Doomstead Diner Menu => Environment => Topic started by: RE on July 30, 2015, 06:10:21 PM

Title: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on July 30, 2015, 06:10:21 PM
Kick-off article from Iran.

RE

Iran city hits suffocating heat index of 154 degrees, near world record (https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/07/30/iran-city-hits-suffocating-heat-index-of-154-degrees-near-world-record/?tid=trending_strip_3)

By Jason Samenow July 30 at 4:59 PM

Wherever you live or happen to travel to, never complain about the heat and humidity again.

In the city of Bandar Mahshahr (population of about 110,000 as of 2010), the air felt like a searing 154 degrees (67.8 Celsius) today, factoring in the humidity.

Its actual air temperature was 109 degrees (42.8 Celsius) with an astonishing dew point temperature of 90 (32.2 Celsius). (If you use NOAA’s calculator, that actually computes to a heat index of 159 degrees).

Bandar Mahshahr sits adjacent to the Persian Gulf in southwest Iran where water temperatures are in the 90s. Such high temperatures lead to some of the most oppressive humidity levels in the world when winds blow off the water.

The highest known heat index ever to be recorded, according to weather historian Christopher Burt, is in the 155-160 degree range. In his book Extreme Weather, Burt says Dharhan, Saudi Arabia, also on the Persian Gulf, logged a heat index of around 155-160 degrees on July 8, 2003. Its air temperature was 108 degrees, with a dew point of 95.

This week, on top of the humidity, a punishing heat wave has engulfed the Middle East.

Today, Baghdad soared to 122 degrees (50C) – though the dew point was a lowly 44 given its desert environs. That combination produced a heat index of 115 – the dry air taking a slight edge off the blistering temperatures.

[Think it’s hot here? Iraq declared a 4-day heat holiday for temps over 120 degrees]

(Credit to AccuWeather’s Anthony Sagliani for posting Iran temperature information on Twitter)
Jason is currently the Washington Post’s weather editor. A native Washingtonian, Jason has been a weather enthusiast since age 10.
Title: February Smashes Earth's All-Time Global Heat Record by a Jaw-Dropping Margin
Post by: RE on March 13, 2016, 02:57:58 PM
Break out the bikinis, it's warming up fast.

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8287/7738397138_5ea3602379_b.jpg)

RE

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/february-smashes-earths-alltime-global-heat-record-by-a-jawdropping (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/february-smashes-earths-alltime-global-heat-record-by-a-jawdropping)

February Smashes Earth's All-Time Global Heat Record by a Jaw-Dropping Margin

By: Jeff Masters and Bob Henson , 7:46 PM GMT on March 13, 2016

 
 

On Saturday, NASA dropped a bombshell of a climate report. February 2016 has soared past all rivals as the warmest seasonally adjusted month in more than a century of global recordkeeping. NASA’s analysis showed that February ran 1.35°C (2.43°F) above the 1951-1980 global average for the month, as can be seen in the list of monthly anomalies going back to 1880. The previous record was set just last month, as January 2016 came in 1.14°C above the 1951-1980 average for the month. In other words, February has dispensed with this one-month-old record by a full 0.21°C (0.38°F)--an extraordinary margin to beat a monthly world temperature record by. Perhaps even more remarkable is that February 2015 crushed the previous February record--set in 1998 during the peak atmospheric influence of the 1997-98 “super” El Niño that’s comparable in strength to the current one--by a massive 0.47°C (0.85°F).


Figure 1. Monthly global surface temperatures (land and ocean) from NASA for the period 1880 to February 2016, expressed in departures from the 1951-1980 average. The red line shows the 12-month running average. Image credit: Stephan Okhuijsen, datagraver.com, used with permission.

An ominous milestone in our march toward an ever-warmer planet
Because there is so much land in the Northern Hemisphere, and since land temperatures rise and fall more sharply with the seasons than ocean temperatures, global readings tend to average about 4°C cooler in January and February than they do in July or August. Thus, February is not atop the pack in terms of absolute warmest global temperature: that record was set in July 2015. The real significance of the February record is in its departure from the seasonal norms that people, plants, animals, and the Earth system are accustomed to dealing with at a given time of year. Drawing from NASA’s graph of long-term temperature trends, if we add 0.2°C as a conservative estimate of the amount of human-produced warming that occurred between the late 1800s and 1951-1980, then the February result winds up at 1.55°C above average. If we use 0.4°C as a higher-end estimate, then February sits at 1.75°C above average. Either way, this result is a true shocker, and yet another reminder of the incessant long-term rise in global temperature resulting from human-produced greenhouse gases. Averaged on a yearly basis, global temperatures are now around 1.0°C beyond where they stood in the late 19th century, when industrialization was ramping up. Michael Mann (Pennsylvania State University) notes that the human-induced warming is even greater if you reach back to the very start of the Industrial Revolution. Making matters worse, if we manage to stabilize emissions of carbon dioxide at current rates, we are still committed to at least 0.5°C of additional atmospheric warming as heat stored in the ocean makes its way into the air, as recently emphasized by Jerry Meehl (National Center for Atmospheric Research). In short, we are now hurtling at a frightening pace toward the globally agreed maximum of 2.0°C warming over pre-industrial levels.

El Niño and La Niña are responsible for many of the one-year up-and-down spikes we see in global temperature. By spreading warm surface water across a large swath of the tropical Pacific, El Niño allows the global oceans to transfer heat more readily into the atmosphere. El Niño effects on global temperature typically peak several months after the highest temperatures occur in the Niño3.4 region of the eastern tropical Pacific. The weekly Niño3.4 anomalies peaked in mid-November 2015 at a record +3.1°C , so it’s possible that February 2016 will stand as the apex of the influence of the 2015-16 El Niño on global temperature, although the first half of March appears to be giving February a run for its money. We can expect the next several months to remain well above the long-term average, and it remains very possible (though not yet certain) that 2016 will top 2015 as the warmest year in global record-keeping.

Lower atmosphere also sets a record in February
Satellite-based estimates of temperature in the lowest few miles of the atmosphere also set an impressive global record in February. Calculations from the University of Alabama in Huntsville show that February’s reading in the lower atmosphere marked the largest monthly anomaly since the UAH dataset began in late 1978. UAH's Dr. Roy Spencer, who considers himself a climate change skeptic, told Capital Weather Gang earlier this month, “There has been warming. The question is how much warming there’s been and how does that compare to what’s expected and what’s predicted.” The satellite readings apply to temperatures miles above Earth’s surface, rather than what is experienced at the ground, and a variety of adjustments and bias corrections in recent years (including an important one just this month) have brought satellite-based readings closer to the surface-observed trends.


Figure 2. Anomalies (departures from average) in surface temperature across the globe for February 2016, in degrees Centigrade, as analyzed by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Image credit: NASA/GISS.

Arctic leads the way
Figure 2 shows a big factor in the February result: a superheated Arctic. As shown by the darkest-red splotches in the figure, large parts of Alaska, Canada, eastern Europe, and Russia, as well as much of the Arctic Ocean, ran more than 4.0°C (7.2°F) above average for the month. This unusual warmth helped drive Arctic sea ice to its lowest February extent on record in February 2016. The tremendous Arctic warmth was probably related to interactions among warm air streaming into the Arctic, warm water extending poleward from the far northeast Atlantic, and the record-low extent of Arctic sea ice. Ground Zero for this pattern was the Barents and Kara Seas, north of Scandinavia and western Russia, where sea ice extent was far below average in February. Typically, the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard--which includes the northernmost civilian settlements on Earth--is largely surrounded by ice from early winter into spring. This winter, the edge of the persistent ice has stayed mostly to the north of Svalbard, which has helped an absurd level of mildness to persist over the islands for months. Air temperatures at the Longyearbyen airport (latitude 78°N) have been close to 10°C (18°F) above average over the past three-plus months. This is the single most astounding season-long anomaly we’ve seen for any station anywhere on Earth. (If anyone can beat it, please let us know and we’ll add it here!)


Figure 3. Daily temperatures (in Celsius, °C) for the past year at the Longyearbyen Airport, Svalbard, Norway, located at latitude 78°N. The black line shows the seasonal average; blue and red traces show the day-to-day readings. The darker blue and red line shows the 30-day running average, which was 10.2°C (18.4°F) above normal in February. Thus far in March, the anomaly (not shown here) has been even larger, close to 12°C (22°F). Image credit: Norwegian Meteorological Institute.

February's heat had severe impacts
It has long been agreed upon in international climate negotiations that a 2°C warming of the Earth above modern pre-industrial levels represents a "dangerous" level of warming that the nations of the world should work diligently to avoid. The December 2015 Paris Climate Accord, signed by 195 nations, included language on this, and the Accord recommend that we should keep our planet from warming more than 1.5°C, if possible. Although the science of attributing extreme weather events to a warming climate is still evolving (more on this in an upcoming post), February 2016 gave us a number of extreme weather events that were made more probable by a warmer climate, giving us an excellent example of how a 2°C warming of the climate can potentially lead to dangerous impacts. And, as we have been repeatedly warned might likely be the case, these impacts came primarily in less developed nations--the ones with the least resources available to deal with dangerous climate change. According to the February 2016 Catastrophe Report from insurance broker Aon Benfield, three nations suffered extreme weather disasters in February 2016 that cost at least 4% of their GDP--roughly the equivalent of what in the U.S. would be five simultaneous Hurricane Katrinas. According to EM-DAT, the International Disaster Database, these disasters set records for the all-time most expensive weather-related disaster in their nations' history. For comparison, nine nations had their most expensive weather-related natural disasters in history in all of 2015, and only one did so in 2014. Here are the nations that have set records in February 2016 for their most expensive weather-related natural disaster in history:


Vietnam has suffered $6.7 billion in damage from its 2016 drought, which has hit farmers especially hard in the crucial southern Mekong Delta. This cost is approximately 4% of Vietnam's GDP, and beats the $785 million cost (2009 USD) of Typhoon Ketsana of September 28, 2009 for most expensive disaster in their history. In this image, we see a boy holding his brother walking across a drought-hit rice field in Long Phu district, southern delta province of Soc Trang on March 2, 2016. Image credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images.


Zimbabwe has suffered $1.6 billion in damage from its 2016 drought. This is approximately 12% of their GDP, and beats the $200 million cost (2003 USD) of a February 2003 flood for most expensive disaster in their history. Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe on February 5, 2016 declared a 'state of disaster' in many rural areas hit by a severe drought, with more than a quarter of the population facing food shortages. This photo taken on February 7, 2016 shows the fast-drying catchment area of the Umzingwani dam in Matabeleland, Southwestern Zimbabwe. Image credit: Ziniyange Auntony/AFP/Getty Images.


Fiji suffered $470 million in damage from Category 5 Cyclone Winston's impact in February. This is approximately 10% of their GDP. The previous costliest disaster in Fiji was Tropical Cyclone Kina in January 1993, at $182 million (2016 USD) in damage. In this image, we see how Category 5 winds can completely flatten human-built structures: Fiji's Koro Island received a direct hit from Winston when the storm was at peak strength with 185 mph winds. Image credit: My Fijian Images and Jah Ray.

One other severe impact from February's record heat is the on-going global coral bleaching episode, just the third such event in recorded history (1998 and 2010 were the others.) NOAA's Coral Reef Watch has placed portions of Australia's Great Barrier Reef under their "Alert Level 1", meaning that widespread coral bleaching capable of causing coral death is likely to occur. Widespread but minor bleaching has already been reported on the reef, and the coming month will be critical for determining whether or not the reef will experience its third major mass bleaching event on record.


Figure 4. Annual mean carbon dioxide growth rates for Mauna Loa, Hawaii. In the graph, decadal averages of the growth rate are also plotted, as horizontal lines for 1960 through 1969, 1970 through 1979, and so on. The highest one-year growth in CO2 was in 2015, at 3.05 ppm. The El Niño year of 1998 was a close second. The estimated uncertainty in the Mauna Loa annual mean growth rate is 0.11 ppm/yr. Image credit: NOAA’s Greenhouse Gas Reference Network.

Last year saw Earth’s highest-ever increase in carbon dioxide
Despite efforts to slow down human emissions of carbon dioxide, 2015 saw the biggest yearly jump in global CO2 levels ever measured, said NOAA last week. The annual growth rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide measured at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii jumped by 3.05 parts per million during 2015, the largest year-to-year increase since measurements began there in 1958. In another first, 2015 was the fourth consecutive year that CO2 grew more than 2 ppm, said Pieter Tans, lead scientist of NOAA's Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network. “Carbon dioxide levels are increasing faster than they have in hundreds of thousands of years,” Tans said. “It’s explosive compared to natural processes.” The last time the Earth experienced such a sustained CO2 increase was between 17,000 and 11,000 years ago, when CO2 levels increased by 80 ppm. Today’s rate of increase is 200 times faster, said Tans. In February 2016, the average global atmospheric CO2 level stood at 402.59 ppm. Prior to 1800, atmospheric CO2 averaged about 280 ppm.

The big jump in CO2 in 2015 is partially due to the current El Niño weather pattern, as forests, plant life and other terrestrial systems responded to changes in weather, precipitation and drought. In particular, El Niño-driven drought and massive wildfires in Indonesia were a huge source of CO2 to the atmosphere in 2015. The largest previous global increase in CO2 levels occurred in 1998, which was also a strong El Niño year. However, continued high emissions from human-caused burning of fossil fuels are driving the underlying growth rate. We are now approaching the annual peak in global CO2 levels that occurs during northern spring, after which the value will dip by several ppm. It is quite possible that the annual minimum in late 2015 will for the first time fail to get below 400 ppm, as predicted by Ralph Keeling (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) last October. To track CO2 concentrations at Mauna Loa and global CO2 concentrations, visit NOAA’s Greenhouse Gas Reference Network and the Keeling Curve website (Scripps).

For more on Saturday’s bombshell report, check out the coverage from Andrew Freedman (Mashable), Eric Holthaus (Slate), and Tom Yulsman (Scientific American/ImaGeo). We’ll have a follow-up post later this week on NOAA’s global climate report for February and for the Dec-Feb period, along with a roundup of all-time records set in February at major stations around the world.

Jeff Masters and Bob Henson

Title: Greenland was hotter than New York City last week
Post by: RE on June 15, 2016, 03:37:16 PM
Greenland!  The New Miami Beach!

RE

http://grist.org/climate-energy/greenland-was-hotter-than-new-york-city-last-week/ (http://grist.org/climate-energy/greenland-was-hotter-than-new-york-city-last-week/)

Greenland was hotter than New York City last week
By Katie Herzog on Jun 15, 2016 4:01 pm

(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/shutterstock_375464218.jpg?w=1455&h=818&crop=1)

Greenland, the Arctic nation that is basically one huge ice cube, is feeling rather balmy lately.

The island experienced the highest temperatures ever recorded on June 9, when air temperature in Nuuk, the capital city, soared to 75 degrees. While that may seem like no sweat, the average high for this time of year between 1961 and 1990 was just 44 degrees, and even Greenland’s hottest month rarely broke 50.

But that was then. That record-breaking day in June was hotter in Nuuk than it was in New York City, while a heat wave in April saw warmer weather in Greenland than in Boston.

All this hot air caused Greenland’s sea ice, which is the size of Texas, to begin thawing nearly six weeks before normal this year. The rapid melting of over 12 percent of the ice sheet was so unusual in April that Danish Meteorological Institute scientist Peter Langen said they “had to check that our models were still working properly.”

It’s a bad omen of what’s to come as climate change ramps up: Scientists predict that if the Greenland ice shelf melted entirely global seas would rise by more than 20 feet.

Granted, Greenland has a lot of ice, and melting all of it could take a few hundred years. By then, Greenland — and most coastal areas — will be gone for good.
Title: 'Rare, dangerous' heat headed to parts of Western US
Post by: RE on June 17, 2016, 06:58:43 PM
Consider the evaporation rate off Lake Mead!  :o

RE

http://www.ajc.com/ap/ap/top-news/rare-dangerous-heat-headed-to-parts-of-the-western/nrhfS/ (http://www.ajc.com/ap/ap/top-news/rare-dangerous-heat-headed-to-parts-of-the-western/nrhfS/)

'Rare, dangerous' heat headed to parts of Western US
6:55 p.m. Friday, June 17, 2016 | Filed in: News

No Break in Brutal Heat for the Southwest
Weather Channel

LOS ANGELES — It's a dry heat, Phoenix residents like to say about Arizona's hot weather. That bravado may vanish as the thermometer flirts with 120 degrees this weekend.

Phoenix won't be alone in the oven. A strengthening ridge of high pressure lifting out of Mexico is on course to also scorch other parts of Arizona and Southern California, bringing potentially record-shattering temperatures.

Though accustomed to triple digits, the upcoming heat spell is a rarity in Phoenix, a desert metropolis of 1.5 million people, raising concerns of heat stroke.
"Rare, dangerous" heat headed to parts of the Western US photo
Glendale Fire Department firefighter Chris Greene, right, gets a case of water from service worker Edi Marroquin, left, from the dozens of cases of water at the Glendale Fire Department Resource Center as they prepare for the record-setting heat predicted for the weekend Thursday, June 16, 2016, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Temperatures are predicted to hit 118 degrees in Phoenix on Sunday and peak at 119 degrees Monday. Such heat is "rare, dangerous and deadly," according to a National Weather Service warning.

"This is extreme even for our standards," said Matthew Hirsch, a weather service meteorologist in Phoenix.

The hottest day on record in Phoenix occurred June 26, 1990, when the thermometer reached 122 degrees.
"Rare, dangerous" heat headed to parts of the Western US photo
Glendale Fire Department firefighter Chris Greene carries a case of water as he walks past dozens of cases of water at the Glendale Fire Department Resource Center in preparation for record-setting heat expected over the weekend and into next week Thursday, June 16, 2016, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Extreme heat is likely to become more common, scientists say, blaming man-made greenhouse gas pollution.

"We should anticipate more and more of this extreme heat, and we're getting to feel it firsthand. It is what global warming looks and feels like," University of Arizona climate scientist Jonathan Overpeck said in an email.

During heat waves, people should watch for signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke, including high body temperature, dizziness and nausea. If untreated, heat stroke can lead to disability or even death.
'Rare, dangerous' heat headed to parts of Western US photo
This Tuesday, June 14, 2016 photo Leo Block, left, Matari Phason, center, and Brian Juarez, right, push part of a shipment of 20,000 water bottles donated by Yellow Cab of Phoenix to Central Arizona Shelter Services, Arizona's largest homeless shelter, to help prepare for the summer heat in Phoenix, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ryan Van Velzer)

Health experts say even a difference of a few degrees outside can cause the body temperature to spike, potentially affecting the brain and other organs. The elderly, babies and those with health problems are especially vulnerable because they can't cool down as fast.

Between 2006 and 2010, some 3,000 Americans died from heat-related illnesses, according to government statistics.

"No one needs to die in a heat wave, yet we do have deaths. They're all preventable," said Kristie Ebi, a professor of global health at the University of Washington.
'Rare, dangerous' heat headed to parts of Western US photo
This Tuesday, June 14, 2016 photo Mike Mcfarland, a volunteer at Redeemed Outreach Center, passes out free water bottles and bread to people who walk by in downtown Phoenix, Ariz. The center of is one of 50 water cooling stations setup up around Maricopa County to help people stay cool in the summer heat. (AP Photo/Ryan Van Velzer)

Earlier this month, a swath of the West Coast sweltered under heat warnings that forced sporting events to start in the evening and festivals to ditch some of the usual pomp and circumstance. Phoenix experienced its earliest recorded 115-degree day on June 4.

On Friday, the agency that operates California's wholesale power system said it's preparing for the heat and may ask residents to voluntarily conserve power to prevent rotating outages.

Death Valley, California, which bills itself as the hottest place on the planet, is expected to live up to its reputation. Temperatures are predicted to exceed 120 degrees next week, according to government forecasters.

Las Vegas is expected to see temperatures up to 112 for the weekend. By the middle of next week, the high pressure ridge is expected to shift toward the Four Corners region — southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, northeastern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico, which will likely see above-normal temperatures.

As in previous heat waves, those living in high heat zones are urged to limit outdoor activities this weekend and to seek shelter in air-conditioned buildings. People should also stay hydrated and drink plenty of water.

June is typically the warmest — and driest — month for desert Southwest states. This toasty period is followed by the monsoon season marked by dust storms, flash floods and lightning.

Until then, "it's just plain hot. There are no other words," said Kelly Redmond, deputy director of the Western Regional Climate Center in Nevada.

It's bound to get hotter in the future, researchers say. A recent study by the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado calculated that summers across much of the globe later this century could be warmer than any summer experienced so far if current emissions continue.
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on June 20, 2016, 01:56:12 AM
Go Long on Shorts & Bikinis.

RE

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/crews-fighting-southwest-wildfires-prepare-excessive-heat-n595201 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/crews-fighting-southwest-wildfires-prepare-excessive-heat-n595201)

Deadly heat wave hits southwest U.S.

By Joshua Berlinger, CNN

Updated 3:43 AM ET, Mon June 20, 2016
Heat wave and wildfires spread across U.S. southwest

Heat wave and wildfires spread across U.S. southwest 01:20

(CNN)A lethal, record-setting heat wave has hit the southwestern United States.
So far four people have been killed in Arizona.
At least three large wildfires are burning in the region, covering an area larger than Paris.

And over 30 million people are under heat warnings or advisories.
It's the hottest start to summer ever in three states -- California, New Mexico and Arizona -- according to CNN Meteorologist Pedram Javaheri.
And Monday could see even more record-high temperatures.
Phoenix set a new daily record Sunday, reaching 118 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the National Weather Service.
It was so hot there, a Mesa Airlines flight to the city had to be diverted back to Texas, the airline said.
The highest temperature recorded on Sunday in the United States was just two degrees warmer in nearby Glendale, Arizona, the NWS said.
Seven areas in western and central New Mexico broke heat records in addition to 14 places in California -- where Palm Springs, Thermal, Indio and Borrego all saw temperatures 117 degrees or higher.
The following map from the National Weather Service shows the parts of the United States are currently under heat advisories (pink areas face excessive heat warnings, while areas in orange face heat advisories.)
Source: National Weather Service
Two hikers -- a woman from out of state and a man from Europe -- died Sunday in Arizona's Pima County due to the heat according to Sheriff's spokeswoman Courtney Rodriguez.
In nearby Phoenix, a 28-year-old female died Sunday, Larry Subervi, a Phoenix fire spokesman said. And a day earlier, a 25-year-old man died, he said.
Three large fires are raging in New Mexico, Arizona and California:

    Dog Head Fire in New Mexico: 17,891 acres burned and 9% contained as of Sunday night
    Cedar Fire in Arizona: 12,140 acres burned and 40% contained as of Sunday afternoon
    Sherpa Fire in California: 7,893 acres burned and 51% contained as of Monday morning

Much of the current heat wave can be attributed to a so-called heat dome -- a pattern that can lead to record-setting temperatures and heat waves -- according to CNN Meteorologist Rachel Aissen. A heat dome occurs when air is capped by the upper atmosphere in the same location: The air hits the cap and returns to the surface, continuing to heat it like a convection oven.
Royal Navy ships lose power because of warm seas

CNN's Joe Sutton and CNN Meteorologists Pedram Javaheri and
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: azozeo on June 20, 2016, 03:49:49 AM
Go Long on Shorts & Bikinis.

RE

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/crews-fighting-southwest-wildfires-prepare-excessive-heat-n595201 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/crews-fighting-southwest-wildfires-prepare-excessive-heat-n595201)

Deadly heat wave hits southwest U.S.

By Joshua Berlinger, CNN

Updated 3:43 AM ET, Mon June 20, 2016
Heat wave and wildfires spread across U.S. southwest

Heat wave and wildfires spread across U.S. southwest 01:20

(CNN)A lethal, record-setting heat wave has hit the southwestern United States.
So far four people have been killed in Arizona.
At least three large wildfires are burning in the region, covering an area larger than Paris.

And over 30 million people are under heat warnings or advisories.
It's the hottest start to summer ever in three states -- California, New Mexico and Arizona -- according to CNN Meteorologist Pedram Javaheri.
And Monday could see even more record-high temperatures.
Phoenix set a new daily record Sunday, reaching 118 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the National Weather Service.
It was so hot there, a Mesa Airlines flight to the city had to be diverted back to Texas, the airline said.
The highest temperature recorded on Sunday in the United States was just two degrees warmer in nearby Glendale, Arizona, the NWS said.
Seven areas in western and central New Mexico broke heat records in addition to 14 places in California -- where Palm Springs, Thermal, Indio and Borrego all saw temperatures 117 degrees or higher.
The following map from the National Weather Service shows the parts of the United States are currently under heat advisories (pink areas face excessive heat warnings, while areas in orange face heat advisories.)
Source: National Weather Service
Two hikers -- a woman from out of state and a man from Europe -- died Sunday in Arizona's Pima County due to the heat according to Sheriff's spokeswoman Courtney Rodriguez.
In nearby Phoenix, a 28-year-old female died Sunday, Larry Subervi, a Phoenix fire spokesman said. And a day earlier, a 25-year-old man died, he said.
Three large fires are raging in New Mexico, Arizona and California:

    Dog Head Fire in New Mexico: 17,891 acres burned and 9% contained as of Sunday night
    Cedar Fire in Arizona: 12,140 acres burned and 40% contained as of Sunday afternoon
    Sherpa Fire in California: 7,893 acres burned and 51% contained as of Monday morning

Much of the current heat wave can be attributed to a so-called heat dome -- a pattern that can lead to record-setting temperatures and heat waves -- according to CNN Meteorologist Rachel Aissen. A heat dome occurs when air is capped by the upper atmosphere in the same location: The air hits the cap and returns to the surface, continuing to heat it like a convection oven.
Royal Navy ships lose power because of warm seas

CNN's Joe Sutton and CNN Meteorologists Pedram Javaheri and

It was still 105 degrees at 6:00 p.m. last eve on the patio. No direct sunlight, just air temp. Whew ....
I heard it got up 115 here in my town yesterday. We're at 3800' elev. So the river cities, Havasu & Bullhead
must have tipped the 125 mark yesterday. They're both at 400' elev.
Title: Re: February Smashes Earth's All-Time Global Heat Record by a Jaw-Dropping Margin
Post by: JRM on July 07, 2016, 06:21:41 PM
Break out the bikinis, it's warming up fast.

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8287/7738397138_5ea3602379_b.jpg)

RE


Just thinking of a steamy, sizzling game of volleyball with this gal got me all heated up.  Think I'll have a nice cold shower now. 
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: Eddie on July 07, 2016, 07:00:30 PM
I gave the pigs a shower. Only 99 here, but heat index of 108 with the high humidity.

I spray them down good with the hose. They have learned to enjoy being hosed off. I didn't stop by yesterday, and they were SO glad to see me show up with fresh food today after work. ( They have automatic feeders, which weren't completely out, but that doesn't seem to matter.) I am their security blanket.Their wallowing in the mud turns them from white to black. I'm going to have to move them again in a week or two. I need more electric fence.
Title: The Great CA BBQ
Post by: RE on August 18, 2016, 02:39:24 AM
CA is having a bad year.

We're not even at the height of the fire season yet.

RE

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-blue-cut-fire-20160816-snap-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-blue-cut-fire-20160816-snap-story.html)

 Homes burn, thousands flee as out-of-control brush fire chars more than 25,600 acres in Cajon Pass
Raw Video: Blue Cut fire

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-57b539b2/turbine/la-me-blue-cut-fire-photos-20160816-063/1100/1100x619)

Raw video from Blue Cut fire near the Cajon Pass.
Paloma Esquivel, Angel Jennings, Shane Newell

An explosive brush fire that ripped through canyons and flatlands in the Cajon Pass in less than a day continued to ravage hillsides and reduce homes to ash and rubble Wednesday, leaving even veteran firefighters bewildered.

“It hit hard, it hit fast — it hit with an intensity that we haven’t seen before,” San Bernardino County Fire Chief Mark Hartwig said.

By Wednesday evening, the Blue Cut fire had charred 25,626 acres and was only 4% contained, according to Melody Lardner, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Forest Service.

The official measurement of the fire was about 4,400 acres fewer than reported earlier in the day, a discrepancy that authorities attributed to more precise mapping of the burn area.
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Despite the downgrade in size, officials said the blaze remained menacing and unruly, racing up Lone Pine Canyon and toward Highway 2, where the ski resort town of Wrightwood, population 4,525, was under threat.

Marc Peebles, a spokesman for the San Bernardino County Fire Department, likened the blaze’s activity Wednesday to an energetic child eluding his parents at the mall.

“It has been running all day,” he said.

With winds fanning the blaze, officials were concerned it could decimate Lytle Creek, a tiny mountain community along the wildfire’s southwestern flank that was under mandatory evacuation.

Structure-protection engines are stationed in Lytle Creek and Wrightwood. More than 1,580 firefighters were attacking the inferno “with everything they can from the air and the ground,” Lardner said.

More than 80,000 people in the county’s rural communities have been forced to flee. An unknown number of homes were destroyed.

The blaze’s small containment line was centered around Old Cajon, where the fire broke out Tuesday morning.

Officials are bracing for an immense tally of devastation from a fire fed by strong winds, parched tinder and triple-digit heat.

“There will be a lot of families that will come home to nothing,” Hartwig warned.

On Wednesday, the remote region was an ominous version of itself. Brilliant flames of red, gold and copper licked at skies choked with smoke. Multiple helicopters whirred in darkness as bulldozers razed paths below.

Summit Inn, a historic diner along Route 66 once frequented by Elvis Presley, had become indistinguishable rubble. Charred skeletons of buildings and cars dotted the area. A cargo train sat idle on tracks, abandoned by its engineer.

A spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service said assessment teams and cadaver dogs would be sent to homes and structures along Highway 138.

“The fire came so quickly,” said Chon Bribiescas. “We want to make sure nobody was left behind.”
As night falls, the fire marches toward Angeles Crest Highway with dozens of homes in its path
As night falls, the fire marches toward Angeles Crest Highway with dozens of homes in its path

It's been 13 years since the area was struck by fire, leaving the hills and mountains a mix of dead brush and new growth.

The conditions on Tuesday were ripe for a fast-moving fire, officials said. The Cajon Pass, acting as a funnel, sent winds that raced up to 30 mph to help the blaze jump Interstate 15, said Michael Wakoski, battalion chief of the San Bernardino County Fire Department and incident commander of the Blue Cut fire.

Firefighters had difficulty navigating the steep slopes while the flames chewed through the rugged terrain, Wakoski said.

Six county firefighters were trapped Tuesday by walls of flame while defending homes and evacuating residents in Swarthout Canyon, officials said. They were treated for minor injuries and have returned to the field, officials said.

No other injuries have been reported.

In addition to Lytle Creek,  Lone Pine Canyon, Wrightwood and Swarthout Canyon, mandatory evacuations were ordered for Baldy Mesa, Old Cajon Road and West Cajon Valley, fire officials said.

But the closure of Highway 138 and Interstate 15 — two key thoroughfares in the area — clogged traffic and made it difficult for residents to leave.
Blue Cut fire explodes, scorching thousands of acres

Mary Grass, 74, and her husband left their Phelan home Tuesday as smoke and flames tore through the area. After dropping their horse off at a friend’s house in Hesperia, they headed to Victorville to spend the night.

They have already seen television footage of neighbors’ residences destroyed.

“Just wondering about our house now,” Grass said.

Others couldn’t bear to leave.

“I stayed just in case there’s a chance that I can do something to save my house,” said Joe Knowlton, who watched the flames from his porch in Wrightwood.

Knowlton, 49, said he watered his property and was standing guard with his 14-year-old son. If an ember fell nearby, at least he’d be around to stamp it out, he said.

“That’s the difference between the house going up in flames or not,” he said. “I don’t mind sticking it out.”

This year alone, California has been besieged by wildfires that have scorched hundreds of homes and killed eight people — all before autumn, when the state’s traditional fire season begins and the Santa Ana winds come into play.

The onslaught of fires has taxed fire departments and left little time for rest. Some firefighters were working up to 36 hours straight, said Peebles, the San Bernardino County Fire Department spokesman.

“These guys are going from fire to fire,” he added.

Such fires are a sort of “new normal,” said Char Miller, an expert on wildfires and national forests at Pomona College.

“We’re in the fifth year of drought and we’re starting to see the consequences of that,” he said.

Aerial fights against intense blazes can only do so much, Miller said. “You need boots on the ground.”

That’s a tall order as firefighters face temperatures that aren’t likely to cool until Friday, said Philip Gonsalves, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in San Diego.

Crews won’t be able to rely on any nighttime humidity to recover either, he said.

The dozens of residents who made their way to Sultana High School in Hesperia found themselves fearing the worst and taking stock of the best.

“You can’t worry about your things,” said Anthony Botello, 48, who left his home with just a handful of clothes and his wedding band. “It’s your life that you have to value.”
Homes burn near Cajon Pass as wildfire forces thousands to seek shelter: 'It seems so final'
Homes burn near Cajon Pass as wildfire forces thousands to seek shelter: 'It seems so final'

Nearby, Osuna Rosa sipped coffee on a cot and retraced the past day’s events.

The 53-year-old hospice nurse was at work in the High Desert on Tuesday morning when she noticed smoke.

The southbound Interstate 15 was closed. She tried an alternate route along Summit Valley Road, but found it clogged with traffic.

After Rosa failed to get a hotel room, she found herself in tears.

Then, a motel employee pointed her to the shelter. In the dimly lighted gymnasium, she managed to get a few hours of sleep, still dressed in her blue hospital scrubs.

paloma.esquivel@latimes.com

angel.jennings@latimes.com

shane.newell@latimes.com

Esquivel reported from Lytle Creek; Jennings from San Bernardino; Newell from Hesperia. Times staff writers Ruben Vives in Wrightwood and Sarah Parvini, Matt Stevens, Matt Hamilton and Corina Knoll in Los Angeles contributed to this report. Photographers Gina Ferrazi and Irfan Khan contributed to this report from Phelan.
Title: Siberia might as well be where the world begins to end.
Post by: RE on August 31, 2016, 05:31:30 PM
http://grist.org/briefly/siberia-might-as-well-be-where-the-world-begins-to-end/ (http://grist.org/briefly/siberia-might-as-well-be-where-the-world-begins-to-end/)

Spoiler Alert
(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/rtr4f0wj.jpg?w=1455&h=818&crop=1)
REUTERS/Vladimir Pushkarev/Russian Centre of Arctic Exploration
Siberia might as well be where the world begins to end.

Already a bleak place, the northern Russian region is looking much bleaker of late. It is warming at twice the rate as the rest of the world, with sometimes deadly, sometimes bizarre consequences.
1. Massive sinkholes

As the frozen ground warms up, dozens of craters have formed, including one mile-long, 300-foot-deep sinkhole. Researchers are afraid to get close to the craters for fear of methane geysers shooting off.
2. Methane unleashed

We don’t want to watch methane literally bubble up from under the grass. And we certainly don’t want the billions of tons of carbon stored in Arctic permafrost — which contains more than twice what’s in the atmosphere today — to be unleashed. Some scientists fear that alone could raise global temperatures by 0.7 degrees Celsius.
3. Smallpox, anthrax, and who knows what else

Warming temperatures have resurrected centuries-old anthrax spores that were dormant in Siberian permafrost, sickening 72 nomadic herders and killing one child. Experts predict that smallpox could also make a comeback as frozen burial grounds thaw.

Legend has it that “Siberia” comes from an indigenous word for “sleeping land.” Now, that land is waking up with fury.
Title: 2-Square-Mile Fire Forces Evacuations in Southern California
Post by: RE on September 26, 2017, 12:46:52 AM
A few more McMansions go to the Great Beyond.

RE

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/california/articles/2017-09-25/250-acre-wildfire-forces-southern-california-freeway-closure (https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/california/articles/2017-09-25/250-acre-wildfire-forces-southern-california-freeway-closure)

2-Square-Mile Fire Forces Evacuations in Southern California
A wildfire in Southern California has grown to more than two square miles, forced the shutdown of two lanes of a major freeway and spurred the evacuation of dozens of homes.

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-5963dc9e/turbine/la-fires-california-20170710)

Sept. 26, 2017, at 12:09 a.m.

2-Square-Mile Fire Forces Evacuations in Southern California

CORONA, Calif. (AP) — A wildfire in Southern California had surged to more than two square miles Monday night, forcing the evacuation of about 1,000 people from suburban canyon homes and spurring the shutdown of two lanes of a major freeway.

The blaze began about 1 p.m. in Corona along the Riverside and Orange county lines, where two eastbound lanes of State Route 91 were closed and commuters were facing serious traffic backups.

Corona fire officials have called for evacuations of about 1,000 residents of an estimated 300 homes. The blaze is also burning into the cities of Anaheim and Chino Hills, authorities said.

Intense flames could be seen creeping down hills and burning at the edges of several neighborhoods where ashes were raining down. There were no immediate reports of damage to homes.

Cora Angeles, 66, prayed and cried as she sat in a park car after frantically fleeing from the flames that raged toward her home. She was able to leave with only important documents, clothes and her 12-year-old granddaughter.

"We don't know what's going to happen," Angeles told the Los Angeles Times. "At least we know we're going to be alive."

Aerial shots from news helicopters showed a large building that looked like a warehouse that was fully engulfed in flames, but it wasn't immediately clear what it was.

A huge plume of smoke could be seen over much of Orange County, including Angel Stadium in Anaheim, where a large crowd was watching the Angels play the Chicago White Sox.

Conditions were favorable for the overnight firefight, with temperatures dipping into the 60s and humidity above 20 percent.
Title: Devastating wildfire sweeps into Ventura, burning homes, at least one dead
Post by: RE on December 05, 2017, 01:51:32 AM
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-school-fire-20171204-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-school-fire-20171204-story.html)

L.A. Now California: This just in
LOCAL L.A. Now
Devastating wildfire sweeps into Ventura, burning homes, at least one dead

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-5a26516b/turbine/la-1512460646-qvmfdrfbcp-snap-image/750/750x422)

Strong winds were pushing the blaze in a southwest direction toward the cities of Santa Paula and Ventura, leading to new evacuations of homes north of Foothill Road in Ventura and reports of power outages.
Alene Tchekmedyian, Jaclyn Cosgrove and Ruben VivesContact Reporters

A fast-moving, wind-fueled wildfire swept into the city of Ventura early Tuesday, burning homes and forcing thousands to evacuate.

The extent of the losses were unclear, but fire officials said there was little they could do stop the flames being pushed by wind gusts of 50 mph.

"The prospects for containment are not good,” said Ventura County Fire Chief Mark Lorenzen at a press conference. “Really mother nature is going to decide.”

The fire had burned at least 10,000 acres. But fire officials expected it would rip through at least 50,000 acres in the mountains between Santa Paula and Ventura.
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The destruction comes in what was already the worst year on record for wildfires in California. In October, more than 40 people died and more than 10,000 structures were lost when fires swept through wine country.

One person was reported killed in a traffic accident on a road closed due to the fire. At least two buildings have been destroyed and more than 1,000 homes in Ventura and Santa Paula were evacuated.

More than 260,000 customers in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties were without power. As of 12:30 a.m. Tuesday, a Southern California Edison spokeswoman did not know when power would be restored.

Strong winds were pushing the blaze in a southwest direction toward the cities of Santa Paula and Ventura. Firefighters were dealing with numerous spot fires as a result of the difficult conditions.

After midnight, residents just outside the evacuation zone wondered whether they should pack up and leave. Taylor Penny, 24, and her neighbor Eric Chen, 31, stood in the road of their neighborhood just south of Foothill Road.

For the past hour, they’d watched the flames ebb and flow along the nearby hills. Chen said the flames seemed to be lessening, but Penny remained worried as they stood in the wind and cold.

The power in the neighborhood was out, and Penny said they had limited access to information about where the fire was because their cellphones had poor reception.

Watching the wind feed the flames on the hillside, the two discussed whether they should flee. Penny’s roommate had already left. “I just hope we’re all right,” she said. “That’s it.”

The blaze started in the foothills near Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula, a popular hiking destination, and grew wildly to more than 15 square miles in the hours that followed — consuming vegetation that hasn't burned in decades, Ventura County Fire Sgt. Eric Buschow said.

Shortly after 10 p.m. Monday, Richard Macklin, a Ventura County fire engineer, was on the phone with a news outlet when his fire station in Santa Paula — the command center for the incident — went dark.

“We have power now,” Macklin said about 10:20 p.m. “I got lights, I don’t know how they’re providing it.”
Brutal Santa Ana winds fuel dangerous Ventura County wildfire, force grounding of choppers

Authorities were evacuating homes east of Dickenson Road, north of Monte Vista Drive along Highway 150 and south of the college in Santa Paula and homes north of Foothill Road in Ventura. The fire was burning on both sides of the highway.

“We’re really just trying to catch it around the edges and just pinch it off as quickly as we possibly can,” said Ventura County Firefighter Jason Hodge, adding that crews are dealing with 25 to 50 mph winds. “That’s what’s driving this fire. So it’s a challenge, but everybody’s out there working hard and will be through the night.”

Santa Paula resident Fabian Mauricio, 31, was playing basketball in Los Angeles when friends began texting him about a fire in his neighborhood. He called his parents, who tried to downplay the blaze to keep him from worrying. But when he checked photos and videos online, he saw a raging inferno.

As his parents packed important documents, clothing and their two dogs, they told him to stay put.

“I’m worried, but there’s nothing I can really do,” said Mauricio, who trained in a fire academy. “It is kind of helpless not being able to be there, help or do anything about it.”
Fire map
  (Los Angeles Times)

Since shortly before 7 p.m., firefighters were in place to protect homes along Highway 150 just north of Santa Paula, said Ventura County Fire Capt. Stan Ziegler. Within an hour, the fire grew from 50 to 500 acres.

Evacuation centers were opened at Nordhoff High School at 1401 Maricopa Highway in Ojai and at the Ventura County Fairgrounds at 10 W. Harbor Blvd. in Ventura.

Four helicopters were to begin making water drops after crews determined that it was safe to fly as the blaze grew rapidly. But about 9:30 p.m., two helicopters were forced to land at Santa Paula Airport due to 50-mph winds. “Waiting for winds to slow down so we can get back in the fight,” officials said on Twitter.

“It’s always difficult and somewhat dangerous to fly at night, so depending on different conditions and the geographic challenges is how they evaluate whether or not they can operate at night,” Hodge said.

Ventura County Fire staffed an extra 100 or so firefighters in anticipation of strong winds that triggered a red flag warning in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. Weather officials said those regions could see wind gusts of 50 to 70 mph Monday night into Tuesday.

The blaze was reported about 6:25 p.m.

“This is exactly what we have prepared for,” Ziegler said. “This is not a surprise by any means.”
RAW: Fast-moving brush fire explodes in Ventura County
CAPTION
RAW: Fast-moving brush fire explodes in Ventura County
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alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com

Twitter: @AleneTchek

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

UPDATES:

1 a.m.: This article was updated with information from Southern California Edison and an interview with a resident outside the evacuation zone.

12:05 a.m.: This article was updated with information about power outages and an interview with a Santa Paula resident.

11:10 p.m.: This article was updated to reflect two structures have been destroyed.

10:35 p.m.: This article was updated with information about power outages.

10:25 p.m.: This article was updated with a larger acreage number and new evacuations.

10:10 p.m.: This article was updated with more information about the emergency response to the fire.

9:40 p.m.: This article was updated with a larger acreage number.

9:10 p.m.: This article was updated with more information from fire officials.

8:55 p.m.: This article was updated with a new acreage number.

8:15 p.m.: This article was updated with information about evacuations.

7:55 p.m.: This article was updated with a new acreage number.

This article was originally published at 7:10 p.m.

Title: SoCal Inferno
Post by: RE on December 05, 2017, 09:51:35 AM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/12/05/out-of-control-southern-california-brush-fire-grows-from-50-to-25000-acres-in-7-hours/?utm_term=.b830128053ea (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/12/05/out-of-control-southern-california-brush-fire-grows-from-50-to-25000-acres-in-7-hours/?utm_term=.b830128053ea)

Out of control’ Southern California fire explodes overnight, forcing tens of thousands to flee
By Travis M. Andrews, J. Freedom du Lac and Mark Berman December 5 at 11:39 AM


1:04
A ferocious wildfire threatens thousands of homes in Southern California
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Fast moving wildfire engulfed an estimated 25,000 acres in less than seven hours in Southern California’s Santa Barbara and Ventura counties on Dec. 5. (Amber Ferguson, Victoria Walker/The Washington Post)

An explosive brush fire raced through Southern California with ferocious speed Tuesday, spreading from about 50 acres to an estimated 45,000 acres in a matter of hours, forcing tens of thousands of residents to flee.

Named the Thomas Fire, it began in a canyon near Santa Paula, about 65 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles. By 4 a.m. Pacific time, the fire had advanced into the city limits of Ventura, with a population of more than 100,000, emergency officials said.

“The prospects for containment are not good,” Ventura County Fire Chief Mark Lorenzen said a news briefing overnight. “Really, Mother Nature’s going to decide when we have the ability to put it out.”

The cause of the fire was not known Tuesday morning, Lorenzen said.

The fire — which had grown to cover an area roughly the size of Washington, D.C. — quickly displaced scores of people as it began to chew through the region.

At a briefing early Tuesday, Lorenzen said 27,000 people had been evacuated, and “almost none of them know the status of their homes.” There was also “a high possibility” that more areas would be evacuated, Lorenzen warned.
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At least 150 structures were destroyed by the fire, Lorenzen said, though he added that this number is expected to increase in the coming days, noting that firefighters were not able to assess damage in most areas where the blaze had spread.

“The fire is still out of control and structures continue to be threatened throughout the fire area,” officials said in a predawn update. “Due to the intensity of the fire, crews are having trouble making access and there are multiple reports of structures on fire.”

Firefighters were also responding to another blaze that erupted further east, this one dubbed the Creek Fire. That fire was spreading north of downtown Los Angeles and had also expanded rapidly, stretching from 500 acres early Tuesday to 2,500 acres within hours.

(https://img.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2017/12/2300ventura-fire-1.jpg)

As the Thomas Fire spread, the Ventura County Fire Department issued a dire warning early Tuesday, saying conditions were expected to worsen.

“Incident commander reporting winds are increasing, expect fire behavior to increase over the entire incident,” a department spokesperson tweeted.

While authorities had said overnight that one person was believed to have been killed in a car crash while trying to evacuate, they reversed course and said early Tuesday that no one had been confirmed dead. A fire department spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

A battalion chief was injured in a traffic accident on Monday night, and this person is expected to recover, Lorenzen said.

[Santa Ana winds sparked a critical wildfire threat in Southern California]

In the cities of Santa Paula and Ventura, evacuation notices were given to 27,000 residents as both places declared states of emergency. Multiple schools were closed Tuesday, and more than 7,500 homes are under mandatory evacuation, authorities said in a statement early Tuesday morning.

The National Weather Service reported that damaging winds and “very critical fire weather conditions” would remain Tuesday and return late Wednesday night into Thursday, warning that these condition could lead to “very rapid fire growth” and “extreme fire behavior.” The NWS issued a red flag warning for Ventura and Los Angeles, saying wind gusts between 50 and 70 mph are likely through Thursday.

Authorities had warned that a combination of strong winds and low humidity this week could increase the wildfire risk across Southern California. Cal Fire said it had moved resources from the northern part of the state to the south and prepared aircraft and fire equipment to respond.

Firefighters were also responding Tuesday to a brush fire in Los Angeles County. The Creek Fire broke out across the county’s foothills in an area northwest of Pasadena, according to the National Weather Service, and Cal Fire said it had grown to encompass 500 acres by sunrise on Tuesday.

A spokesman for the Los Angeles County Fire Department said on Twitter that the three-alarm blaze had prompted mandatory evacuations. Los Angeles city fire officials said the Creek Fire began outside the city before threatening parts of the Sylmar and Lake View Terrace areas.

Early Tuesday morning, officials said 500 firefighters were on the scene of the spreading Thomas Fire with more resources heading there, along with scores of law enforcement officers responding to help with evacuations and road closures.

Four helicopters were making water drops to fight the flames, but by 9:30 p.m. local time on Monday they were grounded after conditions were deemed unsafe to fly at night.

“It’s always difficult and somewhat dangerous to fly at night, so depending on different conditions and the geographic challenges is how they evaluate whether or not they can operate at night,” Ventura County firefighter Jason Hodge told the Los Angeles Times.

Choppers and fixed-wing aircraft “are expected to attack the fire at daybreak,” officials said in a statement.

The fire also caused outages throughout Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, leaving more than 260,000 people without power, Southern California Edison said in a tweet.

The blaze began Monday in the hills near Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula, the Los Angeles Times reported. It was first reported at 6:24 p.m. Pacific Time, Ventura County Fire Sgt. Eric Buschow told The Washington Post and has moved “unbelievably fast” since then.

A mixture of dry foliage from a continued drought, low humidity and sustained winds of more than 30 miles per hour throughout the evening led to its explosive growth, according to Buschow. Some outlets reported the winds exceeded 50 mph.

Title: SoCal Inferno- Ventura County under siege: 'It was like watching Rome burn'
Post by: RE on December 06, 2017, 04:37:45 AM
Lots more pics at the LA Times website.

RE

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-ln-ventura-fire-scene-20171206-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-ln-ventura-fire-scene-20171206-story.html)

Ventura County under siege: 'It was like watching Rome burn'

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-5a27dcd1/turbine/la-me-thomas-fire-photos/650/650x366)


LOCAL CALIFORNIA
Ventura County under siege: 'It was like watching Rome burn'
Thomas fire: Thousands of acres burn in Ventura County
Ruben Vives, Sarah Parvini and Jaclyn CosgroveContact Reporters

The reports started coming in a little after 9 p.m. Monday. A fire had erupted amid the oaks and scrub in the hills north of Santa Paula.

Located on the southern edge of the Sespe Wilderness, the blaze was named the Thomas fire for its proximity to Thomas Aquinas College. Within hours — its embers driven westward on the gusts of the Santa Ana winds — it had reached Ventura, a dozen miles away.

Mark Patterson, 58, and his wife, Linda, 59, woke to the sound of pounding on their front door. It was 1:15 a.m. No one was there, and at first they thought it was a prank. But then they could see flames leaping over the ridgeline to the north. Gathering with neighbors in the street, they kept vigil, and by 4 that morning, the hill was consumed.

Standing in their driveway, feeling the heat of the flames, they knew they had to evacuate. But first they drove to the church where Patterson is the lead pastor. It was safe, but there were more fires downtown, and the enormous apartment complex — Hawaiian Village, known for its views over the city to the ocean — was engulfed in flames.

“We’ve lived in Ventura for 19 years,” Patterson said. “We’ve had a couple fires, but nothing like this.”

The fire had taken Foothill Road as its path into the city. First burning through the dry leaves of the outlying avocado groves, it found new fuel in the homes built north of the 101 Freeway. Its glow brightened the night sky.

Jeff Jacobson and his daughters, Emma, 20, and Olivia, 16, began evacuating before midnight. Their single-story, ranch-style home on Island View Drive — its backyard with coastal views, the Channel Islands in the distance — was threatened.

Jacobson had considered staying, putting up a fight. He looked at his two grand pianos, one a prized 1937 Mason and Hamlin; they could be lost, he thought. But his daughters were insistent.

“Let’s leave,” they said. “Let’s leave.”
VENTURA, CALIF. -- TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2017: John Bain and Brandon Baker take cover from the embers
John Bain and Brandon Baker take cover from the embers as they try to help stop a fire from burning a home in Ventura. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

He could not ignore them. They loaded up a trailer and headed to the evacuation center at the Ventura County Fairgrounds.

In the past, wildfires have largely skirted downtown Ventura, burning through the wildlands that surround the smaller communities of Ojai and Santa Paula. But Monday night was different.

Power outages had left more than 260,000 residents in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties without power. Initial alerts from the Ventura County Fire Department reported nearly 31,000 acres consumed and 150 structures destroyed.

Firefighters set up their command post at the fairgrounds and began planning their offensive, but first they had to wait for daybreak.

To the east, stories were coming in: of neighbors in Camarillo banding together with garden hoses and spray nozzles to battle the onslaught of sparks; of a mother in Santa Paula who raced back through a police line to grab her daughter’s guitar (“It’s all she wanted”); of the crowds who had gathered to watch the black smoke and flames creep along a dry ridge near dozens of homes.

Winds ripped through bougainvillea, sending flames a hundred feet high into the sky. Some homes were spared, others destroyed, trees and chaparral left blackened and smoldering.

The land, said one resident, had not seen a fire in more than three decades, leaving this conflagration to eat its way through years of brush and debris.

At first light — the sky gray with smoke and ash — Scott Quirarte, a public information officer for the Ventura County Fire Department, delivered the news: miles of fire line and the frustration of having to wait until dawn to start full operations.
VENTURA, CALIF. -- TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2017: Olivia Jacobson, 16, wipes her tears, as she looks on
Olivia Jacobson, 16, wipes her tears as she looks on at her family's home destroyed by the brush fire on Island View Drive in Ventura. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

At 6 a.m., Heather Rhoades, 24, and her boyfriend Tyler Miller, 29, were evacuating Oak View with their family. They were driving down Highway 33 into Ventura, and flames covered the hillsides adjacent to highway. It was terrifying, Miller said, “like driving through the gates of hell.”

“All I saw was Ventura engulfed in flames,” Rhoades added. “All my friends’ houses were burning down. It was just scary.”

Heading the other direction were David Demshki and his wife, Christy Harris, who live in Oxnard and needed to rescue their three horses in Oak View.

Making that drive, Demshki said, “felt like you were going into fire.” The hills were “boiling” with flames and the sky glowed orange.

Just east of Highway 33 in Ventura, patients had been evacuated from Vista del Mar Hospital, an acute psychiatric facility, above downtown. Two buildings were destroyed, the facility left smoldering under the smoky sky.

Returning to Island View Drive, Jeff Jacobson watched flames flick out of his still-burning home. He could see one of two pianos, broken and charred, and he tried to hold back the tears as the memories flooded back, the treasured notes of Emma’s playing.

“So many things that are not replaceable, I don’t even know where to start,” Jacobson said.

By 8 a.m., winds were gusting to 40 mph and on the distant ridges, peaking at nearly 70. The ocean was mottled with whitecaps. More than 1,000 firefighters were on the scene, and by 10:30 Gov. Jerry Brown had declared an emergency.
VENTURA, CALIF. -- TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2017: Georgia Crowley, 14, from left, Grace Combs, 15, Murie
Grace Combs, 15, from left, Muriel Rowley, 15, Olivia Jacobson, 16, Emma Jacobson, 19, Anna Niebergall, 20, and Sally Niebergall, 16, comfort each other as the Jacobson sisters watch their home burn in Ventura. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

By some estimates, nearly a quarter of Ventura — 27,000 people — had been evacuated. Mansions off Foothill Road were engulfed in flames. The city was smudged by smoke, palm trees consumed by flames and Christmas decorations — including one inflatable snowman — darkened by soot.

On Main Street, power had been restored at Pete’s Breakfast House, where Gilberto Amaya went to work at the grill. As he scrambled eggs, owner Lindsay Timpson began making breakfast burritos — 800, she guessed — that her daughter would deliver to the firefighters on the hillsides above town.

Mary Tedesco and her husband, Steve, were helping. They got out of their home just in time to save their three dogs, but they lost two Harley-Davidsons and the irreplaceable mementos of their family: an heirloom cookbook and a father’s sergeant badge from World War II.

“I just try very hard not to let myself break down,” Mary Tedesco said. “You gotta stay strong.”

By early afternoon, the fire was at 45,500 acres. By late evening, it was more than 55,000 acres.

“We anticipate that number to grow,” said Capt. Stan Ziegler of the Ventura County Fire Department.

At the fairgrounds evacuation center, south of the 101, Robin Andersen was walking her dogs. After caravanning out of their neighborhood with her neighbors, the 62-year-old spent the night in her car along with her three dogs and two cats.

The city, she said, “looked like Armageddon.”

“I sat facing the fires, and it was like watching Rome burn,” Andersen said. “I cried. I love this city so much and it was overcome by flames.”

Greg Lindfors dressed up as Santa for the children who had been evacuated.

“I can’t help in the way firemen or the Red Cross does, but I can do this,” Lindfors said.

Most of the children he spoke with told him about the Christmas toys they wanted, he said. One boy just wanted a long hug.
 
Title: SoCal Inferno- Morning Commute in LA
Post by: RE on December 06, 2017, 05:25:38 PM
2Bimr1W Imgur
2Bimr1W Imgur
Click the Pic for Animation

Latest SAT View

(https://img.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=https://img.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/files/2017/12/DQXruyYWsAAWEK1.png&w=1484)

That's a LOT of expensive real estate going up in smoke.

RE
Title: SoCal Inferno- The Rich Get Fried
Post by: RE on December 07, 2017, 08:05:13 AM
The insurance industry is going to take a major beating on this one.

RE

http://www.youtube.com/v/EGEsLDG759M
Title: Re: SoCal Inferno- The Rich Get Fried
Post by: Eddie on December 07, 2017, 09:30:58 AM
The insurance industry is going to take a major beating on this one.

RE

http://www.youtube.com/v/EGEsLDG759M

Time to go short on State Farm. Rich people in Cali are probably filing insurance claims and going short on insurance carriers at the same time.
Title: SoCal Inferno- HELL on Earth
Post by: RE on December 08, 2017, 05:19:45 AM
FEEL THE BURN!   :evil4:

http://www.youtube.com/v/fgWXYPwCqhQ

RE
Title: Slave Labor on the Fire Line
Post by: RE on December 09, 2017, 04:52:26 AM
http://grist.org/briefly/inmates-are-risking-their-lives-to-fight-californias-raging-fires/ (http://grist.org/briefly/inmates-are-risking-their-lives-to-fight-californias-raging-fires/)

Briefly
Stuff that matters
risky business

(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/inmatefirefighters.jpg?w=1024&h=576&crop=1)
DAVID MCNEW / Stringer / Getty Images

Inmates are risking their lives to fight California’s raging fires.

As wildfires tear through the greater Los Angeles area, destroying hundreds of homes, officials have warned nearly 200,000 people to evacuate.

Thousands of firefighters have arrived on the scene — many of them inmates, who make up about a third of the state’s wildfire-fighting force. Since the 1940s, California has relied on inmates to combat the flames by digging containment lines and clearing away brush. In return for this difficult and dangerous work — which has been compared to slave-era labor conditions — inmates get credit toward early parole and $2 per day in camp plus $1 per hour for their time on the fire line.

Roughly 250 women inmates serve on California’s firefighting force, risking their lives to get out of prison faster.

“I’ve seen women come back with broken ankles and broken arms, burns, or just suffering from exhaustion, you know, the psychological stress that people go through trying to just pass the requirements,” Romarilyn Ralston, a former firefighter trainer, told PBS.

As climate change makes wildfires worse, state officials are scrambling to recruit more inmates to fight them.
Title: 'This fire is a beast': Massive inferno keeps growing despite all-out battle
Post by: RE on December 14, 2017, 06:57:24 AM
...and the Mansions just keep on burning!  :evil4:

RE

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171214-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171214-story.html)

LOCAL L.A. Now
'This fire is a beast': Massive inferno keeps growing despite all-out battle

Firefighters try to stop the forward march of the Thomas Fire

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-5a321b34/turbine/la-1513233200-kgpor2u2ff-snap-image/650/650x366)
Firefighter Chris Black with the Sacramento Fire Department douses flames Tuesday in Toro Canyon in Carpinteria. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Joseph Serna, Javier Panzar and Matt HamiltonContact Reporters

More than a week after the Thomas fire ignited in Ventura County, destroying hundreds of homes and displacing thousands as it grew into a massive inferno, firefighters are now in a race to protect the pristine coastal communities of neighboring Santa Barbara County before a shift in powerful winds forecast for this weekend.

Across the mountain ridges above Santa Barbara, Summerland and Montecito, firefighters Wednesday were building containment lines, clearing brush, digging breaks and setting small backfires to burn fuel, all in an effort to create barriers to stop the forward march of the fire.

Conditions so far this week have been favorable, allowing firefighters to attack the flames on the southwestern flank of the blaze as it moves west toward the Santa Ynez Mountains.

But the National Weather Service was forecasting sundowner winds blowing southeast at up to 35 mph Friday night, followed by Santa Ana winds Saturday that, at up to 45 mph, could steer the fire toward the southwest.

“When the wind starts pushing it, we can throw everything we have at it and it’s not going to do any good,” Mark Brown, an operations section chief for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, told Santa Barbara residents Wednesday night.

The stakes are high. If the fire moves into Santa Barbara and Montecito, nearly a quarter million residents and 62,000 structures worth $46 billion would be at risk.
Dozers build containment lines as fire approaches
A dozer from the Santa Barbara County Fire Department clears a fire break across a canyon from atop Camino Cielo down to Gibraltar to make a stand should the fire move in that direction. (Mike Eliason / Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)
“When the wind starts pushing it, we can throw everything we have at it and it’s not going to do any good." — Mark Brown, Cal Fire operations section chief

As firefighters well know, sundowner winds are notoriously unpredictable. The winds occur when hot air from the Santa Ynez Valley rises and swiftly pours over the mountain passes toward the Pacific Ocean, as if a person pressed a thumb over the end of a hose.

“It creates very erratic wind conditions, which are very difficult to predict and very difficult to fight fire in,” said Capt. Brendan Ripley, a fire behavior analyst with the Ventura County Fire Department. “It moves fire in different directions. It changes throughout the day.”

If crews can’t finish the containment line across a roughly six-mile stretch in the mountains fast enough to stop the fire’s march west, firefighters may have to burn the fuel themselves — a risky proposition and a scary sight for residents.

“It’s a proactive approach to fight the fire on our terms instead of on Mother Nature’s terms,” Brown said. “It’s well-coordinated if we do it. We’ve had numerous subject-matter experts put the plan together. It’s been vetted at all levels. All the local authorities have looked at it and approved it.”

Fire officials stressed that this plan would be used only if the weekend wind events occur as predicted and if crews can’t make a stand and fight the fire directly. The controlled blaze would burn up to 4,000 acres and be started when winds are favorable for firefighters.
Massive Thomas Fire Threatens Santa Barbara County
The Thomas Fire, feeding on thick chaparral brush which hasn't burned in generations, approaches homes in Montecito. (David McNew / Getty Images)

Meanwhile, firefighters hoped to slow the blaze by building breaks into areas with less vegetation because those areas burned in the last decade, said Chris Childers, a battalion chief with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department.

About 600 fire engines are jammed into the narrow, winding roads in the Santa Barbara County foothills. Trucks are spraying retardant on grassy hillsides and firefighters are wrapping small, indefensible buildings in protective metallic sheeting that looks like tinfoil to reduce the chances they ignite.

As smoke cleared and visibility improved, a conga line of low-flying helicopters started arriving at a county park in Santa Barbara off Highway 154 to pick up fire retardant. Officials said 33 helicopters and eight airplanes were dropping water and retardant on the blaze.

As of Wednesday night, the Thomas fire had burned more than 238,000 acres and was 30% contained. It has destroyed more than 900 homes in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties since it began Dec. 4 near Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula. In its first day, the fire spread southwest, toward Ventura, and northwest, eventually hugging Ojai before pushing to the Central Coast.

With containment lines now protecting Ventura and Santa Paula, firefighters there have been on a “seek and destroy” mission for any lingering hot spots that could threaten avocado groves, fire officials said Wednesday.

“This fire is a beast and you’re gonna kill it,” Martin Johnson, Santa Barbara County fire division chief, told fire crews at a morning briefing. “I have no doubt."

Authorities said it will probably take months for fire officials to determine the cause of the Thomas fire.
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Thomas fire: Thousands of acres burn in Ventura County

Serna from reported from Ventura, Panzar from Santa Barbara and Hamilton from Los Angeles.

joseph.serna@latimes.com

javier.panzar@latimes.com

matt.hamilton@latimes.com

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Title: Inferno Newz: One Dead Fireman, California being 'Devoured'
Post by: RE on December 15, 2017, 12:29:09 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/EdcGvzVYvFg
Title: Inferno Newz: Today's Target- San Ysidro Creek
Post by: RE on December 16, 2017, 03:46:11 AM
http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171216-story.html (http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171216-story.html)
http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171216-story.html (http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171216-story.html)

Winds, danger return as Thomas fire takes aim at Santa Barbara County
By Joseph Serna and Brittny Mejia
Dec 16, 2017 | 2:00 AM
| Montecito, Calif.
Winds, danger return as Thomas fire takes aim at Santa Barbara County

(http://beta.latimes.com/resizer/R68l_u2jdkJ7BoPtKrQUoTlc20c=/1400x0/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-tronc.s3.amazonaws.com/public/2HE2ZPAREBH73EFX3QLH27O7NI.jpg)
Firefighter Chris Black with the Sacramento Fire Department douses flames in Toro Canyon in Carpinteria. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Spotters are in place. Hillsides have been scrubbed of as much flammable vegetation as possible. And now it's time to see whether it was all enough to stop the deadly Thomas fire from wreaking additional havoc.

All eyes Saturday morning are expected to be on the hills above Montecito in Santa Barbara County.

The westernmost edge of the giant Thomas fire, now the fourth largest since California began keeping formal records in 1932, was by Friday night in the north-south canyon through which San Ysidro Creek runs.

A few hours after sunset Friday, the fire was relatively calm. But firefighters feared that gusts of up to 40 mph could start blowing from the north directly to the south in this canyon from 2 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

And if the fire gets into the canyon and the winds breathe new life into the flames, there is nothing to stop the blaze from racing into the foothill homes of Montecito, said Mark Brown, a fire operations commander.

Firefighters have smothered the hills in hundreds of thousands of gallons of fire retardant in an attempt to keep embers from igniting spot fires and to keep flames at bay, Brown said. Some hillsides have been denuded above Montecito, Summerland and Carpinteria, including in Romero and Toro canyons, to limit the potential damage. The fire is out in much of those areas and protected by established containment lines, he said.

But that's not the case around San Ysidro Creek, which is where authorities are most concerned about flames overnight, he said. There was a limit to how much flammable vegetation could be burned in a controlled manner before the Thomas fire arrived at the canyon.

It would have been too risky to attempt a controlled burn there during days of stubborn winds because it would have created another large fire that would sprinkle embers throughout the communities to the south and west, Brown said.
 
  (Sources: Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, Cal Fire, Mapzen, OpenStreetMap )

So at some point Saturday morning, when the spotters on mountain tops alert crews below that the winds are coming, firefighters are going to clear out and watch and wait to see whether their preparations were enough.

If the winds catch the flames well enough to send the blaze running south down the canyon toward Montecito, "we won't stop the spread," Brown said.

There are hundreds of homes that would be in the fire's potential path and with winds that strong, it's a deadly proposition to place firefighters in front to stop it. Instead, crews would have to watch the fire pass by from designated "safety zones" then attack it from behind.

Brown said he expected that structures would burn Friday night or Saturday if the winds return.

More than 300 engine crews are posted along road shoulders, in open fields and on private estates with plenty of room to operate. An additional 300 are ready to flood the area.

"We are doing anything and everything we can to keep the community safe," Brown said.

Martin Johnson, a division chief with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, sent a message directly to residents in the potential evacuation zone.

"If you are in an evacuation order area, I am asking you to please heed that order. If you're in one of the warning areas … be ready to go at a moment's notice," Johnson said. "This is a significant event and we want everybody to be ready."

Commanders have identified specific locations in the mountains that would trigger additional evacuations if the fire reaches those points.

(http://beta.latimes.com/resizer/vBAoEZzZv5zHY2OfB3IidddBX3w=/1400x0/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-tronc.s3.amazonaws.com/public/JK6EUXXPABEIPDULRAUTEH3XVA.jpg)
Firefighters are worried that gusts Saturday will fuel the fire's spread into a canyon containing San Ysidro Creek directly south into the community of Montecito in Santa Barbara County. The red area indicates the area that has burned. (Cal-FIRE / Google Maps )

Friday was the 12th consecutive day of red flag fire warnings — the longest sustained period of fire weather warnings on record.

“We put out plenty of red flag warnings, but we haven’t seen them out 12 days in a row. That’s unusual,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Curt Kaplan. “This has been the longest duration event that we have had a red flag warning out without any breaks.”

Red flag warnings were instituted by the weather service in 2004 and are intended to alert fire agencies to hot, dry and windy conditions that foster wildfires.

The National Weather Service warned that red flag conditions would be in effect in the Santa Barbara County mountains from late Friday night through Saturday evening.

Red flag conditions are also forecast in the mountains and valleys of Ventura and Los Angeles counties late Saturday night through Sunday evening; they were also forecast for parts of Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties Sunday.

Red flag warnings were also in place for this weekend across large swaths of California, including parts of the Bay Area, the Central Valley and Sierra Nevada.

The Thomas fire has killed two people, including a firefighter on Thursday, destroyed more than 1,000 structures, and damaged hundreds more. It was 35% contained Friday night.

The fire began Dec. 4 in Santa Paula near Thomas Aquinas College. In its first day, the fire spread southwest, toward Ventura, and northwest, eventually hugging — and sparing — Ojai before pushing to the Santa Barbara County coast.

The wildfire has scorched 256,000 acres. Now the fourth-largest fire in modern state history, it is only a few thousand acres from climbing the ranks again.

The fire is so large that its eastern and western fronts are influenced by entirely different wind patterns and terrain. In many ways, it's as if firefighters are battling two separate fires some 40 miles apart.

Much of the fire's recent growth was north of Ojai in the Rose Valley east of Highway 33, where flames are feeding on chaparral and dead vegetation, said Jude Olivas, a spokesman for the agencies battling the fire.

The rest of the fire's spread was either north, deeper into Los Padres National Forest, or to the west — where it crawled along canyons near the wealthy enclaves in Summerland, Montecito and Santa Barbara.

Crews from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection have been painstakingly working alongside firefighters from 10 other western states to scrape containment lines that would serve as firebreaks before winds were expected to shift Friday night. Streaks of red fire retardant dropped by aircraft or sprayed by tanker trucks line the hillsides as well.

Firefighters conducted small, controlled burns that destroy fuel for the wildfire. Crews ignite backfires using either a flaming, fuel-filled drip torch or a "stubby" — a pistol that launches flares 20 to 40 feet into the brush. Water tankers and firefighters continually monitor these fires and douse them if they grow too large, Olivas said.

Firefighters estimate the blaze has so far cost $96.9 million to fight. There were an estimated 8,300 firefighters battling the fire Friday.

Serna reported from Montecito and Ventura, Mejia from Los Angeles. Times staff writer Rong-Gong Lin II contributed to this report from Los Angeles.

joseph.serna@latimes.com

brittny.mejia@latimes.com
Title: Inferno Newz: Livestream 12/16/2017
Post by: RE on December 16, 2017, 06:00:27 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/It97piBrE30
Title: Ring of Fire
Post by: RE on December 19, 2017, 04:14:51 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/mIBTg7q9oNc

RE

https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/12/19/ring-of-fire/ (https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/12/19/ring-of-fire/)

December 19, 2017
Ring of Fire

by John Davis

(https://uziiw38pmyg1ai60732c4011-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/dropzone/2017/12/Screen-Shot-2017-12-18-at-8.56.21-PM.png)
Photo by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center | CC BY 2.0

Southern California’s Thomas Fire, the state’s fourth largest, continues to grow. To date, it has consumed over 250,000 acres but in the middle of its burn area, which stretches from Santa Paula in the south east to Santa Barbara in the north west, the Ojai Valley (barring an extraordinary turn-of events), has survived. A week ago, the local weekly, The Ojai Valley News, emblazoned its front page with the banner headline, “Ring of Fire”, a phrase that had been in local circulation for several days previously as residents watched the flames encircle their communities on their seemingly inevitable way to the coast.

Many of us who have reached a certain age cannot hear that phrase without hearing, in our mind’s ear, the thudding voice of Johnny Cash running through his sister-in-law’s honky-tonk ditty of 1963. His earnest rendition has become a cultural touchstone: now, in central coast California and its inland valleys, it has become entwined with the epic events of December 2017 when much of the landscape that lies to the south of the Santa Ynez transverse mountain range was charred in the ring of fire that girdled the Ojai Valley; as it continues to burn to the north and west, it has already destroyed over a thousand structures – the surrounding chaparral blackened, somber, and pungent with congealed super-heated resins.

Cash had a great deal of history in the area. He recorded the song Ring of Fire in a small Ojai recording studio while living in Casitas Springs, the western-most community in the Valley. The town now proclaims itself as “The Home of Johnny Cash” and the trailer park he purchased for relatives to manage still stands forlorn in an area whose center is anchored by a convenience store, nameless but for the red neon sign over its door that reads ‘Bait and Liquor’.

Casitas Springs was founded in 1834 when local Chumash Indians, formerly wards of the Mission San Buenaventura were relocated to pastures along the Ventura River flood plain half a dozen miles inland from the coast. There they settled, built rough shelters (euphemistically called casitas and memorialized in the town’s name) and led lives tragically foreclosed by both the loss of their connection to a tribal life and the enforced institutionalization to which they had succumbed during the Mission era. Their sad histories were washed away in the frequent floods that plague these rank bottom-lands; their archeological footprint, primarily evidenced by their basketry, destroyed by the brush fires that periodically sweep along the escarpment to the south. The fire this time skirted Casitas Springs and the three other towns that run east between the Santa Ynez mountains to the north and Sulphur Mountain to the south – the Valley saved by its topographical character, its heavily irrigated buffers of citrus and avocado groves, accommodating winds and the battalions of fire fighters who worked at its margins.

For all its local resonance, this literal ring of fire also reflects the wild fires that customarily girdle the planet and are shown in a stunning animation on NASA’s Eco Earth website generated from information transmitted by its Terra satellite. Perhaps most of these fires represent versions of slash and burn agriculture, but whatever their origin they are now all non-human creatures of the Anthropocene, their fiery conflagrations, exacerbated by global warming to some unknown degree, reflections of the burning of the planet’s stored solar energy scavenged from its crust.

The Thomas fire has now swept through territory once lightly populated with Chumash Indians who regularly burned their food-gathering lands. As Kat Anderson has shown in Tending the Wild, Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources, 2006, local Indians managed their wild food resources by burning the land to encourage their growth and to create clearings in which they could better hunt game. While the coastal Chumash relied heavily on sea food, inland groups harvested acorns as their staple supplemented with chia seeds, the fruits of the holly leafed cherry and small game. The untouched wilderness eulogized by John Muir was in fact a carefully managed environment, with swathes of chaparral charred in controlled burns where the plants had long co-evolved with regenerative lightning-sparked conflagrations.

Following the European invasion of California in 1769 and the subsequent sacking of the territory by Anglo Americans in the mid nineteenth century in pursuit of gold, rampant infrastructural development in these fire-lands has raised the stakes for the rapid containment of its cyclical irruptions. Californian and Federal agencies, as well as municipal fire-brigades from all over the western states and the National Guard have massed their land and air forces to battle the Thomas fire. They are backed-up by a large police presence and loosely aggregated community support groups. There is a sense that in controlling the flames, in taming their wildness, the chaparral is being returned to the asylum, its place of subjugation. As Thomas H. Birch notes in The Incarceration of Wildness: Wilderness areas as Prisons, “when this place is made, and wildness is incarcerated in it, the imperium is completed”.

If we accept fire as a natural event (although, in the case of the Thomas fire its two starting points were of an anthropogenic origin), then the determination to contain it is very much in the tradition of Mao’s Great Leap Forward of the 1950’s which proposed conquering nature through human intervention. In an arguably more enlightened twenty-first century America might we begin to move towards policies of accommodation and of co-existence with non-human entities and their often cataclysmic manifestations? Reasonable containment strategies could then be incorporated into urban planning practices, or in the case of existing developments, accorded the same level of priority as other infrastructure upgrades in the areas of transportation, public health, communications and the supply of goods and services.

To continue the manic patchwork of whack-a-mole fire suppression is a profoundly reactionary approach that both validates and preserves the existing incongruities of urban and suburban developments within areas whose ecologies requires them to burn.  In many respects, this reaction echoes the mindset that drives the U.S. military towards the lethal suppression of armed resistance in areas of conflict rather than pursuing soft strategies of social, political, and economic accommodation that might remove the underlying grievances of the putative enemy. In both cases, these aggressive policies are the testosterone fueled products of the Neolithic mind.

In addition, the perception of the firefighter as Hero (who saved our town/house/life/pet) gets in the way of a sensible appraisal of the issues at stake. Firefighters do their job and for the most part are handsomely paid for their efforts (prisoners from state penitentiaries on the fire-line excepted) and while they often display extraordinary bravery in the protection of stranger’s lives, their property and pets, our adulation likely confirms in them and their command structure a sense of the ineffable righteousness of their work. We, as a community, are thus locked into the whack-a-mole ethos, which stands in the way of a measured coexistence with forest fires. Co-existence and accommodation do not represent humanity’s defeat in its battle with the elements but indicate a level of solidarity with the non-human and of an appropriate humility in acknowledgement of the other powers with whom we share the Earth.

In the aftermath of the fire running through areas of Upper Ojai there were several instances of looting of evacuated and damaged houses. I witnessed the arrest of a suspected looter on my street. Three Ventura County Sheriff’s black and white SUV’s were pulled up behind a beige Chevy Suburban bulging with boxes of household goods and clothing. Two bicycles were thrown haphazardly on the roof rack. A deputy knelt at the curb carefully probing one box of civilizational detritus at a time. The cuffed suspect was standing by his vehicle, his female companion still in the front passenger seat. I pulled up and my enquiring gaze was met with an explanation from one of the sheriff’s deputies that they were patrolling the streets around the burn area apprehending looters and other ‘undesirables’. I drove off, that last word etched in my consciousness.

Some years after Cash recorded Ring of Fire he went to Folsom prison, actively consorted with the state’s undesirables, then entertained and demonstrated solidarity with them. He revived his fading career by adopting an outlaw image as ‘The Man in Black’. He understood the plight of all those who refused to be totally coopted by the rules-making capitalist imperium. Perhaps, as a profoundly Christian man, he foresaw a day, in an epoch we now call the Anthropocene, when the ‘undesirables’ (in the neo-liberal lexicon, but one step away from the non-human), would inherit the Earth.
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More articles by:John Davis

John Davis is an architect living in southern California. He blogs at Urban Wildland.
Title: Thomas Fire Second-Largest California Wildfire on Record; 425 Miles Burned
Post by: RE on December 20, 2017, 12:42:57 AM
http://ktla.com/2017/12/19/favorable-conditions-slow-271750-acre-thomas-fires-pace-but-dangerous-winds-are-expected-to-return/ (http://ktla.com/2017/12/19/favorable-conditions-slow-271750-acre-thomas-fires-pace-but-dangerous-winds-are-expected-to-return/)

Thomas Fire Now Considered Second-Largest California Wildfire on Record; 425 Miles Burned
Posted 9:57 AM, December 19, 2017, by Erika Martin, Updated at 07:13PM, December 19, 2017

(http://a.abcnews.com/images/US/california-thomas-fires-ap--01-thg-171215_17x11_992.jpg)

The massive Thomas Fire is now the second-largest California wildfire on record, as it reaches 55 percent containment while continuing to burn into a third week across Ventura and Santa Barbara counties on Tuesday.

Thousands remain evacuated from their homes ahead of the Christmas holiday. The stubborn blaze has been half contained since Monday and burned 750 acres overnight — slowing its usual pace — to cover 272,000 acres by Tuesday evening, Cal Fire said. It is second in size only to 2003's Cedar Fire in San Diego, which charred 273,246 acres.
A firefighter puts out hotspots on a smoldering hillside in Montecito as strong winds blow smoke and embers inland, Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images)

A firefighter puts out hotspots on a smoldering hillside in Montecito as strong winds blow smoke and embers inland, Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images)

Rising humidity hindered the flame's spread overnight, allowing firefighters to reinforce containment lines and put out hotspots. Fire crews also made "good progress" during the day Monday with winds dissipating, said Mark Brown,operations section chief for Cal Fire.

"It's nice to have a couple of days in a row where we've had good progress," Brown said. "The weather conditions were just right for us; the winds were blowing into the fire."

However, the powerful gusts that are blamed for fanning the flames thus far are expected to return by Wednesday, with some wind picking up Tuesday afternoon, and humidity is expected to rise, according to Cal Fire and the National Weather Service (NWS). Officials are warning that those could shift northeast and turn into Santa Ana winds over Ventura County by Thursday or Friday, the Los Angeles Times reported.

And, despite positive developments with wind and humidity, hillside chaparral across the region remains "critically dry," Cal Fire said. NWS expects there will be no rain in the area for the rest of the year.

More than 8,200 firefighters are still battling the blaze, which they do next expect to be fully contained until next year, around Jan. 7. The firefight so far has cost $140 million, according to Cal Fire.

Two people, a firefighter from San Diego and a Santa Paula resident, have been killed in the fire.
A strong wind blows embers from smoldering trees as the Thomas Fire burns in Montecito on Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: David McNew / Getty Images)

A strong wind blows embers from smoldering trees as the Thomas Fire burns in Montecito on Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: David McNew / Getty Images)

For a second week, 18,000 structures are under threat, firefighters said. Evacuations orders mainly affect those in Santa Barbara County — where animals have even been evacuated from the Santa Barbara Zoo — though some in Ventura County persist.

The Thomas Fire also is the states' third-most destructive in structure losses and has razed more than 1,000 buildings, at least 765 of them homes, and damaged hundreds more.

Fire crews on Tuesday would be focusing their resources on extinguishing hotspots and strengthening containment lines in Montecito and the Gibralter Road area of Santa Barbara. Firefighters would also be working in the hills north of Camino Cielo to establish a fire line and push forward progress into the burn area from the Zaca Fire that scorched 240,207 acres in 2007.

Officials warned that hotspots also remain active in the Ojai Valley area, where a small tree line fire broke out Monday night, but said the threat to Fillmore has decreased.

On the wildfire's north and east flanks, flames are moving further into the Matilija and Sespe wilderness reserves and toward the Sespe Condor Sanctuary.

To date, it has burned an area larger than New York City, Washington D.C. and San Francisco combined -- and is larger than any city in California except Los Angeles.

For more information on evacuations and road closures, visit CountyofSB.org or ReadyVenturaCounty.org.
Title: 🚰 Wasted Water in Capetown
Post by: RE on January 27, 2018, 12:58:46 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/9LjU42_eqc4
Title: 🎾 Heat policy in effect at the Net with N.Y. temperatures on rise
Post by: RE on August 29, 2018, 12:22:31 AM
Where's McEnroe when we really need him?

http://www.youtube.com/v/t0hK1wyrrAU

RE

http://www.espn.com/tennis/story/_/id/24504349/as-temps-soar-us-open-players-retire-due-heat (http://www.espn.com/tennis/story/_/id/24504349/as-temps-soar-us-open-players-retire-due-heat)

Heat policy in effect with N.Y. temperatures on rise
play
4:22 PM AKDT


    Aishwarya KumarESPN.com


NEW YORK -- Three players were forced to retire Tuesday at the US Open due to issues related to the extreme heat, conditions that were so intense that Novak Djokovic and his opponent used ice baths to cool down during their opening match.

Lithuanian Ricardas Berankis retired due to a heat illness and Stefano Travaglia retired because of cramps, according to tournament referee Brian Earley.

Leonardo Mayer of Argentina said he also retired from his match against Laslo Djere due to the heat, and he added that his blood pressure dropped and he was feeling dizzy.
Editor's Picks

    Hot topic: USTA needs common-sense heat policy at the US Open

    Three players were forced to retire Tuesday because of issues related to the extreme heat, forcing the USTA to ad-lib rules. And Day 3 is supposed to be just as hot.
    Federer cruises, then clarifies retirement joke

    Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic moved one step closer to a potential quarterfinal showdown after each came away with a first-round win on Tuesday at the US Open.
    Keys, Sharapova reach 2nd round of US Open

    Madison Keys and Eugenie Bouchard were among Tuesday's first-round winners at the US Open. Keys beat Pauline Parmentier and Bouchard won at the Open for the first time since a fall in the trainers' room left her with a concussion in 2015.

"I think we should no longer play five sets," Mayer said in Spanish. "That's my opinion, I think that's the past. They won't stop until someone dies. It's incredible, matches become ugly. The only way [to solve this] is to shorten them."

During a break in the second set of the Djokovic-Marton Fucsovics match, Djokovic asked for a trash can -- in case he became ill -- and was provided with several towels with ice for him to cool down. He revealed after the match that during the break the two competitors stripped down and took ice baths side by side in the locker room before resuming the match.

"It was funny," Djokovic said. "Marton and I had the ice baths, one next to the other. So we were in the two ice baths, we were naked in the ice baths and it was quite a wonderful feeling, you know. Battling with a guy for two and a half hours and then you get into the locker room and you haven't finished the match and you're naked in the ice baths. It was quite a magnificent feeling, I must say."

Temperatures hit 98 degrees with a heat index of 107 Tuesday. The United States Tennis Association had released an extreme heat policy for the tournament after one player retired due to heat Monday.

Under the extreme heat policy, men receive a 10-minute break between the third and the fourth sets. No coaching is permitted, but players are allowed to take bathroom breaks and showers to cool down. The tournament referee and the US Open medical team monitor the on-site conditions to determine when the policy will no longer be in effect.

Not all players were happy. Australian John Millman wasn't pleased about the 10-minute break after the third set.

"They should have maybe asked a few people because it seems like they've made up their own rules there," he said after a straight-set victory over Jenson Brooksby. "Probably not the biggest fan of the 10-minute break. I don't know if it does you much good."

This rule change comes after the WTA sent out a statement on Monday reinforcing its policy for the women's side of the tournament, which allows players to take a 10-minute break after the completion of the second set, if one player requests it. A heat break was taken in the Taylor Townsend-Amanda Anisimova match earlier Tuesday. Townsend won the match in three sets after dropping the first set.

"I just imagine I'm laying on a beach with a margarita in hand," Caroline Wozniacki said when asked how she handles the heat during her matches.

It's not just the players who are affected. Fans are feeling the heat, as well. About 20 people were taken to the first aid stations, according to officials, after complaining of dehydration. Some even felt faint. They were given ice packs and electrolytes, and their vitals were checked.

There's no relief coming. Wednesday's temperatures in New York are expected to be just as scorching.
Title: 🏔️Climate change could melt decades worth of human poop at Denali National Park
Post by: RE on April 01, 2019, 04:05:01 AM
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/31/climate-change-could-soon-melt-years-worth-human-poop-alaska-park/3299522002/ (https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/31/climate-change-could-soon-melt-years-worth-human-poop-alaska-park/3299522002/)

Climate change could melt decades worth of human poop at Denali National Park in Alaska
Elizabeth Weise, USA TODAY Published 10:50 a.m. ET March 31, 2019 | Updated 8:18 p.m. ET March 31, 2019

(https://www.gannett-cdn.com/presto/2019/03/29/USAT/71d7aeb4-b32b-4eff-a95b-b6f160bd5b1a-Dan_and_his_CMC.jpg?width=540&height=&fit=bounds&auto=webp)

At Denali National Park a gross reality is taking shape. Climate change could melt decades worth of human poop in the near future! Nathan Rousseau Smith has the story. Buzz60, Buzz60

There’s good news and bad news at Denali, North America’s tallest mountain.

The bad news is that the 66 tons of frozen feces left by climbers on the Alaska summit is expected to start melting out of the glacier sometime in the coming decades and potentially as soon as this summer, a process that’s speeding up in part due to global warming.

The good news is that this year, for the first time, the guide companies that lead many of the 1,200 climbers who attempt the summit each year have voluntarily decided to start packing out their human waste. This comes just a year after the National Park Service instituted a policy that all such waste below 14,000 feet must be carried off the mountain.

“Climbers and particularly guide services are really embracing the new policy and are even exceeding it. It has become kind of an informal badge of merit to carry off all your waste,” said Michael Loso, a National Park Service glaciologist who’s been studying the problem of climber excrement on the mountain for close to a decade.

Denali is a majestic mountain about five hours north of Anchorage, Alaska. At 20,300 feet, it's visible from the city on clear days. It's one of the Seven Summits, the highest mountains on each of the seven continents. Conquering them all is considered a major mountaineering challenge in the climbing world. 
Former National Park Service ranger Dan Corn prepares to depart Kahiltna Basecamp is at 7,200 feet on Alaska's Denali with his Clean Mountain Can strapped to his sled. The CMC (green, with straps) is used to store solid human waste during the trek up and down the mountain.

Former National Park Service ranger Dan Corn prepares to depart Kahiltna Basecamp is at 7,200 feet on Alaska's Denali with his Clean Mountain Can strapped to his sled. The CMC (green, with straps) is used to store solid human waste during the trek up and down the mountain. (Photo: National Park Service)

The poop problem is very real. Climbers scaling  Denali, previously known as Mount McKinley, generate close to 2 metric tons of human waste each year, according to the National Park Service. (The average human “deposit” weighs half a pound and the average length of a climber's stay on the mountain is 18 days, which is how researchers got the figure of 66 tons over the course of the past century.)

Initially, human waste was left in snow pits on the Kahiltna glacier, the most common route up, or thrown into deep crevasses at higher elevations. It was believed that the waste would be ground up in the ice over time.

It turns out that what goes around comes around, even in a glacier, Loso said. He performed several experiments that show the buried feces eventually resurface farther downstream on the surface of the glacier, where they begin to melt.

This is true of all glaciers, which are really extremely slow-moving rivers of ice, though the process seems to be speeding up.

Research by the National Park Service found that in the past 50 years, the area covered by ice within the Alaskan parks has diminished by 8 percent.

“We have lost more glacier cover in the Alaskan national parks than there is area in the whole state of Rhode Island,” said Loso.

“One of the consequences of warming temperatures is that the surface of the glacier is melting more quickly,” he said.

This means that waste deposited at the lowest climbing camp on the mountain could start reappearing soon, maybe even this climbing season, which begins in April. Waste deposited higher up the mountain will take longer to appear.

“That could be as much as two to three centuries,” Loso said.

Park Service staff are keeping their eyes open, but they’re not making special trips to look for excrement.

“We don’t choose to spend our limited funding to just hunt for it all summer long,” Loso said.
Still pretty yucky

Denali has to deal with excrement. On Mount Everest, melting glaciers are exposing the bodies of climbers who had long been buried in the snow and ice. Because elevations are lower on Denali, most climbers who die on the mountain are carried off to be buried.
Tents of climbers on Denali, the tallest peak in North America, in Alaska.

Tents of climbers on Denali, the tallest peak in North America, in Alaska. (Photo: RMI Expeditions)

A 40-some-year trip through a glacier doesn’t make human waste any less gross. Loso’s research suggests that, in general, the bacteria and other bugs that live in feces survive after being buried in the snow or dropped in a crevasse. Tests of the rivers into which the glacier melts found fecal coliform bacteria, albeit in amounts well below the standard for recreational lakes and rivers.

It won't be pleasant for whoever finds that emerging poop.

“The waste will emerge at the surface not very different from when it was buried. It will be smushed and have been frozen and be really wet. It will be biologically active, so the E. coli that was in the waste when it was buried will be alive and well. We expect it to still smell bad and look bad,” Loso said.
Packing it out

The National Parks Service realized there was a poop problem on Denali years ago. In 2001, it launched a pilot program with the American Alpine Club climbing group to test small, lightweight portable toilets called Clean Mountain Cans.
A Clean Mountain Can on the back of a sled on Alaska's Denali. CMCs are used to securely hold human solid waste so it can be packed off the mountain.

A Clean Mountain Can on the back of a sled on Alaska's Denali. CMCs are used to securely hold human solid waste so it can be packed off the mountain. (Photo: National Pak Service)

These reusable bucket-size containers hold 1.8 gallons of solid waste and are lined with a biodegradable bag.

But no urine, notes Joe Horiskey, director of RMI Expeditions. “If you urinate in the CMC, it’s going to freeze and increase the weight.”

After years of testing, last year’s climbing season was the first in which all climbers were required to pack out their excrement below 14,000 feet. Above that, they are allowed to throw the frozen bags into one designated area in a deep ice crevasse.

But for this year’s climbing season, six of the seven guide companies – which take about 50 percent of climbers up the mountain – have voluntarily committed to packing out all their waste, said Tucker Chenoweth, a mountaineering ranger at Denali with the National Park Service.

That means carrying cans of excrement all the way to the summit and back. It’s something the guide companies have been doing informally for a while, but now they're making the leap into total removal.

It’s not the easiest thing to do, said Todd Burleson, president of Alpine Ascents International.

“You’re already carrying 100 pounds and then you’re adding another 20 pounds of feces. But it’s the right thing to do,” he said.

Chenoweth says a lot of individual climbers, especially Americans, are also packing out all their waste.

“There’s a pretty strong ‘Leave no trace’ ethic among U.S. climbing and outdoors folks. It’s kind of part of the deal,” he said.
A climber ascending Alaska's Denali on fixed lines, with a Clean Mountain Can on his backpack. CMCs are used to safely transport human solid waste off the mountain.

A climber ascending Alaska's Denali on fixed lines, with a Clean Mountain Can on his backpack. CMCs are used to safely transport human solid waste off the mountain. (Photo: AAI/Coley Gentzel)
'The best thing for the mountain'

So how do you deal with 21 days' worth of poop? Very carefully.

Each climber is assigned their own Clean Mountain Can by the Park Service before they fly up to base camp at 7,200 feet.

From the moment they touch down on the mountain, all solid waste goes into that can. No trash or wet wipes are allowed, though toilet paper is OK.
Climbers ascending Alaska's Denali, using sleds to carry their equipment.

Climbers ascending Alaska's Denali, using sleds to carry their equipment. (Photo: RMI Expeditions)

“We say about 12 uses is a full can. It weighs somewhere between 10 and 15 pounds when full,” Chenoweth said.

Guides delicately note that up on the mountain, where climbers are eating mostly freeze-dried food, bathroom needs are a little different than down below.

“It might not be an ‘everyday’ thing,” Horiskey said.

The cans are equipped with a gas release valve, so the lid doesn’t pop off when they’re flown off the mountain from base camp.

On the lower part of the climb, climbers use sleds to hold their gear, which includes the cans. Due to the altitude, the cans' contents freeze, so they're not smelly.

On the last leg of the climb, the sleds aren’t used and the cans are strapped to climbers’ backpacks.

“This is something we will all be getting used to,” Horiskey said. “But it’s the best thing for the mountain. It’s just what we’re going to have to do.”


Climbers on the West Buttress route coming down from the Denali high camp at 17,000 carrying their waste off the mountain. (Photo: George Kashouh)
Title: ☀️ Deadly European heatwave highlights global climate crisis
Post by: RE on July 01, 2019, 02:26:04 AM
The SUN ☀️ gives life, and it taketh away.

RE

Deadly European heatwave highlights global climate crisis

At least eight people die in France, Italy and Spain, while parts of the continent get relief from record temperatures.
18 hours ago

Deadly European heatwave highlights global climate crisis

(https://www.aljazeera.com/mritems/imagecache/mbdxxlarge/mritems/Images/2019/6/30/d1b31c243dc142d3ba068e9eba04e28d_18.jpg)
A woman cools off in a water fountain in Marseille as record heatwave hits much of France [Reuters]

Wildfires have burned tracts of land in France and Spain, while a welcome dip in temperatures in parts of Europe has brought relief to areas facing a deadly heatwave for nearly a week.

Hot-weather warnings were lifted across northern and western France, days after the country posted all-time high temperatures as it sizzled along with Italy, Spain and some central European nations.
READ MORE
Europe's heatwave in pictures

Six days of intense heat fuelled huge blazes and pollution peaks, and officially claimed four lives in France and two each in Italy and Spain, including a 17-year-old harvest worker, a 33-year-old roofer and a 72-year-old homeless man.
Record heat in France

The temperature in France's southern Gard region hit an all-time high of 45.9 degrees Celsius on Friday - hotter than in California's Death Valley - sparking scores of fires that burned 600 hectares of land and destroyed several homes and vehicles.

France is the seventh European country to ever register a plus 45-degree temperature, along with Bulgaria, Portugal, Italy, Spain, Greece and North Macedonia, Meteo France said, prompting the weather service to issue its highest alert level of red for the first time.

Winegrowers in the south of France said their precious crops had been badly burned.

"Some vines seem to have been hit with a blowtorch," Jerome Despey said. "I've been a winegrower for 30 years. I have never seen a vine burned by a sudden onset of heat like yesterday."

France remains haunted by the memory of the devastating heatwave of August 2003, in which nearly 15,000 people were estimated to have died.

"I want to appeal to the sense of responsibility of citizens - there are avoidable deaths in every heatwave," French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said.
Weather alerts

In Spain, 40 out of 50 regions have been put under weather alert with seven of them considered to be an extreme risk, the national weather agency said.

Temperatures in Girona in northeastern Spain reached 43.9 degrees Celsius on Friday - the highest recorded in the Catalan city.

A fire that started on Friday in the central Spanish town of Almorox burned at least 1,600 hectares of land, spilling over into the Madrid region and forcing the evacuation of a village, emergency services said.

Temperatures eased slightly on Sunday although the Spanish national meteorological agency predicted the mercury could stay over 40 degrees Celsius in some parts of the country, in particular in the northeast.

Germany's weather service warned of "extreme" heat on Sunday, forecasting peak temperatures of up to 39 degrees Celsius from Saxony in the east to the Upper Rhine in the west - just below an all-time high of 40.3 Celsius.

Germany's national weather service said temperatures were more than four degrees higher in June than an international reference period of 1981-2010.

The stifling heat caused air quality to nosedive in some European cities, prompting local authorities to take anti-pollution measures.
2019 set to be one of the hottest

Meteorologists say a weakening of the high-level jet stream is increasingly causing weather systems to stall and leading summer temperatures to soar.

Five of Europe's hottest summers in the last 500 years have happened in this century.

Earlier this week, the World Meteorological Organization said 2019 was on track to be among the world’s hottest years, and 2015-2019 would then be the hottest five-year period on record.

It said the European heatwave was "absolutely consistent" with extremes linked to the impact of greenhouse gas emissions.

On Friday, a "Rebellion on the Bridge" protest was held in Paris, during which hundreds of people, many of them students, blocked traffic as they called for more attention to climate change.

"The goal was to create activities to alert people and to call for media attention to climate change and its consequences. And today, we see that the government's response was not to start a dialogue with us or hear out our demands, but simply to chase us away by force.", said Loic Daniellou, a 20-year-old French student.
 
Title: ☀️ Last month was the hottest June ever recorded: EU‘s satellite agency
Post by: RE on July 03, 2019, 06:06:33 AM
July has kicked of this week with a SCORCHER here in the Matanuska-Susitna River Valley on the Last Great Frontier.  Hasn't topped 90F (32C) yet, but predicted for this weekend.  I'm roasting.

(https://assetsds.cdnedge.bluemix.net/sites/default/files/styles/big_2/public/feature/images/hottest_month.jpg?itok=WLA1Q9ud)

RE

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/june-hottest-month-ever-earth-2019-weather-heatwave-hot-a8984691.html (https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/june-hottest-month-ever-earth-2019-weather-heatwave-hot-a8984691.html)


(https://2daystories.com/thumbs/big/2019/07/02/hottest-month-history-june-2019-22337.jpg)

Last month was the hottest June ever recorded, the EU‘s satellite agency has announced.

Data provided by the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), implemented by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts on behalf of the EU, showed that the global average temperature for June 2019 was the highest on record for the month.

The data showed European average ​temperatures were more than 2C above normal and temperatures were 6-10C above normal over most of France, Germany and northern Spain during the final days of the month, according to C3S.

The global average temperature was about 0.1C higher than during the previous warmest June in 2016.

Experts have said climate change made last week’s record-breaking European heatwave at least five times as likely to happen, according to recent analysis.
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Rapid assessment of average temperatures in France between 26-28 June showed a “substantial” increase in the likelihood of the heatwave happening as a result of human-caused global warming, experts at the World Weather Attribution group said.

The recent heatwave saw France record the hottest temperature in the country’s history (45.9C) and major wildfires across Spain, where temperatures exceeded 40C.

Germany, Poland and Czech Republic also recorded their highest temperatures for June last week.
Title: ☀️ Anchorage Has Never Reached 90 Degrees. That Could Change This Week.
Post by: RE on July 05, 2019, 01:55:29 AM
It's FUCKING HOT!

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/04/us/alaska-heat-anchorage-fireworks.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/04/us/alaska-heat-anchorage-fireworks.html)

Anchorage Has Never Reached 90 Degrees. That Could Change This Week.

(https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/07/04/us/04alaska-01/merlin_157435899_e5f1f79e-b276-4a69-bde7-a72f4fd230e9-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp)
Fischer Nyce, left, and Robin Nyce cooled off at Goose Lake in Anchorage on Wednesday. Anchorage has had 34 days in a row of above-average temperatures. Credit: Joshua Corbett for The New York Times

By Mike Baker

    July 4, 2019

In more than 100 years of Anchorage history, weather stations have never recorded a single 90-degree reading. If current forecasts hold, it could happen multiple times in the coming days.

With the combined forces of climate change that has disrupted temperature trends around the state, a remarkable dearth of ice in the Bering Sea and weather patterns generating a general heat wave, Alaska is facing a Fourth of July unlike any before. Anchorage has canceled its fireworks display because of wildfire concerns, city officials are worrying about air quality and forecasters expect temperatures to rival those in Miami.

“This is unprecedented,” Anchorage’s mayor, Ethan Berkowitz, said in an interview. “I tease people that Anchorage is the coolest city in the country — and climatically that is true — but right now we are seeing record heat.”

By any measure, the numbers are unusual. Alaska had its warmest March on record — in some places 20 degrees above normal. Once all the data is tabulated, it is likely to be the second-warmest June on record.

Every Friday, get an exclusive look at how one of the week’s biggest news stories on “The Daily” podcast came together.

The highest temperature ever recorded at Anchorage’s official station was 85 degrees, while other stations in the area have gone a couple of degrees higher. Bob Clay, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said forecasters expected a high-pressure system to push temperatures well into the 80s starting on Thursday and potentially reach the 90-degree threshold in parts of the Anchorage area on Friday, Saturday or Sunday.

While the weather has disrupted fireworks plans, Anchorage will still proceed with a Fourth of July pancake breakfast, a community parade and a festival with food vendors. A local Reddit thread was advising overheated residents to put jugs of ice in front of their fans, though a second thread warned those who didn’t already have a fan: “They are sold out everywhere. EVERYWHERE!”
Title: ☀️ Temperatures hit new highs in European heatwave
Post by: RE on July 05, 2019, 03:37:53 AM
They're cooking across the pond also.

RE

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/jul/03/temperatures-hit-new-highs-in-european-heatwave (https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/jul/03/temperatures-hit-new-highs-in-european-heatwave)

Temperatures hit new highs in European heatwave

Records are usually broken by tenths of a degree, but last week’s heatwave was startling

Richard Johnson (MetDesk)

Wed 3 Jul 2019 16.30 EDT
Last modified on Thu 4 Jul 2019 07.06 EDT

(https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a1065ba0a6f0303ed8ba81c6361d7c782dca6f1f/0_0_3185_1911/master/3185.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=0d6d6a31e9e44de34f5cdb0d6abd9667)
People cool off in the Trocadéro fountains near the Eiffel Tower during a heatwave in France on 29 June 2019. Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Much of Europe endured a searing heatwave last week, as an unprecedented plume of hot air pushed northwards from Africa. Last Friday, France recorded its highest temperature of 45.9C at Gallargues-le-Montueux, in the south-east. All-time temperature records are commonly broken by tenths of a degree, but this exceeded the previous record, set during the heatwave of August 2003, by an extraordinary 1.8C. A number of countries in central Europe also broke their June temperature records on 26 June, with 38.9C recorded in Bad Kreuznach, in western Germany, 38.2C in Radzyn, western Poland, and 38.9C in Doksany in the Czech Republic.

Tropical Storm Alvin has become the eastern Pacific’s first tropical cyclone of 2019. Forming last Wednesday, it was unusually late for the season’s first named storm, in waters that often see greater activity during El Niño periods such as now. Alvin formed about 400 miles south-west of Manzanillo, Mexico and stayed away from land as it tracked westwards.

In India, the annual monsoon is finally making progress into northern parts of the country. The monsoon had a slow start, with total rainfall in June 35% below average. The monsoon reached the capital, New Delhi, this week.
As the crisis escalates…

… in our natural world, we refuse to turn away from the climate catastrophe and species extinction. For The Guardian, reporting on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature and pollution the prominence it deserves, stories which often go unreported by others in the media. At this pivotal time for our species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on scientific facts, not political prejudice or business interests.

More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.

The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.

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We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable.
Title: ☀️ HEATWAVE: Europe is BURNING at 114 degrees in these terrifying NASA satellite
Post by: RE on July 06, 2019, 12:14:19 AM
https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/1149332/Heatwave-Europe-weather-temperature-records-satellite-images-NASA-news (https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/1149332/Heatwave-Europe-weather-temperature-records-satellite-images-NASA-news)

HEATWAVE: Europe is BURNING at 114 degrees in these terrifying NASA satellite scans
HEATWAVES and scorching weather across Europe have broken all temperature records, as seen in these terrifying NASA weather scans.
By Sebastian Kettley
PUBLISHED: 15:17, Fri, Jul 5, 2019 | UPDATED: 17:14, Fri, Jul 5, 2019
 
(https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/151/590x/Heatwave-Europe-weather-temperature-records-satellite-images-NASA-news-1149332.webp?r=1562343265796)

Heatwave temperatures across Europe have peaked above 104 Fahrenheit (40 Celsius), prompting widespread safety concerns. In France, temperatures hit a new high on Friday, June 28, peaking at a sweltering 114.6F (45.9C) in the village of Gallargues-le-Montueux. The temperatures broke the previous record of 111F (44.1C) during a 2003 heatwave that killed thousands. In the aftermath of these heatwaves, US space agency NASA has announced June 2019 has officially become the hottest month on record in Europe.
Related articles

    UK weather forecast: Britain’s heatwave to RETURN as temperatures rise
    UK weather forecast: Heatwave set to end this weekend as temperatures

NASA said: “Europe’s massive heatwave is on its way out and it’s leaving a slew of broken temperature records in its wake.

“Many countries were gripped by temperatures above 104 Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius) between June 26 and June 30.

“According to the World Meteorological Organization, June 2019 is now the hottest month on record for the continent as a whole.”

Satellite images snapped by NASA’s Ecosystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) reveal the true scale of the scorching weather.
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READ MORE: Scorching weather forecast as we 'DESPERATELY' need to act on air pollution

Heatwave weather: NASA satellites pictures
HEATWAVE: Scorching temperatures across Europe have broken all records (Image: NASA/GETTY)

Heatwave weather: NASA satellite images
Heatwave: The satellite images reveal heatwaves in Paris, Milan, Rome and Madrid (Image: NASA/JPL-CALTECH)

The NASA instrument measures our planet’s surface temperatures at different times of the day from the International Space Station.

In this case, NASA’s COSTLESS photographed Paris in France, Madrid in Spain and the Italian city of Rome and Milan.

All four populated areas are marked in a crimson red colour – temperatures peaking well above 68F (20C).

The higher temperatures can be attributed to the presence of more heat absorbent materials such as concrete and asphalt.

READ MORE: Sweltering weather and soaring temperatures to ‘SMASH ALL RECORDS'
Related articles

    UK weather forecast: ‘Outbreaks of rain’ hit before heatwave
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Cooler temperatures are marked in blue and green colours and can be seen well outside of the big cities.

NASA said: “Although its primary objective is to monitor the health of plants, ECOSTRESS can also detect heat events such as the one much of Europe just experienced.

    Many countries were gripped by temperatures above 104 Fahrenheit

    NASA

“ECOSTRESS mapped the surface, or ground temperature, of four European cities – Rome, Paris, Madrid and Milan – during the mornings of June 27 and June 28.

"In the images, hotter temperatures appear in red and cooler temperatures appear in blue.

“They show how the central core of each city is much hotter than the surrounding natural landscape due to the urban heat island effect – a result of urban surfaces storing and re-radiating heat throughout the day.”

READ MORE: Soaring temperatures and EXTREMELY HOT weather to rise in frequency

Heatwave weather: High temperatures in France
Heatwave: June 2019, is the hottest month on record across the whole of Europe (Image: GETTY)

Heatwave weather: Scorching temperatures in France
Heatwave: A 2003 heatwave in Europe killed thousands of people (Image: GETTY)

According to the space agency, the phenomenon can be explained by residual heat stored from the previous day in bodies of water, asphalt and concrete.

Without any way to dissipate before the next day, the trapped heat would compound the effects of the heatwave.

This effect, in turn, exacerbated the sweltering conditions in some places even further.

NASA said: “These measurements help scientists assess plant health and response to water shortages, which can be an indicator of future drought.

“They can also be used in observing heat trends, spotting wildfires and detecting volcanic activity.”
UK weather map shows heatwave set to sweep nation
 

What are the biggest risks of a heatwave?

Continuous exposure to high temperatures without adequate cooling and hydration can be lethal.

The NHS lists overbearing, heat exhaustion, dehydration and heatstroke as some of the deadliest health complications of a heatwave.

Those most at risk are the elderly above the age o 75, people with long-term help complications, as well as people with mobility disabilities and little children.

The NHS said: “If a heatwave hits this summer, make sure the hot weather does not harm you or anyone you know.”
Title: ☀️ A Brutal Heat Wave Is Descending on the U.S.—and Blackouts May Ensue
Post by: RE on July 18, 2019, 01:28:40 AM
Might I remind people here of Richard Duncan's Olduvai Hypothesis (http://dieoff.com/page125.htm), which he published over 20 years ago in 1996.

In 1989, I concluded that the life-expectancy of Industrial Civilization is horridly short. This hypothesis was defined in terms of a measurable index, world energy-use per person, and named the "transient-pulse theory of Industrial Civilization." I sketched its maximum point at 1990, followed by a persistent decline (see Note 1). Back then, however, I had no data to support this claim.

The ratio of world annual energy-use to world population gives a robust, testable profile of Industrial Civilization. Over the past six years, I devised a quantitative basis for the theory and gathered several sets of world energy and population data to test it (Note 2). In these pages, the name "Olduvai theory" means the same as "transient-pulse theory," used in previous papers (Note 3).

[ Note 1: 'Industrial Civilization' includes all capital investments and international trade agreements such as GATT, EU, and NAFTA. 'GATT' means General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade; etc.
   Note 2: 'World energy' includes oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear- and hydroelectricity. Energy and population data are available from several sources, e.g., United Nations publications.
   Note 3: Since the 1950s, the Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania has been strongly associated with human origins and the Stone Age way-of-life. In this discussion, 'Olduvai theory' is a metaphor. It suggests our impending return to a Stone Age way-of-life.]

Please have a quick look at Figures 1 and 2. But before getting into the details, in the next section I'd like tell a detective story.


(https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xf7h4ZzO9m4/VGTbt7wYxPI/AAAAAAAANiA/VFQZkL--Mkw/s1600/Duncan.jpg)

...and right on cue, here come the Blackouts.  NY Shity just had one, Venezuela is in an almost constant state of blackout, and Puerto Rico of course STILL hasn't got all their juice back on.

This one rivals Steve's call on the Oil Price Crash, which he nailed to the MONTH.  But that was only from 4 years out, not 20.  Amazing Nostradamus work by Richard Duncan.

RE

A Brutal Heat Wave Is Descending on the U.S.—and Blackouts May Ensue

By Taylor Mahlandt
July 17, 20192:27 PM

(https://compote.slate.com/images/48964afe-19ab-4dc5-9fa1-894abaa23994.jpeg?width=780&height=520&rect=5000x3333&offset=1x0)
Children play with toys and splash around in a fountain in the Columbia Heights neighborhood of D.C.
The Columbia Heights neighborhood of D.C. on June 26.
Anna-Rose Gassot/Getty Images

On Tuesday, two-thirds of the U.S. began burning up, according to forecasters. The scorching temperatures will be with the Midwest and the East Coast until the beginning of next week. And just when people need air conditioning the most, some cities may soon see electricity outages.

Heat watches have been issued, and by Tuesday night, the National Weather Service had 34 million people under heat advisories. For the Eastern region, the former is issued when the heat index value could potentially reach at least 110 degrees, while the latter signals that the heat index value is expected to be between 105 and 109 degrees. The thresholds are slightly lower west of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Temperatures are predicted to continue rising throughout the week, with the Midwest experiencing its hottest temperatures on Friday, and the East seeing the worst of it on Saturday or Sunday. According to the Washington Post, the coupling of high dew points—meaning stifling humidity—and soaring temperatures may result in elevated nighttime temperatures and could make this heat wave particularly dangerous to public health. In Philadelphia, Tuesday was declared a code orange ozone action day, signifying that ozone levels in the environment were dangerous for sensitive groups. Ozone levels can meet the criteria for code orange at any time of the year, but they’re often highest during heat waves, when high pressure and high temperatures result in elevated concentrations of ozone particles. The warning was downgraded by Wednesday but will likely rise back to “code orange” concentrations again by the weekend, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s AirNow monitoring system.

In response, cities have started providing the usual recommendations to residents—drink plenty of water, stay out of the sun, try to spend as much time in the A/C as possible. To make it easier for residents to cool down, Philadelphia and New York are making all public pools free until further notice. New York is also offering spray showers in the park when temperatures reach 80 degrees or higher. In the Midwest, cities like Chicago and Detroit are also buckling down and will likely record their highest temperatures of the summer. The Windy City will offer residents six “cooling centers” located inside community service centers where they can beat the heat.

Mike Clendenin, the spokesman for Consolidated Edison, the company that operates New York’s power grid, told Pix11 news regarding the upcoming heat wave, “We do expect there to be power outages … with any heat wave, you’re going to have power outages. They happen. But our crews are ready to respond to anything.” The company’s statements follow the five-hour outage in Manhattan on Saturday, which was caused by equipment failure and was unrelated to the heat wave.
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Systems around the country are bracing for impact, but if you think it seems logical that power outages will provide a brief reprieve for the environment, think again. Carl Pope, senior climate adviser to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, told USA Today that there are “all kinds of inefficiencies and waste” that only multiply during a blackout. For instance, we fall back on diesel generators when electrical grids go out, which magnifies the carbon footprint. Besides that, manufacturing processes that were halted during an outage have to be restarted after the power comes back on, resulting in a lot of wasted product.

The heat wave should end by Sunday, but until then, in some cities, utility companies have backup crews working extra hours to try to keep the lights on.

While a heat wave in the middle of July is not unexpected, events like this could become much more common within the next few years, thanks to climate change. This heat wave comes just a few weeks after a hellish rash of high temperatures in Europe, where air conditioning is much less common.
Title: ☀️ Dangerous heat wave scorches millions in Midwest, East Coast
Post by: RE on July 21, 2019, 04:48:32 AM
https://abcnews.go.com/US/dangerous-heat-wave-scorches-millions-midwest-east-coast/story?id=64456339

Dangerous heat wave scorches millions in Midwest, East Coast

    By  samantha wnek, mark osborne andella torres

Jul 20, 2019, 11:51 AM ET

(https://s.abcnews.com/images/US/sat-heat-index-abc-mo-20190720_hpEmbed_13x8_992.jpg)

Several heat index readings came close to setting records across the eastern half of the U.S. on Friday, with the hottest temperatures still yet to come on the East Coast.
(MORE: Heat wave is coming: How to stay safe and prepare an emergency supply kit )
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Des Moines, Iowa, saw a heat index reading -- the "feels like" temperature due to the high humidity -- of 119 degrees, just 3 degrees away from a record. The heat index was 115 degrees in Minneapolis with a dew point of 80, the highest recorded in eight years. The temperature was 93 in Chicago, with a heat index of 107, while it reached a temperature of 95 degrees in Washington, D.C.
(MORE: These 5 statistics show why we're experiencing historically hot weather)

Many cities across the across the Midwest and Northeast started Saturday with heat indices in the 90s, and the day will be another scorcher with heat indices up to 115 degrees by afternoon. Excessive heat warnings have been issued from Kansas to Ohio and North Carolina to New Hampshire.
(MORE: Video: Massive heat wave forecast to hit NYC)

In Arkansas, Mitch Petrus, a former New York Giants offensive lineman, died Thursday of a heat stroke after working outside near Carlisle, according to the Associated Press. The heat index that day was higher than 100 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.
PHOTO: Heat index readings will be over 100 across most of the eastern half of the country on Saturday. ABC News
Heat index readings will be over 100 across most of the eastern half of the country on Saturday.

Some of the temperatures on Saturday will be the hottest in several years.
(MORE: Midwest bracing for possible tornadoes as heatwave strikes US)

New York City and Philadelphia could see their hottest temperatures since 2012, while Washington, D.C., could hit 100 for the first time since 2016.
PHOTO: The heat index will already be 90 degrees in the Northeast on Sunday morning, with more heat to come. ABC News
The heat index will already be 90 degrees in the Northeast on Sunday morning, with more heat to come.

Overnight lows again will struggle to dip below 80, and it will already feel like 90 degrees when people wake up Sunday morning in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Boston.
PHOTO: A cool down is finally in the forecast for the work week ahead. ABC News
A cool down is finally in the forecast for the work week ahead.

Sunday will be the final day of oppressive heat in the East before cooler temperatures arrive.
(MORE: What is the heat index and why is it important?)

Temperatures will be much cooler than this weekend for the start of the work week, and will even be below average for late July with highs in the 70s across much of the Midwest and East Coast.
Severe storms

The dip in the jet stream and associated cold front bringing the cooler temperatures to the Midwest and Northeast will also bring severe weather.
PHOTO: Severe storms are again possible in the Upper Midwest on Saturday. ABC News
Severe storms are again possible in the Upper Midwest on Saturday.

There were more than 140 reports of severe weather Friday and overnight into Saturday from South Dakota to New York. Baseball-size hail damaged wind shields in Minnesota, while 84 mph wind gusts knocked out power in Wisconsin.

Heavy downpours, thunderstorms and 70 mph winds left thousands of people without power across Michigan. As of Saturday morning, 76,000 customers of Detroit-based DTE Energy were without power. At one point, 108,000 residents had been affected by an outage. Most people affected were located in the western suburbs of Detroit.

There is another chance for severe weather Saturday from Iowa to Michigan and another pocket in Colorado. The main threats will be for damaging winds, large hail and an isolated tornado.
Title: Satellite Images Show Vast Swaths of the Arctic On Fire
Post by: Surly1 on July 21, 2019, 06:17:28 AM
Satellite Images Show Vast Swaths of the Arctic On Fire
https://earther.gizmodo.com/satellite-images-show-vast-swaths-of-the-arctic-on-fire-1836500468

(https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/s--7k7Qudxq--/c_scale,f_auto,fl_progressive,q_80,w_1600/ec1wjvaunewb5omeu0hn.jpg)


Brian Kahn
Thursday 4:00pmFiled to: THEY CALL IT GLOBAL WARMING FOR A REASON

Vast stretches of Earth’s northern latitudes are on fire right now. Hot weather has engulfed a huge portion of the Arctic, from Alaska to Greenland to Siberia. That’s helped create conditions ripe for wildfires, including some truly massive ones burning in remote parts of the region that are being seen by satellites.

Pierre Markuse, a satellite imagery processing guru, has documented some of the blazes attacking the forests and peatlands of the Arctic. The imagery reveals the delicate landscapes with braided rivers, towering mountains, and vast swaths of forest, all under a thick blanket of smoke.

In Alaska, those images show some of the damage wrought by wildfires that have burned more than 1.6 million acres of land this year. Huge fires have sent smoke streaming cities earlier this month, riding on the back of Anchorage’s first 90 degree day ever recorded. The image below show some of the more remote fires in Alaska as well as the Swan Lake Fire, which was responsible for the smoke swallowing Anchorage in late June and earlier this month.

(https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/s--83wHRNhZ--/c_scale,f_auto,fl_progressive,q_80,w_1600/xbcjm28ofghgmbjg56x3.jpg)
The Swan Lake Fire just south of Anchorage.
Image: Pierre Markuse


Intense hot conditions have also fanned flames in Siberia. The remote nature of many of the fires there means they’re burning out of control, often, through swaths of peatland that’s normally frozen or soggy. But as Thomas Smith, a fire expert at London School of Economics, noted on Twitter, there are ample signs the peat dried out due to the heat and is ablaze. That’s worrisome since peat is rich in carbon, and fires can release it into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Peat fires can also burn underground into the winter and reignite in spring.

Then there’s the weird fire that sparked up in Greenland last week. A landscape known more for its ice, this is the second time in the past three years a wildfire has ignited in western Greenland. There are very few historical precedents for these types of blazes, and though they’re not on the scale of what’s happening in Siberia and Alaska, they’re yet another symptom of an Arctic transitioning into a more volatile state as the planet warms.

All told, northern fires released as much carbon dioxide in June as the entire country of Sweden does in a year, according to data crunched by the European Union’s Copernicus program. The agency said the wildfire activity is “unprecedented” amidst what was, incidentally, the hottest June ever recorded for the planet with the Arctic particularly sweltering. All that carbon dioxide released by fires represents one of the scarier feedback loops of climate change as hot weather ensures more fires, which releases carbon dioxide and makes climate change worse. The boreal forest that rings the northern portion of the world is witnessing a period of wildfire activity unseen in at least 10,000 years, and this summer is another worrying datapoint.

More disturbing images at article link: https://earther.gizmodo.com/satellite-images-show-vast-swaths-of-the-arctic-on-fire-1836500468


Title: ☀️ It’s so hot in Nebraska, you can bake biscuits in your car
Post by: RE on July 22, 2019, 12:21:29 AM
https://nypost.com/2019/07/21/its-so-hot-in-nebraska-you-can-bake-biscuits-in-your-car/

It’s so hot in Nebraska, you can bake biscuits in your car

By Tamar Lapin
July 21, 2019 | 4:56pm

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D_xLRQvXUAAo3H0?format=jpg&name=small)

More On:
heat wave
De Blasio's 78-degree dictat was an empty stunt
Con Ed taking 30K people off power for repairs, says de Blasio
10,000 New Yorkers lose power at height of Sunday heat
It's 113 degrees in Times Square!

This is for when your car’s like an oven.

The National Weather Service in Omaha, Neb., baked biscuits in a car Friday amid a major heat wave in the Northeast and Midwest.

“If you are wondering if it’s going to be hot today, we are attempting to bake biscuits using only the sun and a car in our parking lot,” NWS Omaha tweeted, along with an image of four raw biscuits on a metal tray inside a car.

Within 45 minutes, the dough had begun to rise, the NWS said.

After an hour, the pan had reached 175 degrees, and the tops of the biscuits were at 153 degrees.

“This is a good time to remind everyone that your car does in fact get deadly hot. Look before you lock!,” the NWS said.

Four hours later, the tops of the biscuits were golden, but the bottoms remained doughy.

The NWS team turned the car slightly to adjust it to changing angle of the sun — and the backseat temperature eventually reached 144.5 degrees.

After baking in the sun for nearly eight hours, the biscuits were edible, but the middle remained “pretty doughy.”
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: azozeo on July 23, 2019, 11:06:55 AM
I've lived in the Mohave since 1991 ....

Never have I experienced a NICER summer than this one.
I'm not posting this to be "cute" I feel for the folks that have lost their A/C & have to deal with the elements. 113 is no cake walk to be sure. Ben' there, wrecked that.

My point is this. Typically it's 110+ in late July, here. Worse down on the river....

It's under 90 currently on the back patio, with a breeze & thunder clouds all around. Hopefully, some rain will prevail later in the day.

That's not a bad day weather wise for the desert rats.

The arctic's on fire, folks are cookin' biscuits on their car dash in Nebraska & we're having chamber of commerce nice here in the desert. Wonky weather for sure :icon_scratch:
Title: ☀️ Europe heatwave: French city of Bordeaux hits record temperature
Post by: RE on July 24, 2019, 08:58:07 AM
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49083283 (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49083283)

Europe heatwave: French city of Bordeaux hits record temperature

    4 hours ago

Related Topics

    Europe heatwaves

(https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/8777/production/_107997643_hi055471994.jpg)
Record-high temperatures are expected across France - including the capital, Paris - Credit AFP

The French city of Bordeaux has hit its highest temperature since records began, as Western Europe braces for the second heatwave to hit this summer.

On Tuesday, Meteo France registered 41.2C (106.1F) in the south-western city, breaking a 2003 record of 40.7C.

Forecasters predict a record-breaking run across Europe this week, including Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands.

A World Meteorological Organization (WMO) spokeswoman said the heatwaves bore "the hallmark of climate change".

    Are you ready for the 35C heatwave?
    A guide to coping with hot weather
    Last four years are 'world's hottest'
    In pictures: Europe tries to stay cool in the heat

"As we saw in June they are becoming more frequent, they're starting earlier and they're becoming more intense," Claire Nullis added. "It's not a problem that's going to go away."
How hot could it get?

Much of France has been issued with an orange alert - the second highest level of warning.

Meteo France said Paris temperatures might hit new highs on Thursday. The record, set in 1947, stands at 40.4C.

Comparisons have been drawn to a heatwave France experienced in August 2003, during which heat contributed to almost 15,000 deaths.

The mercury is also expected to climb to 40C in a string of countries:

    In an unprecedented move, Belgium has issued a code red weather warning for the whole country

    Spain declared a red alert in its Zaragoza region, which was hit by devastating wildfires last month. The European Commission's Copernicus Climate Change Service says the risk of wildfires is high in Spain and in Portugal

    In the Netherlands, the government activated its "national heat plan"
    In the UK, temperatures are predicted to exceed 35C, and could be the highest ever recorded

What preparations are being made?

To limit the heating of water used to keep its nuclear reactors cool, French energy firm EDF said it would be shutting two reactors at the Golftech nuclear power plant in the southern Tarn-et-Garonne region.

Ice foot baths and extra water points are being made available to cyclists competing in the Tour de France - which is entering its final week - to avoid dehydration.

The French government is outlawing animal transportation "for economic reasons" between 13:00 (11:00 GMT) and 18:00 in areas affected by heat alerts.
How high have temperatures been already?

The French weather service has reported temperatures of 42C in areas of the south-west. It is expected the heat will not dip below 20C for the rest of the week.
Media captionBBC colleagues from hot countries give their tips for staying cool

An intense heatwave swept through areas of Europe last month, making it the hottest June on record.

France set an all-time high-temperature record of 46C, according to the WMO, and new June highs were set in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Austria, Andorra, Luxembourg, Poland, and Germany.
What about droughts?

The continent has also been hit by severe droughts, particularly in France, with no rainfall in many areas since last month's heatwave.

A number of places in France have set new records for the lowest amount of rainfall ever recorded, Ms Nullis of the WMO said.

This has caused problems with nuclear energy facilities and agriculture - such as grape harvests for wine in the region and crops. Farmers in mountainous areas have been allowing cattle to graze on what are ski slopes in winter due to the effect of the drought on lower ground.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Cows graze on a ski slope on the ridge of the Vosges mountains as droughts hit lower ground

The government has imposed restrictions on water use in 73 regions and Paris has seen its driest period for almost 150 years.

France will send a request to the European Commission to bring forward a payment of €1bn ($1.12bn; £892m) to assist farmers hit by the recent weather.
Is climate change to blame?

Linking a single event to global warming is complicated. While extreme weather events like heatwaves occur naturally, experts say these will happen more often because of climate change.

Records going back to the late 19th Century show that the average temperature of the Earth's surface has increased by about one degree since industrialisation.

A climatology institute in Potsdam, Germany, says Europe's five hottest summers since 1500 have all been in the 21st Century.

Scientists are concerned that rapid warming linked to use of fossil fuels has serious implications for the stability of the planet's climate.
Title: ☀️ Europe heat wave: Temperatures hit 109 degrees in Paris "urban heat island"
Post by: RE on July 26, 2019, 03:17:13 AM
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/europe-heat-wave-sets-record-breaking-temperatures-in-france-belgium-netherlands-britain-and-germany-2019-07-25/ (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/europe-heat-wave-sets-record-breaking-temperatures-in-france-belgium-netherlands-britain-and-germany-2019-07-25/)

By Ian Lee CBS News July 25, 2019, 6:39 PM
Europe heat wave: Temperatures hit 109 degrees in Paris "urban heat island"

(https://www.commondreams.org/sites/default/files/styles/cd_large/public/headlines/europe.jpg?itok=1lgfKGcw)

Paris — Europe is in the middle of a life-threatening heat wave. Records fell like dominoes on Thursday in cities in France, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Britain. It hit 100 degrees in London, 109 in Paris —  the highest temperature ever recorded there. But the French capital is not built for it.

Iconic landmarks became water parks, anything to beat the heat. But this latest hot spell isn't all frolicking in the fountains.

The high heat has officials concerned about the stability of Notre Dame Cathedral, which almost burnt down in April. They worry the stones could become unstable leading to a collapse. 

Thursday's record-breaking heat wave in Paris hit 109 degrees, delaying trains, leaving passengers stranded and even affecting the power grid. A nuclear plant in southern France shut down two reactors due to the heat.
FRANCE-WEATHER-CLIMATE-HEAT
People cool off and sunbathe at the Trocadero Fountains in Paris, on July 25, 2019 as a new heatwave hits the French capital. Getty

Paris prepared with temporary solutions, free water and mist machines to cool commuters' heels. This could turn into a permanent problem as heat waves become more frequent and severe, big cities like Paris struggle to cope.

Scientists call it the "urban heat island." Buildings and roads absorb the heat during the day, then release it at night like a radiator, becoming a new challenge for old Europe.

A meteorologist in Paris said because of climate change, the extreme heat could become the norm.
Title: ☀️ Europe's heatwave could now cause catastrophic melting of Greenland's ice she
Post by: RE on July 27, 2019, 12:09:47 AM
https://theweek.com/speedreads/855186/europes-heatwave-could-now-cause-catastrophic-melting-greenlands-ice-sheet

    Europe's heatwave could now cause catastrophic melting of Greenland's ice sheet
    July 26, 2019

(https://images.theweek.com/sites/default/files/styles/tw_image_6_4/public/gettyimages-79734143.jpg.webp?itok=GIYmFWgP&resize=180x180)
Torsten Blackwood - Pool/Getty Images


It's not just Europe that's sweltering in record-breaking heat.

The same heat wave that swept across Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom this week, breaking high-temperature records reaching up to 114 degrees, is wafting over to Greenland and could cause catastrophic melting, the United Nations said Friday.

Reuters reports that the heat could cause record melting of one of the world's largest ice sheets, contributing to rising sea levels around the globe. The Greenland ice sheet has been struggling in recent scorching weeks, according to Denmark data tracking the gains and losses of the ice mass.

"In July alone, it lost 160 billion tonnes of ice through surface melting," said U.N. World Meteorological Organization spokeswoman Clare Nullis. "That's roughly the equivalent of 64 million Olympic-sized swimming pools. Just in July. Just surface melt — it's not including ocean melt as well."

If the Greenland ice sheet melts entirely, it would raise global sea levels by 7 meters, or approximately 23 feet, Denmark's data shows. Nullis says rising temperatures, which are linked to manmade climate change, are expected to soar past records regularly by 2050 with biennial heatwaves. "What we saw with this one was that temperature records weren't just broken," said Nullis, "they were smashed." Summer Meza
like a shooting star
Title: Think It’s Hot in Europe? The Human Body Is Already Close to Thermal Limits
Post by: Surly1 on July 27, 2019, 07:02:39 AM
Heatwave: Think It’s Hot in Europe? The Human Body Is Already Close to Thermal Limits Elsewhere (https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/07/27/heatwave-think-its-hot-europe-human-body-already-close-thermal-limits-elsewhere/)

July 27, 2019
© Photo: Pixabay

Tom MATTHEWS

I am a scientist who researches climate hazards. This week I have published research on the potential for a catastrophic cyclone-heatwave combo in the global south. Yet over the past few days I have been approached by various media outlets to talk not about that hazard, but about the unfolding UK heatwave and climate change. It is always satisfying to respond to public interest around weather extremes, but there is a danger that key messages about extreme heat globally are not receiving enough airtime.

It is by now very well established that hot extremes are more likely in the changed climate we are living in. Yet there is a seemingly unquenchable thirst for this story to be retold every time the UK sweats. Narratives around such acute, local events detract from critical messages about the global challenges from extreme heat.

Make no mistake, maximum temperatures of 35°C or more are hot by UK standards, but such conditions are familiar to around 80% of the world’s population. The headline-grabbing 46°C recently experienced by Britain’s neighbours in France is indeed unusual, but still falls short of the 50°C recorded in India earlier this summer, and is somewhat temperate relative to the 54°C confirmed for both Pakistan (in 2017) and Kuwait (in 2016). People in these hotter climates are better at coping with high temperatures, yet such heat still kills.

Deadly heatwaves are, of course, no stranger to Europeans. The infamous 2003 event claimed as many as 70,000 lives, and 2010 saw more than 50,000 fatalities in western Russia. Fortunately, lessons were learned and authorities are now much better prepared when heat-health alerts are issued.

Kolkata, India: Temperatures soar past 40˚C during a June 2019 heatwave. Piyal Adhikary / EPA

But spare a thought for less fortunate communities who are routinely experiencing extraordinary temperatures. In places like South Asia and the Persian Gulf, the human body, despite all its remarkable thermal efficiencies, is often operating close to its limits.

And yes, there is a limit.

When the air temperature exceeds 35°C, the body relies on the evaporation of water – mainly through sweating – to keep core temperature at a safe level. This system works until the “wetbulb” temperature reaches 35°C. The wetbulb temperature includes the cooling effect of water evaporating from the thermometer, and so is normally much lower than the normal (“drybulb”) temperature reported in weather forecasts.

Once this wetbulb temperature threshold is crossed, the air is so full of water vapour that sweat no longer evaporates. Without the means to dissipate heat, our core temperature rises, irrespective of how much water we drink, how much shade we seek, or how much rest we take. Without respite, death follows – soonest for the very young, elderly or those with pre-existing medical conditions.

Wetbulb temperatures of 35°C have not yet been widely reported, but there is some evidence that they are starting to occur in Southwest Asia. Climate change then offers the prospect that some of the most densely populated regions on Earth could pass this threshold by the end of the century, with the Persian GulfSouth Asia, and most recently the North China Plain on the front line. These regions are, together, home to billions of people.

Beijing, on the northern edge of the North China Plain, set a new temperature record in 2018. maoyunping / shutterstock

As the climate warms in places like the UK, people can take sensible precautions against heat – slowing down, drinking more water, and seeking cool refuges. Air conditioning is one of the last lines of defence but comes with its own problems such as very high energy demands. By 2050, cooling systems are expected to increase electricity demand by an amount equivalent to the present capacity of the US, EU, and Japan combined.

Provided that electricity supplies can be maintained, living in chronically heat-stressed climates of the future may be viable. But with such dependence on this life-support system, a sustained power outage could be catastrophic.

Deadly combination

So what would happen if we combined massive blackouts with extreme heat? Two colleagues and I recently investigated the possibility of such a “grey swan” event – foreseeable but not yet fully experienced – in a global study of storms and heat, published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

We looked at tropical cyclones, which have already caused the biggest blackouts on Earth, with the months-long power failure in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria among the most serious. We found that as the climate warms it becomes ever more likely that these powerful cyclones would be followed by dangerous heat, and that such compound hazards would be expected every year if global warming reaches 4°C. During the emergency response to a tropical cyclone, keeping people cool would have to be as much a priority as providing clean drinking water.

The UK is moving into new territory when it comes to managing extreme heat. But the places that are already heat stressed will see the largest absolute increases in humid-heat with the smallest safety margin before reaching physical limits, and they are often least-equipped to adapt to the hazard. It is therefore hardly surprising that extreme heat drives migration. Such mass displacement makes extreme heat a worldwide issue. Little Britain will feel the consequence of conditions far away from its temperate shores.

The challenges ahead are stark. Adaptation has its limits. We must therefore maintain our global perspective on heat and pursue a global response, slashing greenhouse gas emissions to keep to the Paris warming limits. In this way, we have the greatest chance of averting deadly heat – home and abroad.

theconversation.com

Title: Dutch supermarkets emptied out due to extreme heat
Post by: Surly1 on July 27, 2019, 07:08:26 AM
Dutch supermarkets emptied out due to extreme heat [the cooling system unable to keep products cool]

(https://i.imgur.com/qCFR8tu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/j7DPfqN.jpg)
Title: ☀️ The Arctic’s on fire and now it’s going to be hit by a heat wave
Post by: RE on July 27, 2019, 01:07:27 PM
https://thinkprogress.org/arctic-fire-heat-wave-europe-climate-change-melting-bad-89735ea2c172/

The Arctic’s on fire and now it’s going to be hit by a heat wave
Things aren't looking good.

E.A. Crunden
Jul 27, 2019, 10:20 am   

(https://i0.wp.com/thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/GettyImages-1152291110.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1)
Smoke over a site of forest fire in Rybnovsky District, Ryazan Region, central European Russia. CREDIT: Alexander RyuminTASS via Getty Images

Europe’s historic heat wave is heading north this weekend, to the relief of the continent, but its path will send it right towards the Arctic — where it could speed up the melting of sea ice and coincide with devastating wildfires.

Unprecedented wildfires are currently raging across the Arctic Circle, with some the size of 100,000 football fields — so big they can be seen from space. Arctic sea ice is moreover already running at a record low this year; scientists worry a heat wave will only further exacerbate the area’s problems.

One week after the United States saw record-shattering high temperatures, the same fate befell Europe. On Thursday, Paris saw temperatures of 108.7 degrees Fahrenheit (42.6 degrees Celsius), a record high, with Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands also facing their own record days. The sweltering weather is the result of a heat dome that has allowed hot air to come north from the Sahara Desert, all while blocking cooler air from reaching people.

July is typically a warm month in much of the northern hemisphere, but climate scientists have connected the uptick in dangerously hot temperatures to global warming, with future years set to be much worse.

Scorching temperatures can be deadly for children, the elderly, and people with disabilities, in addition to anyone without access to cooling systems. In Europe, where air-conditioning is less common than the United States, many residents faced grueling heat without an easy mechanism for cooling off. London, for example, does not have air conditioning in its crowded subway system.
Smeerenburgbreen, glacier near Reuschhalvoya in Albert I Land debouches into Bjornfjorden, inner part of Smeerenburgfjorden, Svalbard, Norway. CREDIT: Arterra/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
New research shows that Paris Agreement goals might not save the Arctic

And this recent heat wave is set to do more damage. Norway, Finland, and Sweden are all bracing for their own stint of bad weather this weekend. As the hot air moves north, it could also impact Greenland’s melting ice sheet, which covers roughly 80% of its surface. The country’s rapidly melting ice could eventually mean catastrophic sea-level rise, impacting almost every major coastal city in the world.

There have been more than 100 wildfires burning across the Arctic since June, often ignited by sources like lightning. Russia, Alaska, and Greenland have all been impacted by the blazes, and while wildfires are common this time of year, the current intensity and sheer number have experts concerned. Some of the fires also appear to be burning in peat soils — as opposed to forests — which burn for longer and can release significant amounts of carbon, speeding up global warming in the process.

In a memo released earlier in July, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said that the wildfires have released at least 50 megatonnes of carbon dioxide — more than the total annual emissions produced by Sweden.
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“The northern part of the world is warming faster than the planet as a whole,” the weather monitoring body warned. “That heat is drying out forests and making them more susceptible to burn.”

Sea ice melt in the Arctic is also a concern. The white ice-covered surface is critical to reflecting sun away from the Earth and keeping temperatures cooler. Without it, dark oceans will warm far more rapidly.

A recent study found that even adhering to the goals of the Paris Agreement might not be enough to save the Arctic’s critical summer sea ice. The agreement aims to keep global temperatures below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) of warming over preindustrial temperatures, with an aspirational goal of limiting the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit).

Scientists are currently monitoring summer sea ice melt in the Arctic to see if it reaches a record low in September, which would mark a grim new record.
Title: ☀️ Think the heatwave was bad? Climate already hitting key tipping points
Post by: RE on July 29, 2019, 12:05:49 AM
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-climate-change-heatwaves/think-the-heatwave-was-bad-climate-already-hitting-key-tipping-points-idUSKCN1UN065 (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-climate-change-heatwaves/think-the-heatwave-was-bad-climate-already-hitting-key-tipping-points-idUSKCN1UN065)

July 27, 2019 / 11:05 PM / Updated 10 hours ago
Think the heatwave was bad? Climate already hitting key tipping points
Matthew Green

LONDON (Reuters) - “Shall we all just kill ourselves?”

(https://d3i6fh83elv35t.cloudfront.net/static/2019/06/RTS2JLUS-1024x683.jpg)
FILE PHOTO: People cool off in the Trocadero fountains across from the Eiffel Tower in Paris as a new heatwave broke temperature records in France, July 25, 2019. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol/File Photo

It was an odd title for a comedy night, but British stand-up Carl Donnelly turned out to have chosen an environmental theme with impeccable timing.

With temperature records tumbling daily in last week’s European heatwave, a crowd in an east London bar seemed uniquely primed to appreciate his darkly humorous riffs on the existential threat posed by climate change.

That foretaste of a radically hotter world underscored what is at stake in a decisive phase of talks to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement, a collective shot at avoiding climate breakdown.

With study-after-study showing climate impacts from extreme weather to polar melt and sea level rise outstripping initial forecasts, negotiators have a fast-closing window to try to turn the aspirations agreed in Paris into meaningful outcomes.

“There’s so much on the line in the next 18 months or so,” said Sue Reid, vice-president of climate and energy at Ceres, a U.S. non-profit group that works to steer companies and investors onto a more sustainable path.

“This is a crucial period of time both for public officials and the private sector to really reverse the curve on emissions,” Reid told Reuters.

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In October, the U.N.-backed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned emissions must start falling next year at the latest to stand a chance of achieving the deal’s goal of holding the global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

With emissions currently on track to push temperatures more than three degrees higher, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is working to wrest bigger commitments from governments ahead of a summit in New York in September.

Telling world leaders that failing to cut emissions would be “suicidal,” the Portuguese diplomat wants to build momentum ahead of a fresh round of climate talks in Chile in December.

By the time Britain convenes a major follow-up summit in late 2020, plans are supposed to be underway - in theory at least - to almost halve global emissions over the next decade.

“In the next year-and-a-half we will witness an intensity of climate diplomacy not seen since the Paris Agreement was signed,” said Tessa Khan, an international climate change lawyer and co-director of the Climate Litigation Network.
“REVOLUTION OR COLLAPSE”

As the diplomatic offensive intensifies, the latest scientific studies have offered negotiators scant comfort.

U.S climatologist Michael Mann believes emissions need to fall even more drastically than the IPCC assumes since the panel may be underestimating how far temperatures have already risen since pre-industrial times.

“Our work on this indicates that we might have as much as 40% less carbon left to burn than IPCC implies, if we are to avert the 1.5 Celsius warming limit,” said Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University.

Mann has urged governments to treat the transition to renewable energy with the equivalent urgency that drove the U.S. industrial mobilization in World War Two.

So far, no major economy has taken heed.

Although Britain boosted the Paris Agreement in June by committing to net zero carbon emissions by 2050, the country, preoccupied by Brexit, is far from on a climate war footing.

Likewise, a push led by France and Germany for the European Union to adopt a similar target was relegated to a footnote at a summit in Brussels after opposition from Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary.

U.S. President Donald Trump remains committed to pulling the world’s second biggest emitter out of the Paris deal altogether.

Given the uncertain prospects for international cooperation to stabilize the climate on which life on earth depends, some are starting to steel themselves for the unraveling of the world they once knew.
FILE PHOTO: People are silhouetted against the setting sun at "El Mirador de la Alemana" (The viewpoint of the German), as the summer's second heatwave hits Spain, in Malaga, southern Spain July 24, 2019. REUTERS/Jon Nazca/File Photo

“Either we radically transform human collective life by abandoning the use of fossil fuels or, more likely, climate change will bring about the end of global fossil-fuelled capitalist civilization,” wrote U.S. author Roy Scranton, in an April essay in MIT Technology Review.

“Revolution or collapse — in either case, the good life as we know it is no longer viable.”

Reporting by Matthew Green; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne
Title: ☀️ Greenland is melting in a heatwave. That's everyone's problem
Post by: RE on July 31, 2019, 12:03:44 PM
https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/31/europe/greenland-heatwave-climate-crisis-intl/index.html (https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/31/europe/greenland-heatwave-climate-crisis-intl/index.html)

Greenland is melting in a heatwave. That's everyone's problem

By Sheena McKenzie, CNN

Updated 5:51 AM ET, Wed July 31, 2019
Scientist captures melting ice sheet in viral photo

http://www.youtube.com/v/l4bTOLfXVaM

(CNN)Extreme heat bowled over Europe last week, smashing records in its wake. Now, the heatwave that started in the Sahara has rolled into Greenland -- where more records are expected to crumble in the coming days.
That means the heatwave is now Greenland's problem, right? Not quite. When records fall in Greenland, it's everyone's problem.
Greenland is home to the world's second-largest ice sheet. And when it melts significantly -- as it is expected to do this year -- there are knock-on effects for sea levels and weather across the globe.
A woman shields herself with a newspaper in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A woman shields herself with a newspaper in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, July 25.
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People cool off with a water fight at a park in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off with a water fight at a park in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday, July 24.
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A polar bear named Nanook cools off at a zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A polar bear named Nanook cools off at a zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, July 24.
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People collect water from the public fountain in front of the Pantheon in Rome on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People collect water from the public fountain in front of the Pantheon in Rome on Thursday, July 25.
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People cool off and sunbathe next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off and sunbathe next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
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People cool off next to the fountains at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off next to the fountains at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday, July 24.
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A man cools down at an outdoor pool's shower in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A man cools down at an outdoor pool's shower in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, on Thursday, July 25.
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A woman in Paris walks past a window reflecting a temperature of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A woman in Paris walks past a window reflecting a temperature of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Thursday, July 25.
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A dry part of the Loire's river bed is seen in Montjean-sur-Loire, France, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A dry part of the Loire's river bed is seen in Montjean-sur-Loire, France, on Wednesday, July 24.
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A boy cools off under a public water spray on the bank of the Seine river in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A boy cools off under a public water spray on the bank of the Seine river in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
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A woman shields herself with a newspaper in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A woman shields herself with a newspaper in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, July 25.
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People cool off with a water fight at a park in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off with a water fight at a park in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday, July 24.
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A polar bear named Nanook cools off at a zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A polar bear named Nanook cools off at a zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, July 24.
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People collect water from the public fountain in front of the Pantheon in Rome on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People collect water from the public fountain in front of the Pantheon in Rome on Thursday, July 25.
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People cool off and sunbathe next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off and sunbathe next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
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People cool off next to the fountains at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off next to the fountains at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday, July 24.
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A man cools down at an outdoor pool's shower in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A man cools down at an outdoor pool's shower in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, on Thursday, July 25.
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A woman in Paris walks past a window reflecting a temperature of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A woman in Paris walks past a window reflecting a temperature of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Thursday, July 25.
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A dry part of the Loire's river bed is seen in Montjean-sur-Loire, France, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A dry part of the Loire's river bed is seen in Montjean-sur-Loire, France, on Wednesday, July 24.
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A boy cools off under a public water spray on the bank of the Seine river in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A boy cools off under a public water spray on the bank of the Seine river in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
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01 europe heat wave gallery
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01 europe heatwave 0723 France
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Greenland's ice sheet usually melts during the summer. This year, it started melting earlier, in May, and this week's heatwave is expected to accelerate the melt.

The country's mammoth ice sheet rises 3,000 meters above sea level. Forecasters predict that its summit will be particularly warm this week, at just below zero degrees.
"It's a very warm temperature for that altitude," said Ruth Mottram, climate scientist at the Danish Meteorological Institute.
Now 2019 could come close to the record-setting year of 2012, said Jason Box, professor and ice climatologist at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland. During that "melty year," he said, Greenland's ice sheet lost 450 million metric tons -- the equivalent of more than 14,000 tons of ice lost per second.
Global effects
What happens in Greenland will be felt across the world.
Box said that this year's melt is flooding the North Atlantic with freshwater, which could affect the weather in northwestern Europe. The result could be stronger storms, he added, citing flooding in the UK in 2015 and 2016.
"Whatever happens in Greenland radiates its impact down," he said.
Vehicles in a flood caused by rising sea levels on a highway in Central Java, Indonesia on February 2.
Vehicles in a flood caused by rising sea levels on a highway in Central Java, Indonesia on February 2.
During a year like 2012 or 2019, water produced by Greenland's ice sheet adds more than one millimeter to global sea levels, according to Box. But countries in the tropics could see a rise of two millimeters or more, he said.
Extreme is the new norm
It will still be some time before the full "meltiness" of 2019 is measured. But it's already poised to rival the proportions of 2012 -- and we haven't even reached the end of summer.
In July alone, Greenland's ice sheet lost 160 billion tons of ice, according to Clare Nullis, spokeswoman for the UN World Meteorological Organization. That's roughly the equivalent of 64 million Olympic-sized swimming pools, she told reporters on Friday.
One of the most remarkable things about the 2019 heatwave is not just the number of records it broke across Europe -- but the margin by which it did so, she said.
"Normally when you get a temperature record broken, it's by a fraction of a degree," said Nullis. "What we saw yesterday was records being broken by two, three, four degrees -- it was absolutely incredible."
And it's not just the heat that's breaking records. Last year, Greenland experienced it's coldest year in decades, said Box.
Visitors interact with blocks of melting ice from an exhibit called 'Ice Watch' in central London in December 2018.
Visitors interact with blocks of melting ice from an exhibit called 'Ice Watch' in central London in December 2018.
According to Nullis, intense heatwaves such as the one bringing up temperatures in Greenland "carry the signature of man-made climate change."

It's a view shared by a group of European scientists, including scholars at the University of Oxford, who earlier this month concluded in an analysis published in World Weather Attribution that recent French heatwaves had been made five times more likely because of climate change.
The researchers also said that the world is "very likely" to see more extreme heatwaves in the future due to climate change.

CNN's Isabelle Gerretsen contributed to this report.
Title: ☀️ Redneck BBQ in Alabama
Post by: RE on August 14, 2019, 02:23:21 AM
The Rednecks are Baking.  There ARE some good outcomes from Climate Change!  :icon_sunny:

RE

https://www.al.com/news/2019/08/just-how-how-will-it-feel-in-alabama-today-excessive-heat-warnings-continue.html (https://www.al.com/news/2019/08/just-how-how-will-it-feel-in-alabama-today-excessive-heat-warnings-continue.html)

Just how hot will it feel in Alabama today? Excessive heat warnings continue
Updated Aug 13, 5:00 PM;Posted Aug 13, 6:24 AM
Alabama heat index Tuesday 2 p.m.

(https://www.al.com/resizer/976klFB3B67hKc3DjiOX3KhWmHE=/700x0/smart/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-advancelocal.s3.amazonaws.com/public/XSAKEO3NQ5C7HIQXU74BPSIAYI.jpg)

Here's a look at how hot it could feel at 2 p.m. today. It's not pretty.
474 shares
By Leigh Morgan

Tuesday may end up being the hottest day of 2019 for parts of Alabama, with the heat index climbing as high as 115 degrees for some.

Even the meteorologists are sick of it.

The heat index is used to gauge how hot it feels when air temperatures and humidity are combined.

It’s just not going to be pleasant outside today wherever you are. Air temperatures are forecast to climb into the mid- to upper 90s statewide today, and some spots could even crack the triple digits.

Add to that dew points in the 70s and you’ve got the recipe for oppressive and dangerous heat for those working outdoors.

That’s caused the weather service to dust off its excessive heat warnings, which haven’t been used by some offices in the state for more than seven years. Those warnings are shown below in pink:
Heat map

The Alabama counties in pink are under excessive heat warnings today. The rest of the state is under a heat advisory (in orange).

But there is at least a little relief in sight. A cold front will bring the chance for rain later today to north Alabama and tonight and Wednesday for south Alabama.

There could be a few storms as well. The Storm Prediction Center has expanded the area in north Alabama that has a slight risk of severe weather today, which means scattered severe storms will be possible. The rest of north Alabama and part of north-central Alabama have a marginal risk for severe storms today:
Alabama severe weather outlook Wednesday update

Scattered severe storms will be possible in north Alabama today. The areas in dark green could see isolated severe storms.

On Wednesday the threat of strong storms shifts south and covers most of south Alabama and some of south-central Alabama:
Wednesday severe weather outlook

Most of south and south-central Alabama will have a marginal risk for severe weather on Wednesday.

Here’s a look at today’s heat warnings and advisories:

NORTH ALABAMA

It’s going to be another stifling day across north Alabama, and an excessive heat warning has been issued for some northwest counties.

The warning was expanded and extended this afternoon to include Madison, Morgan and Limestone counties, according to the National Weather Service in Huntsville.

The excessive heat warning is now set to expire at 9 p.m. instead of the original 6 p.m.

The other counties in the excessive heat warning are Lauderdale, Colbert, Franklin and Lawrence.

The rest of the region is under a heat advisory until 6 p.m. today.

Those counties are Jackson, DeKalb, Marshall and Cullman.

The heat index could reach 109 degrees in those counties this afternoon, according to the weather service.

The heat index for some north Alabama locations climbed as high as 112 degrees on Monday, according to the National Weather Service.

See a list of north Alabama heat indices here.

CENTRAL ALABAMA

Several counties in central Alabama are under an excessive heat warning until 9 p.m. today, according to the National Weather Service in Birmingham.

The counties in the excessive heat warning are Marengo, Dallas, Autauga, Lowndes, Elmore, Montgomery, Macon, Bullock, Russell, Pike and Barbour.

All of the region will be under a heat advisory as well until 6 p.m. Wednesday, according to the weather service.

Highs are expected to climb into the mid- to upper 90s today, and that could send the heat index anywhere from 108 degrees to 113, forecasters said.

The heat index on Wednesday could range from 105 degrees to 108.

SOUTH ALABAMA

The National Weather Service in Mobile expects temperatures today to be a few degrees higher than what they have been, and a few areas could see the triple digits today.

Accordingly, forecasters have issued an excessive heat warning for all of southwest Alabama for today.

The excessive heat warning will be in effect until 7 p.m. today.

The counties affected are Choctaw, Washington, Clarke, Wilcox, Monroe, Conecuh, Butler, Crenshaw, Escambia, Covington, Mobile and Baldwin.

A heat advisory will also be in effect until 7 p.m. Wednesday, according to forecasters.

High temperatures today will range from the upper 90s to around 100 for most inland areas and the lower to middle 90s near the immediate coast, the weather service said.

The heat index today could range from 110 degrees to 115, with locally higher values possible, the weather service said.

On Wednesday the heat index could be as high as 106 to 112 degrees.

The weather service in Tallahassee, Fla., has also extended a heat advisory for its southeast Alabama counties, which are Coffee, Dale, Henry, Geneva and Houston.

It will run from 10 a.m. until 7 p.m. today.

The heat index is forecast to climb as high as 108 to 112 degrees, according to the weather service.
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: John of Wallan on August 14, 2019, 02:55:32 PM
This article is a little confusing talking of heat indexes. Need to keep an eye on wet bulb temperatures.
I have seen hotter than this in summer but with very low humidity you can cool off in shade. We usually have hot dry summers in sun-tropical Oz.
Talks about storms in some areas, and I bel;ieve there should be plenty of moisture around from recent floods?
I assume this means high humidity. High temp and high humidity = death. Your body cant cool itself by sweating.
Here is some info. From what I see there may be many areas with lethal wet bulb temperatures

http://web.science.unsw.edu.au/~stevensherwood/wetbulb.html (http://web.science.unsw.edu.au/~stevensherwood/wetbulb.html)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet-bulb_temperature#Heat_waves_with_high_humidity (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet-bulb_temperature#Heat_waves_with_high_humidity)

JOW
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on August 14, 2019, 03:29:17 PM
This article is a little confusing talking of heat indexes. Need to keep an eye on wet bulb temperatures.
I have seen hotter than this in summer but with very low humidity you can cool off in shade. We usually have hot dry summers in sun-tropical Oz.
Talks about storms in some areas, and I bel;ieve there should be plenty of moisture around from recent floods?
I assume this means high humidity. High temp and high humidity = death. Your body cant cool itself by sweating.
Here is some info. From what I see there may be many areas with lethal wet bulb temperatures

http://web.science.unsw.edu.au/~stevensherwood/wetbulb.html (http://web.science.unsw.edu.au/~stevensherwood/wetbulb.html)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet-bulb_temperature#Heat_waves_with_high_humidity (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet-bulb_temperature#Heat_waves_with_high_humidity)

JOW

The Wet Bulb issue I think will become a problem in the medium term for places like TX, LA and FL.  Southern FSoA locations.  In the near term, this can be compensated for by HVAC, as long as there is oil to run it and the grid stays up.

Midwest, probably not so much humidity or heat, should be bearable though sweaty.

Where I live, it's not an issue in the near term or even medium term.  A hot summer day here goes into the 80sF (about 28C), and those still are fairly rare. Midsummer, 65F is typical still. The Glaciers which surround the Matanuska-Susitna River Valley are going to take quite some time to melt off, even under the worst case scenario.  50 years at least.  I will be long dead before then.

North to Alaska.

http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA

RE
Title: 🏜 Australia hit its hottest day ever – but it's a record unlikely to last long
Post by: RE on December 18, 2019, 12:26:29 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/vDdI97TFnf4
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: John of Wallan on December 19, 2019, 12:10:48 AM
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-19/australia-heatwave-sets-hottest-day-for-second-time-in-two-days/11813446 (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-19/australia-heatwave-sets-hottest-day-for-second-time-in-two-days/11813446)
De ja vu.

43 expected here tomorrow.
https://www.weatherzone.com.au/vic/north-central/wallan/detailed-forecast (https://www.weatherzone.com.au/vic/north-central/wallan/detailed-forecast)
Expecting another record to be broken.
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/brace-for-a-scorcher-victoria-set-for-hottest-december-day-on-record-20191219-p53ll9.html (https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/brace-for-a-scorcher-victoria-set-for-hottest-december-day-on-record-20191219-p53ll9.html)

Got hoses, gen set, battery radio and water tanks all ready.
Going to be a real shitter. Will be home and while power is on will be on net watching for fires or outside keeping on guard.
Will give a few updates on fires on the world of wildfire thread, as I am sure they will be bad tomorrow everywhere.


JOW

Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on December 19, 2019, 12:20:45 AM
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-19/australia-heatwave-sets-hottest-day-for-second-time-in-two-days/11813446 (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-19/australia-heatwave-sets-hottest-day-for-second-time-in-two-days/11813446)
De ja vu.

43 expected here tomorrow.
https://www.weatherzone.com.au/vic/north-central/wallan/detailed-forecast (https://www.weatherzone.com.au/vic/north-central/wallan/detailed-forecast)
Expecting another record to be broken.
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/brace-for-a-scorcher-victoria-set-for-hottest-december-day-on-record-20191219-p53ll9.html (https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/brace-for-a-scorcher-victoria-set-for-hottest-december-day-on-record-20191219-p53ll9.html)

Got hoses, gen set, battery radio and water tanks all ready.
Going to be a real shitter. Will be home and while power is on will be on net watching for fires or outside keeping on guard.
Will give a few updates on fires on the world of wildfire thread, as I am sure they will be bad tomorrow everywhere.


JOW

Your Boots-on-the-Ground updates are much appreciated JoW!

Are you working on the Black Saturday article for the Blog?  This would be the right time tto publish it.

RE
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: John of Wallan on December 19, 2019, 02:14:56 AM
About 1500 words in. Maybe half done.
Give me a few days.
A little bit busy with current events right now...

JOW
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on December 19, 2019, 03:13:10 AM
About 1500 words in. Maybe half done.
Give me a few days.
A little bit busy with current events right now...

JOW

Understood.  Good Luck with the Firefight, if it comes your way.  Get pics & vid if it is SAFE to do so.  GTFO of Dodge if it is not.  A day early is better than a minute too late to make your Bugout Run.

RE
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: AJ on December 19, 2019, 03:30:14 AM
Yeah, really JOW. Just get out if it looks like you are at any risk.
I worry about this all the time in the middle of rain in the winter. Always waiting for next summer  :-[
AJ
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on December 19, 2019, 12:39:37 PM
Yeah, really JOW. Just get out if it looks like you are at any risk.
I worry about this all the time in the middle of rain in the winter. Always waiting for next summer  :-[
AJ

Do you have a Bugout Machine and Bugout Kit ready to go all the time?

RE
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: John of Wallan on December 19, 2019, 02:52:18 PM
Yeah, really JOW. Just get out if it looks like you are at any risk.
I worry about this all the time in the middle of rain in the winter. Always waiting for next summer  :-[
AJ

Do you have a Bugout Machine and Bugout Kit ready to go all the time?

RE

Yes and sort of yes.
I live in outskirts of town. Not sure where to bug out to.... Can go into town but prbably less defendable than home in the real bad days. Town centre is about 5km away.
Distance does not make a difference unless you are 50 plus km away and up wind!
We have a hard drive with all documents scanned onto as well as a box of photos we will grab and go if needed. I plan to stay and defend, but my wife is not so sure. Have an old 4WD which is the go to vehicle. I always have 20lt water in the back as well as a heap of tools and recovery gear. Its the vehicle I use to go wood chopping in. Has a well stocked 1st aid kit too. If at the last minute we panic and have to get out I would just drive through the neighbours padocks across fences and all to get away.

The correct and by far the safest thing to do is leave the day before if you can. For us that would be gointo melbourne and stay in a hotel. Not sure what we could do with the dog and chickens in that case. Once the fires starts i think the best thing to do is stay in place. Driving through smoke and flames is worst thing to do. Also traffic goes stupid when fires start. a lot of dickhead gawkers drive around to see whats happening. I put out the sprinklers and start making defence preparations when fires are near or coming my way. I am not on a forested block. I am surrounded by similar size 2 acre or so house blocks o all sides. Nearest forest is about 250m away to my west. This is the danger dirrection.

Getting warm now.
Still no fires in this area.
http://emergency.vic.gov.au/respond/?=&bbox=143.6187744140625%2C-38.1734326790354%2C146.85974121093747%2C-36.86424015502006&tm=1576795482923# (http://emergency.vic.gov.au/respond/?=&bbox=143.6187744140625%2C-38.1734326790354%2C146.85974121093747%2C-36.86424015502006&tm=1576795482923#)
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-19/catastrophic-fire-conditions-forecast-in-sa-as-temperatures-soar/11815346 (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-19/catastrophic-fire-conditions-forecast-in-sa-as-temperatures-soar/11815346)

JOW
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on December 19, 2019, 03:20:46 PM

The correct and by far the safest thing to do is leave the day before if you can. For us that would be gointo melbourne and stay in a hotel. Not sure what we could do with the dog and chickens in that case.

That's why you need a proper Bugout Machine with a Trailer.

(http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Stealth-Combo-Exterior.gif)

The dog can ride in the trailer in a travel dog box.  The chickens you leave behind.  They are replaceable.  You leave a day early, drive to the coast and camp out by the beach until the fire burns through.

I did the 3D mockup for one of my articles on Bugouts some time back.

RE
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: John of Wallan on December 20, 2019, 01:25:23 AM
Fucking hot.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-20/finger-pointed-at-climate-change-as-heatwave-smashes-records/11817884 (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-20/finger-pointed-at-climate-change-as-heatwave-smashes-records/11817884)
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/temperature-records-tumble-across-victoria-as-melbourne-peaks-at-43-5-degrees-20191220-p53lyr.html (https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/temperature-records-tumble-across-victoria-as-melbourne-peaks-at-43-5-degrees-20191220-p53lyr.html)
https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/12/20/bushfire-crisis-adelaide-victoria-nsw/ (https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/12/20/bushfire-crisis-adelaide-victoria-nsw/)
https://www.sbs.com.au/news/tomorrow-will-be-a-difficult-day-australia-braces-for-weekend-of-catastrophic-bushfire-conditions (https://www.sbs.com.au/news/tomorrow-will-be-a-difficult-day-australia-braces-for-weekend-of-catastrophic-bushfire-conditions)

JOW
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on December 20, 2019, 02:43:16 AM
Fucking hot.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-20/finger-pointed-at-climate-change-as-heatwave-smashes-records/11817884 (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-20/finger-pointed-at-climate-change-as-heatwave-smashes-records/11817884)
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/temperature-records-tumble-across-victoria-as-melbourne-peaks-at-43-5-degrees-20191220-p53lyr.html (https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/temperature-records-tumble-across-victoria-as-melbourne-peaks-at-43-5-degrees-20191220-p53lyr.html)
https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/12/20/bushfire-crisis-adelaide-victoria-nsw/ (https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/12/20/bushfire-crisis-adelaide-victoria-nsw/)
https://www.sbs.com.au/news/tomorrow-will-be-a-difficult-day-australia-braces-for-weekend-of-catastrophic-bushfire-conditions (https://www.sbs.com.au/news/tomorrow-will-be-a-difficult-day-australia-braces-for-weekend-of-catastrophic-bushfire-conditions)

JOW

No FIRE 🔥  :evil4: by you yet I hope. 🤞

RE
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: Surly1 on December 20, 2019, 04:54:24 AM
Fucking hot.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-20/finger-pointed-at-climate-change-as-heatwave-smashes-records/11817884 (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-20/finger-pointed-at-climate-change-as-heatwave-smashes-records/11817884)
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/temperature-records-tumble-across-victoria-as-melbourne-peaks-at-43-5-degrees-20191220-p53lyr.html (https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/temperature-records-tumble-across-victoria-as-melbourne-peaks-at-43-5-degrees-20191220-p53lyr.html)
https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/12/20/bushfire-crisis-adelaide-victoria-nsw/ (https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/12/20/bushfire-crisis-adelaide-victoria-nsw/)
https://www.sbs.com.au/news/tomorrow-will-be-a-difficult-day-australia-braces-for-weekend-of-catastrophic-bushfire-conditions (https://www.sbs.com.au/news/tomorrow-will-be-a-difficult-day-australia-braces-for-weekend-of-catastrophic-bushfire-conditions)

JOW

No FIRE 🔥  :evil4: by you yet I hope. 🤞

RE

Here is an article I came across this morning. 49.9C is nearly 123F!

Roads melt as temperature hits 49.9C in remote SA ahead of catastrophic fire conditions

Updated

A road which is deteriorating in Port Augusta
Photo: In Port Augusta, bitumen has started to melt on several roads. (Facebook: Port Augusta City Council)

Catastrophic fire conditions have been forecast in South Australia today as the state's stifling heatwave continues into a fourth day — with temperatures hitting almost 50 degrees Celsius in some areas yesterday.

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said December temperature records had tumbled in more than a dozen locations, while some towns set all-time highs.

Parts of Adelaide sweltered through the hottest night on record, with the minimum reaching just 33.6C at 10:20pm at BOM's West Terrace site.

It was the highest minimum at the site since January 1939, when it reached 33.2C.

Senior forecaster Simon Timcke said it was a preliminary record, as the temperature could still drop, but that was very unlikely.

He said the city had a hotter night at the Kent Town site in 2009, when it only dropped to 33.9C.

The minimum at Kent Town last night 33.6C at 11:30pm.

Nullarbor was the hottest spot around the state yesterday, reaching an incredible 49.9C — the fourth hottest temperature ever recorded in Australia, overtaking Eucla in WA which reached that mark just hours earlier.

Adelaide reached 45.3C on Thursday, its highest top temperature for the month of December since records began in 1887, and is forecast to reach 46C today.

Parts of the northern suburbs also hovered around 46C.

Ceduna's top of 48.8C was a record high, while Wudinna and Port Augusta — where roads melted in the intense heat — rose above 48C.

"McConnal Road, Alma Street, Forster Street and Cobbin Street have all shown signs of bleeding," Port Augusta City Council said in a statement.

"A contractor has been engaged to spread rocks over problem areas.

"The roads should be avoided and only used by local residents — please take an alternate route during this extreme weather."

SA Power Networks spokesman Paul Roberts warned there was a "heightened risk of extended power outages" in today's conditions.

"We have enacted detailed resource plans with multiple crews … and others on stand-by if needed," he said.

"Where conditions are confirmed to be catastrophic and there's evidence to suggest it would be wise and would help protect lives and property, we would disconnect [power to high bushfire risk areas]."

Catastrophic fire conditions in six districts

The heatwave conditions will take a dangerous turn today with extreme temperatures and high winds combining to produce catastrophic bushfire conditions in six districts.

Lower Eyre Peninsula, Yorke Peninsula, the Mid North, Mount Lofty Ranges, Kangaroo Island and Lower South East districts have all been given the highest fire danger rating.

Heat records tumble across Australia for second day running


The record books just can't stand the heat this week, as the national average maximum temperature hits an all-time high for the second time in two days.

Country Fire Service (CFS)deputy chief officer Andrew Stark said if fires break out today, they will be dangerous, fast-moving and erratic.

"They are the kind of conditions that are very dangerous even for our firefighters, from CFS, from MFS, Department of Environment and Water, the kind of conditions that we see property lost and unfortunately sometimes, lives lost," he said.

"Under these conditions [fires are] so erratic, they'll move so fast and develop so quickly, it doesn't matter how many firefighters we have, we're not going to stop the progress of the full spread of fires under these conditions."

Mr Stark labelled today's conditions "the most dangerous … we've faced this season", and said residents in affected areas should activate their bushfire plans, if their plan is to leave.

"The safest place is to be away from areas that will see these conditions forecast, so if your plan is not to stay, you need to think about where you will go with your family," he said.

"We have a high potential for fires to break out with the effects of lightning, which will be widespread again right across South Australia.

"We will see a very gusty wind change, and even though people may start to see some relief from those winds, if we have fires burning, they will continue to be very dangerous fires for many hours after the change goes through."

Bureau of Meteorology forecaster Kylie Egan said strong winds and the risk of lightning would elevate fire danger across the state.

"We haven't really seen conditions much worse than this across the state, the wind speeds are really as strong as they can get," she said.

"The risk of lightning is certainly there, which makes it a very significant fire weather day for South Australia."

Adelaide's temperature is expected to peak in the afternoon at 46C before the cool change moves through.

Friday's twilight horse races cancelled

On Thursday afternoon, Thoroughbred Racing SA (TRSA) announced it had cancelled its Friday twilight meet at Morphettville Racecourse, despite earlier in the week saying it would still go ahead.

Morphettville RacecoursePhoto: Thoroughbred Racing SA said Friday's twilight race meet had been cancelled due to the forecast. (ABC News: Sowaibah Hanifie)

The organisation's chief executive officer, Jim Watters, said while TRSA had been in contact with the BOM about the forecast for Friday evening, the latest temperature predictions were higher than expected.

"While a cool change was and continues to be forecast to arrive in time for Friday's twilight race meeting, the most recent updates indicate a higher temperature than originally advised immediately prior to the cool change," he said.

"In light of this we have determined that Friday's twilight race meeting at Morphettville will be postponed, with the meeting re-scheduled to next Monday.

"As always, the welfare of our horses and participants is our number one consideration when making these decisions, and from the outset we had advised that we would monitor the situation throughout and if deemed necessary the meeting would be postponed."

The back-flip follows condemnation from animal welfare groups about TRSA's previous plan to go ahead with the meet despite the heatwave.

Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: RE on December 20, 2019, 07:15:01 AM
Here is an article I came across this morning. 49.9C is nearly 123F!

It's SMOKIN' HOT!!!  :evil4:

http://www.youtube.com/v/wVOa3xhl0bg

RE
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: John of Wallan on December 26, 2019, 08:03:53 PM
https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/cattle-have-stopped-breeding-koalas-die-of-thirst-a-vet-s-hellish-diary-of-climate-change-20191220-p53m03.html (https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/cattle-have-stopped-breeding-koalas-die-of-thirst-a-vet-s-hellish-diary-of-climate-change-20191220-p53m03.html)

Hmmm.

JOW
Title: Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
Post by: AJ on December 27, 2019, 03:26:19 AM
Good article. Sad the politicians don't see or acknowledge a problem with climate change. Willful ignorance is evil.
AJ
Title: The Last Decade Was The Hottest On Record Thanks To Global Warming
Post by: Surly1 on January 15, 2020, 11:16:01 AM
The Last Decade Was The Hottest On Record Thanks To Global Warming (https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/zahrahirji/hottest-decade-climate-change?ref=bfnsplash&utm_term=4ldqpho)
"We are experiencing the impacts of global warming unfolding literally in real time."


NASA / Via data.giss.nasa.gov

NASA temperature map for December 2019 compared to the 1951–1980 timeframe.

Posted on January 15, 2020, at 11:40 a.m. ET

Last year was the world's second-warmest year, capping off the hottest decade on record, according to experts at NOAA and NASA.

And here’s another record to add to the pile: The past five years were collectively the warmest since record-keeping began about 140 years ago. 2019's temperatures were second only to 2016, coming in around 1.7 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average, per NOAA.

“The decade that just ended is clearly the warmest decade on record,” NASA's Gavin Schmidt said in a statement. “Every decade since the 1960s clearly has been warmer than the one before.”

This warming trend, scientists say, is undoubtedly the result of human-made climate change.

“We are experiencing the impacts of global warming unfolding literally in real time,” said Noah Diffenbaugh, an earth science professor at Stanford University not involved in the newly released analyses. “We now have clear evidence that people and ecosystems are being impacted across the world, from the equator to the poles, from both in the ocean and on land, from the coastal areas to the high elevations.”

The twin government analyses, released Wednesday, come on the heels of a new study in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences concluding that the world’s oceans in 2019 were the warmest since record-keeping began around the 1950s, capping off an exceptionally warm 10-year streak for the oceans.

Meanwhile, Australia continues to struggle with unprecedented bushfires that have destroyed thousands of homes, shrouded large swaths of the country in unhealthy smoke levels, and killed more than a dozen people and thousands and thousands of animals.

“We know that the climatic conditions that enable dangerous fires are increasing globally,” Colin Beale, a biology professor at the University of York who has studied climate and fire impacts, told BuzzFeed News in an email. “We also know that the current fire season is exceptional (a product primarily of the Indian Ocean Dipole, a weather phenomenon that has now ended, probably exacerbated by underlying climate change) and is unlikely to be repeated again very soon — but could become normal if climate change is not tackled adequately.”