of hail up to 2 1/2 inches in diameter.

6:04 p.m.: The National Weather Service has issued a moderate risk of severe storms Tuesday evening into early morning Wednesday, including chances of strong winds, damaging hail and the chance for strong tornadoes.

NWS hydrometeorological technician Brad Herold said it's likely storms will arrive in Indiana between 7 and 9 p.m., ahead of a cold front also bringing the possibility of strong, severe storms.

"It’s not going to be just one quick event," he said. "We’re going to have a couple waves of storms in the area."

A cold front will enter northwest Indiana around 1 a.m., he said, bringing with it chances of severe weather as it moves through the state into Wednesday afternoon. But storms moving through Missouri and Illinois Tuesday afternoon would likely be part of the first wave of storms.

The main threats for Wednesday night's storms include widespread and long-lived severe storms that could last until 4 or 5 a.m. Wednesday, Herold said, as well as the possibility for destructive hail 2 or more inches in diameter. Strong tornadoes EF2 or higher are also a possibility, he said.

Compared to last week's chances of severe weather, which also included gusty winds and the possibility for tornadoes, there are numerous factors coming together to create widespread severe weather across much of the Midwest, Herold said, including the amount of moisture in the atmosphere.

"The more moisture there is to work with, typically the more unstable the atmosphere is," he said.

There is an added element of danger with these storms, he said, because of its timing. Much of the severe weather is expected to occur overnight, while people are asleep and visibility for event such as tornadoes is low.

He encouraged residents of Central Indiana to watch for weather developments either through the NWS Indianapolis Facebook or Twitter pages, local news outlets or by listening to a weather radio.

"Find a good weather source, have a backup to it if possible, keep an eye to the sky and be ready to react," he said. "Conditions are prime for severe weather."

Call IndyStar reporter Holly Hays at (317) 444-6156. Follow her on Twitter: @hollyvhays.
Title: It's A(nother) Twista!
Post by: RE on March 01, 2017, 07:32:37 AM
Illinois had a rough night too.

RE

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-illinois-tornado-ottawa-0302-20170301-story.html (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-illinois-tornado-ottawa-0302-20170301-story.html)

1 dead, 14 hurt after severe weather hits Ottawa: 'My whole neighborhood is pretty well destroyed'

A tornado touched down in Ottawa, Ill. on Feb. 28, 2017, as part of a system that produced severe weather across the northern part of the state Tuesday night. (Nuccio DiNuzzo / Chicago Tribune)
John Keilman, Erin Gallagher and Elyssa CherneyContact ReportersChicago Tribune

One person was confirmed dead in Ottawa in north-central Illinois after a tornado touched down there, part of a storm that produced severe weather across the northern part of the state Tuesday afternoon and evening, according to the National Weather Service.

The Ottawa Fire Department reported one fatality from the tornado that hit the town about 4:45 p.m., according to the weather service. The victim, who had not been identified, was killed by an uprooted tree, Illinois Emergency Management Agency spokeswoman Patti Thompson said, according to the Associated Press.
From Our Partners: Large Tornado in Hardy, NE

In downstate Illinois, a 71-year-old man was killed when a twister struck a small building near a house in the Crossville area, in the southeast part of the state near the Indiana border, according to authorities. The man's wife was injured.

At least 14 people were injured during the storm in the Ottawa area, according to a news release from St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Ottawa. The hospital treated people for injuries to their heads, knees and arms. People were injured by falling tree limbs, and others were hurt as they tried to get home.

By Wednesday, the tornado watch had ended for the area. Dense fog was expected for areas north of Interstate 80 before sunrise, according to the weather service. Communities north of Interstate 88 could see snow showers in the afternoon.

Less than three miles away in Naplate, Ill., population 550, Mike McGrath sat late Tuesday in the Village Hall, wearing the wry smile of someone who had just experienced the best and worst of luck.

On Tuesday afternoon, he and his wife had been at home watching TV for news of an incoming tornado when the announcer said, "It's here." McGrath, 65, glanced out the back window and saw that the sky had turned as black as midnight. Instantly, he and his wife fled into an central room and huddled in a corner.
Severe weather hits Illinois

A weather system moved through Illinois Tuesday night, Feb. 28, 2017, producing severe storms around the Chicago area.

"It seemed like it lasted forever, though I know it was only like a minute and a half," he said. "Then it was quiet. I got up, surveyed the damage and pretty much couldn't believe what we saw. Still can't believe it. … (The house) is pretty well gone. My whole neighborhood is pretty well destroyed."

McGrath and his wife, though, were uninjured. No one else in Naplate was badly hurt or killed, even though the tornado damaged or wrecked 50 homes.

Among the structures that were damaged in the village was a factory. Storm damage was also reported in Woodford County, east of Peoria, according to Thompson.

Naplate Fire Chief John Nevins said 50 houses in the town of 550 residents suffered damage, ranging from missing roof shingles to total destruction. There were no fatalities, however, and the injuries were minor, he said.

"We've never had anything like this before," he said. "Like anyone else we've had high winds that take some trees down, but nothing like this."
Tornado spotted near Peru

A tornado spotted near Peru, Ill. on Feb. 28, 2017. (Jorgeanne Schramm)

Later, a severe thunderstorm warning was in effect in LaSalle County late Tuesday after a storm with 80 mph winds and ping-pong ball size hail started moving east through the county near Peru, according to the weather service.

Just before 6 p.m., a trained spotter reported a tornado near Rutland. Around that time, a round of storms had spurred tornado warnings in LaSalle, Livingston and Grundy counties.

National Weather Service meteorologist Amy Seeley said she did not have a full count of how many tornadoes were reported because some sightings may have been the same system. Investigators will assess damage Wednesday and determine whether a twister hit Oregon, Ill., in Ogle County.

"Besides the tornadoes, there was a lot of hail reports across the area," Seeley said. "Ottawa had the baseball-size hail too."

In the neighborhood of South Ottawa, the tornado's fickle path was clear. Some streets Wednesday morning were a jumble of tree limbs and dangling powerlines; other streets were almost entirely free of debris. Some houses were wrecked; others nearby appeared untouched.

Anne Houk surveyed the damage outside of her bungalow. Her front lawn was covered in branches, and a large piece of soffit dangled from a nearby tree. Her garage was blocked by another tree, and the rear windshield of her car was blown out.

Still, with her house mostly unscathed, she counted herself lucky.

"We fared pretty well compared to other people, "she said. "We're thankful for the brick. The three little pigs did it right, I guess."

In LaSalle County, Illinois State Police were in the area, helping Ottawa police. Residents displaced by the storms were being advised to go Ottawa Township High School, 211 E. Main St. in Ottawa, where the Red Cross was helping set up a shelter. The Red Cross also was setting up a reception center at Waltham Elementary School, 946 N. 33rd Road in Utica.

There were widespread power outages in LaSalle County following the tornado touchdown, according to Ameren Illinois.

By the time the tornado was almost on top of them in their small town of Naplate, the Dutton family had mere seconds to take cover.

Their house has no basement, so Rachel Dutton, her son Noah Jonassen and their pug-zu Chewbacca climbed into the bathtub, while Rachel's husband, Jason Dutton, lay facedown on the bathroom floor.

The tornado passed with the sound of a freight train, Jason Dutton said, and a moment later, the house was a splintered ruin.

"I could look up and see sky," said Rachel Dutton, whose family escaped uninjured. "If we had been in the living room another 30 seconds, I don't know what would've happened."

Ottawa resident Nate Hermann was driving through the damaged area just after the storm hit. He said homes in Naplate, which is west of Ottawa, were severely damaged. He said the LaSalle County Building and the nursing home also suffered heavy damage.

"My aunt's house in Naplate got pushed over," he said, adding that she is OK.

He said her house was a half-block west of the old St. Mary's church in Ottawa.

The Rev. David Kipfer of St. Columba Catholic Church in Ottawa said St. Mary's church, which closed its parish but whose building remains in use, may have suffered damage, but damage and closed streets were preventing anyone from getting to the area to know for certain, he said.

Ryan Cryder, who lives about eight miles northwest of Morris in Nettle Creek Township, was attending a youth volleyball game at Rutland Grade School when the sirens went off about 4:45 p.m, with the bulk of the storm hitting that area to the north of Ottawa about 5 p.m., he said. The game was canceled, and families left after the first wave of storms were through. At the school, they saw golf-ball-sized hail. However, when Cryder's family arrived home, they found even larger hailstones.

"There was hail about the size of your fist, huge," Cryder said. "I've never seen it so big."

The Village Grille, located at 221 20th Ave. in Naplate, posted on Facebook photos of their restaurant that was hit by the tornado, and that "everyone is ok."

"Severe damage has been done to our little restaurant," the posting says. "We are in tears. …Sending prayers to all who was affected by this monster."

A twister hit the LaSalle County Nursing Home in Ottawa. A woman answering the telephone at the nursing home said several residents reported bumps and bruises but no serious injuries. Trees and power lines were also down in the area.

LaSalle County Sheriff Tom Templeton said the tornado had all but destroyed the LaSalle County Nursing Home and the county's highway department building, which lay just west of Naplate.

As in the town, though, there were no major injuries to residents or workers, he said.

"The staff did a marvelous job of moving people out of rooms (as the tornado hit)," he said. "Windows were blown out. The roof was extremely damaged. The front doors were sucked right out of the building and crushed.

"I couldn't have asked more from the staff. Some of those (residents) were scared. Some were kind of oblivious to everything that's going on and were hard to control, because they wanted to just walk everywhere. The staff was just calm. Sirens going off, fire alarms going off, but it wasn't chaotic."

A fleet of ambulances transferred the residents to other quarters within a few hours, he said.

Jerry Janick, a captain with the city of LaSalle's fire department, said his department sent an ambulance and equipment to nearby Ottawa and Naplate shouldering the storm.

Workers with the LaSalle County Emergency Management Agency were out surveying damage, the office said.

In Oregon, Ill., the city's emergency manager reported buildings destroyed, large trees uprooted and siding taken off homes in a storm that hit the area a little after 5 p.m., according to the weather service.

Large hail fell throughout northern Illinois, with 1.75-inch hailstones reported in Olympia Fields, 1.25-inch hailstones reported in Frankfort, and 1-inch hail in Alsip, Romeoville and other locations, according to the weather service.

In Joliet, a metal pole barn was leveled during evening storms, according to the weather service.

The watch area included all of northern and central Illinois, as well five northwest Indiana counties and 17 counties in Iowa.

Check the Tribune's weather page for more information. Check back for updates.

The Chicago Tribune's Keilman reported from LaSalle County. The Tribune's Liam Ford, Elvia Malagon and the Associated Press contributed. Erin Gallagher is a freelance reporter.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 03, 2017, 05:37:54 PM
2017-03-01 - Heavy snow and avalanches hit Afghanistan and Pakistan, nearly 70 people killed:
http://www.sott.net/article/343991-Nearly-70-people-killed-by-avalanches-in-Afghanistan-and-Pakistan (http://www.sott.net/article/343991-Nearly-70-people-killed-by-avalanches-in-Afghanistan-and-Pakistan)


http://www.youtube.com/v/30dlbKogOws&fs=1
Title: Wind knocks out power to 1 million customers in Michigan
Post by: RE on March 09, 2017, 08:25:02 AM
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-michigan-power-idUSKBN16G23Z (http://www.reuters.com/article/us-michigan-power-idUSKBN16G23Z)

Wind knocks out power to 1 million customers in Michigan

Some one million Michigan homes and other buildings were without power on Thursday after high winds caused what is believed to be the biggest outage in the state's history, utility companies said.

Wind gusts of more than 60 miles per hour on Wednesday downed at least 3,000 power lines across the state, which has a population of about 10 million people, Detroit-based DTE Energy Co said.

"This is the largest weather event in DTE history," the company said in a statement.

High winds, and soft soil - caused by unusually warm winter weather and heavy rainfall - uprooted trees and brought down power lines and poles, DTE said.

Crews from surrounding states were arriving in Michigan to help restore power, the company said.

More than 679,000 DTE customers were without power early on Thursday, while more than 300,000 customers of Consumers Energy Co (CMS_pb.N), another Michigan utility company, were without power, the companies said.

(Reporting by Laila Kearney; Editing by Bernadette Baum)
Title: The Weather Yo-Yo returns to the Northeast
Post by: RE on March 12, 2017, 04:29:38 AM
From the 60's to Blizzard.  Fun.

RE

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/03/12/storm-to-hit-northeast-blizzard-watch-for-new-york-boston.html (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/03/12/storm-to-hit-northeast-blizzard-watch-for-new-york-boston.html)

Blizzard watch issued for New York, Boston as storm forecast to hit Northeast
Published March 12, 2017 FoxNews.com

(http://a57.foxnews.com/images.foxnews.com/content/fox-news/us/2017/03/12/storm-to-hit-northeast-blizzard-watch-for-new-york-boston/_jcr_content/par/featured-media/media-0.img.jpg/876/493/1489309846355.jpg?ve=1&tl=1)
FILE - In this Friday, March 10, 2017 file photo, a woman walks through a winter snow storm in Philadelphia.  (AP)

Forecasters said Sunday there’s a blizzard watch for coastal regions including New York City and Boston for Monday night into Tuesday.

National Weather Service officials said there also is a winter storm watch for a larger area that includes much of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, upstate New York and New England.

The severe weather comes just a week after the region saw temperatures climb into the 60s. The chilly weather and snow some areas got on Friday is expected to be just a teaser.

"It's a noticeable difference. It's going to be a cold week," said Brian Hurley, a meteorologist at the weather service's Weather Prediction Center in Maryland.

The blizzard watch for the New York metro area encompasses New York City along with Long Island, coastal Connecticut and southern Westchester County.

Carlie Buccola, a weather service meteorologist based on Long Island, said a snowfall of 12 to 18 inches is predicted for the area along with sustained winds up to 30 mph with gusts up to 50 mph. Visibility could be a quarter mile or less, Buccola said.

The lower Hudson Valley and northeastern New Jersey could also get 12 to 18 inches of snow, Buccola said. The blizzard watch is not extended to those areas because high winds and low visibility are not expected.

Southern Rhode Island and coastal Massachusetts could possibly receive those blizzard conditions.

Washington is not officially under a winter storm watch but Hurley said the city could get 4 to 8 inches of snow.
Title: I'm Dreaming of a White St. Patrick's Day
Post by: RE on March 14, 2017, 05:23:55 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39262161 (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39262161)

Storm Stella: North-eastern US states hit by huge snowstorms

    36 minutes ago
    From the section US & Canada

(http://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/615C/production/_95142942_ussnow.jpg)
Snow shovellers are out in force in New York's Times Square  Image copyright AP

The north-eastern US states of New York and New Jersey have declared states of emergency as a huge winter storm sweeps in, bringing heavy snow.

The US National Weather Service has issued blizzard warnings for parts of Maine, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut.

Schools are closed and thousands of flights have been cancelled.

The conditions caused German Chancellor Angela Merkel to postpone a trip to Washington to meet President Trump.

With winds of up to 60mph (100km/h), Winter Storm Stella is likely to cause severe disruption for commuters across many parts of the north-east on Wednesday morning, forecasters say.

In all, about 50 million people across America are under a blizzard warning.

House in New York state encased in ice
Media captionBBC Weather's Louise Lear reports on the huge snow storm forecast for NE USA

A 24-hour blizzard warning was issued by the US National Weather Service from midnight (04:00 GMT Tuesday) for New York, Connecticut and New Jersey.

"Snowfall amounts in excess of a foot are likely inland along with strong and gusty winds," the agency said.

Winter storm warnings were also posted from eastern West Virginia to Maine.

"During its height we could see snowfall rates of 1-3 inches (2.5-7.6cm), even up to four inches per hour," said Alan Dunham, a meteorologist based in Taunton, Massachusetts.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption New York city is experiencing freezing conditions

More than 6,800 flights have been cancelled, tracking service FlightAware reported, with airports in New York, Washington, Boston, Baltimore and Philadelphia worst hit.

Schools will be closed on Tuesday in New York, Providence, Rhode Island and in some towns across Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Declaring a state of emergency, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said commuters should expect road closures, delays and cancellations.

"I strongly urge everyone to limit unnecessary travel on Tuesday and if you must drive, please plan ahead, be careful, and stay safe," he said in a statement.

Mr Cuomo advised New Yorkers to prepare food supplies for seven to 10 days, and an emergency supply of bottled water.

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie also declared a state of emergency and ordered all state employees not involved in the response to stay at home.
Image copyright Reuters
Image caption New Yorkers have been advised to stay indoors during the severe weather

Mrs Merkel's visit, which was planned for Tuesday, has been rescheduled for Friday.

The storm also forced Irish Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Enda Kenny to cut short a visit to Boston and head to Washington a day early by train.

The winter storm follows a spell of unusually mild weather in the north-eastern US, with last month being the second warmest February since record-keeping began in 1895.

President Trump said he had spoken to Homeland Security and that the Federal Emergency Management Agency was ready to provide assistance where needed.

"Everybody in government is fully prepared and ready," he said. "Let's hope it's not going to be as bad as some people are predicting. Usually it isn't."

In 2016 New York experienced the biggest snowstorm in the city's history, with a record 27.3 inches falling on Central Park in 24 hours.

The blizzard brought parts of the north-eastern states to a standstill, and left 18 people dead.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 20, 2017, 01:51:35 PM
2017-03-18 - Namibia, first hit by crippling drought, now hit by worst flooding ever recorded there:
http://www.thebigwobble.org/2017/03/another-country-crippled-from-drought.html (http://www.thebigwobble.org/2017/03/another-country-crippled-from-drought.html)

2017-03-18 - Peru floods update - over half a million affected, 72,115 displaced, 110,094 homes affected, more rain on the way:
http://www.thebigwobble.org/2017/03/state-of-emergency-declared-peru-floods.html (http://www.thebigwobble.org/2017/03/state-of-emergency-declared-peru-floods.html)

2017-03-18 - Heavy rain and flooding hit parts of New South Wales (Australia):
http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/database/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=FL-20170318-57545-AUS (http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/database/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=FL-20170318-57545-AUS)

2017-03-18 - Signals of climate change visible as record fires give way to massive floods in Peru:
http://robertscribbler.com/2017/03/17/signals-of-climate-change-visible-as-record-fires-give-way-to-massive-floods-in-peru/ (http://robertscribbler.com/2017/03/17/signals-of-climate-change-visible-as-record-fires-give-way-to-massive-floods-in-peru/)
Title: Singin' in the Peruvian Rain
Post by: RE on March 21, 2017, 02:02:33 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/w40ushYAaYA

RE

http://www.businessinsider.com/el-nio-related-storms-flooding-kill-more-than-70-people-in-peru-2017-3/#over-the-weekend-floodwaters-surged-into-trujillo-the-countrys-third-largest-city-leaving-people-clinging-to-each-other-for-safety-huaycos-what-peruvians-call-powerful-avalanches-of-mud-and-stone-coming-down-from-andean-hillsides-after-heavy-rains-continued-to-do-damage-6 (http://www.businessinsider.com/el-nio-related-storms-flooding-kill-more-than-70-people-in-peru-2017-3/#over-the-weekend-floodwaters-surged-into-trujillo-the-countrys-third-largest-city-leaving-people-clinging-to-each-other-for-safety-huaycos-what-peruvians-call-powerful-avalanches-of-mud-and-stone-coming-down-from-andean-hillsides-after-heavy-rains-continued-to-do-damage-6)

Devastating photos of the El Niño-driven flooding that has killed more than 70 people in Peru

Peru El Nino Lima flooding damage destructionA dog stands among the debris of a destroyed home in Huachipa, Lima, Peru, March 19, 2017.REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

The rapid and unusual warming of the waters off northern Peru has unleashed the deadliest rainfall the South American country has seen in decades.

Significant amounts of rain have fallen over relatively short periods of time in some parts of the Andean country in the latest iteration of a local El Niño, sending flash floods raging through city streets and across dry floodplains where people had built makeshift homes.

The downpours have overwhelmed riverbanks and caused mudslides.

"We've never seen anything like this before," said Jorge Chavez, a general in charge of organizing the government's response, according to Reuters.

"From one moment to the next, sea temperatures rose and winds that keep precipitation from reaching land subsided," Chavez said.

About half the country has been placed under a state of emergency to allow aid to get to the hardest-hit areas first, and in some areas on Peru's northern coast, small villages have been completely isolated by the deluge.

Intense rains and mudslides over the last week have wrought havoc around country and caught residents in Lima, a desert city of 10 million where it almost never rains, by surprise.

View As: One Page Slides

 

In recent days, residents of Lima have become stranded as streets are suddenly flooded by rainwater. People on the outskirts of the city have awoken to find their homes flooded.

In recent days, residents of Lima have become stranded as streets are suddenly flooded by rainwater. People on the outskirts of the city have awoken to find their homes flooded.
A woman is assisted while crossing a flooded street after the Huaycoloro river overflowed its banks sending torrents of mud and water rushing through the streets in Huachipa, Peru, March 17, 2017.REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo

Source: AFP

Periodic warming of waters in the Pacific Ocean causes increased evaporation and saddles clouds with immense loads of water, which then fall on coastal areas, causing rivers to overflow and avalanches from steep hillsides. A lack of wind keeps the clouds in place and prolongs the rain. Intense downpours have sent torrents of water and mud whipping through city streets, sweeping away homes, furniture, and sometimes people.

Periodic warming of waters in the Pacific Ocean causes increased evaporation and saddles clouds with immense loads of water, which then fall on coastal areas, causing rivers to overflow and avalanches from steep hillsides. A lack of wind keeps the clouds in place and prolongs the rain. Intense downpours have sent torrents of water and mud whipping through city streets, sweeping away homes, furniture, and sometimes people.
A woman gets rescued after a massive landslide and flood in the Huachipa district of Lima, Peru, March 17, 2017.REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo

Source: AFP, El Tiempo

Since January, when the rainy season typically reaches its height, at least 75 people have been killed and about 100,000 have lost everything. Another 630,000 people have suffered damages. The country is braced for another month of floods before the rainy season winds down.

Since January, when the rainy season typically reaches its height, at least 75 people have been killed and about 100,000 have lost everything. Another 630,000 people have suffered damages. The country is braced for another month of floods before the rainy season winds down.
People try to cross the Rimac River after rivers breached their banks due to torrential rains, causing flooding and widespread destruction, in Huachipa, Lima, Peru, March 19, 2017.REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

Source: El Tiempo, Reuters

Below, a woman swept away by muddy flood waters emerges from a pool of debris, which livestock have also become stuck in.

 

In Lima, classes have been canceled and water service was suspended after treatment systems were clogged, sparking shortages of bottled water at stores as people rushed to stock up.

In Lima, classes have been canceled and water service was suspended after treatment systems were clogged, sparking shortages of bottled water at stores as people rushed to stock up.
A man gets rescued after a massive landslide and flood in the Huachipa district of Lima, Peru, March 17, 2017.REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo

Source: Reuters

Below, footage shows people stuck in a car and bus caught up in the inundation.

 

 

 

"There's no electricity, no drinking water ... no transit because streets are flooded," Valentin Fernandez, mayor of Nuevo Chimbote, a coastal town north of Lima, told Reuters.

"There's no electricity, no drinking water ... no transit because streets are flooded," Valentin Fernandez, mayor of Nuevo Chimbote, a coastal town north of Lima, told Reuters.
A man stands in a flooded street after a massive landslide and flood in the Huachipa district of Lima, Peru March 17, 2017.REUTERS/Guadalupe Pard

Source: Reuters

Over the weekend, floodwaters surged into Trujillo, the country's third-largest city, leaving people clinging to each other for safety. "Huaycos," what Peruvians call powerful avalanches of mud and stone coming down from Andean hillsides after heavy rains, continued to do damage.

Over the weekend, floodwaters surged into Trujillo, the country's third-largest city, leaving people clinging to each other for safety. "Huaycos," what Peruvians call powerful avalanches of mud and stone coming down from Andean hillsides after heavy rains, continued to do damage.
A group of people, stranded in flood waters, hold onto a rope as they walk to safety in Lima, Peru, March 17, 2017.(AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

Source: AFP

"We are confronting a serious climatic problem," President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski said in a statement broadcast live Friday afternoon. "There hasn't been an incident of this strength along the coast of Peru since 1998."

"We are confronting a serious climatic problem," President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski said in a statement broadcast live Friday afternoon. "There hasn't been an incident of this strength along the coast of Peru since 1998."
A loader carries residents after a massive landslide and flood in the Huachipa district of Lima, Peru, March 17, 2017.REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo

Source: Associated Press

Disorderly construction in some areas has pushed homes into areas vulnerable to flooding. Kuczynski also declared Peru's Central Highway in a state of emergency on Friday and announced he would be boosting funds for reconstruction.

Disorderly construction in some areas has pushed homes into areas vulnerable to flooding. Kuczynski also declared Peru's Central Highway in a state of emergency on Friday and announced he would be boosting funds for reconstruction.
A man walks through a flooded street after the Huaycoloro river overflowed its banks, sending torrents of mud and water rushing through the streets in Huachipa, Peru, March 17, 2017.REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo

Sources: El Tiempo, Associated Press

 

The president said he was optimistic that the country was in a good position to make a quick recovery, but he urged Peruvians to be cautious. "This hasn't ended," he warned. "And it will continue for some time more."

The president said he was optimistic that the country was in a good position to make a quick recovery, but he urged Peruvians to be cautious. "This hasn't ended," he warned. "And it will continue for some time more."
A man tries to help his neighbor to cross a flooded street after the Huaycoloro river overflowed its banks, sending torrents of mud and water rushing through the streets in Huachipa, Peru, March 17, 2017.REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo

Source: Associated Press

A poll taken March 15-17 found his approval had fallen 6 percentage points to 32%. The poll didn't assess how Peruvians viewed Kuczynski's handling of the rains and flooding, but a majority did not feel that public safety, the economy, or the fight against corruption have improved during Kuczynski's 8-month-old centrist government.

A poll taken March 15-17 found his approval had fallen 6 percentage points to 32%. The poll didn't assess how Peruvians viewed Kuczynski's handling of the rains and flooding, but a majority did not feel that public safety, the economy, or the fight against corruption have improved during Kuczynski's 8-month-old centrist government.
Residents stand near a destroyed home in Cajamarquilla, Lima, Peru, March 18, 2017.REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

Source: Reuters

Kuczynski's approval rating has dropped by half from a of 63% in September. But legislators from across Peru's political landscape have pledged to avoid clashes with the executive so the government can focus on emergency efforts.

Kuczynski's approval rating has dropped by half from a of 63% in September. But legislators from across Peru's political landscape have pledged to avoid clashes with the executive so the government can focus on emergency efforts.
Residents walk on a flooded street in Huachipa, Lima, Peru, March 20, 2017.REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

Source: Reuters

 

Chavez, the general handling Peru's response to the disaster, said the country needed to rethink its infrastructure to prepare for the possible "tropicalization" of the northern desert coast, which some climate models have predicted as temperatures rise.

Chavez, the general handling Peru's response to the disaster, said the country needed to rethink its infrastructure to prepare for the possible "tropicalization" of the northern desert coast, which some climate models have predicted as temperatures rise.
Train tracks lay destroyed in a flooded river in the Chosica district of Lima, Peru, March 19, 2017.(AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

Source: Reuters

"We need more and better bridges, we need highways and cities with drainage systems," Chavez said, according to Reuters. "We can't count on nature being predictable."

"We need more and better bridges, we need highways and cities with drainage systems," Chavez said, according to Reuters. "We can't count on nature being predictable."
A dog stands among the debris of a destroyed home in Huachipa, Lima, Peru, March 19, 2017.REUTERS/Mariana Bazo
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 25, 2017, 01:56:52 PM

2107-03-23 - Metallic trumpet-like sounds recorded in the sky in Sweden:
http://www.sott.net/article/346167-Metallic-trumpet-like-sounds-recorded-in-Sweden (http://www.sott.net/article/346167-Metallic-trumpet-like-sounds-recorded-in-Sweden)
http://www.youtube.com/v/IXAKpJzytIE&fs=1
Title: Thousands flee as Cyclone Debbie bears down on Australia
Post by: RE on March 26, 2017, 09:08:20 PM
Looks like a rough day in the Cardiology lab for Geoff Chia tomorrow.

RE

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-australia-cyclone-idUSKBN16X15E?il=0 (http://www.reuters.com/article/us-australia-cyclone-idUSKBN16X15E?il=0)

Thousands flee as Cyclone Debbie bears down on Australia

(http://www.sbs.com.au/news/sites/sbs.com.au.news/files/styles/full/public/debbie-lead.jpg?itok=rzKpwQoI&mtime=1490432402)

By Tom Westbrook | SYDNEY

Thousands of Australians abandoned their homes as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland on Monday, while others ignored authorities' advice to evacuate with winds forecast to reach up to 300 km per hour (185 mph).

Cyclone Debbie is a forecast to strengthen to a Category four storm before it makes landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology said.

State Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk warned it would be the most powerful storm to hit the country since Cyclone Yasi in 2011, which destroyed homes, shredded crops and devastated island resorts.

About 3,500 people left low-lying townships near Townsville, while authorities advised 2,000 more people in the town of Bowen to also leave, Palaszczuk said, adding that the "window of opportunity to leave is drastically closing" as weather worsens.

"This is going to be a nasty cyclone," Palaszczuk told Nine Network television. "These wind gusts are going to be absolutely huge."

A category five storm is the strongest on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale of hurricane intensity.

The Abbot Point coal terminal and ports at Mackay and Hay Point were closed until further notice, ports spokeswoman Fiona Cunningham said.

BHP Billiton suspended operations at its South Walker Creek coal mine, which is just to the south of the cyclone's expected path.

Gales were already lashing the tourist resorts at Airlie Beach and the Whitsunday Islands.

Townsville Airport was closed and airlines Qantas, Jetstar, Rex and Virgin Australia said they had canceled several flights to and from the region scheduled for Monday and Tuesday.

Pictures showed residents who had stayed behind protecting homes and shops with sandbags and plywood boards.
Also In World News

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"We'll just give it a go and rally together," Cungulla resident Mike Kennedy told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Queensland produces some 95 percent of Australian bananas and while Cyclone Debbie is on course to miss the largest growing regions in the state's far north, analysts said heavy rains and strong winds could cause significant crop damage.

The cyclone is expected to miss most of region's coal mines, weather and mining data in Thomson Reuters Eikon shows, and no major dry-bulk vessels are in storm's path.

Police blamed the wild weather associated with the storm for a traffic accident in which a 31-year-old female tourist died. Police did not give the woman's nationality.

(Additional reporting by Sonali Paul, Colin Packham and Benjamin Weir. Editing by Jane Wardell and Simon Cameron-Moore)
Title: Cyclone Debbie: category four storm due to hit Queensland coast – live updates
Post by: RE on March 27, 2017, 03:20:08 PM
Cat 4 on Landfall and slow moving too.  Gonna be a real mess.

RE

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/live/2017/mar/28/cyclone-debbie-queensland-coast-live-updates-australia (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/live/2017/mar/28/cyclone-debbie-queensland-coast-live-updates-australia)

Cyclone Debbie: category four storm due to hit Queensland coast – live updates

(https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/37c764b7a926e5ed8f1cf0549c470cc4ddc1d768/0_0_1407_844/master/1407.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=e41dd59ce06cba5b336bdb8da76eeab0)

Residents between Townsville and Mackay prepare for destructive winds and potential flooding from what may be one of Australia’s worst cyclones in years

• 25,000 told to evacuate as Queensland storm gathers fury
LIVE Updated 14m ago
Cyclone Debbie Queensland Australia
Tropical Cyclone Debbie closes in on the coast of Queensland, Australia. Photograph: EPA

Christopher Knaus
@knausc

Monday 27 March 2017 17.57 EDT
First published on Monday 27 March 2017 15.15 EDT
Show

    14m ago Police commissioner warns worst yet to come
    44m ago Cyclone Debbie hits the Whitsundays

Show

14m ago 17:57
Police commissioner warns worst yet to come

Queensland’s police commissioner, Ian Stewart, is warning the worst of Cyclone Debbie is yet to come. Stewart said the cyclone is moving very slowly, and its destructive core is still to pass over the coast. He also warned residents to prepare for a long day inside.

“The main core area of the cyclone - so that’s the area with the very, very high and destructive winds - really has not passed generally over the coast,” Stewart told the ABC.

“It’s tucked right on the edge of the coast and certainly places like Proserpine, Airlie Beach, the islands, Hayman, Hamilton, all of those,” he said.

“They would feel the full force of those winds, but the main core has not yet passed directly onto the coast and that’s when we’re going to see those sustained, destructive winds for many, many hours.”
Strong winds and rain lash Airlie Beach on Tuesday.
Strong winds and rain lash Airlie Beach on Tuesday. Photograph: Dan Peled/AAP

Updated at 5.57pm EDT
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26m ago 17:45

Bureau of Meteorology forecaster, Adam Morgan, has urged residents in the cyclone’s path to stay inside. He said in Hamilton Island, peak wind gusts of 189km/h have been recorded. Incredibly strong winds of more than 100km/h have been recorded continuously since 9pm Monday.

Mackay has seen category one strength winds, Morgan said, and areas west of the town have experienced 400mm of rainfall. Morgan repeated warnings that residents should not go outside, even when they think the worst has passed.

“The strongest winds are on the outside of the eye. That eye, as I heard mentioned, may take a while to cross,” he said.

“This is a dangerous period of time. People should not go outside because winds will quickly pick up from exactly the same strength that fastest winds were but from the opposition direction.

“Don’t go outside during the eye and stay in shelter, even once the eye of the cyclone passes.”
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38m ago 17:33

The force of the winds in Mackay is already causing damage. The latest readings from Mackay Airport record winds of 65km/h, and gusts of up to 89km/h. That’s still far below what’s forecast for Cyclone Debbie.
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44m ago 17:27
Cyclone Debbie hits the Whitsundays

The impact of Cyclone Debbie is currently being felt most on the Whitsundays, the popular holiday islands off the north Queensland coast. Queensland deputy police commissioner, Steve Gollschewski, said he had received reports of roof damage at police facilities in the Whitsundays region.

“We’re getting some reports already of roofs starting to lift, including at some of our own facilities in the Whitsundays,” he told the ABC.

On Hamilton Island, residents struggled to sleep as the cyclone approached. Helena Mo who is holidaying on the island at the Reef View Hotel. She said the wind started to get “pretty bad” around 1am but the worst came after 4am.

“I have to admit it’s been difficult to get some sleep, even with the knowledge that we are staying in a very secure hotel,” she told AAP.

“I have never heard gusts of wind howl this loud and this intense before.”

“You can’t help but worry about what’s going to happen next.”

The conditions on Hayman Island, the most northerly of the Whitsundays, was also deteriorating.
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52m ago 17:19

The latest rainfall figures on the Bureau of Meteorology site are pretty astonishing. On Hamilton Island, 89.2mm has fallen since 9am on Monday. Bowen has seen 76.8mm of rain during the same time, and Mackay 110.6mm.
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1h ago 17:10

Mackay’s mayor, Greg Williamson, has attempted to clarify confusion over whether cyclone evacuation centres in the town are open. Williamson said evacuation centres will open only after the cyclone has passed. He said authorities do not want residents on the road while the cyclone is still active.

Williamson used a colourful turn of phrase to describe the night in Mackay.

“It’s been a woolly night in north Queensland and it’s not over yet, Debbie’s fabulous dance over the Coral Sea in the last couple of days is still going and she hasn’t crossed the coast yet,” he told the ABC.

“Unfortunately it’s over the Whitsunday Islands now and still heading for the Bowen region, so our hearts, and thoughts and prayers are going out to people in that region.”

Amateur footage from Mackay suggests the wind is starting to pick up.
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1h ago 17:00

Vision of turbulent winds and rain in tourist hotspot Airlie Beach has begun to emerge.
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1h ago 16:57

While many in Far North Queensland are doing everything they can to get out of Debbie’s path, others are rushing towards it.

Josh Morgerman is an American cyclone chaser who came to Queensland to experience the category four storm. Morgerman is currently in Bowen, where the destructive core of the storm is due to hit. He has described conditions at 6.30am local time as “turbulent but nothing too crazy yet”.

Keep in mind, Morgerman has experienced some pretty harrowing cyclones. He was in the Philippines for typhoon Haiyan, one of the most intense cyclones on record. Haiyan killed more than 6,000 people in the Philippines alone.
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1h ago 16:46

The latest radar image from the Bureau of Meteorology’s Bowen radar shows the extent of rainfall expected between Mackay in the south and Townsville further north. In some areas, 13 inches (33cm) of rain is expected to fall on Tuesday. Deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce, gave us a sense of the scale of the expected rainfall.

“That is absolutely astronomical,” Joyce told ABC radio.

“So for your listeners, 13 inches of rain is what people out west get in a year.”

Updated at 5.40pm EDT
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2h ago 16:39

Far North Queensland sees more than its fair share of tropical cyclones. So how are homes in the region built to withstand destructive winds? James Cook University’s cyclone testing station research director, John Ginger, said homes built since the mid-1980s, under improved building standards, would be able to withstand Debbie.

“Houses built in the cyclonic regions of Queensland to improved building standards since the mid-1980s can be expected to withstand wind-loads forecast in TC Debbie,” Ginger said.

“Some older houses will be vulnerable to damage,” he said.

“Houses in low-lying coastal regions especially to the south of the crossing, and are subjected to storm surge will be vulnerable to significant damage.”
Strand Hotel manager, John McBride, is seen taping up the hotels doors and windows in preparation for Cyclone Debbie Monday.
Strand Hotel manager, John McBride, is seen taping up the hotels doors and windows in preparation for Cyclone Debbie Monday. Photograph: Ian Hitchcock/Getty Images
Workers put up plywood panels to protect a shop on the Strand in Townsville on Monday.
Workers put up plywood panels to protect a shop on the Strand in Townsville on Monday. Photograph: Ian Hitchcock/Getty Images
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2h ago 16:28

The ABC has reported that engine problems with two of the Navy’s largest ships - the amphibious assault ships HMAS Canberra and HMAS Adelaide - have rendered them unable to assist in the Cyclone Debbie response. Labor has described that as “very, very troubling”. Deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce, has just told ABC radio that another vessel, HMAS Choules, has been deployed instead and will arrive in the region in time.

“That’s how you manage things, if one isn’t available you send the other one,” Joyce said.
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2h ago 16:22

Queensland premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk, has just appeared on ABC to urge residents to stay safe, and prepare for a long day. She warned residents against being lulled into a false sense of security when the eye of the storm passes over.

“People will see some daylight and think that the worst of the storm has passed. Once again, I must urge everyone to stay indoors for most of today,” Palaszczuk said.

She said the storm was expected to make landfall between midday and 1pm, and authorities were expecting strong winds of 260km/h.

“My message to everyone in the region is to please stay safe. This is going to be a long day. A lot of people are bunkered down. They’re in a safe place, but it is going to take a long time, well into this afternoon and to the evening before winds even start to die down,” Palaszczuk said.

“The best place to be is in your safe place in your home. Do you not move out. Stay there. Stay with your family close by.”
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Palloy2 on March 27, 2017, 03:38:14 PM
Quote
may be one of Australia’s worst cyclones in years

At Category 4 it definitely isn't one of the worst (Category 5).

Quote
The latest rainfall figures on the Bureau of Meteorology site are pretty astonishing. On Hamilton Island, 89.2mm has fallen since 9am on Monday. Bowen has seen 76.8mm of rain during the same time, and Mackay 110.6mm.

Pathetic - 300+ would be worth reporting, 500+ would be astonishing.

The Guardian is trying too hard to be scary.  They'll be telling us next that a tree has blown over!
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 27, 2017, 03:50:56 PM


Quote

The Guardian is trying too hard to be scary.  They'll be telling us next that a tree has blown over!

Gotta' luv the Guardian....

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/mar/24/us-scientists-launch-worlds-biggest-solar-geoengineering-study (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/mar/24/us-scientists-launch-worlds-biggest-solar-geoengineering-study)

 US scientists launch world's biggest solar geoengineering study

Research programme will send aerosol injections into the earth’s upper atmosphere to study the risks and benefits of a future solar tech-fix for climate change


US scientists are set to send aerosol injections 20km up into the earth’s stratosphere in the world’s biggest solar geoengineering programme to date, to study the potential of a future tech-fix for global warming.

The $20m (£16m) Harvard University project will launch within weeks and aims to establish whether the technology can safely simulate the atmospheric cooling effects of a volcanic eruption, if a last ditch bid to halt climate change is one day needed.

Scientists hope to complete two small-scale dispersals of first water and then calcium carbonate particles by 2022. Future tests could involve seeding the sky with aluminium oxide – or even diamonds.
Is geoengineering a bad idea?
Read more

“This is not the first or the only university study,” said Gernot Wagner, the project’s co-founder, “but it is most certainly the largest, and the most comprehensive.”

Janos Pasztor, Ban Ki-moon’s assistant climate chief at the UN who now leads a geoengineering governance initiative, said that the Harvard scientists would only disperse minimal amounts of compounds in their tests, under strict university controls.

“The real issue here is something much more challenging,” he said “What does moving experimentation from the lab into the atmosphere mean for the overall path towards eventual deployment?”

Geoengineering advocates stress that any attempt at a solar tech fix is years away and should be viewed as a compliment to – not a substitute for – aggressive emissions reductions action.

But the Harvard team, in a promotional video for the project, suggest a redirection of one percent of current climate mitigation funds to geoengineering research, and argue that the planet could be covered with a solar shield for as little as $10bn a year.
Geoengineering is fast and cheap, but not the key to stopping climate change
Read more

Some senior UN climate scientists view such developments with alarm, fearing a cash drain from proven mitigation technologies such as wind and solar energy, to ones carrying the potential for unintended disasters.

Kevin Trenberth, a lead author for the UN’s intergovernmental panel on climate change, said that despair at sluggish climate action, and the rise of Donald Trump were feeding the current tech trend.

“But solar geoengineering is not the answer,” he said. “Cutting incoming solar radiation affects the weather and hydrological cycle. It promotes drought. It destabilizes things and could cause wars. The side effects are many and our models are just not good enough to predict the outcomes”

Natural alterations to the earth’s radiation balance can be short-lasting, but terrifying. A 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption lowered global temperatures by 0.5C, while the Mount Tambora eruption in 1815 triggered Europe’s ‘year without a summer’, bringing crop failure, famine and disease.

A Met Office study in 2013 said that the dispersal of fine particles in the stratosphere could precipitate a calamitous drought across North Africa.

Frank Keutsch, the Harvard atmospheric sciences professor leading the experiment, said that the deployment of a solar geoengineering system was “a terrifying prospect” that he hoped would never have to be considered. “At the same time, we should never choose ignorance over knowledge in a situation like this,” he said.

“If you put heat into the stratosphere, it may change how much water gets transported from the troposphere to the stratosphere, and the question is how much are you [creating] a domino effect with all kinds of consequences? What we can do to quantify this is to start with lab studies and try to understand the relevant properties of these aerosols.”

Stratospheric controlled perturbation experiments (SCoPEX) are seen as “critical” to this process and the first is planned to spray water molecules into the stratosphere to create a 1km long and 100m wide icy plume, which can be studied by a manoeuvrable flight balloon.

If lab tests are positive, the experiment would then be replicated with a limestone compound which the researchers believe will neither absorb solar or terrestrial radiation, nor deplete the ozone layer.

Bill Gates and other foundations are substantially funding the project, and aerospace companies are thought to be taking a business interest in the technology’s potential.

The programmme’s launch will follow a major conference involving more than 100 scientists, which begins in Washington DC today.

Solar geoengineering’s journey from the fringes of climate science to its mainstream will be sealed at a prestigious Gordon research conference in July, featuring senior figures from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Oxford University.

Pasztor says that most scientific observers now see the window to a 1.5C warmed world as “practically gone” and notes that atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will continue rising for many decades after the planet has reached a ‘net zero emissions’ point planned for mid-late century.

But critics of solar radiation management approach this as a call to redouble mitigation efforts and guard against the elevation of a questionable Plan B.

“It is appropriate that we spend money on solar geoengineering research,” said Kevin Anderson, the deputy director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. “But we also have to aim for 2C with climate mitigation and act as though geoengineering doesn’t work, because it probably won’t.”

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on March 27, 2017, 04:09:30 PM
Quote
may be one of Australia’s worst cyclones in years

At Category 4 it definitely isn't one of the worst (Category 5).

It was qualified by "in years".  The last Cat 5 to hit Oz was Yasi, in 2011, 6 years ago.

Quote
Quote
The latest rainfall figures on the Bureau of Meteorology site are pretty astonishing. On Hamilton Island, 89.2mm has fallen since 9am on Monday. Bowen has seen 76.8mm of rain during the same time, and Mackay 110.6mm.

Pathetic - 300+ would be worth reporting, 500+ would be astonishing.

The Guardian is trying too hard to be scary.  They'll be telling us next that a tree has blown over!

It's a slow mover.  It will dump rain all week.  Give it some time here to accumulate rainfall totals.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on March 27, 2017, 04:26:23 PM
Quote
may be one of Australia’s worst cyclones in years

At Category 4 it definitely isn't one of the worst (Category 5).

It was qualified by "in years".  The last Cat 5 to hit Oz was Yasi, in 2011, 6 years ago.

Quote
Quote
The latest rainfall figures on the Bureau of Meteorology site are pretty astonishing. On Hamilton Island, 89.2mm has fallen since 9am on Monday. Bowen has seen 76.8mm of rain during the same time, and Mackay 110.6mm.

Pathetic - 300+ would be worth reporting, 500+ would be astonishing.

The Guardian is trying too hard to be scary.  They'll be telling us next that a tree has blown over!


It's a slow mover.  It will dump rain all week.  Give it some time here to accumulate rainfall totals.

RE


Palloy2,
The only thing pathetic is your inability to connect the Climate change cause and effect Fossil Fuel Pollution DOTS.

RE,
You will wait a very long time for an admission by Palloy2 that he does not repetitively and consistently use derision, mockery and hyperbole to avoid admitting the FACT that Catastrophic climate change has begun.

He won't admit it until it's too late.  (http://www.createaforum.com/gallery/renewablerevolution/3-200714183337.bmp)

He simply does not believe the following hard truths:

(http://renewablerevolution.createaforum.com/gallery/renewablerevolution/3-110217171320.png)

(http://cdn.zmescience.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/whereisglobalwarminggoing.png)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on March 27, 2017, 04:48:56 PM
(http://therealnews.com/t2/templates/gk_twn/images/logo3.png)


March 27, 2017

Study Links Extreme Weather Events to Climate Change

Dr. Michael Mann says the way climate change affects the jet stream is intensifying and increasing the regional scale of droughts and flooding.

https://youtu.be/gThvsFZ8nQo (https://youtu.be/gThvsFZ8nQo)

biography

Dr. Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Meteorology at Penn State University, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI). He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).


transcript
Study Links Extreme Weather Events to Climate Change

KIM BROWN: Welcome to The Real News Network in Baltimore. I'm Kim Brown.

   Unprecedented summer warmth, flooding, forest fires, drought and torrential rain –- extreme weather events are occurring more and more often. But now, an international team of climate scientists have found a connection, between many extreme weather events, and the impact climate change is having on the jet stream. Jet streams are fast-flowing air currents found in earth's atmosphere.

   To discuss this significant new study, titled, "Influence of Anthropogenic Climate Change on Planetary Wave Resonance and Extreme Weather Events," which is published in the peer-reviewed journal, Nature.

We're joined by its lead author Dr. Michael Mann. He is the author of the book titled, "The Hockey Stick and Climate Wars." His latest book, co-authored with Tom Toles, is titled, "The Madhouse Effect: How Climate Change Denial is Threatening Our Planet, Destroying Our Politics, and Driving Us Crazy."

   Michael, we appreciate you joining us again, here on The Real News. Thank you.

DR. MICHAEL MANN: Great to be here.

KIM BROWN: More and more, scientists have been connecting the dots of human-caused global warming, and extreme weather events. Tell us about the role of the jet stream, and what you've found.

DR. MICHAEL MANN: Yeah. We know climate change is leading to more extreme weather events of certain types, obviously more heat waves, more intense heat, and more drought, because of the... As you bake the earth with record temperatures, you dry out the soils. You get record levels of drought, and a warmer atmosphere holds more moisture, so you can get record flooding as well. All of that is related to just the basic attributes of the atmosphere getting warmer, the earth getting warmer.

   What our study shows, is that there's an additional factor that is leading to more extreme weather. Climate change, is changing the behavior of the jet stream, in a way that makes it not only more likely to get stuck in place, so that you have low pressure centers, and high pressure centers, sort of stuck in the same place. Warm temperatures, or cold temperatures, stuck in the same place, wet conditions or dry conditions, stuck in the same place.

But climate change is actually amplifying the jet stream waves, in a way that leads to larger regional weather anomalies. Larger amounts of rainfall, of sustained rainfall, more sustained drought, more sustained heat. So, there's this additional factor, in how climate change is changing the jet stream that is intensifying many of these extreme weather events even further, beyond what we would expect, just from the direct effects of global warming.

KIM BROWN: Talk more about how we know that there is a heavy influence of human-caused, or anthropogenic climate change, to extreme weather events, and not just El Niño, or La Niña, or natural changing weather patterns, as climate deniers would have us believe.

DR. MICHAEL MANN: Yeah. That's right. What we looked at, was what is the pattern of temperature that leads to this particular configuration of the jet stream. Where it gets sort of stuck in place, and where the waves, the troughs and the peaks of the jet stream become amplified, so you get very large regional weather anomalies? And because the jet stream is stuck in place, individual regions continue to get rained on for weeks at a time, or continue to get baked by sunshine, and unprecedented warmth for weeks at a time.

It's those very persistent anomalous weather patterns that give us the extremes that we've seen in recent years: the 2011 Texas and Oklahoma drought, where they lost 25% of their cattle, and agriculture was devastated, the 2010 Moscow heat wave and wildfires, the 2015 California wildfires. Each of these events, it turns out, occurred when the jet stream was in that particular configuration.

What we've shown, using climate models, is that global warming is making that jet stream configuration more frequent. And it's making it more frequent because it's changing the pattern of temperatures, in a way that favors that pattern in the jet stream. The bottom line is, that global warming leads to amplified warming in the poles, where you melt away sea ice in the Arctic, so you get even more warming in the Arctic.

And that means you decrease the gradient, as we call it, in temperature, the change in temperature, from the warm tropics to the cold poles. We decrease that difference in temperature by warming the poles so much, and when you do that, you actually change the pattern of the jet stream. And you change it in a way that, projects onto that particular pattern that leads to these unprecedented weather anomalies.

KIM BROWN: Michael, you used both computer simulations, and observational and historical data, going back to records from as early as 1880, and roughly 50 climate models from around the world. What did you deduce from these recordings, and these models?

DR. MICHAEL MANN: The first thing we did, was to look at the climate models and project forward in time, over the historical period, and see what happens to this particular temperature pattern that we know is associated, with these anomalous jet stream conditions, that give us these extreme weather events.

We were able to show, that very consistently, among nearly all of the climate models that pattern of temperature change becomes more and more frequent, and, again, it becomes more frequent, in large part because you're warming the poles so much. That makes that particular temperature pattern that gives you these jet stream conditions more frequent. And that's happening in the climate models.

   Well, then we looked at the observations to see what was happening to this temperature pattern, in the historical surface temperature observations. And exactly the same thing is happening: that pattern is getting more common over time. We know that's happening in the observations, and in the observations, we know that that it's tied to many of these extreme weather events we've seen in recent summers. What the climate models tell us is that that change is due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

KIM BROWN: What other key takeaways from your study should we know, in your opinion, Michael?

DR. MICHAEL MANN: What we should know, is that many of the extreme weather events that we've seen, particularly in the summer season. The mechanism that we're looking at is primarily relevant to the warm part of the year. The spring, the summer, the early fall, and so when we think of many of these extreme heat waves, and droughts, and flooding events we've seen in Europe and North America in recent years, many of these events are indeed associated with this unusual pattern in the jet stream.

What we've done is, to connect the dots and say, that pattern in the jet stream is being made more common by human-caused climate change. So, we've sort of connected the dots from many of these extreme weather events that we've seen in recent years, to human-caused warming of the planet.

KIM BROWN: In terms of practical application, you looked at the historical atmospheric observations, to document the conditions under which extreme weather patterns form and persist. Does this mean that we could get to the point where we can know an extreme weather event will arrive long before it actually happens?

DR. MICHAEL MANN: Yeah. There's a good chance that we can identify in advance, with weather models, when the atmosphere appears to be getting locked into one of those configurations, that favors these extreme persistent weather events. It doesn't mean we could predict the precise weather events. But we can predict when we are likely to see an increase in these extreme weather events, in the northern hemisphere. So, there's some potential predictive capacity there.

KIM BROWN: You know, Donald Trump released his budget, and it contains a barrage of cuts to federal agencies, particularly to the EPA, to NASA, to NOAA. What do you think about these budget cuts that Trump has proposed across all government agencies, on anything related to climate change, effects important research such as yours that might actually aid in human survival on a warming planet? Your thoughts about that.

DR. MICHAEL MANN: Yeah, it's dangerous. It's, frankly, dangerous. The cuts that he is proposing in NOAA, in NASA's Earth Science Program, the Satellite Programs that help us measure what the atmosphere and ocean and ice are doing, that forecasters use to help us understand the threat from hurricanes and extreme weather events.

It's, to me, his de-funding of many of the basic scientific programs that are there to measure, to monitor what's happening with the climate, is sort of like having a child who is suffering from a very high fever, and then deciding to just stop measuring their temperature, stop taking their temperature. That's effectively what he is doing. But not just with a single human being –- with our entire planet –- and it's a threat to all of us.

It's a threat to companies and corporations, and stakeholders that rely upon this information, for assessing risk and making important decisions. And obviously it's a threat to all of society, which will suffer from the lack of information that we will have, and the lack of our ability to make, to take certain precautionary and adaptive steps, to protect ourselves from the impacts that climate change is having.

KIM BROWN: The name of the report is titled, "Influence of Anthropogenic Climate Change on Planetary Wave Resonance and Extreme Weather Events."

We've been joined with Michael E. Mann. He's a doctor, he's from Penn State University, he's also the lead author of this. If you'd like to check out this report, we will have a link to it at the bottom of this interview.

   Michael, we appreciate you joining us, and good work on this report. Thank you very much for your contributions to this.

DR. MICHAEL MANN: Thank you, always a pleasure to talk with you.

KIM BROWN: Thank you, and we appreciate you all watching and supporting The Real News Network.

-------------------------
END

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=18755 (http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=18755)
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: RE on March 27, 2017, 04:52:09 PM
You will wait a very long time for an admission by Palloy2 that he does not repetitively and consistently use derision, mockery and hyperbole to avoid admitting the FACT that Catastrophic climate change has begun.

Well, in this case he is using Derision & Mockery against the Guardian and not against another Diner, so it's not a Violation of the CoC.

RE
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 27, 2017, 06:06:48 PM
You will wait a very long time for an admission by Palloy2 that he does not repetitively and consistently use derision, mockery and hyperbole to avoid admitting the FACT that Catastrophic climate change has begun.

Well, in this case he is using Derision & Mockery against the Guardian and not against another Diner, so it's not a Violation of the CoC.

RE


Lately I've noticed several msm tabloids coming out of the closet.
Guess they've found a tinfoil hat that fits.
These douche-bags (msm) know there sunk financially if they don't grow some cajones' & lose the in the box mentality.
Title: Cyclone Debbie HITS!
Post by: RE on March 27, 2017, 09:20:59 PM
According to PY, "Nothing to see here, please move along".  ::)

The Guardian was just fear mongering.

RE

http://www.youtube.com/v/iKpPhlx7MxQ

http://www.youtube.com/v/Pmp1TFsG4rk
Title: Cyclone Debbie: 'Monster' storm batters Australia
Post by: RE on March 28, 2017, 04:03:36 AM
Looks like some neighborhoods will see up to PY's threshhold of 500mm for it to be a significant rain event.  ::)

RE

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-39409693 (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-39409693)

Cyclone Debbie: 'Monster' storm batters Australia

(http://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/118FF/production/_95353917_cyclone_debbie_624map.png)

    15 minutes ago
    From the section Australia

Share
Media captionThe powerful storm is expected to last for hours

A powerful cyclone has pummelled the north-east Australian coast, causing major damage, torrential rain and power cuts to tens of thousands of homes.

Cyclone Debbie made landfall between Bowen and Airlie Beach in Queensland as a category four storm, whipping gusts of up to 263km/h (163 mph).

It is moving inland as a category two but could cause damage for hours yet. One serious injury has been reported.

PM Malcolm Turnbull told parliament he had activated a disaster response plan.

"Conditions have deteriorated rapidly," he said. "Take care and stay safe. Be prepared to shelter in place until Wednesday."

The extent of Cyclone Debbie's devastation, which has a 50km-diameter eye wall, may not be known for some time, authorities said.

Queensland Police Commissioner Ian Stewart said the storm's slow speed had created a "battering ram effect", adding: "We are going to get lots of reports of damage, and sadly I think we will also receive reports of injuries, if not death."

    In pictures: Debbie makes landfall
    Five tales of the storm

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said assessing damage was difficult because communities had been cut off from power and phone reception.

She said: "Everyone is going to be in shock tomorrow, just to see the full impact of this cyclone. I'm bracing myself for it."

One man had been seriously injured in a wall collapse triggered by the storm in Proserpine, Mr Stewart said.

Electricity providers said it was not known when power would be restored to houses.

Authorities warned people to stay indoors until it was safe to go outside.
Lockdown - BBC's Hywel Griffith in Ayr
Image copyright AFP/Getty Images
Image caption Storm clouds gather in Ayr

Sit and wait is all that's left to do. Now that Debbie has finally hit land, it's too late to leave towns like Ayr, which lie in its path. Even the local fire-fighters are on lockdown, under strict orders not to respond to any calls until wind speeds fall back down below 80km/h.

That could take several hours, so they are doing the same as everyone else - following the footage on TV and checking the latest forecasts online.

Only the town pub is open, where a mix of locals and loggers are necking a few pints and playing pool. For the locals, it's a way to take their minds off the damage being done to their homes.

For the loggers, it's some respite before the busy month ahead, which they expect to spend helping to put power lines back in place.

"We're going to see the impact of Cyclone Debbie for the next three to five days as it travels down the coast," Ms Palaszczuk said.

More than 25,000 people were urged to evacuate their homes ahead of predictions the cyclone would be Queensland's most damaging since 2011.

One person in the Whitsunday Islands compared the winds to "freight trains coming through left and right".

"The trees are going wild. The place is just shaking continuously," the man, identified only as Charlie, told the Australian Broadcasting Corp.
Image copyright EPA
Image caption Damage in Airlie Beach - the full extent may not be known for some time

Greg Williamson, the mayor of Mackay regional council, told the BBC: "We've had winds up to about 95km/h for the last 12 hours. We've had torrential rain.... but that's what you get for living in a tropical paradise."

He said the Whitsunday Islands, Proserpine and Bowen were "really getting lashed now at the moment".

In other key developments:

    The region is expected to be hit with 150-500mm of rain on Tuesday, with warnings of floods in low-lying areas
    Police warned people to beware of fallen power lines, which could be deadly
    Emergency stockpiles of food and fuel have been set aside, and the army is on standby
    The Insurance Council of Australia declared the cyclone a "catastrophe"
    David Wachenfeld, of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, said he feared Debbie may have caused extensive damage to reefs in its path

More than 2,000 emergency workers are on standby, but people have been warned crews will only respond when it is safe to do so.
Image copyright EPA
Image caption The eye of the storm at 05:30 GMT

All flights have been cancelled at Townsville Airport and Mackay Airport.

Mr Stewart said the weather contributed to the death of a woman in a car crash on Monday.

Cyclones and hurricanes: Different names for same thing
Media captionTomasz Schafernaker gives the latest forecast on Cyclone Debbie
Why is it so powerful?

As well as being a wider storm than most: "It is well above average intensity and made landfall at close to its peak intensity," Dr Jeffrey D Kepert, head of the Bureau of Meteorology's High Impact Weather Research told the BBC.

Crucially, it is also very slow-moving. That "can be more damaging because the duration of strong winds is longer. As structures experience a longer battering, things like metal fatigue set in, leading to more damage. Also, more of the rain falls in the same area rather than being spread out, leading to a greater flood risk," he added.
What is the predicted damage?

"The great concern in Queensland for decades has been what if it hits a major city," said Assoc Prof David King, director of the Centre for Disaster Studies in the state's James Cook University.

Fortunately Debbie looks likely to head between two cities so "the destruction is likely to be somewhat less than feared." And while tourists are less able to evacuate from the resorts that have been hit more directly, their hotels are "likely to have higher foundations" and be built more solidly than many ordinary homes near the coast.
Panic over?

No. The storm will still be around even as it downgrades. But, as a silver lining, it could bring some relief to farmers affected by drought. "Hopefully that will bring a bit of rain to the interior," Prof King says.
Title: Cyclone Debbie Latest Video: Oz gets HAMMERED!
Post by: RE on March 28, 2017, 09:18:34 AM
So much for the tourist industry in Northern Queensland for at least the next year.  The rebuild after this one is going to take some time, not to mention a LOT of money!

Flooding problems from the massive rainfall not accounted for yet.

RE

http://www.youtube.com/v/akIOcRQSYO0
Title: Monster Cyclone Debbie Compilation Video
Post by: RE on March 28, 2017, 06:21:30 PM
They got Hammered!  Lotta wrecked Seasteads parked in those Marinas.

RE

http://www.youtube.com/v/MgHMNysIqS0
Title: Singin' in the Peruvian Rain 2
Post by: RE on March 29, 2017, 12:28:44 AM
Peruvians still swimming.

I wonder if they will count all the cholera deaths in the next year in with the 96 so far tallied?  ???  :icon_scratch:

Best part comes at the end:

Quote
International aid has begun to arrive, with the United States pledging $525,000 in relief. China’s ambassador to Peru, Jia Guide, said his country will donate $1.5 million to relief efforts. Also pledging aid are France, South Korea, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and the Vatican, among others.

Costs and lost revenue estimated around $4B.  Then two of the "richest" countries in the world offer up a big  $.5M (FSoA) and $1.5M (China) each. This is like if you have $4000 in bills after your McMansion is washed away and your rich brother hands you $1 to help you out.  ::)

RE

http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-peru-floods-20170328-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-peru-floods-20170328-story.html)

 Peru's brutal season of floods leaves 94 dead, 700,000 homeless

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-58daa1cc/turbine/la-1490723364-94uv93pb04-snap-image/650/650x366)
Residents in the city of Piura, 1,000 kilometres north of Lima, wade through water on the streets on
Nearly 15 hours of rain caused a flood that has inundated the Peruvian city of Piura, about 620 miles north of Lima. (PATRICIA LACHIRA / AFP/Getty Images)

Adriana Leon, Chris Kraul

Extreme weather has battered many parts of the world this year, but few countries have suffered more in lives, homes and crops lost than Peru, the Andean country that has been beset with torrential rains and massive flooding for much of this year.

On Tuesday, the Peruvian government raised the death toll from floods to 94 while relief agencies estimated that 700,000 persons have been left homeless in 12 of the country’s 25 regions. The cost to Peru’s economy in lost productivity has been estimated at $3.1 billion, or 1.6% of the country’s annual output of goods and services.
From Our Partners: What You Need to Know About Donald Trump’s New Energy Plan

The price tag for fixing roads and bridges is at least $1 billion and the work will take two to three years to complete, Transportation Minister Martin Vizcarra said Tuesday.

Widespread damage to roads and highways has isolated many victims, hampering relief efforts. In Catacaos, floodwaters reaching 6 feet high have killed four people and left much of the riverside city inundated. Five hundred people there were evacuated Tuesday morning, with many others still awaiting rescue.

We have lost everything. — Carmela Calle, flood victim

“We’re trapped and we can’t get out,” said Carmela Calle, a 43-year-old homemaker in Catacaos who spoke to The Times by phone. “Please help us. We are on the roof with a newborn baby and two elderly relatives. We are desperate and without food. We have lost everything.”

The government’s meteorological service said there is little chance of a respite in the near future, as heavy rains are forecast to continue through this weekend. Rains have been unseasonably intense since January, with the most severe damage reported in the country’s northwestern coastal areas as a result of what has been described as a coastal El Niño.

Eight people have been reported killed in Lima, the capital, with 8,400 homes destroyed by the flooding. Some southern and central parts of the capital have gone six days without drinking water.

Damage was worse in the northwestern city of Piura, a metropolis of 1.8 million, where rising floodwaters reached the central square known as Plaza de Armas, killing four and forcing hundreds of families to abandon their homes. Four bridges connecting the center of town with outlying districts were reported washed out.

More than 1,200 people in Piura have been rescued from flooded homes, according to Gen. Jorge Chavez of the National Center for Emergency Operations. Military and police personnel were using inflatable boats to reach areas left isolated by floods, he said.

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-58da9f76/turbine/la-1490722765-rm8jtvqezk-snap-image/750/750x422)
Two men make their way in Piura, where more than 1,200 people have been rescued from flooded homes. (Edwin Zapata Alvarado / EPA)

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-58daa300/turbine/la-1490723672-h7yf3ybleo-snap-image/750/750x422)
Some buildings in Piura collapsed when floodwaters hit the city. (PATRICIA LACHIRA / AFP/Getty Images)

“We know this is an extreme situation, but we are pleading for calm. Please be confident that all will be taken care of,” Chavez said. But there were widespread complaints that officials were responding too slowly.

“We don’t know where to turn because no one is helping us. We hear on TV that the government is sending support but until now we have seen nothing,” said Hector Santos, a Piura resident and owner of a flooded house. “We have no place to sleep,” he said, telling a radio reporter he was speaking from his roof.

Reynaldo Hilbck Guzman, governor of the Piura region, said the volume of water coursing through the Piura River is unprecedented and overwhelming levees. Floods already have destroyed 15,000 acres of crops, he said.

A spokesman for President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski said the government has sent hundreds of military and police personnel to help in relief efforts. He also appointed special ministers in each province to manage relief efforts. The national emergency operations center reported that a total of 150,000 houses and businesses have been flooded out.

“I have lost my grocery store and my house, which no longer exists,” said Mariano Carreras of Chongoyape, a town in the Lambayeque region.

“My children have no clothes to wear, and the flood took away all their school books,” he told The Times by phone. “We are desperate and having nothing. Who will help us?”

International aid has begun to arrive, with the United States pledging $525,000 in relief. China’s ambassador to Peru, Jia Guide, said his country will donate $1.5 million to relief efforts. Also pledging aid are France, South Korea, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and the Vatican, among others.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 29, 2017, 01:42:24 PM
2017-03-27 - WMO says drastic climate change in 2016 will continue this year:
http://www.rt.com/usa/381664-climate-change-report-wmo/ (http://www.rt.com/usa/381664-climate-change-report-wmo/)
http://www.sott.net/article/346504-World-Meteorological-Organization-Drastic-climate-change-in-2016-will-continue-this-year (http://www.sott.net/article/346504-World-Meteorological-Organization-Drastic-climate-change-in-2016-will-continue-this-year)

2017-03-27 - Climate change - 'human fingerprint' found on global extreme weather:
http://www.fasterthanexpected.com/2017/03/27/climate-change-human-fingerprint-found-on-global-extreme-weather/ (http://www.fasterthanexpected.com/2017/03/27/climate-change-human-fingerprint-found-on-global-extreme-weather/)

2017-03-27 - If you want to know how climate change is transforming our world, ask your grandparents:
http://robinwestenra.blogspot.com/2017/03/asiss-ecosystems-are-collapsing.html (http://robinwestenra.blogspot.com/2017/03/asiss-ecosystems-are-collapsing.html)
Title: Debbie Does Downunder
Post by: RE on March 30, 2017, 12:13:52 AM
The FLOODING begins!

They hit PYs threshhold of 500mm of rain for a "significant" event!  Guess the Guardian (and RE  ;D ) was right this time.  ::)

RE

http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/schools-closed-as-brisbane-and-sydney-brace-for-fall-as-cyclone-debbies-aftereffects-get-disastrous/news-story/9f025c16d4be60ddaa330e09c73a6f96 (http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/schools-closed-as-brisbane-and-sydney-brace-for-fall-as-cyclone-debbies-aftereffects-get-disastrous/news-story/9f025c16d4be60ddaa330e09c73a6f96)

Schools closed as southeast Qld braces for ‘nightmare’ in Debbie’s wake

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Schools closed as southeast Qld braces for ‘nightmare’ in Debbie’s wake

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Ex-tropical cyclone Debbie causes flooding in Brisbane

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Liz Burke and wiresnews.com.au

EVACUATION advisories have been issued to people downstream of two Queensland dams and in low-lying areas of the Tweed River near Murwillumbah, as the remnants of Cyclone Debbie smash southeast Queensland and northern NSW with fierce winds and torrential rain, and rising floodwaters.

And the worst is yet to come, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk warned, as the cyclone aftermath causes weather havoc across the state and into NSW.

“The safest place for families to be over the next 24 hours is in their homes,” she said.

Schools were closed down in southeast Queenland today in an unprecedented move, and will remain so on Friday.

Residents outside the Queensland town of Biloela are being urged to relocate as authorities issued an emergency alert for water levels at the Callide and Kroombit Dams.

Police say residents downstream should consider leaving “in case water releases are required”.

Across the border in northern NSW, residents in low-lying areas near Murwillumbah have been ordered to evacuate as the Tweed River rises towards major flood levels, according to 7 News reports.

A major flood warning has also been issued for the northern rivers city of Lismore, where 270mm of rain fell in the 15 hours to 3pm Thursday.

‘IT WILL GET WORSE’

It comes as the heaviest downpour is expected to hit Brisbane, the Sunshine Coast and the Gold Coast shortly before peak hour on Thursday, creating a nightmare commute for those returning home from work.

The head of Queensland’s Fire and Emergency Services has warned nowhere in southeast Queensland is safe from the destructive aftermath of Cyclone Debbie set to lash the area this afternoon.

Speaking with ABC radio, QFES commissioner Katarina Carroll said the system was so large and widespread, no parts of Brisbane and its surrounding areas were any safer than others.

“Whether you’re on the Sunshine Coast or the Gold Coast or in north Brisbane or South Brisbane, we’re all going to be subjected to severe weather this afternoon,” she said.

Flooding has already begun and Queensland residents are scrambling for sandbags as they prepare for the deluge no one saw coming.

Areas of the Gold Coast Hinterland have already had up to 412mm of rain in the past 24 hours with conditions to worsen. “The situation will get worse before it gets better,” Ms Carroll warned.

Rigby Wilshire wades through flood waters to get to his home on Longlands st at East Brisbane. Picture: Darren England.

Rigby Wilshire wades through flood waters to get to his home on Longlands st at East Brisbane. Picture: Darren England.Source:News Corp Australia

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SWIFT WATER RESCUES

The extreme weather event is the unexpected sting in ex-tropical Cyclone Debbie’s tail, and is expected to bring with it half a metre of rain that will leave Brisbane feeling like “a nightmare”.

Southeast Queensland is shutting down.

The rain is so severe Queensland authorities made the unprecedented call to close all schools in the state’s southeast and everyone from Mackay to Brisbane and the Gold Coast was told to go home today.

Swift water rescue teams have pulled more than 40 people from floodwaters.

Most were people stranded in cars by flash flooding across Brisbane, and on the Gold and Sunshine coasts, where some businesses and roads have been flooded.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Commissioner Katarina Carroll said information was coming in quickly.

“There has been close to 40 swiftwater rescues in the southeast, those figures are around an hour-and-a-half old so I expect they would have increased,” Commissioner Carroll told reporters about 3.30pm AEDT.

The rescues in southeast Queensland followed nearly 90 in the Mackay region overnight and this morning from floodwaters that left many stranded on the roofs of their homes and in their cars.

Southeast Queensland is shutting up shop after severe warnings.

Southeast Queensland is shutting up shop after severe warnings.Source:News Corp Australia

Travel was delayed but free as Brisbane commuters rush home.

Travel was delayed but free as Brisbane commuters rush home.Source:News Corp Australia

MORE RAIN TO COME

Bureau of Meteorology forecaster Matthew Bass said parts of Brisbane had received more than 200mm of rain and Springbrook had more than 380mm — with more on the way.

“We do have the final heavy burst of rainfall and winds due to come tonight,” he said.

Bureau of Meteorology forecaster Matthew Bass said it looked like “the heavy rain may just clear Brisbane by about midnight or the very early hours of the morning.”

The Bureau of Meteorology has cancelled a severe thunderstorm warning for southeast Queensland, but a more general severe weather warning remains in place and more torrential rain is expected.

Parts of Brisbane were flooded hours ahead of the storm’s peak. Blunder Rd Causeway at Durack Picture: Marc Robertson

Parts of Brisbane were flooded hours ahead of the storm’s peak. Blunder Rd Causeway at Durack Picture: Marc RobertsonSource:News Corp Australia

Bureau of Meteorology issued a severe weather warning at 11am AEST highlighting the danger zone.

Bureau of Meteorology issued a severe weather warning at 11am AEST highlighting the danger zone.Source:Supplied

Locals were warned peak hour would be “a nightmare”.

“The other message for today is that peak hour will probably be a nightmare this afternoon, so if employees can be staggered in terms of being released from work to go home, that would be the best thing possible in terms of ensuring that our road network is not clogged up,” Deputy Premier Jackie Trad warned.

Some people ignored warnings from authorities. Footage send to Channel 9 showed Gold Coasters riding jet skis around a flooded dog park.

Cars submerged at Robina Hospital on the Gold Coast. Picture: Nigel Hallett

Cars submerged at Robina Hospital on the Gold Coast. Picture: Nigel HallettSource:News Corp Australia

Residents all across southeast Queensland have been told to make sure their mobile phones are charged, and mobile battery packs if they have them.

Commuters began making their way home from work as soon as they arrived in Brisbane’s CBD.

Commuters began making their way home from work as soon as they arrived in Brisbane’s CBD.Source:News Corp Australia

ALL SCHOOLS CLOSED

The Queensland government has taken the extraordinary step of closing all schools in Queensland between Agnes Waters and the New South Wales border.

The massive area stretches more than 600km down the state’s coast. More than 2000 schools and childcare facilities are affected. They will remain closed on Friday.

Dozens of schools in northern NSW have also been declared non-operational for Thursday and Friday.

Queensland Deputy Premier Jackie Trad announced the last-minute decision just before 7.30am AEST on Thursday.

Parents who had already taken their children to school were assured they would be looked after throughout the day and were urged to collect them before closing time if possible.

A complete list of affected schools is available on the state’s Department of Education website.

In Brisbane, university and TAFE campuses were closed early, all the theme parks on the Gold Coast were shut and beaches along the entire south eastern coast from Mackay were also closed.

Virgin and Tiger Air flights into the Gold Coast are also to be cancelled from noon.

 

WORSE THAN WE THOUGHT

Police Commissioner Ian Stewart has admitted authorities don’t know how serious the effects of Thursday’s deluge will be.

Following emergency meetings on Thursday morning, Mr Stewart said the aftermath of Cyclone Debbie was worse than anticipated.

“We had hoped that we had seen the last of Tropical Cyclone Debbie,” he said.

“We knew it was going to be a low, we knew it was going to track exactly the way it did, what the sting is, though, that the intensity has ramped up.”

Mr Stewart said Debbie’s unexpectedly powerful resurgence had resulted in “unprecedented” rain and flash flooding.

In Mackay, where flash flooding caused damage overnight, Mr Stewart said there had been a significant spike in 000 calls because people were in danger.

He urged people in the southeast to take precaution so that wouldn’t be repeated.

“They were caught out, so we don’t want that to happen,” he said.

When asked to estimate the damage rains would bring, Mr Stewart said: “We just don’t know.”

A children's swing sits in flooded waters at a playground on the Gold Coast. Picture: Dave Hunt/AAP

A children's swing sits in flooded waters at a playground on the Gold Coast. Picture: Dave Hunt/AAPSource:AAP

Bowhill Rd is cut by fast flowing water at Durack. Picture: Marc Robertson

Bowhill Rd is cut by fast flowing water at Durack. Picture: Marc RobertsonSource:News Corp Australia

People are being advised to avoid the roads. Picture: Marc Robertson

People are being advised to avoid the roads. Picture: Marc RobertsonSource:News Corp Australia

BRISBANE

Sandbagging stations were set up across Queensland’s capital with residents of the state’s most populous city warned to prepare for about a month’s worth of rain over 24 hours.

Mr Stewart urged Queenslanders to stay inside and not to underestimate the dangers of the heavy rainfall.

“We saw what happened five or six years ago when we had the summer of disasters,” Commissioner Stewart said.

Unprecedented: Deputy Premier Jackie Trad announced all schools would be closed from Agnes Waters to the state’s southern border. Picture: Mark Calleja

Unprecedented: Deputy Premier Jackie Trad announced all schools would be closed from Agnes Waters to the state’s southern border. Picture: Mark CallejaSource:News Corp Australia

SOUTHEAST QUEENSLAND

Severe thunderstorms are likely to produce very heavy rainfall that may lead to flash flooding over the next several hours. Locations which may be affected include the McPherson Range, Springbrook, Numinbah Valley, Little Nerang Dam, Tallebudgera and the area south of Canungra. 186mm in 3 hours has fallen at Numinbah.

Numinbah has already seen 287mm today and Springbrook on the Gold Coast has seen 237mm.

Disaster teams and dam ­operators are on high alert, swiftwater rescue reinforcements are arriving from interstate and sandbags are ready.

Senior meteorologist Matthew Bass from the Bureau of Meteorology said rainfall totals could exceed 400mm throughout the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast Hinterland.

Mr Bass said rainfall and thunderstorms brought by ex-tropical Cyclone Debbie would hit Brisbane, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast areas today, moving across the area tonight and offshore Friday morning.

Areas of the Gold Coast Hinterland have already been lashed with up to 130mm of rain in only three hours on Thursday.

The Bureau of Meteorology has issued a severe thunderstorm warning for southeast Queensland and both Brisbane and Sydney are forecast to cop a drenching today as ex-Cyclone Debbie drags a humid tropical air mass south.

Officials say the Gold and Sunshine Coast hinterlands, where up to 650mm of rain has fallen already this month, again face the biggest soaking.

The southeast’s overall dam levels were at 71.7 per cent ­yesterday, but are set to rise substantially.

Some, like the Gold Coast’s Hinze Dam, were already spilling over after last week’s torrential rain and Seqwater said this week’s downpour could add several months’ water ­supply to the southeast.

The low pressure system is expected to move off the coast tomorrow morning as coastal areas prepare for big seas.

On the Gold Coast, classes have been cancelled at Griffith and Bond universities, and elective surgeries are cancelled at the Gold Coast University Hospital.

Dreamworld is also closed for the day.

The deluge will swamp much of Queensland.

The deluge will swamp much of Queensland.Source:The Courier-Mail

NEW SOUTH WALES

NSW residents can expect to be lashed by heavy rain in the afternoon as the remnants of ex-tropical cyclone Debbie clash with a cold front. The Bureau of Meteorology is forecasting heavy showers and flash flooding in the state’s northeast and damaging coastal winds north of Sydney on Thursday and Friday.

Residents in Lismore, Grafton, Coffs Harbour Glen Innes and Inverell will be dumped with most of the rain while Sydney, Gosford, Newcastle and Port Macquarie will be hit by damaging winds.

The Northern Rivers region can expect 100mm over a 24-hour period. Sydneysiders can expect showers to start on Thursday afternoon and continue into the evening with a maximum of 45 millimetres expected.

“It is likely that some locations will exceed more than 200mm,” the bureau said on Wednesday.

The showers will linger on Friday for Sydney but it won’t be as much as the previous day’s dumping, with about 6mm forecast.

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Cars completely swamped by water on the Gold Coast

CYCLONE DEBBIE’S DAMAGE UP NORTH

Emergency services workers are attempting to rescue about 50 stranded people, many off the roofs of houses and cars, after being trapped by floodwaters in and around cyclone-battered Mackay.

The majority, about 40, are awaiting rescue in the Homebush area, just southwest of Mackay, with swift water crews working to move them from the West Leagues Club.

It’s already been a stressful morning for frantic authorities with 38 swift water rescues completed overnight, including a heavily pregnant woman who was evacuated from a house in Homebush.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Commissioner Katarina Carroll says she was moved to the Eton rural fire shed before being taken by helicopter to West Leagues Club.

Ms Carroll says rescue efforts are also underway to reach 11 people near Eton, in the Pioneer Valley, further west of low-lying Mackay.

“We have some 12 incidents currently taking place that we have got crews on the ground,” the QFES commissioner said on Wednesday morning.

She asked stranded people to be patient.

“We are definitely getting to you. We know where you are. We have got the helicopters working in that area, as well as swift water rescue and SES. Please be patient with us, we will get to you as soon as humanly possible.” Ms Carroll said some had to scramble onto the roofs of homes and cars to escape floodwaters.

“From about 9pm onwards, there was flash flooding particularly in that area, so we did have people up on the top level of their houses, reports of people on the roofs of their houses and roofs of their cars,” she said.

Aerial view of damage to Shute Harbour after cyclone Debbie. Must credit: 400ft Airlines. Picture: Liam Kidston.

Aerial view of damage to Shute Harbour after cyclone Debbie. Must credit: 400ft Airlines. Picture: Liam Kidston.Source:News Corp Australia

Severe weather warnings h

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on March 30, 2017, 02:28:45 AM
Here is a Story from the Age Newspaper to lighten the mood. North Queensland has copped a beating the last few days.
I grew up around brown snakes just north of where this story is from, and had a few close call. They are very shy, but when cornered they will lash out. They are 2 or 3 on the worlds deadliest list. (I think we have 6 or 7 on the top 10 list...) I will attach photo. Looks like a nice specimen. I have seen a few 6' examples. This one looks pretty close to that!

JOW

A mum got the shock of her life when taking a photo of her daughter this week.
Bianca Dickinson, from Kaniva, in the Wimmera, took a picture of her two-year-old daughter Molly as they waited for Molly's older siblings to get off the school bus on Wednesday afternoon.
At first, nothing seemed out of place.
But then Ms Dickinson looked closer and saw a two-metre long brown snake just centimetres away from her daughter.
Ms Dickinson thought she noticed a bit of bark flying off a nearby tree out the corner of her eye.
"It was really windy," she said.
"Then I looked up out of the camera to see where the bark went and saw a big mother of a snake."
Luckily, Molly didn't even notice the snake behind her.
On closer inspection the brown snake becomes obvious.
"I'm surprised it didn't touch her, it was so close," Mrs Dickinson said.
"I checked her for bite marks still."
A mum got the shock of her life when taking a photo of her daughter this week.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 30, 2017, 02:45:13 PM
2017-03-28 - Severe heatwave bakes parts of India:
http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/database/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=HT-20170328-57643-IND (http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/database/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=HT-20170328-57643-IND)
http://www.thebigwobble.org/2017/03/its-only-march-but-heatwaves-have-begun.html (http://www.thebigwobble.org/2017/03/its-only-march-but-heatwaves-have-begun.html)

Quote: "In a scary preview to how tortuous the 2017 summer threatens to be, the mercury breached the 43-degree mark in at least four towns and cities. In most cities across Gujarat, the temperature touched 43 degrees. Deesa in Banaskantha was record-breaking hot at 43.4 degrees."
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: Palloy2 on March 30, 2017, 06:16:27 PM
The cyclone blew trees and fences over !

Houses that weren't built to cyclone standards had their roofs blown off, by a cyclone !!

Non-cyclone-rated garages, patio roofs, street signs, etc got blown away.  One daft woman who owned a pub that had a garden, had the canvas shades blown away - "There was nothing we could do!", she said, (except take the things down before the cyclone arrived). !!!

Lots of cars, parked in low lying areas and basements, got submerged !!!!

Houses built in low-lying areas got flooded. !!!!!

When these "disasters" are not covered by the insurance companies, they will complain.  And when the insurance costs go up next year, they will complain again. !!!!!!

Fucking stupid people.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on March 30, 2017, 06:31:49 PM
Peter Ward Our Future In a World Without Ice Caps ★ Climate Change Channel

http://www.youtube.com/v/NY0wSg5ITQc


What's next on climate change


http://www.youtube.com/v/yavR7uk3epQ
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: John of Wallan on March 30, 2017, 07:49:57 PM
Palloy,
I agree with most of the premise of your post.
I still cant believe people build on floodways and then complain about floodwaters.
Not many people actually have or want an understanding of their surrounding areas.
Down south here it is fires.
I am still dumbfounded how many people every year complain that they were not warned every time a fire gets close. We have tanks pumps and battery operated radio, and check weather report and fire warnings every morning in Summer.
I have owned 2 houses and took into consideration lay of the land for both. 1st was on slight rise higher than neighbours and current is half way up a mountain!

Yes my insurance sucks because we socialise stupidity.

This particular cyclone was pretty big, and they are generally getting getting bigger and appearing further South the hotter the ocean and atmosphere gets.
A lot of old infrastructure and building will not stand up against the changes going on.

JOW

Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: azozeo on March 31, 2017, 01:04:21 PM
How many people check flood zones down at the county office prior to purchase ? Not many
in my professional years of real estate practice. Steering is illegal in Az. However I would caution prospective buyers
of the consequences of buying property in a flood. If a person insists because of location, location, location or the
frickin' view for the misses, then put in a river rock bed to move the water along as quickly as possible off of your property.
Title: Re: Crazy Weather
Post by: agelbert on March 31, 2017, 02:36:40 PM
How many people check flood zones down at the county office prior to purchase ? Not many
in my professional years of real estate practice. Steering is illegal in Az. However I would caution prospective buyers
of the consequences of buying property in a flood. If a person insists because of location, location, location or the
frickin' view for the misses, then put in a river rock bed to move the water along as quickly as possible off of your property.


Thank you Az, for telling it like it is.  :emthup:  8)
Title: The Mansion at the Top of the Hill
Post by: RE on March 31, 2017, 02:51:51 PM
How many people check flood zones down at the county office prior to purchase ? Not many
in my professional years of real estate practice. Steering is illegal in Az. However I would caution prospective buyers
of the consequences of buying property in a flood. If a person insists because of location, location, location or the
frickin' view for the misses, then put in a river rock bed to move the water along as quickly as possible off of your property.


Thank you Az, for telling it like it is.  :emthup:  8)

http://www.youtube.com/v/su6-GGy88ZE

Generally speaking, it's POOR PEOPLE who live in flood prone areas.  Look at NOLA after Katrina.  It was the 9th Arrondisment which got nailed, not the folks in the Rich part of town.

Rich people live on the High Ground, where they look down on the Poor People from, and say how stupid they were for buying in a flood plain, which was all they could afford to buy.

Rich people live in gated communities at the top of the hill.  They don't worry about floods.

(http://img12.deviantart.net/f53f/i/2012/322/4/8/mansion_on_a_hill_stock_ii_by_ghost_rebel_stock-d5lfoqg.jpg)
Title: More than 100 dead in flooding as landslide rips through city
Post by: RE on April 01, 2017, 11:22:48 AM
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/colombia-flooding-more-than-100-dead-after-rivers-overflow-and-sweep-through-city/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/colombia-flooding-more-than-100-dead-after-rivers-overflow-and-sweep-through-city/)

More than 100 dead in flooding as landslide rips through city

In this handout photo released by the Colombian National Army, soldiers carry a victim on a stretcher, in Mocoa, Colombia, Saturday, April 1, 2017 AP
 

BOGOTA, Colombia -- Colombia President Juan Manuel Santos says at least 112 people have been killed after intense rains triggered an avalanche of mud and water from overflowing rivers that swept through a small city and destroyed homes while people slept.

The incident happened around midnight in Mocoa, a city of about 350,000 located near Colombia’s border with Ecuador, tucked between mountains and at the crux of two rivers.

Santos arrived at the disaster zone Saturday, warning the death toll could rise as the search for survivors continues.

(http://cbsnews2.cbsistatic.com/hub/i/r/2017/04/01/fd437d56-e6d8-41fd-bd74-969c1e94f47b/resize/620x/09ddad7c0c986c807bd48b1e9c8ec9f0/ap-17091626393403-1.jpg[img])[/img]
In this handout photo released by the Colombian National Army, soldiers and residents work together in rescue efforts in Mocoa, Colombia, Saturday, April 1, 2017
AP

Muddy water and debris quickly surged the city’s streets, toppling homes, ripping trees from their roots, lifting cars and trucks and carrying them downstream. With most of the community deep in slumber when the water avalanche began, many residents did not have enough time to climb on top of their roofs or seek safety on higher ground.

Herman Granados, a surgeon at the local hospital, said he believed there are likely more than 300 people injured and that doctors were quickly running out of blood. He suspected the death toll would rise.

“Under the mud, I am sure there are many more,” he said Saturday after working throughout the night on patients.

Witnesses described feeling buildings vibrate as the flood began. Although an alarm reportedly went off, it could not be heard throughout the city, survivors said. Videos that some residents posted online showed vast areas filled with wood planks and debris. People could be heard calling out the names of missing loved ones.

“There are many people looking for their relatives,” said Oscar Forero, a spokesman with the Colombian Red Cross.

The Red Cross planned to set up a special unit in Mocoa Saturday afternoon to help relatives search for their relatives.
Title: Colombia now past 200 Dead in Body Count after Mudslides
Post by: RE on April 02, 2017, 09:32:45 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/02/americas/colombia-mudslide/ (http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/02/americas/colombia-mudslide/)

More than 200 dead, many missing in Colombia mudslides

(http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170402073405-14-colombia-mud-slides-0401-exlarge-169.jpg)

By Angela Dewan, Jennifer Deaton and Mariano Castillo, CNN

Updated 10:46 PM ET, Sun April 2, 2017
Hundreds killed in Colombian mudslides

ns nepal earthquake/landslide_00000206.jpg
Landslide caused by earthquake caught on camera
lklv udas nepal landside bodies_00003715.jpg
Dozens of bodies found buried in Nepal landslide
nepal drone footage earthquake disaster relief orig_00011504.jpg
Major landslide blocks aid for Nepal villages
dnt landslide moves house_00000226.jpg
Watch landslide knock home off its foundation
sot wolf california rock slide vercammen _00005521.jpg
Homes buried by tons of rocks and mud
The city of Mocoa, Colombia was hit by a devastating mud slide after heavy rains on March 31.
Hundreds killed in Colombian mudslides
china landslide mann_00003504.jpg
Video shows moment of landslide in China
guatemala mudslide darlington pkg_00004219.jpg
Guatemala landslide death toll rises to 161
People search for relatives after a landslide in Salgar municipality, Antioquia department, Colombia.
Red Cross: 'Entire families lost lives' in landslide
ns nepal earthquake/landslide_00000206.jpg
Landslide caused by earthquake caught on camera
lklv udas nepal landside bodies_00003715.jpg
Dozens of bodies found buried in Nepal landslide
nepal drone footage earthquake disaster relief orig_00011504.jpg
Major landslide blocks aid for Nepal villages
dnt landslide moves house_00000226.jpg
Watch landslide knock home off its foundation
sot wolf california rock slide vercammen _00005521.jpg
Homes buried by tons of rocks and mud
The city of Mocoa, Colombia was hit by a devastating mud slide after heavy rains on March 31.
Hundreds killed in Colombian mudslides
china landslide mann_00003504.jpg
Video shows moment of landslide in China
guatemala mudslide darlington pkg_00004219.jpg
Guatemala landslide death toll rises to 161
People search for relatives after a landslide in Salgar municipality, Antioquia department, Colombia.
Red Cross: 'Entire families lost lives' in landslide
ns nepal earthquake/landslide_00000206.jpg
Landslide caused by earthquake caught on camera
Story highlights

    Highways, bridges, homes flattened as mudslides follow torrential rain
    President declares state of emergency as crews search for missing

(CNN)Rescuers in southern Colombia were scrambling Sunday to reach more than 100 people who are missing after devastating mudslides tore through entire communities.
Hundreds are reported dead after torrential rains Friday night caused three rivers surrounding Mocoa, in Putumayo province, to overflow -- sending a torrent of mud surging through the city.
Rescuers search for more victims under the debris in Mocoa.
Rescuers search for more victims under the debris in Mocoa.
Reports of the exact number of those killed in the rugged, remote area vary. The Colombian military said at least 254 are dead and around 400 more injured. The Red Cross reports 234 deaths and said that 158 people were missing. A police officer was among the victims, federal officials said.

President Juan Manuel Santos has declared a state of emergency. Santos put the death toll at 254 but told reporters at the scene that the number could climb.
"The first thing I want to say is that my heart, our hearts, the hearts of all Colombians are with the victims of this tragedy," he said.
Santos said 43 children were among the dead, and 22 more were hospitalized. Several children have been reunited with their parents; many children are in shelters, he said.
"There are still many missing people. We don't know where they are. That's why the system is still trying to locate them and will continue to do so until we find the last person."
Earlier Santos said, "Many people are coming to us saying, 'My son is missing, my father is missing, my mother is missing."
Authorities have identified about 170 of the dead, according to the president.
CNN Map
© Mapbox © OpenStreetMap Improve this map
"Here we are facing a disaster caused by nature, by climate change," Santos said earlier. He added that the region received nearly 500 millimeters of rain in March, which he said is about 80% more than the usual amount for the month.
Heavy rains, high levels of deforestation, informal housing and dense human populations are some factors that can leave communities vulnerable to landslides, scientists say.
Running for their lives
Aerial footage of the site showed some rooftops poking above the muddy deluge that flattened other homes, bridges and highways.
Soldiers evacuating a victim after the mudslide hit Mocoa on Friday night.
Soldiers evacuating a victim after the mudslide hit Mocoa on Friday night.
Power and water supplies to Mocoa have been cut by the disaster, and the hospital system has shut down, firefighters say.
Images showed cars and buses trapped in several feet of mud.
Gabriel Umaña, a spokesman for the Colombian Red Cross, told CNN that 300 families had been displaced and more than two dozen homes had been flattened.
Many were sound asleep when the river of mud hit their neighborhoods, and witnesses said the sludge flowed so fast that they had to run for their lives.
Many people searched through the debris for their possessions after the mudslide destroyed their homes.
Many people searched through the debris for their possessions after the mudslide destroyed their homes.
"Around 11, 12 o'clock (on Friday), there was a huge storm, a lot of water. I got up because it sounded so heavy, the sound of the rocks. Everyone (was shocked)," one man at the site said, Reuters reported.
Another wearing yellow rubber boots stood on some rocks as a river of mud streamed by.
"Nobody has given me news. Nobody, nobody. No one from my house or my family. I am at the will of my God. I have nothing. Nothing to eat, nowhere to sleep. These clothes were given to me," he said.
Soldiers retrieve bodies from the mudslide site.
Soldiers retrieve bodies from the mudslide site.
Residents congregated outside a family welfare center pored over a list of missing people. One listed only children, some as young as 2.
"We have lost a baby, who has gone missing, and the rest is as you can see. A little baby, we can't find him anywhere," said one woman, wiping away tears.
President Santos personally comforted Marcelo Garreta, who said he could see dead bodies being carried away by floodwaters but was powerless to help.
"We couldn't help anybody, because if we tried we would've been washed away as well. I saw light poles washed away by the floodwaters. This is a great tragedy," Garreta said.
'Hero' officer died helping a family
The Colombian National Police identified the officer killed in the mudslides as Deciderio Ospina Otavo. He was caught in a mudslide as he tried to rescue a family early Saturday, authorities said.
"Once again, our institution is in mourning by the sad departure of our hero," the department said in a statement.
"Our condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of this young Colombian, who chose serving his country as a career, fulfilled his duty to give his own life to save others if necessary and honored his homeland," police said.
"A very mountainous region surrounded by rivers"
Simón Uribe, a filmmaker living in the area, told CNN the mudslide wreaked havoc on Mocoa's "many irregular settlements."
"Mocoa is an a very mountainous region surrounded by rivers," Uribe said. "We were staying at a house near one of those rivers and, in a matter of minutes, we started to see cars being washed away, motorcycles and chunks of houses."
General view of damages caused by mudslides following heavy rains in Mocoa, Putumayo department, southern Colombia on April 2, 2017.
General view of damages caused by mudslides following heavy rains in Mocoa, Putumayo department, southern Colombia on April 2, 2017.
Uribe and those in the house with him retreated to the second floor as floodwaters rushed in, but they were eventually forced to evacuate.
"It was chaos with people running in all different directions, trying to get out of their houses and climbing on top of roofs. We were in that critical situation for about two hours."
When he returned to the house, Uribe said, "a good portion of it was destroyed and mud was about 1.5 meters high."
A fireman searches for victims inside a muddy house, following mudslides caused by heavy rains in Mocoa, Putumayo department, southern Colombia on April 2, 2017.
A fireman searches for victims inside a muddy house, following mudslides caused by heavy rains in Mocoa, Putumayo department, southern Colombia on April 2, 2017.
Mocoa resident Leandro Delgado told CNN that floodwaters swept away huge trees just before midnight.
"Those neighborhoods located uphill are the hardest hit.This is complete catastrophe," Delgado said. "People would run. They were desperate. They started pulling bodies around three in the morning from those mounds of mud there."
Some appear to have escaped with only their lives.
"I was left with nothing, but my two children," Lourdes Gutiérrez told CNN. "Everything is truly finished."
Racing against time
More than 1,000 soldiers and national police officers are involved in the ongoing rescue effort, and they are facing enormous challenges.
"The difficulties we are facing are that it is still raining in the region and the (mudslide) turned up a considerable amount of land. There are mobility issues on almost 80% of the roads, and where the road ends, it is three hours to the place where the (mudslide) took place," a police spokesman told reporters.
Photos released by Colombia's military showed rescuers carrying old women and children over downed, mud-caked trees and homes.
President Santos said Sunday that 10 mobile water tanks were in place and 16 more were on the way to Mocoa, as well as water purification systems. He added that a local hospital was back in operation and medical supplies had been flown in.
Colombia is no stranger to mudslides.
In 2015, torrential rains in northwest Colombia caused a mudslide that killed more than 80 people.

CNNE's Fernando Ramos in Colombia, and Rafael Romo, Matt Rehbein, Gisela Crespo, Darran Simon and Deanna Hackney in Atlanta contributed to this report.

Title: Crazy Weather - Hailstones pierce galvanized steel roof
Post by: azozeo on April 04, 2017, 12:06:45 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/uFhVxB0Rrm8&fs=1
Title: Check the Latest Climate Disaster on your Smartphone App!
Post by: RE on April 05, 2017, 12:10:40 AM
I'll have to add some of these to my 3D Earthquake App.  ::)

RE

http://www.startribune.com/70-ish-this-weekend-tornado-siren-fatigue-remembering-tiros-1/418180143/ (http://www.startribune.com/70-ish-this-weekend-tornado-siren-fatigue-remembering-tiros-1/418180143/)

70-ish This Weekend - Tornado Siren Fatigue - Remembering TIROS-1

 

 
This Year Don't Rely Just on Emergency Sirens

 It's 2017, and still no flying cars. Most of us are walking around with little supercomputers in our pockets & purses. And smartphone apps are an effective way to get not only GPS-specific weather, but time-sensitive warnings. My favorites are Aeris Pulse (full disclosure: my company cooked this one up) and RadarScope.
 
Research confirms the more sources of weather information, the greater the odds you'll get a warning in time to take evasive action. Radio, TV, NOAA Weather Radio and sirens are all part of a well-rounded weather diet.
 
Sirens are cold war technology, designed to be heard outdoors only. If you only rely on sirens to take action you're going to get caught with your Doppler down.
 
April brings greening lawns, budding flowers and trees - and more frequent severe outbreaks, but the atmosphere overhead will be too cool and stable for hail or tornadoes this week.
 
Tornadoes strafe the Southeast today; a soaking rain triggers flooding in the Northeast tomorrow. Here? Dry
 into Saturday, when temperatures may hit 70F. T-storms Sunday could be strong to severe. Here we go!

The United States of Extremes. Today's storm spawns tornado-producing supercell thunderstorms across the Southeast, while a shield of heavy rain changes to heavy wet snow across the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley. Meanwhile (no surprise) another sloppy front invades the Pacific Northwest. A super-sized severe weather spring is brewing - just a continuation of trends present in the pattern since January. 84-hour NAM Future Radar: NOAA and Tropicaltidbits.com.

April Lake Effect. What little ice formed on the Great Lakes this past "winter" is pretty much gone; a moist fetch off the water enhancing snowfall rates downwind. Plowable snow amounts are possible over Lower Michigan, maybe a couple inches for the Ohio Valley, where much of the slush will melt on contact.

2017 Off to Record-Breaking Start for Tornadoes and Severe Weather. Will It Continue? At the rate we're going 2017 may set more tornado records. Here's an excerpt from U.S. Tornadoes: "2017 has been off to as fast a start to the severe weather season as any in the modern record. Through the beginning of April, it’s running neck-and-neck with 2008 for first place. There have been outbreaks in each month of the year, and roughly 360 to 400 tornadoes so far.  That’s more than twice normal to date, and we’ve barely even started to wander through the beginning of peak severe weather season, which runs April-June. The country is also in the midst of a two-week long onslaught of severe storms, with more on the way over the next few days..."

Praedictix Briefing: Issued Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

  • An active severe weather day is expected from the Ohio Valley to the Southeast on Wednesday. A Moderate Risk of severe weather is in place for tomorrow across parts of the Southeast, including metro Atlanta.
  • The main risks across this area include tornadoes (some of which could be strong and long-tracked), damaging winds and large hail. These conditions will also be possible across the Enhanced Risk area, which stretches as far north as southern Indiana and Ohio.

Moderate Risk Wednesday. A Moderate Risk of severe weather is in place from the Storm Prediction Center for Wednesday across portions of the Southeast, including parts of Florida, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina. This includes the cities of Atlanta, Columbus and Macon (GA), as well as Montgomery (AL). The threat for severe weather will extend northward into the Ohio Valley tomorrow as well, with an Enhanced Risk of severe weather as far north as southern Indiana and Ohio. The Enhanced Risk includes cities like Charlotte (NC), Nashville (TN), Louisville (KY) and Cincinnati (OH). We are watching the likelihood of a severe weather outbreak Wednesday and Wednesday Night across the region, including the potential of tornadoes (some strong and long-lived, especially in the Moderate Risk area), large hail and damaging winds.


Strong Probability Of Severe Weather. As a system moves into the central U.S. Wednesday, confidence is increasing on the potential of severe weather from the Southeast to the Ohio Valley. The Storm Prediction Center has a 45% probability of severe weather from the Florida panhandle northeast into western South Carolina tomorrow, covering the Moderate Risk area. There is also a “hatched” area stretching from the Moderate Risk area to the Ohio Valley. This hatched area indicates at least a 10% probability of significant severe weather within 25 miles of a point, which includes the threats of strong, long-lived tornadoes, very large hail, and hurricane-force wind gusts. Map credit: NOAA SPC.


Storm Timing. In areas of the Southeast, it could be a long day on Wednesday, with rounds of storms possible throughout the day, starting as early as daybreak. The first round in the morning will have the potential to include tornadoes and large hail before some areas receive a little break. That will only allow the environment some time to recover, and more storms are expected to develop across parts of Alabama and Georgia by the afternoon. It appears these storms would have the best potential for significant severe weather, including long-tracked tornadoes. Further north, toward Tennessee and Kentucky, storms will start to form during the afternoon hours. Initial storms that form will have the potential of large hail and a few tornadoes (some of which could be strong) before merging into lines of storms which will be more supportive of damaging winds. Map credit: AerisWeather.


Tornado Potential Index. Our internal algorithms show the potential of rotating storms that could produce tornadoes (potentially some strong) across the Southeast as we head through Wednesday, with some of the highest values pinpointed across the Moderate Risk area during the afternoon hours. It also indicates the risk of a few tornadoes as far north as the Ohio Valley during the afternoon and evening hours as well. Map credit: AerisWeather.

Summary. A severe weather outbreak is expected Wednesday across parts of the Southeast north into the Ohio Valley, with tornadoes (some potentially strong and long-tracked), large hail and damaging winds possible. A Moderate Risk of severe weather is in place for portions of Florida, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina Wednesday, including the cities of Atlanta, Columbus and Macon (GA), as well as Montgomery (AL). It is over this area that has the highest potential of seeing strong tornadoes, particularly during the afternoon and evening hours. Today would be the day to make sure facilities across the severe threat area are up to date on severe weather procedures as tomorrow is likely to be active.

D.J. Kayser, Meteorologist, Praedictix


Ripe for Supercellular T-storms. Watch the isolated cells out ahead of the main squall line later today. These are the storm most likely to start spinning in response to very strong wind shear. Conditions are ripe for a major outbreak of tornadoes, and city centers from Montgomery and Auburn to Atlanta, Macon and Columbia may see severe weather and violent winds. 3 KM NAM: Tropicaltidbits.com.



How 148 Tornadoes In One Day in 1974 Changed Emergency Preparedness. Smithsonian Magazine provides perspective: "...But two important things happened because of the 1974 outbreak, research meteorologist Howard Brooks told Galvin. “First, the National Weather Service adopted the Fujita Scale. And second, support and money for tornado-intercept operations greatly increased.” The Fujita scale created a standard language for the scientific community to talk about tornadoes, Galvin writes. Intercept operations, which send scientists out to actually chase tornadoes, have allowed them to observe what was happening firsthand, improving future warnings. These innovations, combined with the money and political will to update detection gear, mean that the National Weather Service now has more weather stations and better forecasting technology, he writes. Research, more weather stations, and Doppler radar combined have increased the average tornado warning time from "about zero," as one meteorologist put it, to 12 to 14 minutes. "It doesn't seem like a lot," he told Galvin, "but when you need to take shelter every minute counts..." (Map credit: NOAA).


Xenia (Ohio) Tornado Anniversary. The Super Outbreak of April 3, 1974 was staggering in scope and intensity; one of the reasons I ultimately became a meteorologist. The Xenia Gazette remembers that terrible day: "The tornado injured 1,150 and destroyed approximately 1,400 buildings — about half of those in Xenia. Nine schools, nine churches and almost 180 businesses were destroyed in the F5 tornado, which claimed more than 30 lives. The twister was part of the the 1974 Super Outbreak, which was the second-largest tornado outbreak on record for a single 24-hour period, just behind the 2011 Super Outbreak. It was also the most violent tornado outbreak ever recorded, with 30 F4/F5 tornadoes confirmed. From April 3 to April 4, 1974, there were 148 tornadoes confirmed in 13 U.S. states and Ontario, Canada. Tornadoes struck Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia and New York. The entire outbreak caused more than $600 million (in 1974 dollars) in damage in the U.S. alone, and extensively damaged approximately 900 square miles along a total combined path length of 2,600 miles according to online reports. At one point, as many as 15 separate tornadoes were ongoing at the same time..."
 
Photo credit: "Monday was the 43rd anniversary of the 1974 Xenia tornado. The days and months after April 3, 1974, tornado were filled with many scenes like the ones you see here. The tornado injured 1,150 and destroyed some 1,400 buildings — about half of those in Xenia. Nine schools, nine churches and almost 180 businesses were destroyed in the F5 tornado."


70-ish This Weekend. Saturday looks like the nicer, drier, sunnier day with a good shot at 70F if the sun stays out most of the afternoon. ECMWF guidance hints at a few showers and T-storms Sunday, marking the leading edge of a cooler front early next week. MSP numbers: WeatherBell.

Celebrating the World's First Meteorological Satellite: TIROS-1. NOAA NESDIS has a good write-up on the first weather satellite, an event that changed our capabilities - and expectations here on the ground: "...TIROS-1 orbited 450 miles above Earth and communicated with two command and data acquisition stations. When the satellite was in range of a station and the data was read out, the images (up to 32 could be recorded for playback) were recorded on 35-mm film for making prints. Although the satellite operated for only 78 days, TIROS-1 sent back 19,389 usable pictures, proving the worth of weather observing satellites to the world and opening the door for the weather systems of the future. The first image from the satellite was a fuzzy picture of thick bands and clusters of clouds over the United States. An image captured a few days later revealed a typhoon about a 1,000 miles east of Australia..."
 
Image credit: "One of the first images from the TIROS-1 satellite, April 1, 1960." Credit: NASA

Tropical Cyclone Report on Hurricane Matthew. Check out the 96 page (PDF) from NOAA on last year's biggest hurricane to threaten the southeastern USA. (Hurricane Matthew file: University of Wisconsin SSEC).

Senate Passes Comprehensive Bipartisan Bill to Improve Weather Forecasting. An encouraging step in the right direction; details via Jason Samenow at Capital Weather Gang: "After stumbling blocks and delays, sweeping bipartisan legislation to improve weather forecasting has passed the Senate. The 65-page bill, the Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017, H.R. 353, contains four sections that support research and programs to improve weather forecasting and its communication on short and long time scales. Containing scores of provisions, the bill would require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to, for example:

  • Establish a program to improve tornado warnings.
  • Protect the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Program, whose funding was previously slashed.
  • Develop a formal plan for weather research.
  • Develop an annual report on the state of its weather models..."

Image credit: Milwaukee office of the National Weather Service.


Global Temperature Records. Coolwx.com still has the best site (in my humble opinion) when it comes to tracking U.S. and global temperatures that are close to record territory.

Real-Time Lightning. Check out the free display for not only North America, but much of the planet, courtesy of Blitzortung.org, which uses triangulation from ground-based lightning sensors. Pretty cool.


Current Temperatures. This is one of the more aesthetically-pleasing maps I've found on the web displaying current temperatures around the Lower 48, courtesy of the Oklahoma Mesonet. Refresh your browser to get the latest observations.

 


More Water Flowing in California This Year. Details via Climate Central: "...For only the second time this decade, the last being in 2011, the snowpack at the start of April is above normal, providing a respite from a drought which had been especially bad in California. In the Sierra Nevada, the snowpack was 164 percent of normal at the start of the month. The snow water equivalent, or the amount of liquid water locked away in the snow, was about 46 inches. This year's barrage of western storms and the increase in meltwater has already sped up runoff into California's reservoirs, the majority of which are above their historical averages, although not by much. Only the San Luis Reservoir in central California is within a few percent of capacity, but even so, that reservoir is twice as high as it was at this time last year..."

Graphic credit: "More water is flowing this year in California from frequent storms and melting snowpack." Credit:


 
Wealth Didn't Matter. Pollution From a Coal-Fired Plant, Carried Miles by Wind, Still Hurt Their Babies. One of many reasons why we probably don't want to go back to a "coal-first" energy diet. Here's an excerpt from The Washington Post: "Air pollution from power plants has wanderlust. It never stays still. It rides the wind, drifting far from its source, visiting homes miles away with potentially harmful effects. New research released Monday documents the impact that pollution from a coal-fired plant in Pennsylvania had on four wealthy New Jersey counties as far as 30 miles downwind. Women in those counties had a greater risk of having babies of low or very low birthweight — less than 5½ pounds — than did women in similarly affluent areas. It didn’t matter that the mothers there had advantages that low-income mothers don’t: money and access to private health care. Their babies still appeared to suffer from the effects of air pollution, specifically wind-borne sulfur emissions. The study authors say stronger federal regulation of emissions from coal-fired plants is needed to safeguard human health..."
 
Photo credit: "Smoke and steam billow from cooling towers and smokestacks at the Bruce Mansfield power plant near Shippingport, Pa., one of the country’s largest coal-fired power generators." (Joby Warrick/The Washington Post).

Report: Regional Power Grid Can Handle Much More Gas and Renewables. Here's an excerpt from The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "...The analysis found that PJM could remain reliable “with unprecedented levels of wind and solar resources” as long as they are mixed with other types of power generation, like natural gas or nuclear, that can balance their reliability weaknesses. The study found a marked decrease in reliability for generation portfolios heaviest in wind and solar, suggesting that there are limits — probably around 20 percent of operational capacity — to how much of those types of intermittent renewables could be integrated into the grid without sacrificing reliability. The analysis did not try to measure the effects of potential advances in battery storage or distributed energy..." (Photo credit: Wind on the Wires).

Former Google Vice President Starts a Company Promising Clean and Safe Nuclear Energy. Bloomberg Technology has details: "...Though Cassidy remains an advisor at Google, he has quietly started a new company, Apollo Fusion. On Friday, a website for the firm, which previously consisted only of a definition of the phrase “nuclear fusion,” was updated to include a vision statement that gives a tantalizing peek into Cassidy's plans. “We're working on revolutionary hybrid reactor technology with fusion power to serve safe, clean, and affordable electricity to everyone,” reads the site. “Apollo Fusion power plants are designed for zero-consequence outcomes to loss of cooling or loss of control scenarios and they cannot melt down...”


The Next Million Jobs Will Come From Startups Across America, But Not Without Smarter Public Policy. Here's an excerpt of a post at Forbes that caught my eye: "...The report argues that overly strict rules governing crowdfunding sometimes limit the ability of startups to raise funds on the local level and that changing tax policy to support innovation will make it easier for companies to pour money back into research and development. And improving access to overseas markets and limiting trade barriers will open up new opportunities for startups to grow their businesses and scale. It also suggests increasing investment in entrepreneurial and STEM-related education similar to the curriculum at the Chicago Tech Academy and a growing number of schools across America.  The Technet-published report says Congress needs to tackle immigration reform to make it “easier for immigrant entrepreneurs to build new companies in the United States..."


This Is How The Next World War Starts. Here's an excerpt of a harrowing story at The Huffington Post: "...With these issues in mind, I traveled to Germany this winter to talk with U.S. Air Force General Tod D. Wolters, who commands American and NATO air operations. We sat in his headquarters at Ramstein Air Base, a gleaming, modern complex where officers in the uniforms of various NATO nations bustle efficiently through polished corridors. “The degree of hair-triggeredness is a concern,” said Wolters, a former fighter pilot who encountered Soviet bloc pilots during the Cold War. “The possibility of an intercept gone wrong,” he added, is “on my mind 24/7/365.” Admiral James G. Stavridis, the commander of NATO from 2009 to 2013, is more blunt. The potential for miscalculation “is probably higher than at any other point since the end of the Cold War,” he told me. “We are now at maximum danger...”

Illustrations by Cam Floyd. Animation by Pablo Espinosa.



63 F. high temperature yesterday in the Twin Cities.

52 F. average high on April 4.

42 F. high temperature on April 4, 2016.

April 5, 1999: Heavy snow falls over the Arrowhead, with 11 inches at Two Harbors.

April 5, 1929: A tornado cuts a path from Lake Minnetonka through North Minneapolis and leaves six dead.


TODAY: More clouds, late shower or sprinkle possible. Winds: N 7-12. High: 56

WEDNESDAY NIGHT: Partial clearing, chilly. Low: 34

 THURSDAY: Partly sunny and breezy. Winds: N 10-15. High: 53

 FRIDAY: Mild sun. Leave work early. Winds: SE 7-12. Wake-up: 36. High: near 60

SATURDAY: Lukewarm sun. Evacuate outdoors. Winds: S 10-20. Wake-up: 45. High: near 70

SUNDAY: T-storms may turn severe. Winds: SW 10-15. Wake-up: 53. High: 72

 MONDAY: Unsettled, few showers linger. Winds: NW 10-15. Wake-up: 50. High: 60

 TUESDAY: Mostly cloudy, cooler breeze. Winds: NW 10-15. Wake-up: 39. High: 49


Climate Stories...

Then and Now: How Glaciers Around the World Are Melting. Here's an excerpt from The Washington Post: "Over the past decade, scientists and photographers keep returning to the world’s glaciers, watching them shrink with each visit. Now they want others to see how a warming planet is melting masses of ice in a series of before-and-after photos. In the Geological Society of America’s GSA Today journal , a group of ice researchers and a photographer-filmmaker published pictures showing how much five of the world’s glaciers have thinned. “There is something fundamentally compelling about the approach they take. For all our emphasis on models and math, seeing is still believing,” said University of Colorado ice scientist Ted Scambos, who wasn’t part of the team..."

Photo credit: "In this photo provided by James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey and Matthew Kennedy, the Stein glacier in Switzerland in 2015. Over the past decade or so scientists and photographers keep returning to the world’s glaciers, watching them shrink with each visit. Now they want other people to see what haunts them in a series of before and after photos." (Matthew Kennedy/Earth Vision Institute via AP) (Associated Press).



True Conservatives Should Worry About Climate Change. Here's an excerpt of an Op-Ed at The Charlotte Observer: "...To follow Mr. Loris’ recommendations will push the concentration of carbon dioxide above 400 ppm. We are now aware that these choices have consequences for us, for our children and for generations to come. The moral choice has been different over the last 30 years than it was for our grandparents. Mr. Loris cannot simply argue for a limited set of jobs helped by fossil fuels without also accepting the burden we now understand – such as rising sea levels, abnormal precipitation leading to droughts in some areas and flooding or mudslides in others. It is not a conservative value to ignore our impacts on those around us or on the economic conditions we leave for our kids. Thankfully, there are conservative voices speaking out on this issue. Fifteen House Republicans have joined the bipartisan House Climate Solutions Caucus to hold meaningful discussions on what can be done..."

Photo credit: "Burning coal increases carbon dioxide in the air. It’s not a conservative value to not worry about what we are leaving our children." Matthew Brown AP.


The Climate Could Hit a State Unseen in 50 Million Years. Climate Central has details: "...Scientists have been able to track the historic changes in carbon dioxide through a number of methods, from air pockets in Antarctic ice cores to sludge on the deep sea floor. The new research compiles 1,500 of these carbon dioxide estimates to create a view that extends 420 million years. The carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere today are ones that likely haven’t been reached in 3 million years. But if human activities keep committing carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at current rates, scientists will have to look a lot deeper into the past for a similar period. The closest analog to the mid-century atmosphere we’re creating would be a period roughly 50 million years ago known as the Eocene, a period when the world was completely different than the present due to extreme heat and oceans that covered a wide swath of currently dry land..."

Graphic credit: "Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels could reach a level unseen in 50 million years by the 2050s. If they continue rising into the 2200s, they'll create a climate that likely has no precedent in at least 420 million years." Credit: Foster, et al., 2017.


 Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article142480589.html#storylink=cpy

 Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article142480589.html#storylink=cpy

We Need to Talk About "Ecoanxiety". Climate Change is Causing PTSD, Anxiety and Depression on a Mass Scale. So says an article at Quartz, and they have new research to back up their claims: "Depression, anxiety, grief, despair, stress—even suicide: The damage of unfolding climate change isn’t only counted in water shortages and wildfires, it’s likely eroding mental health on a mass scale, too, reports the American Psychological Association, the preeminent organization of American mental health professionals. Direct, acute experience with a changing climate—the trauma of losing a home or a loved one to a flood or hurricane, for example—can bring mental health consequences that are sudden and severe. After Hurricane Katrina, for example, suicide and suicidal ideation among residents of areas affected by the disaster more than doubled according to a paper led by Harvard Medical School, while one in six met the criteria for PTSD, according to a Columbia University-led paper. Elevated PTSD levels have also been found among people who live through wildfires and extreme storms, sometimes lasting several years..."

Photo credit: "What we need to talk about when we talk about climate change." (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)


Mayor Will Lead on Climate Change for Political Gain, Says Ex-NYC Mayor. Here's an excerpt from Reuters: "Mayors globally are increasingly adopting measures to slash greenhouse gas emissions because it makes them popular with voters, former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg said on Monday. Days after U.S. President Donald Trump dismantled countrywide climate-change policies, Bloomberg said mayors are going beyond national government regulations to reduce greenhouse gases blamed for global warming for political gain. "This is not ethics, this is politics. That's the real world," he told the Sustainable Energy for All Forum in New York. "Elected officials want publicity so they can be re-elected and keep their jobs," he said at the three-day event. "It's become fashionable..."

Photo credit: "Former New York Mayor and U.N. Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change Michael Bloomberg speaks during the C40 Cities Women4Climate event in New York City, U.S., March 15, 2017." REUTERS/Brendan McDermid.


What Financial Markets Can Teach Us About Managing Climate Risks. The New York Times reports.


The End of Winter May Signal Bigger Changes Ahead for Earth's Climate. An Op-Ed at USA TODAY captures the sense of disbelief that facts, data and evidence have become optional and politicized: "...We have no trouble believing that dinosaurs lived 150 million years ago, but who can even count back that far? We take it on faith that the continents drift around on tectonic plates like ice floes in a slush pond, but the ground feels pretty stable to me. Even though none of us can independently verify any of these things, most of us accept them as facts, not assertions. We recognize them as the settled conclusions of qualified experts who have studied the evidence carefully and ruled out every competing hypothesis. That’s what science does; it extends our reach and allows us to make connections, connect dots, that we couldn’t possibly link on our own. If we accepted only the evidence of our senses, we’d still think that the Earth was flat and the sun and stars revolved around us. When it comes to climate change, however, the Earth is still flat. Scientific facts have somehow become opinions, and carefully researched conclusions are written off as theories or even hoaxes. Climate scientists went to the same schools, earned the same degrees, and follow the same protocols as experts we wouldn’t begin to question on other matters, but millions of us find it easy to say, “I don’t think so....”

Image credit: Jeff Williams, NASA.


Climate Change Doesn't Care Who You Voted For. Here's a clip from Teen Vogue. What, you don't read Teen Vogue? "...Climate change denial has been able to flourish because it papers over a painful reality. It’s hard to reconcile the scope of danger with the sense that there is nothing we can do about it, but political inefficacy is just another myth in need of rejection. We must come together to insist on the reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions via federal effort. Each passing day in this DEFCON 1 political climate, it seems less and less possible to bridge the party divide, but we can all be united by the need for clean air, fresh water, and a better world for our children. As it stands, Trump’s climate change policy puts all of those things at risk, and unfortunately floods and droughts don’t give a crap whom you voted for."


The Case for Climate Risk Investing in Trump Era. Here's a clip from The Wall Street Journal: "...According to the Global Sustainable Investment Alliance, climate change and carbon emissions was “the most significant overall environmental factor” for socially-minded investors in the U.S., drawing allocation of $2.15 trillion in institutional investor assets in the year ended Dec. 31, 2015. Shareholder proposals focusing on the climate risk are also getting more support, even if none got majority approval over board opposition so far. According to Proxy Monitor, an arm of the Manhattan Institute’s Center for Legal Policy that tracks resolutions filed with Fortune 250 companies, 23 of the total 58 environmental-related proposals as of the end of June, 2016, got 26% of the vote, compared with 16% support in 2015 and 14% in the 2006-2015 period..."

Older Post

Brightening Up - Counting Our Atmospheric Blessings - Shot at 70F Saturday - Why Men Are More Flood-Prone
 
More from Star Tribune
More From Paul Douglas on Weather
April 4

70-ish This Weekend - Tornado Siren Fatigue - Remembering TIROS-1

Tuesday turned out a little nicer than expected, which is legal and perfectly acceptable. It's when the weather goes south with no warning that people tend to get more upset. A cooler breeze arrives today, but we won't be scraping slush off our sidewalks, like they will in Michigan and parts of the Ohio Valley. A major tornado outbreak is likely over the southeastern USA, and a few storms here may push severe limits by Sunday. Just don't rely on the sirens...
April 3

Brightening Up - Counting Our Atmospheric Blessings - Shot at 70F Saturday - Why Men Are More Flood-Prone

OK, at least it was gloomy on a Monday. Consider this penance for a stunning, postcard-worthy Saturday. The sun peeks out again today after a gray start, with fairly quiet weather spilling into Saturday, when temperatures mellow well into the 60s to near 70. A growl of thunder Sunday marks the leading edge of cooler air. No drama; Minnesota gets off easy compared to the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley, where plowable amounts of snow are possible by Thursday.
April 2