Doomstead Diner Menu => The Kitchen Sink => Topic started by: RE on August 14, 2012, 12:05:49 AM

Title: Diner Library
Post by: RE on August 14, 2012, 12:05:49 AM
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii8/arwenshubby/Atavachron.jpg)

I thought I started a Topic with this title before, but I guess I never did.  I just mentioned in on of my posts in another thread I was starting a Library of Collapse related documents once Peter got the Media area up and running.

Anyhow, in addition to the David Korowicz Trade Off: Financial system supply-chain cross contagion – a study in global systemic collapse pdf, I just added another of his papers from 2010 called Tipping Point: Near-Term Systemic Implications of a Peak in Global Oil Production which is another very comprehensive paper overall, this one focused on the dynamics of the collapsing energy supply.

Together, if you ever want to Slam Dunk a Cornucopian these two papers provide all the Ammo you will ever need in an argument.  :icon_mrgreen: Also, if you want to introduce the more intelligent people you know to the concepts of systemic collapse, if you print out these two documents and hand them over to them, this should bring just about anyone Up to Speed without having to read all the longer Books out there, from Tainter to Heinberg to Orlov etc, etc, etc.

Tipping Point
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Trade Off
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I got both papers from the FEASTA (http://www.feasta.org/) website, which I also just added to our Blogroll.  Quite a lot of good information available on that site.

I encourage Diners to add any longer documents they run across with important information in them for collapse researchers to review.  Particularly important for bringing Newby diners up to speed.

Unfortunately there are some Size Limitations on these files which I have not been able to figure out how to increase.  pdfs in this size range fit easily though.

Far as storing longer videos goes, for that I mainly suggest you store them on YouTube.  Uses up Bandwidth here on our server if they are stored here when people watch them. Anyhow, most Videos you would pull as Reference are already on You Tube.

Add the Videos in here inside the Diner Library thread.  Following this post, I will add the Dust Bowl Documentary I plastered through two other threads here today already.  :icon_mrgreen:  Try to make good Editorial Decisions on what Videos you add to this thread, I don't want it to get too cluttered.  Only drop in really content rich stuff that pertains to the Collapse.  If in my Infinite Wisdom I don't think something you drop in here is WORTHY, I'll move it out of the thread to...somewhere.  LOL.

Also, each time you drop a New File into the Library itself, note it here with the BBcode Link as I did above in a new post.  If we get a lot of these at some point, I will create an Index Post here and paste them into that post as they come in, then I will delete your To be Filed Post.  RE the Librarian.  :icon_mrgreen:

(http://mistercomfypants.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/star-trek-323-all-our-yesterdays-05.png)

All that being said, WELCOME to the NEW Doomstead Diner Library!

Doomstead Diner # for DOOM on the Net!

RE
Title: Diner Library: Dustbowl Documentary from the 1950s
Post by: RE on August 14, 2012, 01:02:30 AM
Posted in a couple of other threads.  This is a MUST WATCH Video!  Currently also the Feature Video on the Diner Blog (8/14/2012).

http://www.youtube.com/v/CM3ZHMBhP2k

RE
Title: Diner Library: Damon Vrabel
Post by: RE on August 14, 2012, 01:25:58 AM
Possibly the best analysis ever done of how the Banking Cartel overtook the FSofA, and then the World as a whole.  By the incomparable Damon Vrabel.

Renaissance 2.0 Financial Empire
http://www.youtube.com/v/96c2wXcNA7A

Debunking Money: The Way the World Really Works
http://www.youtube.com/v/7_yh4-Zi92Q
Title: Diner Library: Albert Bartlett
Post by: RE on August 14, 2012, 02:00:43 AM
Albert explains the Exponential Function.

http://www.youtube.com/v/e_VpyoAXpA8

RE
Title: Diner Library: Richard Duncan
Post by: RE on August 14, 2012, 02:12:49 AM
Richard isn't the world's Best Lecturer, but the Olduvai theory is one of the best ones out there.

http://www.youtube.com/v/LWCQ9MDxOaw
Title: Diner Library: Richard Heinberg
Post by: RE on August 14, 2012, 02:36:38 AM
Instead of posting this other Doomer Richard's lectures, I'm posting the Animated Vids his Post Carbon Institute has produced.  This is good for folks who aren't too cool with sitting down to READ the 50  page pdfs or the 500  page Books, or even watching 1  hour Lecturing.  Most of it contained here in about 30 min total of Cartoons.  Love the choice of the Scottish Girl doing the Narration also.  :icon_mrgreen:

Part I
http://www.youtube.com/v/61Yp0npCbo0

Part II
http://www.youtube.com/v/ZZmGZ5jqeBo

Part III
http://www.youtube.com/v/DVRk8CUiUKQ
Title: Re: Diner Library : Electric Fence
Post by: Golden Oxen on March 21, 2013, 08:06:33 PM
Just a poem I wish to place in the Diner's Library.  Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

                          Electric Fence
Tom Healy

A teacher once told me
that my girlish voice
registered about
as strong a jolt
as a needle prick
on the side of a barn.
Current that
carried no heaviness,
a thrum as thin
and ordinary
as the single-strand
electric fence
it was my job to string
around the pasture
each March, and that
my father said I
did piss-poorly.
But it was a fence.
And I took some
satisfaction
in the mild wince,
the shudder of surprise
when heifers ran out
in the spring mud
and dumb-muscled their heads
through to what
they thought would be
greener grass, greener grass,
not knowing the old joke
about the farmer
who’s asked for directions
and scratching
his head says
you can’t really get
anywhere from here.
Title: Re: Diner Library: We are Birds in Migration
Post by: Golden Oxen on March 22, 2013, 09:16:38 PM
Another for the Poetry shelf of the library

         We are birds in migration
Elena Shvarts

Translated from the Russian by Stephanie Sandler


We are birds in migration from this world to that.
(That sounds coarse, like the German Tod.)
And when our hour is announced‚
When our season nears its end‚
A true compass awakens inside us
And shows the world’s fifth point.
Invisible wings flutter nervously
And the inner gaze slowly turns
In bitter longing‚ as if prophetic‚
Toward the garden it knows: it
Sees miracles‚ and longing
Lengthens‚ doubled‚ as
The caravans fly off.
Title: Re: Diner Library: We are Birds in Migration
Post by: Surly1 on March 23, 2013, 05:27:31 AM
Another for the Poetry shelf of the library

         We are birds in migration
Elena Shvarts

Translated from the Russian by Stephanie Sandler


We are birds in migration from this world to that.
(That sounds coarse, like the German Tod.)
And when our hour is announced‚
When our season nears its end‚
A true compass awakens inside us
And shows the world’s fifth point.
Invisible wings flutter nervously
And the inner gaze slowly turns
In bitter longing‚ as if prophetic‚
Toward the garden it knows: it
Sees miracles‚ and longing
Lengthens‚ doubled‚ as
The caravans fly off.

GO, this one is for you.

Interesting synchronicity-- my niece posted this on her wall this morning.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=58291553
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on March 23, 2013, 05:41:05 AM
Quote
GO, this one is for you.

Interesting synchronicity-- my niece posted this on her wall this morning.

Thank's Surly, Absolutely beautiful! What a great way to start the day.

Amazed at the coincidence, found the posted poem at about the same time while just drifting about the net.
Title: Re: Diner Library: The Coast of Apples
Post by: Golden Oxen on March 30, 2013, 07:56:44 AM
For the Diner poetry shelf.

The Coast of Apples
Lee Upton

I would fly to the coast of apples.
            —Euripides, translated by Frederick Morgan



When I flew to the coast of ghosts,
there, on the white branch, sat Euripides.
At once, I tried to peel the skin

off my own anxiety. Euripides,
I said, you with the glorious name,
what do you want with apples

now? Flying, I can understand.
Although there are problems enough.
I’ve flown every month

for a year. Too often my flight was detoured
to the coast of bullets, the coast of salt,
the coast of abandoned tires—

which is not much better than flying
to the coast of thistles
but preferable to the coast of briars

next to the coast of radioactive waste.
At last when I stopped talking
Euripides peered down and said to me:

I bet the wings were the hardest part.
That, and the rest of the horse.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Surly1 on March 30, 2013, 08:43:10 AM
GO, extraordinary.    :emthup: :emthup: :emthup:
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on March 30, 2013, 09:11:22 AM
GO, extraordinary.    :emthup: :emthup: :emthup:

Yes Surly, Struck me the same way. What a gift some have with the written word.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: reanteben on March 30, 2013, 12:02:36 PM
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on March 31, 2013, 07:35:33 AM
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me. 
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on March 31, 2013, 10:32:55 AM
Here's a poem that came to mind on this Easter Sunday.


Some keep the Sabbath going to Church – (236)


Some keep the Sabbath going to Church –
I keep it, staying at Home –
With a Bobolink for a Chorister –
And an Orchard, for a Dome –

Some keep the Sabbath in Surplice –
I, just wear my Wings –
And instead of tolling the Bell, for Church,
Our little Sexton – sings.

God preaches, a noted Clergyman –
And the sermon is never long,
So instead of getting to Heaven, at last –
I’m going, all along.

                 Emily Dickinson

Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: reanteben on March 31, 2013, 11:46:13 AM
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me.

thanks GO. perhaps it was silly of me to ask you that. at any rate i do have a clear impression as to why this poem resonated with you at this time. feels like a window into your soul so thank you. likewise i expect it provided you with a window into the soul of the protagonist astride pegasus. the greatness in a poem lies in its ability to offer blind men brief glimpses of the elephant in its entirety.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on March 31, 2013, 01:37:30 PM
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me.

thanks GO. perhaps it was silly of me to ask you that. at any rate i do have a clear impression as to why this poem resonated with you at this time. feels like a window into your soul so thank you. likewise i expect it provided you with a window into the soul of the protagonist astride pegasus. the greatness in a poem lies in its ability to offer blind men brief glimpses of the elephant in its entirety.

"There are none so blind as those that refuse to see"

                                             
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: reanteben on April 01, 2013, 09:02:24 AM
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me.

thanks GO. perhaps it was silly of me to ask you that. at any rate i do have a clear impression as to why this poem resonated with you at this time. feels like a window into your soul so thank you. likewise i expect it provided you with a window into the soul of the protagonist astride pegasus. the greatness in a poem lies in its ability to offer blind men brief glimpses of the elephant in its entirety.

"There are none so blind as those that refuse to see"

                                             
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya

my point was that blindness has nothing to do with refusal, but that seeing has to do with magic.

dickens' paternalistic character, Gradgrind, knew no magic, as seen here in his definition of a horse:  Quadruped. Graminivorous. Forty teeth, namely twenty-four grinders, four-eye teeth, and twelve incisive.

if a circus is insisted upon being viewed as an ideality, the least one can do is not be offended by one's own view of it.

Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on April 01, 2013, 10:17:23 AM
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me.

thanks GO. perhaps it was silly of me to ask you that. at any rate i do have a clear impression as to why this poem resonated with you at this time. feels like a window into your soul so thank you. likewise i expect it provided you with a window into the soul of the protagonist astride pegasus. the greatness in a poem lies in its ability to offer blind men brief glimpses of the elephant in its entirety.

"There are none so blind as those that refuse to see"

                                             
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya

my point was that blindness has nothing to do with refusal, but that seeing has to do with magic.

dickens' paternalistic character, Gradgrind, knew no magic, as seen here in his definition of a horse:  Quadruped. Graminivorous. Forty teeth, namely twenty-four grinders, four-eye teeth, and twelve incisive.

if a circus is insisted upon being viewed as an ideality, the least one can do is not be offended by one's own view of it.

I see, we are back to square 1 "Resources".  Thanks for "Your Perspective". Interesting and appreciated.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: reanteben on April 01, 2013, 10:37:43 AM
no, GO, not resources, in the sense you are using it. (see GO's take on JMG's comment to william.)   it's almost as if you are conflating anarchism with ayn rand philosophy, which of course a common mistake in an operating system running on fear. it's not superhuman qualities that's required to achieve liberation but merely addition by subtraction.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on April 05, 2013, 05:00:12 AM
Thought this poem might be inspirational for the authors of the purpose of the foxstead's creation.

                    A Nation's Strength
   
by Ralph Waldo Emerson   

What makes a nation's pillars high
And its foundations strong?
What makes it mighty to defy
The foes that round it throng?

It is not gold. Its kingdoms grand
Go down in battle shock;
Its shafts are laid on sinking sand,
Not on abiding rock.

Is it the sword? Ask the red dust
Of empires passed away;
The blood has turned their stones to rust,
Their glory to decay.

And is it pride? Ah, that bright crown
Has seemed to nations sweet;
But God has struck its luster down
In ashes at his feet.

Not gold but only men can make
A people great and strong;
Men who for truth and honor's sake
Stand fast and suffer long.

Brave men who work while others sleep,
Who dare while others fly...
They build a nation's pillars deep
And lift them to the sky.
Title: Re: Diner Library: Framing
Post by: Golden Oxen on April 21, 2013, 11:08:33 AM
For the Diner's poetry shelf.

                                                     Framing


The desert isn’t a creature. It doesn’t have eyes nor ears, nor hands and feet, nor does it have a language. Always, strangers define it. (Anyone who doesn’t speak will be defined by strangers.)

Picking up small rocks and large stones, my mind calling them “rocks” and “stones” but also wondering there you are, who are you, how would you like to be held, would you like to be held, thrown over there, left alone, stepped on, flipped over, taken from here and collected and put on some table in front of a television with maybe some music playing?

Bounded to the west by the San Francisco Peaks, to the north by Mt. Hesperus, to the south by Mt. Taylor and to the east by Mt. Blanca, you are __________.

The well-meaning stranger’s tongue was cut off in A Distant Episode because he believed his brain was enough to tell the desert what it is.

The cold of the desert evening reaches my hands first. My fingers curl like a petal of one of those flowers that sleep and wake in the course of a day, that I’ve never been able to name.

I accept the significant things told to me by the Irish nuns and Jesuit brothers and think it right that there are people who can, on my behalf, complete my sentences and even my thoughts.

Strangers carry the desert from one side of a highway and dump it on the other side; but in a sudden snowstorm, at twenty degrees below seasonal normals and in freezing high winds, the desert flurries in an icy mix of snow and sand, remaking its own partitions.


About The Author   
Josey Foo, an immigrant of peranakan descent from Malaysia, is Associate Attorney to the Chief Justice of the Navajo Nation. A poet and writer, she recently co-authored A Lily Lilies with Leah Stein and is a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship recipient.
Title: Re: Diner Library: Robert Frost on poet Amy Lowell
Post by: Golden Oxen on April 30, 2013, 04:51:19 AM
What a special person Robert Frost was, amazing gift with words. :icon_sunny:


In honor of National Poetry Month, here's an excerpt from the great US poet's salute, which he wrote for the Monitor. It ran on May 16, 1925.

Robert Frost on poet Amy Lowell

Frost penned a salute to his fellow poet for the Monitor in 1925.

By Robert Frost / April 30, 2013 at 5:00 am EDT

In honor of National Poetry Month, here's an excerpt from the great US poet's salute, which he wrote for the Monitor. It ran on May 16, 1925.

It is absurd to think that the only way to tell if a poem is lasting is to wait and see if it lasts. The right reader of a good poem can tell the moment it strikes him that he has taken an immortal wound – that he will never get over it. That is to say, permanence in poetry as in love is perceived instantly. It hasn't to await the test of time. The proof of a poem is not that we have never forgotten it, but that we knew at sight that we never could forget it. There was a barb to it and a tocsin that we owned to at once. How often I have heard it in the voice and seen it in the eyes of this generation that Amy Lowell had lodged poetry with them to stay.

The most exciting movement in nature is not progress, advance, but expansion and contraction, the opening and shutting of the eye, the hand, the heart, the mind. We throw our arms wide with a gesture of religion to the universe; we close them around a person. We explore and adventure for a while and then we draw in to consolidate our gains.... Amy Lowell was distinguished in a period of dilation when poetry, in the effort to include a larger material, stretched itself almost to the breaking of the verse. Little ones with no more apparatus than a tea-cup looked on with alarm. She helped make it stirring times for a decade to those immediately concerned with art and to many not so immediately.... Her poetry was forever a clear resonant calling off of things seen.

http://rss.csmonitor.com/~r/feeds/csm/~3/6EPBLMBU4k4/Robert-Frost-on-poet-Amy-Lowell (http://rss.csmonitor.com/~r/feeds/csm/~3/6EPBLMBU4k4/Robert-Frost-on-poet-Amy-Lowell)  :icon_study: :icon_sunny:
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on April 30, 2013, 09:37:59 AM
Robert Frost....I read somewhere that he was, in his time, one of the country's most loved performance artists...it's been a long time since written/spoken word artists were pop stars. Says something about the decline of American culture.

He had a lot of personal tragedy in his life. I don't think that's what made him a great poet, but it sure shaped his character. I think hardship builds enormous character in some people and destroys others.

This poem I'm posting is by an artist from here in Austin, who is part of that spoken word renaissance that's been going on the past few years. It's very raw, but I'm posting it anyway. When I read that Frost quote, The proof of a poem is not that we have never forgotten it, but that we knew at sight that we never could forget it. , I thought of this one immediately. I read it a couple of years ago, and it stuck with me. I think it's a remarkable poem, both in its rhyme and meter, and in its stark honesty.


The Men We Marry, the Men We Fuck

This one kissed me beneath the stars.
That one fondled me up the stairs.

This one confessed his sins but to God.
That one demanded his pity aloud.

This one drove me to the store.
That one drove me like a car.

This one gave me violets and asters.
That one brought me violence and disaster.

This one wed me in the chapel.
That one ate me like an apple,

And he was as handsome as he was doomed.
Lovely as lust, but fickle as the moon.

This one built a house to live in.
That one fed me glass and poison.

This one tended a kindled hearth.
That one threw me to the dirt

And by the greenbrier patch we tangled,
Hand to thigh and lip to nipple.

The men we marry, the men we fuck:
This one doubly filled my cup,

That one used me up.

-- Jill Alexander Essbaum
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on April 30, 2013, 09:51:11 AM
I love the Beats. Kenneth Rexroth was an early Beat poet, older and maybe less well known than some of them. He used to sponsor other poets, paying for space for them to perform. He paid for the venue when Allen Ginsburg performed Howl for the first time. He was a big influence on a lot of younger poets, especially Gary Snyder.

This poem is about a hike in the high Sierras...but it's also about what was on the author's mind as he hiked...another infamous day in Boston. Rexroth thought it would be remembered. He was wrong. People always forget, and quickly.

Climbing Milestone Mountain, August 22, 1937

For a month now, wandering over the Sierras,
A poem had been gathering in my mind,
Details of significance and rhythm,
The way poems do, but still lacking a focus.
Last night I remembered the date and it all
Began to grow together and take on purpose.
We sat up late while Deneb moved over the zenith
And I told Marie all about Boston, how it looked
That last terrible week, how hundreds stood weeping
Impotent in the streets that last midnight.
I told her how those hours changed the lives of thousands,
How America was forever a different place
Afterwards for many.
In the morning
We swam in the cold transparent lake, the blue
Damsel flies on all the reeds like millions
Of narrow metallic flowers, and I thought
Of you behind the grille in Dedham, Vanzetti,
Saying, “Who would ever have thought we would make this history?”
Crossing the brilliant mile-square meadow
Illuminated with asters and cyclamen,
The pollen of the lodgepole pines drifting
With the shifting wind over it and the blue
And sulphur butterflies drifting with the wind,
I saw you in the sour prison light, saying,
“Goodbye comrade.”
In the basin under the crest
Where the pines end and the Sierra primrose begins,
A party of lawyers was shooting at a whiskey bottle.
The bottle stayed on its rock, nobody could hit it.
Looking back over the peaks and canyons from the last lake,
The pattern of human beings seemed simpler
Than the diagonals of water and stone.
Climbing the chute, up the melting snow and broken rock,
I remembered what you said about Sacco,
How it slipped your mind and you demanded it be read into the record.
Traversing below the ragged arête,
One cheek pressed against the rock
The wind slapping the other,
I saw you both marching in an army
You with the red and black flag, Sacco with the rattlesnake banner.
I kicked steps up the last snow bank and came
To the indescribably blue and fragrant
Polemonium and the dead sky and the sterile
Crystalline granite and final monolith of the summit.
These are the things that will last a long time, Vanzetti,
I am glad that once on your day I have stood among them.
Some day mountains will be named after you and Sacco.
They will be here and your name with them,
“When these days are but a dim remembering of the time
When man was wolf to man.”
I think men will be remembering you a long time
Standing on the mountains
Many men, a long time, comrade.

Kenneth Rexroth




Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on May 01, 2013, 05:35:13 AM
Doc, Thanks for bringing up the Beats, did a little reading last night on them, brought back some pleasant memories.  :icon_sunny:  :emthup:

                                                       A Supermarket in California

What thoughts I have of you tonight, Walt Whitman, for I walked down the
streets under the trees with a headache self-conscious looking at the full moon.

In my hungry fatigue, and shopping for images, I went into the neon fruit
supermarket, dreaming of your enumerations!
What peaches and what penumbras! Whole families shopping at night! Aisles
full of husbands! Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes! --- and you,
Garcia Lorca, what were you doing down by the watermelons?
I saw you, Walt Whitman, childless, lonely old grubber, poking among the
meats in the refrigerator and eyeing the grocery boys.
I heard you asking questions of each: Who killed the pork chops? What price
bananas? Are you my Angel?
I wandered in and out of the brilliant stacks of cans following you, and
followed in my imagination by the store detective.
We strode down the open corridors together in our solitary fancy tasting
artichokes, possessing every frozen delicacy, and never passing the cashier.
Where are we going, Walt Whitman? The doors close in an hour. Which way does
your beard point tonight?
(I touch your book and dream of our odyssey in the supermarket and feel
absurd.)
Will we walk all night through solitary streets? The trees add shade to
shade, lights out in the houses, we'll both be lonely.
Will we stroll dreaming of the lost America of love past blue automobiles in
driveways, home to our silent cottage?
Ah, dear father, graybeard, lonely old courage-teacher, what America did you
have when Charon quit poling his ferry and you got out on a smoking bank and
stood watching the boat disappear on the black waters of Lethe?

  Allen Ginsberg : 3 / 50
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on May 01, 2013, 06:08:03 AM
Makes me think of the Marina Safeway in San Fran...that most literary of grocery stores. But maybe the ghost of Whitman only shops in Chicago?

Maryanne meets Michael at the Marina Safeway...from Tales of the City. Great books, decent movie too.

http://www.youtube.com/v/4J2XgzozoDc&fs=1
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Surly1 on May 01, 2013, 09:05:25 AM
Friends,
FWIW, this is one spectacular thread. One that can be read and re-read and will repay the reader many times over.

In gratitude, I offer a favorite of my own--

In Place Of A Curse

By Ciardi, John

“At the next vacancy for God, if I am elected...”

At the next vacancy for God, if I am elected,
I shall forgive last the delicately wounded who,
having been slugged no harder than anyone else,
never got up again, neither to fight back,
nor to finger their jaws in painful admiration.

They who are wholly broken, and they in whom mercy is understanding,
I shall embrace at once and lead to pillows in heaven.
But they who are the meek by trade, baiting the best of their betters with extortions of a mock-helplessness,
I shall take last to love, and never wholly.

Let them all in Heaven - I abolish Hell -
but let it be read over them as they enter:
Beware the calculations of the meek, who gambled nothing
gave nothing, and could never receive enough.
Title: Re: Diner Library Poetry Shelf : The State Para-Military Force Speaks
Post by: Golden Oxen on May 07, 2013, 10:17:02 PM
  The State Para-Military Force Speaks
Raena Shirali



                        Bombay Riots, December, 1992

We stood by quietly as the mosque fell. Or was pulled.
The celebration turned riot and all the idols
lay decapitated at Nirmal Nagar. The elephant

god without an elephant head. Even without
the cold, we shivered. The buses around
us enshrined in flames. Who could tell

which temple was falling, and when? Of course,
we were in Jogeshwari when we found them.
The sickles. Iron rods flaking dark red chips

into the dirt. The Constable face-down
in the garbage. Seventy-two times
we intervened. Seventy-two times we killed

and were killed. Standing over us, the attackers
mocked. Where’s your army now, they said,
and we did not have an answer.

 
This young ladies poem was one of the winners of the Discovery 2013 Poetry contest.

 Raena Shirali’s work has appeared in Fogged Clarity and Four Way Review.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on May 08, 2013, 08:13:59 AM
Richard Brautigan was a favorite of mine back in high school. I think his work has stood the test of time.

He died by his own hand, crazy and alone, up on his beautiful wild land at Big Sur, a bitter old alcoholic and a gun nut. There's a lesson there for preppers, I'm pretty sure.


Karma Repair Kit: Items 1-4

1. Get enough food to eat, and eat it.
2. Find a place to sleep where it is quiet, and sleep there.
3. Reduce intellectual and emotional noise until you reach the silence of yourself, and listen to it.
4.

                                 ---Richard Brautigan


All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace

I like to think (and
the sooner the better!)
of a cybernetic meadow
where mammels and computers
live together in mutually
programming harmony
like pure water
touching clear sky.

     --- Richard Brautigan
Title: Re: Diner Library...Howl 2.0
Post by: Eddie on May 08, 2013, 11:57:56 AM
My daughter brought this to my attention after seeing it on her brother's FaceBook page. So FaceBook influences me even though I never, ever use it. This poem is am awesome parody of the original Ginsberg.
   

      HOWL 2.0
      For Fixoid
      I

      I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by
      tumblr, blogging hysterical naked,
      dragging themselves through the 4chan threads at dawn
      looking for some tranny dicks,
      angelheaded hipsters burning for the facebook heavenly
      connection to the starry dynamo in the machin-
      ery of night,
      who poverty and tatters and hollow-eyed and high sat
      up smoking in the supernatural darkness of
      lcd screens floating across the tops of desks
      contemplating gifs,
      who bared their brains to Google Map how to get under the El and
      saw Cory Arcangels staggering on boing-
      boing posts illuminated,
      who passed through universities with radiant cool eyes
      hallucinating Lauren Conrad and Blake Lively
      among the scholars of blog,
      who were expelled from the EFnets for crazy &
      publishing obscene odes on the Windows of the
      95,
      who cowered in unshaven chatrooms in underwear, burn-
      ing their CDs in wastebaskets and listening
      to the SouljaBoy Thru The Phone,
      who got busted in pubic forums returning through
      Flickr with a belt of JPG's for ffffound,
      who made fire in MS paint intels or drank martinis in
      Silicon Valley, death, or purgatoried their
      inbox night after night
      with Delicious, with Dashboard, with waking nightmares, Re-
      dbull and cock and endless balls online,
      incomparable blind; tweets of Amazon cloud and
      lightning in the modem leaping toward poles of
      Adam4Adam, illuminating all the mo-
      tionless world of internet Time between,
      P2P solidities of halls, backyard green tree cemetery
      dawns, wine drunkenness over the rooftops,
      storefront boroughs of teahead joyride neon
      blinking traffic light, sun and moon and tree
      vibrations in the roaring winter dusks of Brook-
      lyn, ashcan rantings and kind king light of mind,
      who chain lettered themselves to email for the endless
      ride from Blogspot to holy Blogger on common meme
      until the noise of hard drives and hamster dances brought
      them down shuddering mouse-wracked and
      battered bleak of brain all drained of brilliance
      in the drear light of .ZIP,
      who sank all night in submarine light of Rhizome
      floated out and sat through the stale gif after
      noon in desolate Nastynets, listening to the crack
      of M.F Doom on the Pandora jukebox,
      who blogged continuously seventy hours from bed to
      desk to kitchen to toilet to desk to the App-
      le Store,
      lost battalion of platonic conversationalists tweeting
      on the stoops on fire escapes on windowsills
      on Empire State out of the moon,
      ROTFL screaming vomiting whispering facts
      and memories and anecdotes and eyeball kicks
      and shocks of YTMND's and YouTube's and Space Ghetto posts,
      whole intellects disgorged in Total Recall for seven days
      and nights with brilliant eyes, memes for the
      Ad Agency cast on the pavement,
      who vanished into nowhere Zen Live Journal leaving a
      trail of ambiguous picture postcards of Triangles
      In Space,
      suffering Email sweats and Terabyte disk-grind-
      ings and products of China under dirtstyle-with-
      drawal in notcot's bleak furnished room,
      who wandered around and around at midnight in the
      MySpace blog wondering where to go, and went,
      leaving no broken hearts,
      who lit cigarettes at keyboards keyboards keyboards racketing
      through spam toward lonesome render farms in Bang-
      ladesh night,
      who studied Zuckerberg Jobs Duke Nukem of the Disk telep-
      athy and bop DFA records because the cosmos in-
      stinctively vibrated at their fingers in iTunes,
      who loned it through the booksmarks of J.O.D.I seeking vis-
      ionary internet angels who were visionary internet
      angels,
      who thought they were only mad when Ballmer
      gleamed in supernatural ecstasy,
      who jumped in bandwagons with the Dipset of No-
      homo on the impulse of winter midnight torrent
      light smalltown rain, pause
      who lounged hungry and lonesome through Gawker
      seeking news or sex or soap, and followed the
      brilliant Segal to converse about LOL Cats
      and Shaq, a hopeless task, and so took ship
      to The Pirate Bay,
      who disappeared into the volcanoes of GeoCities leaving
      behind nothing but the shadow of dancing gifs
      and the Java and ASP of poetry scattered in fire
      place Homested,
      who reappeared on the Kanye West Blog investigating the
      M.I.A in leggings and shorts with big pacifist
      eyes sexy in their dark skin sending out incom-
      prehensible Facebook invites,
      who burned Trapped in the Closet DVDs in their drives protesting
      the third season of Flavor of Love,
      who distributed Macromedia warez in Lime
      Wire weeping and undressing while the sirens
      of Lars Ulrich wailed them down, and wailed
      down Kazaa, and the Soulseak users also
      wailed,
      who broke down crying in blue screens of death naked
      and trembling before the machinery of other
      skeletons,
      who SurfTheChannel streamed The Wire and shrieked with delight
      in Aeron chairs for committing no crime but the shows
      own wild cooking pederasty and intoxication,
      who howled on their knees in the office and were
      dragged off the their desk waving Blackberrys and power-
      points,
      who let themselves be fucked in the ass by saintly
      fixed gear cyclists, and screamed with joy,
      who blew and were blown by those human seraphim,
      the hipsters, caresses of Bushwick and East Williamsburg
      love,
      who balled in the morning in the evenings in coffee
      shops and the Dolores parks and
      free WiFi spots scattering their semen freely to
      whomever come who may,
      who hiccuped endlessly trying to giggle but wound up
      on the FAIL blog behind some Epic Fail subpar post
      when cute overload kitties and puppies came to pierce
      them with a sword,
      who lost their Lonelygirl15's to the three old shrews of fake
      Greg Goodfriend, the one eyed shrew of the heterosexual dollar
      Ramesh Finders, the one eyed shrew that winks out of the womb
      and Miles Beckett, the one eyed shrew that does nothing but
      sit on his ass and snip the intellectual golden
      threads of the craftsman's loom,
      who masturbaited ecstatic and insatiate with a bookmark list of
      free porn a Redtube vid a Megarotic NSFW vid a clip-
      hunter vid and fell off their chair, and continued along
      the floor and down the hall and ended fainting
      on the wall with a vision of ultimate cunt and
      come eluding the last gyzym of consciousness,
      who downloaded the snatches of a million girls trembling
      in the sunset, and were red eyed in the morning
      but prepared to twitpic the snatch of the sun
      rise, flashing buttocks under barns and naked
      in the lake,
      who went out whoring through miseed connections in Nerve.com
      stolen virgin-cards, Tuker Max, secret hero of these
      poems, cocksman and Adonis of Douchebag-joy
      to the memory of his innumerable lays of girls
      in empty lots & bougie backyards, movie house parties
      Beatrice Inns, on rooftops in cubicles or with
      gaunt Public Relations chicks in familiar L train lonely pet-
      ticoat upliftings & especially secret podcast-stations
      solipsisms of johns, & midtown alleys too,
      who faded out in vast sordid MPEGs, were Ctl Alt Deleted in
      dreams, woke on a sudden Brooklyn, and
      picked themselves up out of basements hung
      over with Heartless mp3s and horrors of Xzibit
      Yo Dawg memes & stumbled to unemploy-
      ment websites,
      who blogged all night with their socks full of crud on
      their OS X docks waiting for a door in the
      blogosphere to open to a room full of Friend Requests
      and YouTube hits,
      who listened to Suicidal Tendancies on the apartment
      cliff-banks of the Hudson under the World Trade Center
      blue floodlight of the boom & their heads shall
      be crowned with turban in oblivion,
      who ate the Value Meals of the Dollar Menu or digested
      the iced lumps at the muddy bottom of the rivers of
      McFlurry,
      who wept at My Chemical Romance and The Streets with their
      iPods full of Onion podcasts and bad music,
      whose files sat in dropboxes breathing in the darkness under the
      2GB file limit, and finally were downloaded to blare MSTRKRFT
      in their roommate cluttered lofts,
      who coughed up nakid pix on the fourth chan of /B/ crowned
      with flame wars under the carpal tunnel sky surrounded
      by orange crates of theology cliff notes,
      who typed all night rocking and rolling over lofty
      incantations which in the yellow morning were
      stanzas of gibberish,
      who saw rotten.com animals lung heart feet tail Seinfeld
      & Taco Bell dreaming of the Terri Schiavo
      kingdom,
      who plunged themselves under Whole Foods trucks looking for
      a wireless signal,
      who threw their Storm™ 9530's off the roof to V-Cast their ballot
      for Eternity outside of Technology, & alarm clocks
      fell on their heads every day for the next decade,
      who got on Gawker three times successively unsuccess-
      fully, gave up and were forced to open thrift
      stores where they thought they were growing
      old and cried,
      who were burned alive in their innocent Prada shoes
      on Madison Avenue amid blasts of leaden verse
      & the tanked-up clatter of the Ad Age Daily emails
      of fashion & the nitroglycerine shrieks of the
      fairies of advertising & the mustard gas of sinis-
      ter intelligent Art Directors, or were run down by the
      drunken taxicabs of Absolut Reality campaigns,
      who signed off the Media Bistro list this actually hap-
      pened and trolled away unknown and forgotten
      into the ghostly daze of Chinatown soup alley
      ways & EBT, not even one free beer,
      who sang out of their Windows 7 in despair, fell out of
      the subway Windows XP, jumped in the filthy Red-
      hat, leaped on Snow Leopard, cried all over the manual,
      danced on broken Linux distros barefoot smashed
      5.25 floppies of nostalgic Mac OS
      7.1.2P floppies finished the Repair Disk Permissions and
      threw up groaning into the Disk Warrior, moans
      in their ears and the blast of colossal spindle
      whistles,
      who barreled down the information super highways of the past journeying
      to each other's keynote-Golgotha jail-broken-solitude
      webcast or TED talk incarnation,
      who drove crosscountry seventytwo hours to find out
      if I was a venture capitalist or you were a venture capitalist or he was
      a venture capitalist to find out fiduciary,
      who journeyed to Shareware, who died with Shareware, who
      came back to Shareware & waited in vain for the 30 day free trail to expire, who
      watched over Shareware & brooded & loned with
      Shareware and finally went away to find the
      Freeware, & now Shareware is lonesome for her heroes,
      who fell on their knees in hopeless data recovery centers praying
      for their disk's salvation and light and breasts,
      until the geaks illuminated its data for a second,
      who crashed through their gMail accounts in jail broken iPhones waiting for
      impossible head hunters with golden heads and the
      charm of reality in their hearts who sang sweet
      blues to Monster.com,
      who retired to Freelance to cultivate a habit, or became Production
      Assistants to tender QVC or What Not to Wear to Jersey Boys
      or Survivor auditions to the Black Entertainment Network or
      The New School to Narcissus to Portland to the
      bong rip or grave,
      who demanded sanity trials accusing the rap music videos of product
      placement & were left with their insanity & their
      hands & a hung jury,
      who threw vegan chicken salad at Hampshire lecturers on Feminism
      and subsequently presented themselves on the
      granite steps of the madhouse with shaven heads
      and harlequin MySpace updates of suicide, demanding in-
      stantaneous lobotomy,
      and who were given instead the concrete void of bandwidth
      ConEd bills data roaming fees Cable Modem-
      repair sometime in between 10am-5pm buffers Internet Addicts Anonymous &
      amnesia,
      who in humorless protest erased only one symbolic
      Mr Show clip, resting briefly in catatonia,
      returning years later truly bald except for some black thick rimmed
      eye glasses, and Wondershozen and Arrested Development, to the visible Mad
      Men mondays of the awards of the Smallville of the
      Season 6,
      Two Girls One Cups's and Goatse's foetid
      JPG, bickering with the echoes of the soul, rock-
      ing and rolling in the midnight Pottery Barn-bench
      Ikea dolmen-realms of love, dream of life outdoors a night-
      mare, bodies turned to stone as heavy as the
      moon,
      with Mamma Metasearch finally ******, and the last fantastic Altavista query
      flung out of the taskbar of Windows 98, and the last
      window closed at Y2K. and the last cellphone
      slammed at the wall in SMS relay and the last fur-
      nished room emptied down to the last piece of
      Design Within Reach furniture, a yellow paper 3M™ Post-it® stuck
      on a CRT monitor in the closet, and even that
      imaginary, nothing but a hopeful little bit of
      hallucination
      ah, Fixoid, while you are not safe I am not safe, and
      now you're really in the total Au Bon Pain soup of
      the Internet
      and who therefore ran through the icy For Dummies books obsessed
      with Adobe Flash of the CS3 of the use
      of the Illustrator the Photoshop the After Effects & the In-
      Design align function,
      who dreamt and made incarnate gaps in Bevel & Emboss
      through images juxtaposed, and trapped the
      Cory Arcangel style of the soul between 2 visual images
      and joined the elemental verbs and set the noun
      and dash of consciousness together jumping
      with sensation in AOL Instant Messen-
      ger
      to recreate the syntax and measure of poor Google
      searches and stand before YouTube speechless and intel-
      ligent and shaking with shame, rejected yet con-
      fessing out the soul to conform to the rhythm
      of thought in his naked and endless head,
      the Corey Worthington bum and Crank Dat beat in Time, unknown,
      yet putting down here what might be left to say
      in time come after death,
      and rose reincarnate in the ghostly clothes of Melissa Smith in
      the P. Diddy shadow of Making The Band 3 and blew the
      suffering of America's naked mind for love into
      an OMFG soft synth
      cry that shivered the blogs down to their last Rapidshare upload
      with the absolute heart of the tweet of life butchered
      out of their own bodies good to read a thousand more
      tweets.
      II
      What sphinx of silicon and solder bashed open
      their skulls and ate up their brains and imagi-
      nation?
      Babbage! Solitude! Filth! Ugliness! Ashcans and unob
      tainable dollars! Children screaming inside the
      forum threads! Boys sobbing in WoW Raids! Old men
      weeping in the Drudge Report!
      Babbage! Babbage! Nightmare of Babbage! Babbage the
      loveless! Mental Babbage! Babbage the heavy
      judger of men!
      Babbage the incomprehensible prison! Babbage the
      crossbone soulless routers and Servers of
      sorrows! Babbage whose towers are judgment!
      Babbage the vast stone of flame war! Babbage the stun-
      ned governments!
      Babbage whose mind is pure machinery! Babbage whose
      blood is running money! Babbage whose fingers
      are ten armies! Babbage whose bandwidth is a canni-
      bal dynamo! Babbage whose ear is a smoking
      fuse!
      Babbage whose eyes are a thousand blind Windows!
      Babbage whose server racks stand in the data
      centers like endless Jehovahs! Babbage whose fac-
      tories dream and croak in the fog! Babbage whose
      antennae and satellites crown the cities!
      Babbage whose love is endless gigahertz and megabytes! Babbage
      whose soul is electricity and banks! Babbage
      whose poverty is the specter of genius! Babbage
      whose fate is an Amazon cloud of sexless IP addresses!
      Babbage whose name is the Mind!
      Babbage in whom I sit lonely! Babbage in whom I dream
      Angels! Crazy in Babbage! Cocksucker in
      Babbage! Lacklove and manless in Babbage!
      Babbage who entered my soul early! Babbage in whom
      I am a consciousness without a body! Babbage
      who frightened me out of my natural ecstasy!
      Babbage whom I abandon! Wake up in Babbage!
      Light streaming out of the sky!
      Babbage! Babbage! Robot apartments! invisible suburbs!
      skeleton treasuries! blind capitals! demonic
      industries! spectral nations! invincible mad
      houses! virtual cocks! monstrous bombs!
      They broke their backs lifting Babbage to Heaven! Pave-
      ments, trees, radios, tons! lifting the city to
      Heaven which exists and is everywhere about
      us!
      Visions! omens! hallucinations! miracles! ecstasies!
      gone down the American river!
      Dreams! adorations! illuminations! religions! the whole
      boatload of sensitive bullshit!
      Breakthroughs! over the river! flips and crucifixions!
      gone down the flood! Highs! Epiphanies! De-
      spairs! Ten years' animal screams and suicides!
      Minds! New loves! Mad generation! down on
      the rocks of internet Time!
      Real holy laughter in the river! They saw it all! the
      wild eyes! the holy yells! They bade farewell!
      They jumped off the roof! to solitude! waving!
      carrying laptops! Down to the river! into the
      street!
      III
      Fixoid! I'm with you on the Internet
      where you're madder than I am
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you must feel very strange
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you imitate the shade of my mother
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you've murdered your twelve Followers
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you laugh at this invisible humor
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where we are great writers on the same dreadful
      cyberspace
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where your condition has become serious and
      is reported on your blog
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where the faculties of the skull no longer admit
      the worms of the senses
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you drink the tea of the posts of the
      spinsters of TMZ
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you pun in the tags of your Delicious the
      harpies of the bookmark
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you scream in a straightjacket that you're
      losing the game of the actual Tumblarity of the
      abyss
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you bang on the catatonic keyboard the soul
      is innocent and immortal it should never die
      ungodly in a well connected madhouse
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where fifty more shocks will never return your
      soul to its body again from its pilgrimage to a
      cross in the void
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you accuse your rebloggers of insanity and
      plot the NetArt socialist revolution against the
      fascist national Rhizome
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where you will split the heavens of Google Images
      and resurrect your living human image from the
      superhuman tomb
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where there are two-point-one-billion mad com-
      menters all together singing the final stanzas of Man in the Mirror
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where we hate and kiss the Internet under
      our bedsheets the Internet that blogs all
      night and won't let us sleep
      I'm with you on the Internet
      where we wake up electrified out of the coma
      by our own souls' computer fans roaring over the
      roof it's come to drop angelic bombs the
      hospital illuminates itself imaginary walls col-
      lapse O skinny legions run outside O starry
      spangled shock of mercy the eternal war is
      here O victory forget your underwear we're
      free
      I'm with you on the Internet
      in my dreams you walk dripping from a sea-
      journey on the information super highway across the Atlantic in tears
      to the door of my apartment in the Eastern night

      Ryder Ripps, 2009
   
Title: Re: Diner Library: Declining Public Appetite for Large Wars of Occupation
Post by: Golden Oxen on May 16, 2013, 05:42:15 AM
For the Diner Poetry Shelf

                      Declining Public Appetite for Large Wars of Occupation
Dara Wier

Unlike before, unlike in prehistoric times, unlike during the good old days when the public’s appetite for large wars of occupation made for lively, crisp, contoured news reporting filled with edifying dramas of mass slaughters and satisfying banquets of blood and guts and sinew-strewn sidewalks. Those were the better days, the past times, the public knew a good large war when it got one, the public demanded large wars preferably of the kind which could be counted on to kill, wound, maim, ruin, displace, dislodge, condemn, crush and otherwise offensively rush to overrun someone else’s public and its otherwise starved for attention, truth be told, somewhat dull life in need of large injections of free misery, served sliced, sans ice, more rife, less priced, what’s that, that’s the roar of the gathering voice of the declining public appetite, who are these people who say such things, the public appetite for large wars, for large wars of occupation, declining public appetite for large wars, declining public large war occupation with increasingly larger public appetite for petit discrete minute wars, you hear it all the time, we need some more smaller wars, what we need is, it is just the tiny ticket, things will improve, wars will be smaller and much more satisfying, increasing public appetite for small wars of quasi-occupation, perhaps virtual occupation of insignificant size bundles of modalities, wars of all sizes, wars, little tapas wars, little miniature wars, pint-sized wars, little buddy wars, cute wars, skinny wars, pocket-sized wars, smart wars, starter wars, correctly sized airline travel-sized wars, tasting wars, war samplers and war jars just the right-sized war for a public whose whims are made up by a thug disguised as Palladium or a mass murderer whose job’s to justify whatever war a warrior wants cause a warrior’s purpose wants war or maybe not, maybe warriors talk just like artists, blaming it all on the muse of war or on weapons which when we have them we have to use them or so says the playwright who says an axe or a shotgun or maybe it was a bow and arrow or a missile of some kind, or a pretty little bomb, bomb, camouflaged in a dainty little napkin introduced in Act I must go off, or is it will go off, by the end of the story. Story’s end.

Dara Wier’s newest book is You Good Thing. She writes for flying-object.org.
Title: NEW BLOG FEATURE: Diner Library Database Catalogue
Post by: RE on May 18, 2013, 07:06:05 PM
Elvis over on Economic Undertow is beginning Library of MUST READS for Doomers, and we also have our Library here inside the Diner, but neither one is Searchable in good DB formatting.

I contacted Peter about finding a good Widget for it, but so far nothing real good has turned up.

All on my Lonesome though, I figured out a means to drop a sortable Table onto the Diner Blog which will list out all the Diner's Top Selections for Collapse Reads.

If you wanna add to this Table, contact me via PM and I will let you know how to do it.

You can find the Catalogue at

http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/library/ (http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/library/)

or just click the Library Button on the Top Menu of the Diner Blog.

RE
Title: Diner Library: Seeking Librarians
Post by: RE on May 19, 2013, 03:35:22 AM
OK, I added a couple of the listings from Elvis' thread, and re-sorted the Table by Author to present on the Blog.

Any Diner can add to this Database, in fact at the moment anybody can, I have the Yahoo Group it is housed in Open for Membership, anybody can join.  You do need a Yahoo ID to join, but who doesn't have one of those already?

Anyhow, I encourage all Diners who are Collapse Reading Buffs who have favorite Books on Collapse to add to this Database.  I will Monitor it and periodically Update it on the Diner Blog, maybe once a month or so if it gets used by Diners/Undertowers.

Peter is working on finding a Widget we can use directly on the Diner for this, but until he locates one, this is quite serviceable.  Any entries made to this DB can be Exported as a CSV then moved to an In-House Diner DB, or in fact onto your own computer and you can make an Access DB to search and filter it as well.

You can also add good Collapse Websites to this DB, just put the name of the Blog under the Title Category.  Rest you can fudge as you see fit.

RE
Title: Bill Black with Chris Martenson on Kleptocracy
Post by: RE on May 25, 2013, 10:35:00 PM
H/T Zero Hedge.  I haven't listened to them, but I am sure they are Worthy additions to the Library here.

RE

http://www.youtube.com/v/i9JfmzUtlWM?feature=player_embedded

Part II (http://www.peakprosperity.com/martensoninsider/bill-black-part-ii-mess-own-making) is Premium, you gotta pay your dues to Chris to listen to this one.

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library BLASPHEMY
Post by: Golden Oxen on June 16, 2013, 07:22:41 AM

  Blasphemy
By Matt Sumpter

            A dog’s grave: mound of concrete
with a cross pressed in.
We are full-on sinful,
unbuttoning our Levi’s,

crouched behind a slash pile
in the Rathbone’s woods.
Scott pisses on it first,
then Harris, Owen, me. Steam fountains up

and forms sastrugi, greeting our faces
like sheer tongues,
like the dead who cannot bring
themselves to tell us, what you’ve feared is true.

None of us wonders
if there’s something worse
than Judgment: the years we’ll spend unmarried

to any home, praying in Potosi, Fayetteville, Batavia,
afraid that God
won’t care, afraid he will.

The worst thing we can think of, we’ve done,

then we walk home, grateful that the streetlights float
on darkness, indifferent as distant boats.


Matt Sumpter is an MFA candidate in Poetry at The Ohio State University, where he works as an Associate Poetry Editor for The Journal. He has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and an AWP Intro Journals Award, and he recently won the Crab Orchard Review Special Issues Feature Award in Poetry. Other work has appeared or is forthcoming in Boulevard, 32 Poems, Cincinnati Review, West Branch Wired, and elsewhere.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on June 26, 2013, 09:48:32 AM
Another favorite poem that came to mind today.

On His Blindness

When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg’d with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide,
“Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?”
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies: “God doth not need
Either man’s work or his own gifts: who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
And post o’er land and ocean without rest:
They also serve who only stand and wait.”

— John Milton
Title: Re: Diner Library: Reading Season
Post by: Golden Oxen on June 27, 2013, 04:59:50 AM
 by Nancy Grohol | June 23, 2013 · 11:28 am
Reading Season

By Sandy Stott

It seems a bit counterintuitive that, as the hours of daylight stretch out toward solstice and invite us outside, many of us also become expansive in our reading. But early summer brims with experiment; sleep seems distant kin of the other solstice. We sing the day elastic.

And so there seems also ample time for that sweetest of slow times, summer reading. Here is a briefly annotated list of summer books that also might have interested Henry, though, given his omnivorous reading appetite, that would be a safe wager in many instances.

This House of Sky – Ivan Doig: a lyrical first book by a noted writer of western landscapes (and behaviors), this memoir about Scottish immigrants making their way in another hard land is one of my favorites.

Reading the Mountains of Home – John Elder: Take Robert Frost’s great poem, “Directive,” topo maps of the mountains outside of Bristol, Vermont, Middlebury English professor, John Elder and ample stretches of time and combine them and you get a superb meditation on what it is to be guided into knowing a home landscape, which finally yields knowing home.

Teaching a Stone to Talk – Annie Dillard: Yes, this book of essays has knocked around for years, but it is still in print for good reason. Written after Dillard’s homage to Henry, A Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, these sometimes cryptic pieces were Dillard’s primary work. Some of the essays – Total Eclipse, Living Like Weasels, Teaching a Stone to Talk – have been heavily anthologized.

The Thoreau You Don’t Know – Robert Sullivan: Would Henry have picked up a book about himself? If he’d been introduced to Robert Sullivan’s earlier work, perhaps he would have. Sullivan is a quirky mind drawn to off-the-beaten-track subjects – see his books, Rats or The Meadowlands – and so his take on Thoreau avoids others’ tracks too. A very fine storyteller.

Seek – Denis Johnson: Join the essayist on his honeymoon in the Alaska bush, where he and his bride contract with a bush pilot notorious for coming down hard, aka, crashing. Finally, Johnson and wife are out there 100 miles from anyone to pan for gold so they can forge their own rings; the bush is not interested. What else do they learn? Other essays from the edges of our world, a number of them grim. One of the best stylists writing.

Street Haunting – Virginia Woolf’s classic essay about rambling the streets of London resonates – for me – with Thoreau’s daily footborne looks at his world, even as the settings are wildly different. Woolf’s writing makes more music than most writers can imagine.

And you, what are your summer reads? Send them on and we can compile a list loosely linked to Thoreau, who, after all, read globally.

                                             
Thoreau You Dont Know1
Thoreau You Dont Know1

http://thoreaufarm.org/2013/06/reading-season/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=reading-season (http://thoreaufarm.org/2013/06/reading-season/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=reading-season)   :icon_study:
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Surly1 on June 27, 2013, 07:46:47 AM
Excellent recommendations, GO. Thanks.

Was wondering where you were this morning!
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on June 27, 2013, 08:07:25 AM
Excellent recommendations, GO. Thanks.

Was wondering where you were this morning!

Hi Surly, My 3 grandchildren close by are out of school now for the summer, and my daughter is working, so I drop them off at summer camp and the YMCA every morning, and they have a way of conning me into McDonald's or the PancakeHouse for breakfast some mornings  on the way.  :exp-grin:

If I am not around for early coffee some mornings this summer, you know where I will be.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Surly1 on June 27, 2013, 11:04:56 AM
Excellent recommendations, GO. Thanks.

Was wondering where you were this morning!

Hi Surly, My 3 grandchildren close by are out of school now for the summer, and my daughter is working, so I drop them off at summer camp and the YMCA every morning, and they have a way of conning me into McDonald's or the PancakeHouse for breakfast some mornings  on the way.  :exp-grin:

If I am not around for early coffee some mornings this summer, you know where I will be.  :laugh:

Good to know. That will keep us from searching the FEMA camps in New England.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on June 27, 2013, 02:51:49 PM
Quote
Good to know. That will keep us from searching the FEMA camps in New England.

Please, don't rule that out completely Surly. If Big Brother has been reading my e-mails and listening in on my phone conversations, I got a problem.  :laugh: :exp-laugh: :-\ :'(
Title: Re: Diner Library: Four Walls
Post by: Golden Oxen on June 29, 2013, 05:32:51 AM

Four Walls
By Zeeshan Sahil, translated from the Urdu by Faisal Siddiqui, Christopher Kennedy, and Mi Ditmar
March 15, 2013


You could call where we live
a house.
A room, very high up
with a very low ceiling,
one window, quite large,
and one very small door
that you could pass through
with your hands folded over your breast,
never lifting your feet from the floor.
You can look out this window, too,
out the window in the very high room
with the very low ceiling
if you like;
you can sleep without stretching your legs;
you can live never lifting your head.

Zeeshan Sahil was born on December 15, 1961 in Hyderabad, Sindh. He is one of the main poets who started writing prose poetry in Pakistan. During his lifetime he published eight collections of poetry in Urdu. All eight books have been published in a single volume, titled Saari Nazmain, and his ghazals were collected in another volume, Wajh-e Begangi, in 2011. He died on April 12, 2008 in Karachi.
Title: Re: Diner Library: 1776
Post by: Golden Oxen on July 17, 2013, 10:13:20 AM

1776

July 10, 2013
Claire Sylvester Smith

In appraising a living tree, one must first consider its age. Then:

location, species, condition. If many trees of the same

kind grow in proximity, each loses value because it lacks

a distinctive gleam. Tree appraisal’s much simpler

if the tree is small enough still to be moved, in which case

and replanting a tree of the same type, girth and condition.

Still, we talk very earnestly about the price of things

that could never be uprooted or sold. We know seasons

are not arbitrary, from the rings and from the way they

remind us what it felt like to be us before. When this country was

becoming one, men wore white wigs, because their age

was a luxury, not a fact to be ashamed of or hide. A tree

in an industrial area is worth more than a tree in the woods.

a silent but looming reply. I like yelling very loud inside my house

and knowing no one can hear me, like when a tree falls

in the forest and somehow no money is lost, or when two

messengers pass on the road to each other’s masters, and say

nothing of the small sealed envelopes they carry near their chests.

 

 


Title: The Blind Men and the Elephant
Post by: jdwheeler42 on August 14, 2013, 05:52:24 AM
THE BLIND MEN AND THE ELEPHANT

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f8/Blind_men_and_elephant3.jpg)

John Godfrey Saxe

It was six men of Indostan
To learning much inclined,
Who went to see the Elephant
(Though all of them were blind),
That each by observation
Might satisfy his mind.

The First approach'd the Elephant,
And happening to fall
Against his broad and sturdy side,
At once began to bawl:
"God bless me! but the Elephant
Is very like a wall!"

The Second, feeling of the tusk,
Cried, -"Ho! what have we here
So very round and smooth and sharp?
To me 'tis mighty clear
This wonder of an Elephant
Is very like a spear!"

The Third approached the animal,
And happening to take
The squirming trunk within his hands,
Thus boldly up and spake:
"I see," quoth he, "the Elephant
Is very like a snake!"

The Fourth reached out his eager hand,
And felt about the knee.
"What most this wondrous beast is like
Is mighty plain," quoth he,
"'Tis clear enough the Elephant
Is very like a tree!"

The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,
Said: "E'en the blindest man
Can tell what this resembles most;
Deny the fact who can,
This marvel of an Elephant
Is very like a fan!"

The Sixth no sooner had begun
About the beast to grope,
Then, seizing on the swinging tail
That fell within his scope,
"I see," quoth he, "the Elephant
Is very like a rope!"

And so these men of Indostan
Disputed loud and long,
Each in his own opinion
Exceeding stiff and strong,
Though each was partly in the right,
And all were in the wrong!

MORAL.

So oft in theologic wars,
The disputants, I ween,
Rail on in utter ignorance
Of what each other mean,
And prate about an Elephant
Not one of them has seen!
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: luciddreams on August 14, 2013, 07:23:45 AM
Nice point ;)

Wonder if it falls on some deaf ears :laugh:

Deaf and Blind as it were.  I had heard that story before, but I had no idea it was a poem that somebody wrote. 
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: jdwheeler42 on August 14, 2013, 08:11:28 AM
Deaf and Blind as it were.  I had heard that story before, but I had no idea it was a poem that somebody wrote.
The story is actually ancient, long predating the poem from 150 years ago.  Saxe's poem is just the best telling I've read.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on August 14, 2013, 08:18:56 AM
Lots of elephants wandering around in these rooms. A blind man would probably be trampled in short order.
Title: Re: Diner Library: A Smile To Remember : Poetry Shelf
Post by: Golden Oxen on August 19, 2013, 11:48:20 AM
A Smile To Remember

we had goldfish and they circled around and around
in the bowl on the table near the heavy drapes
covering the picture window and
my mother, always smiling, wanting us all
to be happy, told me, 'be happy Henry!'
and she was right: it's better to be happy if you
can
but my father continued to beat her and me several times a week while
raging inside his 6-foot-two frame because he couldn't
understand what was attacking him from within.

my mother, poor fish,
wanting to be happy, beaten two or three times a
week, telling me to be happy: 'Henry, smile!
why don't you ever smile?'

and then she would smile, to show me how, and it was the
saddest smile I ever saw

one day the goldfish died, all five of them,
they floated on the water, on their sides, their
eyes still open,
and when my father got home he threw them to the cat
there on the kitchen floor and we watched as my mother
smiled

Charles Bukowski

This poet was called the Poet Laureate of Skid Row
Title: Re: Diner Library...Bukowski
Post by: Eddie on August 19, 2013, 01:01:44 PM
I believe Bukowski was a huge influence on Hunter Thompson. If I were an English professor I'd get some poor grad student to write his thesis on that one. It's a subject that's been sorely neglected by academia, imho.

That and the influence of C.S. Lewis on Douglas Adams. If I ever get to be a tenured Professor of Literature, I'm going to publish something on that one too. And the influence of Gertrude Stein on Jack Kerouac. So many fascinating subjects, so little interest (by anyone besides me, I mean.).LOL.

Title: Re: Diner Library...Bukowski
Post by: Surly1 on August 19, 2013, 01:36:02 PM
I believe Bukowski was a huge influence on Hunter Thompson. If I were an English professor I'd get some poor grad student to write his thesis on that one. It's a subject that's been sorely neglected by academia, imho.

That and the influence of C.S. Lewis on Douglas Adams. If I ever get to be a tenured Professor of Literature, I'm going to publish something on that one too. And the influence of Gertrude Stein on Jack Kerouac. So many fascinating subjects, so little interest (by anyone besides me, I mean.).LOL.

No, fascinating to others as well. But such pursuits are a byproduct of the Age of Surplus, which is winding to an end. I suspect that we will all be fully engaged in more utilitarian pursuits, sooner rather than later.

And GO, this is Somewhere Near You--
http://bukowskitavern.net/ (http://bukowskitavern.net/)

Title: Re: Diner Library...Bukowski
Post by: Golden Oxen on August 19, 2013, 03:55:57 PM
I believe Bukowski was a huge influence on Hunter Thompson. If I were an English professor I'd get some poor grad student to write his thesis on that one. It's a subject that's been sorely neglected by academia, imho.

That and the influence of C.S. Lewis on Douglas Adams. If I ever get to be a tenured Professor of Literature, I'm going to publish something on that one too. And the influence of Gertrude Stein on Jack Kerouac. So many fascinating subjects, so little interest (by anyone besides me, I mean.).LOL.

No, fascinating to others as well. But such pursuits are a byproduct of the Age of Surplus, which is winding to an end. I suspect that we will all be fully engaged in more utilitarian pursuits, sooner rather than later.

And GO, this is Somewhere Near You--
http://bukowskitavern.net/ (http://bukowskitavern.net/)

Not sure about that path Surly but I certainly get your drift. My vision of doom sees all the energy intensive activity going first, frivolous driving, homes heated at 78 degrees in winter with oil, no money to blow on a 200 dollar evening out at a sporting event, staying home and cooking rather than the fast food joints. Have a hope and a feeling that it might lead to a resurgence of reading, and study of our country and it's literature for a while anyway. Of course I see your vision as well eventually, but am hoping for a a period of introspection and thought by many before the lights go out completely.

As to the taverns, yes, one close buy in Cambridge and the other in Boston. Not my kind of places however, checked the menus and pictures.  Don't know exactly why but I go the Chinese restaraunt  route when I feel like tipping a few. Always liked the ambiance more, the lighting and Buddha ornaments, as well as the Chinese Cocktails; Zombies, Suffering Bastards, and Fog Cutters amongst my favorites. There is always that Chinese menu as well with two dozen different appetizers and a couple of hundred different goodies to nibble on until 1 AM.

On the menu of one of my favorite bars there is a description and caption under every Asian Cocktail with a saying. The one that makes me laugh the most is the Fog Cutter. "TWO OF THESE WILL CLEAR YOUR VISION" is the caption.   :laugh: :laugh: ;D ;D :exp-laugh: :exp-laugh:

                                                       
Zombie
Zombie
 
Title: Re: GO said
Post by: Eddie on August 19, 2013, 05:36:57 PM
My vision of doom sees all the energy intensive activity going first, frivolous driving, homes heated at 78 degrees in winter with oil, no money to blow on a 200 dollar evening out at a sporting event, staying home and cooking rather than the fast food joints. Have a hope and a feeling that it might lead to a resurgence of reading, and study of our country and it's literature for a while anyway. Of course I see your vision as well eventually, but am hoping for a a period of introspection and thought by many before the lights go out completely.

I was thinking too, about what Surly said, and I think you have it right on this one. We cut back first on the frivolous energy use, at least what seems right now to be most frivolous. Which is "discretionary driving". Because the cost of fuel continues to rise, we then cut back on luxuries to be able to still buy the fuel we think we "have to have", like gas to commute 30 miles to work.

So fewer restaurant meals, maybe less airline travel. Fewer vacation trips.

Eventually we will move closer to work, but not until we're hurting for the money. It will be a slow spiral down for a while, punctuated by black swan events that pull the rug out from underneath us from time to time.

The pursuit of frivolous knowledge, like studying the influence of Charles Bukowski on Hunter S. Thompson? That won't end entirely, but it might become the intellectual property of the sons and daughters of the elites, if any of them have the brains and the interest. The real problem might not be the end of energy surplus, but the end of intellectual inquiry as a human pastime. Nobody reads much anymore.

I caught my son reading Infinite Jest today. Made me feel good, even though I don't know much about David Foster Wallace. I don't think many 24 year- olds are wading through thousand page novels these days.


Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on August 19, 2013, 05:49:13 PM
Quote
I caught my son reading Infinite Jest today. Made me feel good, even though I don't know much about David Foster Wallace. I don't think many 24 year- olds are wading through thousand page novels these days.

Praise the Lord and treasure such a gift Doc, My two daughters are TV sitcom addicts, not even PBS watchers for a few hours a week.

My grand kids go from TV to I Pods. They are typical of the entire generation, or so they tell me.

No wonder no one gives a hell about anything but us doomer's it would appear.    :-\
Title: Re: Diner Library/Bukowski
Post by: Surly1 on August 20, 2013, 02:40:34 PM
One of my favorite writes gets Atlanticized on his birthday weekend.
Good analysis, too . . .

On Bukowski's Birthday Weekend, His Ode to 'The Railroad Yard'
When an industrial landscape is as good as the sea
Alexis C. Madrigal Aug 18 2013, 11:57 PM ET
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/08/on-bukowskis-birthday-weekend-his-ode-to-the-railroad-yard/278798/ (http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/08/on-bukowskis-birthday-weekend-his-ode-to-the-railroad-yard/278798/)
(http://[url=http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/mt/assets/science/railyard.jpg]http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/mt/assets/science/railyard.jpg[/url])

I read a lot of Charles Bukowski once upon a time, back during my Beat-reading phase, when the tragic strictures of the 1950s seemed to reflect my own pre-adult circumstances, and their abandon felt like the freedom I wanted.

Bukowski would have been 93 on Friday. This is his birthday weekend, which I'm sure he would have toasted. And so when I saw the tweets marking this minor occasion, I dug out the book of his that I remember best, a posthumous collection called, What Matters Most Is How Well You Walk Through the Fire. I can even remember pulling it from the shelf at Powell's in Portland and walking all the way across town to the South Park Blocks. I read it in the sunshine (it must have been July?) and I marked the poems I liked with tape tabs. Reading through those favorites now, 14 years later, I mostly see the things in Bukowski that I loved then, but came to dislike. Stanzas like this:

    how to break clear?
    a .44 magnum?
    a can of ale?
    the museum of pain
    doesn't charge admission,
    it's free as skunkshit.

Being a writer (and person) of considerably sunnier disposition, I used to revel in darkness on the page. Depravity, desperation, depression: these things were heavy! And who doesn't want to be heavy at 17? My dad even wrote me an epic warning letter after I made him read some of my teenage poems warning me not to equate being messed up with being deep.

In any case, I do not have unalloyed admiration for Bukowski anymore.

But there was one poem I marked that still speaks to me. It's called "the railroad yard."

    the feelings I get
    driving past the railroad yard
    (never on purpose but on my way to somewhere)
    are the feelings other men have for other things.
    I see the tracks and all the boxcars
    the tank cars the flat cars
    all of them motionless and so many of them
    perfectly lined up and not an engine anywhere
    (where are all the engines?).
    I drive past looking sideways at it all
    a wide, still railroad yard
    not a human in sight
    then I am past the yard
    and it wasn't just the romance of it all
    that gives me what I get
    but something back there nameless
    always making me feel better
    as some men feel better looking at the open sea
    or the mountains or at wild animals
    or at a woman
    I like those things too
    especially the wild animals and the woman
    but when I see those lovely old boxcars
    with their faded painted lettering
    and those flat cars and those fat round tankers
    all lined up and waiting
    I get quiet inside
    I get what other men get from other things
    I just feel better and it's good to feel better
    whenever you can
    not needing a reason.

I don't see the writer I became in a lot of what I read as a teenager, but here, I do. We can marvel at the landscapes we've built, their depths and ways can be as sublime and full of possibility as any natural system. But only if we look at them the right ways.
Title: Re: Diner Library: Phenomenal Woman - Diner Poetry Shelf
Post by: Golden Oxen on August 25, 2013, 04:31:30 AM
Phenomenal Woman

Pretty women wonder where my secret lies.
I'm not cute or built to suit a fashion model's size
But when I start to tell them,
They think I'm telling lies.
I say,
It's in the reach of my arms
The span of my hips,
The stride of my step,
The curl of my lips.
I'm a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That's me.

I walk into a room
Just as cool as you please,
And to a man,
The fellows stand or
Fall down on their knees.
Then they swarm around me,
A hive of honey bees.
I say,
It's the fire in my eyes,
And the flash of my teeth,
The swing in my waist,
And the joy in my feet.
I'm a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That's me.

Men themselves have wondered
What they see in me.
They try so much
But they can't touch
My inner mystery.
When I try to show them
They say they still can't see.
I say,
It's in the arch of my back,
The sun of my smile,
The ride of my breasts,
The grace of my style.
I'm a woman

Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That's me.

Now you understand
Just why my head's not bowed.
I don't shout or jump about
Or have to talk real loud.
When you see me passing
It ought to make you proud.
I say,
It's in the click of my heels,
The bend of my hair,
the palm of my hand,
The need of my care,
'Cause I'm a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That's me.


Maya Angelou :

(born Marguerite Ann Johnson on April 4, 1928) an American author and poet who has been called "America's most visible black female autobiographer" by scholar Joanne M. Braxton. She is best known for her series of six autobiographical volumes, which focus on her childhood and early adult experiences. The first and most highly acclaimed, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), tells of her first seventeen years. It brought her international recognition, and was nominated for a National Book Award. She has been awarded over 30 honorary degrees and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for her 1971 volume of poetry, Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water 'Fore I Diiie.
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry - Digging - Seamus Heaney
Post by: Golden Oxen on September 12, 2013, 04:59:47 AM
 Lucid, I thought of you and your wonderful family after reading this poem this morning. I hope you and Gypsy Mama enjoy it as much as I did.



Digging
By Seamus Heaney
 

Between my finger and my thumb   
The squat pen rests; snug as a gun.

Under my window, a clean rasping sound   
When the spade sinks into gravelly ground:   
My father, digging. I look down

Till his straining rump among the flowerbeds   
Bends low, comes up twenty years away   
Stooping in rhythm through potato drills   
Where he was digging.

The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft   
Against the inside knee was levered firmly.
He rooted out tall tops, buried the bright edge deep
To scatter new potatoes that we picked,
Loving their cool hardness in our hands.

By God, the old man could handle a spade.   
Just like his old man.

My grandfather cut more turf in a day
Than any other man on Toner’s bog.
Once I carried him milk in a bottle
Corked sloppily with paper. He straightened up
To drink it, then fell to right away
Nicking and slicing neatly, heaving sods
Over his shoulder, going down and down
For the good turf. Digging.

The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap
Of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge
Through living roots awaken in my head.
But I’ve no spade to follow men like them.

Between my finger and my thumb
The squat pen rests.
I’ll dig with it.

Seamus Heaney, "Digging" from Death of a Naturalist. Copyright 1966 by Seamus Heaney. Reprinted with the permission of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, LLC.


Seamus Heaney, who died Friday morning in Dublin, published poetry for roughly half a century. As he wrote in “Digging,” one of his most famous poems, that was his work. While his father and grandfather toiled in the fields, he worked by putting his pen to paper.

                                                         http://www.youtube.com/v/dIzJgbNANzk&fs=1
                                                                     
Title: Re: Diner Library/Wendell Berry Thoughts in the Presence of Fear
Post by: Surly1 on September 12, 2013, 08:29:13 AM
On this day after 9-11, it occurs to me to post this here. Posted yesterday on the DDFB page.
To me it reads like a manifesto of what we as Diners believe (well, most of us... I don't see RE signing on to #18...)

Thoughts in the Presence of Fear
by Wendell Berry
Web exclusive to the Autumn 2001 issue of Orion magazine
http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/214 (http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/214)

    This essay along with two others by Wendell Berry was published by Orion in In the Presence of Fear, available for purchase in the online store.


I. The time will soon come when we will not be able to remember the horrors of September 11 without remembering also the unquestioning technological and economic optimism that ended on that day.

II. This optimism rested on the proposition that we were living in a “new world order” and a “new economy” that would “grow” on and on, bringing a prosperity of which every new increment would be “unprecedented”.

III. The dominant politicians, corporate officers, and investors who believed this proposition did not acknowledge that the prosperity was limited to a tiny percent of the world’s people, and to an ever smaller number of people even in the United States; that it was founded upon the oppressive labor of poor people all over the world; and that its ecological costs increasingly threatened all life, including the lives of the supposedly prosperous.

IV. The “developed” nations had given to the “free market” the status of a god, and were sacrificing to it their farmers, farmlands, and communities, their forests, wetlands, and prairies, their ecosystems and watersheds. They had accepted universal pollution and global warming as normal costs of doing business.

V. There was, as a consequence, a growing worldwide effort on behalf of economic decentralization, economic justice, and ecological responsibility. We must recognize that the events of September 11 make this effort more necessary than ever. We citizens of the industrial countries must continue the labor of self-criticism and self-correction. We must recognize our mistakes.

VI. The paramount doctrine of the economic and technological euphoria of recent decades has been that everything depends on innovation. It was understood as desirable, and even necessary, that we should go on and on from one technological innovation to the next, which would cause the economy to “grow” and make everything better and better. This of course implied at every point a hatred of the past, of all things inherited and free. All things superseded in our progress of innovations, whatever their value might have been, were discounted as of no value at all.

VII. We did not anticipate anything like what has now happened. We did not foresee that all our sequence of innovations might be at once overridden by a greater one: the invention of a new kind of war that would turn our previous innovations against us, discovering and exploiting the debits and the dangers that we had ignored. We never considered the possibility that we might be trapped in the webwork of communication and transport that was supposed to make us free.

VIII. Nor did we foresee that the weaponry and the war science that we marketed and taught to the world would become available, not just to recognized national governments, which possess so uncannily the power to legitimate large-scale violence, but also to “rogue nations”, dissident or fanatical groups and individuals - whose violence, though never worse than that of nations, is judged by the nations to be illegitimate.

IX. We had accepted uncritically the belief that technology is only good; that it cannot serve evil as well as good; that it cannot serve our enemies as well as ourselves; that it cannot be used to destroy what is good, including our homelands and our lives.

X. We had accepted too the corollary belief that an economy (either as a money economy or as a life-support system) that is global in extent, technologically complex, and centralized is invulnerable to terrorism, sabotage, or war, and that it is protectable by “national defense”

XI. We now have a clear, inescapable choice that we must make. We can continue to promote a global economic system of unlimited “free trade” among corporations, held together by long and highly vulnerable lines of communication and supply, but now recognizing that such a system will have to be protected by a hugely expensive police force that will be worldwide, whether maintained by one nation or several or all, and that such a police force will be effective precisely to the extent that it oversways the freedom and privacy of the citizens of every nation.

XII. Or we can promote a decentralized world economy which would have the aim of assuring to every nation and region a local self-sufficiency in life-supporting goods. This would not eliminate international trade, but it would tend toward a trade in surpluses after local needs had been met.

XIII. One of the gravest dangers to us now, second only to further terrorist attacks against our people, is that we will attempt to go on as before with the corporate program of global “free trade”, whatever the cost in freedom and civil rights, without self-questioning or self-criticism or public debate.

XIV. This is why the substitution of rhetoric for thought, always a temptation in a national crisis, must be resisted by officials and citizens alike. It is hard for ordinary citizens to know what is actually happening in Washington in a time of such great trouble; for all we know, serious and difficult thought may be taking place there. But the talk that we are hearing from politicians, bureaucrats, and commentators has so far tended to reduce the complex problems now facing us to issues of unity, security, normality, and retaliation.

XV. National self-righteousness, like personal self-righteousness, is a mistake. It is misleading. It is a sign of weakness. Any war that we may make now against terrorism will come as a new installment in a history of war in which we have fully participated. We are not innocent of making war against civilian populations. The modern doctrine of such warfare was set forth and enacted by General William Tecumseh Sherman, who held that a civilian population could be declared guilty and rightly subjected to military punishment. We have never repudiated that doctrine.

XVI. It is a mistake also - as events since September 11 have shown - to suppose that a government can promote and participate in a global economy and at the same time act exclusively in its own interest by abrogating its international treaties and standing apart from international cooperation on moral issues.

XVII. And surely, in our country, under our Constitution, it is a fundamental error to suppose that any crisis or emergency can justify any form of political oppression. Since September 11, far too many public voices have presumed to “speak for us” in saying that Americans will gladly accept a reduction of freedom in exchange for greater “security”. Some would, maybe. But some others would accept a reduction in security (and in global trade) far more willingly than they would accept any abridgement of our Constitutional rights.

XVIII. In a time such as this, when we have been seriously and most cruelly hurt by those who hate us, and when we must consider ourselves to be gravely threatened by those same people, it is hard to speak of the ways of peace and to remember that Christ enjoined us to love our enemies, but this is no less necessary for being difficult.

XIX. Even now we dare not forget that since the attack of Pearl Harbor - to which the present attack has been often and not usefully compared - we humans have suffered an almost uninterrupted sequence of wars, none of which has brought peace or made us more peaceable.

XX. The aim and result of war necessarily is not peace but victory, and any victory won by violence necessarily justifies the violence that won it and leads to further violence. If we are serious about innovation, must we not conclude that we need something new to replace our perpetual “war to end war?”

XXI. What leads to peace is not violence but peaceableness, which is not passivity, but an alert, informed, practiced, and active state of being. We should recognize that while we have extravagantly subsidized the means of war, we have almost totally neglected the ways of peaceableness. We have, for example, several national military academies, but not one peace academy. We have ignored the teachings and the examples of Christ, Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and other peaceable leaders. And here we have an inescapable duty to notice also that war is profitable, whereas the means of peaceableness, being cheap or free, make no money.

XXII. The key to peaceableness is continuous practice. It is wrong to suppose that we can exploit and impoverish the poorer countries, while arming them and instructing them in the newest means of war, and then reasonably expect them to be peaceable.

XXIII. We must not again allow public emotion or the public media to caricature our enemies. If our enemies are now to be some nations of Islam, then we should undertake to know those enemies. Our schools should begin to teach the histories, cultures, arts, and language of the Islamic nations. And our leaders should have the humility and the wisdom to ask the reasons some of those people have for hating us.

XXIV. Starting with the economies of food and farming, we should promote at home, and encourage abroad, the ideal of local self-sufficiency. We should recognize that this is the surest, the safest, and the cheapest way for the world to live. We should not countenance the loss or destruction of any local capacity to produce necessary goods

XXV. We should reconsider and renew and extend our efforts to protect the natural foundations of the human economy: soil, water, and air. We should protect every intact ecosystem and watershed that we have left, and begin restoration of those that have been damaged.

XXVI. The complexity of our present trouble suggests as never before that we need to change our present concept of education. Education is not properly an industry, and its proper use is not to serve industries, either by job-training or by industry-subsidized research. It’s proper use is to enable citizens to live lives that are economically, politically, socially, and culturally responsible. This cannot be done by gathering or “accessing” what we now call “information” - which is to say facts without context and therefore without priority. A proper education enables young people to put their lives in order, which means knowing what things are more important than other things; it means putting first things first.

XXVII. The first thing we must begin to teach our children (and learn ourselves) is that we cannot spend and consume endlessly. We have got to learn to save and conserve. We do need a “new economy”, but one that is founded on thrift and care, on saving and conserving, not on excess and waste. An economy based on waste is inherently and hopelessly violent, and war is its inevitable by-product. We need a peaceable economy.
Title: Re: Wendell Berry
Post by: Eddie on September 12, 2013, 08:43:29 AM
VII. We did not anticipate anything like what has now happened. We did not foresee that all our sequence of innovations might be at once overridden by a greater one: the invention of a new kind of war that would turn our previous innovations against us, discovering and exploiting the debits and the dangers that we had ignored.

Actually, some of us wondered for many years why the wide world was full of terrorists, but that here in the Motherland we were untouched by the violence so common in other places...like Northern Ireland and Israel and Chechnya. I always expected it would start sometime.

In fact some of us still wonder why we have so little terrorism here and now. I don't believe that it has that much to do with the government protecting us.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: WHD on September 12, 2013, 08:50:35 AM
On this day after 9-11, it occurs to me to post this here. Posted yesterday on the DDFB page.
To me it reads like a manifesto of what we as Diners believe (well, most of us... I don't see RE signing on to #18...)

Thoughts in the Presence of Fear
by Wendell Berry
Web exclusive to the Autumn 2001 issue of Orion magazine
http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/214 (http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/214)

    This essay along with two others by Wendell Berry was published by Orion in In the Presence of Fear, available for purchase in the online store.


I. The time will soon come when we will not be able to remember the horrors of September 11 without remembering also the unquestioning technological and economic optimism that ended on that day.

II. This optimism rested on the proposition that we were living in a “new world order” and a “new economy” that would “grow” on and on, bringing a prosperity of which every new increment would be “unprecedented”.

III. The dominant politicians, corporate officers, and investors who believed this proposition did not acknowledge that the prosperity was limited to a tiny percent of the world’s people, and to an ever smaller number of people even in the United States; that it was founded upon the oppressive labor of poor people all over the world; and that its ecological costs increasingly threatened all life, including the lives of the supposedly prosperous.

IV. The “developed” nations had given to the “free market” the status of a god, and were sacrificing to it their farmers, farmlands, and communities, their forests, wetlands, and prairies, their ecosystems and watersheds. They had accepted universal pollution and global warming as normal costs of doing business.

V. There was, as a consequence, a growing worldwide effort on behalf of economic decentralization, economic justice, and ecological responsibility. We must recognize that the events of September 11 make this effort more necessary than ever. We citizens of the industrial countries must continue the labor of self-criticism and self-correction. We must recognize our mistakes.

VI. The paramount doctrine of the economic and technological euphoria of recent decades has been that everything depends on innovation. It was understood as desirable, and even necessary, that we should go on and on from one technological innovation to the next, which would cause the economy to “grow” and make everything better and better. This of course implied at every point a hatred of the past, of all things inherited and free. All things superseded in our progress of innovations, whatever their value might have been, were discounted as of no value at all.

VII. We did not anticipate anything like what has now happened. We did not foresee that all our sequence of innovations might be at once overridden by a greater one: the invention of a new kind of war that would turn our previous innovations against us, discovering and exploiting the debits and the dangers that we had ignored. We never considered the possibility that we might be trapped in the webwork of communication and transport that was supposed to make us free.

VIII. Nor did we foresee that the weaponry and the war science that we marketed and taught to the world would become available, not just to recognized national governments, which possess so uncannily the power to legitimate large-scale violence, but also to “rogue nations”, dissident or fanatical groups and individuals - whose violence, though never worse than that of nations, is judged by the nations to be illegitimate.

IX. We had accepted uncritically the belief that technology is only good; that it cannot serve evil as well as good; that it cannot serve our enemies as well as ourselves; that it cannot be used to destroy what is good, including our homelands and our lives.

X. We had accepted too the corollary belief that an economy (either as a money economy or as a life-support system) that is global in extent, technologically complex, and centralized is invulnerable to terrorism, sabotage, or war, and that it is protectable by “national defense”

XI. We now have a clear, inescapable choice that we must make. We can continue to promote a global economic system of unlimited “free trade” among corporations, held together by long and highly vulnerable lines of communication and supply, but now recognizing that such a system will have to be protected by a hugely expensive police force that will be worldwide, whether maintained by one nation or several or all, and that such a police force will be effective precisely to the extent that it oversways the freedom and privacy of the citizens of every nation.

XII. Or we can promote a decentralized world economy which would have the aim of assuring to every nation and region a local self-sufficiency in life-supporting goods. This would not eliminate international trade, but it would tend toward a trade in surpluses after local needs had been met.

XIII. One of the gravest dangers to us now, second only to further terrorist attacks against our people, is that we will attempt to go on as before with the corporate program of global “free trade”, whatever the cost in freedom and civil rights, without self-questioning or self-criticism or public debate.

XIV. This is why the substitution of rhetoric for thought, always a temptation in a national crisis, must be resisted by officials and citizens alike. It is hard for ordinary citizens to know what is actually happening in Washington in a time of such great trouble; for all we know, serious and difficult thought may be taking place there. But the talk that we are hearing from politicians, bureaucrats, and commentators has so far tended to reduce the complex problems now facing us to issues of unity, security, normality, and retaliation.

XV. National self-righteousness, like personal self-righteousness, is a mistake. It is misleading. It is a sign of weakness. Any war that we may make now against terrorism will come as a new installment in a history of war in which we have fully participated. We are not innocent of making war against civilian populations. The modern doctrine of such warfare was set forth and enacted by General William Tecumseh Sherman, who held that a civilian population could be declared guilty and rightly subjected to military punishment. We have never repudiated that doctrine.

XVI. It is a mistake also - as events since September 11 have shown - to suppose that a government can promote and participate in a global economy and at the same time act exclusively in its own interest by abrogating its international treaties and standing apart from international cooperation on moral issues.

XVII. And surely, in our country, under our Constitution, it is a fundamental error to suppose that any crisis or emergency can justify any form of political oppression. Since September 11, far too many public voices have presumed to “speak for us” in saying that Americans will gladly accept a reduction of freedom in exchange for greater “security”. Some would, maybe. But some others would accept a reduction in security (and in global trade) far more willingly than they would accept any abridgement of our Constitutional rights.

XVIII. In a time such as this, when we have been seriously and most cruelly hurt by those who hate us, and when we must consider ourselves to be gravely threatened by those same people, it is hard to speak of the ways of peace and to remember that Christ enjoined us to love our enemies, but this is no less necessary for being difficult.

XIX. Even now we dare not forget that since the attack of Pearl Harbor - to which the present attack has been often and not usefully compared - we humans have suffered an almost uninterrupted sequence of wars, none of which has brought peace or made us more peaceable.

XX. The aim and result of war necessarily is not peace but victory, and any victory won by violence necessarily justifies the violence that won it and leads to further violence. If we are serious about innovation, must we not conclude that we need something new to replace our perpetual “war to end war?”

XXI. What leads to peace is not violence but peaceableness, which is not passivity, but an alert, informed, practiced, and active state of being. We should recognize that while we have extravagantly subsidized the means of war, we have almost totally neglected the ways of peaceableness. We have, for example, several national military academies, but not one peace academy. We have ignored the teachings and the examples of Christ, Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and other peaceable leaders. And here we have an inescapable duty to notice also that war is profitable, whereas the means of peaceableness, being cheap or free, make no money.

XXII. The key to peaceableness is continuous practice. It is wrong to suppose that we can exploit and impoverish the poorer countries, while arming them and instructing them in the newest means of war, and then reasonably expect them to be peaceable.

XXIII. We must not again allow public emotion or the public media to caricature our enemies. If our enemies are now to be some nations of Islam, then we should undertake to know those enemies. Our schools should begin to teach the histories, cultures, arts, and language of the Islamic nations. And our leaders should have the humility and the wisdom to ask the reasons some of those people have for hating us.

XXIV. Starting with the economies of food and farming, we should promote at home, and encourage abroad, the ideal of local self-sufficiency. We should recognize that this is the surest, the safest, and the cheapest way for the world to live. We should not countenance the loss or destruction of any local capacity to produce necessary goods

XXV. We should reconsider and renew and extend our efforts to protect the natural foundations of the human economy: soil, water, and air. We should protect every intact ecosystem and watershed that we have left, and begin restoration of those that have been damaged.

XXVI. The complexity of our present trouble suggests as never before that we need to change our present concept of education. Education is not properly an industry, and its proper use is not to serve industries, either by job-training or by industry-subsidized research. It’s proper use is to enable citizens to live lives that are economically, politically, socially, and culturally responsible. This cannot be done by gathering or “accessing” what we now call “information” - which is to say facts without context and therefore without priority. A proper education enables young people to put their lives in order, which means knowing what things are more important than other things; it means putting first things first.

XXVII. The first thing we must begin to teach our children (and learn ourselves) is that we cannot spend and consume endlessly. We have got to learn to save and conserve. We do need a “new economy”, but one that is founded on thrift and care, on saving and conserving, not on excess and waste. An economy based on waste is inherently and hopelessly violent, and war is its inevitable by-product. We need a peaceable economy.

Amen.  :)

WHD
Title: Re: Wendell Berry
Post by: Surly1 on September 12, 2013, 01:39:05 PM
VII. We did not anticipate anything like what has now happened. We did not foresee that all our sequence of innovations might be at once overridden by a greater one: the invention of a new kind of war that would turn our previous innovations against us, discovering and exploiting the debits and the dangers that we had ignored.

Actually, some of us wondered for many years why the wide world was full of terrorists, but that here in the Motherland we were untouched by the violence so common in other places...like Northern Ireland and Israel and Chechnya. I always expected it would start sometime.

In fact some of us still wonder why we have so little terrorism here and now. I don't believe that it has that much to do with the government protecting us.

I would suggest we have plenty of terrorism. It's just in body armor and tanks.

(http://images.dailytech.com/nimage/Police_Brutality_Poster_New.jpg) (http://spilldabeanz.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Police-Brutality-at-Its-Finest.jpg)
(http://www.xerraireart.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/Barcelona.jpg) (http://yourworldnews.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/police-brutality-small.jpg)
(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/10/14/article-2049137-0E5F4EA500000578-857_634x423.jpg) (http://www.actnowny.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/J3AE5.jpg)
(http://endthelie.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/cab29_occupy-movement-union-square-774.jpg)
(http://www.rlgfirm.com/images/policebrutality1.jpg)
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Surly1 on September 12, 2013, 02:06:32 PM
Plus my personal favorite. Our tax dollars at work.

(http://lisaleaks.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/police-brutality.jpg)

Back story here:
http://www.ynaija.com/police-officer-who-kicked-an-handcuffed-woman-in-the-face-given-10-year-suspension-photos-video/ (http://www.ynaija.com/police-officer-who-kicked-an-handcuffed-woman-in-the-face-given-10-year-suspension-photos-video/)
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on September 12, 2013, 04:15:24 PM
We damn sure have an abundance of Law and Order in this country. Way more than we need, and far too well equipped. But that's not the same as terrorism, exactly, in my book. Terrorism is pressure cookers and black powder and ball bearings. Bombs in baby carriages.

The behavior you're referencing is our fledgling attempt to learn how to ease right-wing death squads into the 21st century American zeitgeist. We're coming right along on that, no doubt.

"The nail that sticks out gets hammered down" as the Japanese say. My heartfelt advice to anyone who is listening is "Don't be the nail that sticks out". At least not by fighting cops with rubber bullets and pepper spray using  trash can lids and water soaked bandanas. The graveyards are full of dead heroes.

Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry- Nothing Gold Can Stay - Robert Frost
Post by: Golden Oxen on September 15, 2013, 08:42:07 AM

Nothing Gold Can Stay


by Robert Frost   

Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.


Title: Re: Diner Library/Avoiding the feeding of trolls
Post by: Surly1 on September 18, 2013, 11:43:47 AM
Didn't want to start a new topic, so I thought I might park this here.

Two remarkable little sites that I found today and reposted on the DDFB site.

First, this:
https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/

A logical fallacy is a flaw in reasoning. Logical fallacies are like tricks or illusions of thought, and they're often very sneakily used by politicians and the media to fool people. Don't be fooled! This website has been designed to help you identify and call out dodgy logic wherever it may raise its ugly, incoherent head.

Rollover the icons above and click for examples. If you see someone committing a fallacy online, link them to their fallacy e.g. yourlogicalfallacyis.com/strawman.

Visit the site and see for yourself. Then when someone pops and ad hom or false cause, just hit them with the URL.


Here is the next. Mario Piperni posted this today, and I visited:
https://bookofbadarguments.com/?view=allpages

Delightful little book. We're see many old familiars within.

(https://bookofbadarguments.com/images/strawman.png)

(https://bookofbadarguments.com/images/false_dilemma.png)

When the book is ready, I'll be giving some as Christmas gifts.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Golden Oxen on September 18, 2013, 06:02:12 PM
Just finished that wonderful illustrated book Surly, what a great find. 

Placed it in my favorites, a keeper for sure.  :emthup:
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry - William Blake - Auguries of Innocence
Post by: Golden Oxen on September 29, 2013, 07:01:20 AM

Auguries of Innocence

To see a world in a grain of sand
And a heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
And eternity in an hour.

A robin redbreast in a cage
Puts all heaven in a rage.

A dove-house fill'd with doves and pigeons
Shudders hell thro' all its regions.
A dog starv'd at his master's gate
Predicts the ruin of the state.

A horse misused upon the road
Calls to heaven for human blood.
Each outcry of the hunted hare
A fibre from the brain does tear.

A skylark wounded in the wing,
A cherubim does cease to sing.
The game-cock clipt and arm'd for fight
Does the rising sun affright.

Every wolf's and lion's howl
Raises from hell a human soul.

The wild deer, wand'ring here and there,
Keeps the human soul from care.
The lamb misus'd breeds public strife,
And yet forgives the butcher's knife.

The bat that flits at close of eve
Has left the brain that won't believe.
The owl that calls upon the night
Speaks the unbeliever's fright.

He who shall hurt the little wren
Shall never be belov'd by men.
He who the ox to wrath has mov'd
Shall never be by woman lov'd.

The wanton boy that kills the fly
Shall feel the spider's enmity.
He who torments the chafer's sprite
Weaves a bower in endless night.

The caterpillar on the leaf
Repeats to thee thy mother's grief.
Kill not the moth nor butterfly,
For the last judgement draweth nigh.

He who shall train the horse to war
Shall never pass the polar bar.
The beggar's dog and widow's cat,
Feed them and thou wilt grow fat.

The gnat that sings his summer's song
Poison gets from slander's tongue.
The poison of the snake and newt
Is the sweat of envy's foot.

The poison of the honey bee
Is the artist's jealousy.

The prince's robes and beggar's rags
Are toadstools on the miser's bags.
A truth that's told with bad intent
Beats all the lies you can invent.

It is right it should be so;
Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

Joy and woe are woven fine,
A clothing for the soul divine.
Under every grief and pine
Runs a joy with silken twine.

The babe is more than swaddling bands;
Every farmer understands.
Every tear from every eye
Becomes a babe in eternity;

This is caught by females bright,
And return'd to its own delight.
The bleat, the bark, bellow, and roar,
Are waves that beat on heaven's shore.

The babe that weeps the rod beneath
Writes revenge in realms of death.
The beggar's rags, fluttering in air,
Does to rags the heavens tear.

The soldier, arm'd with sword and gun,
Palsied strikes the summer's sun.
The poor man's farthing is worth more
Than all the gold on Afric's shore.

One mite wrung from the lab'rer's hands
Shall buy and sell the miser's lands;
Or, if protected from on high,
Does that whole nation sell and buy.

He who mocks the infant's faith
Shall be mock'd in age and death.
He who shall teach the child to doubt
The rotting grave shall ne'er get out.

He who respects the infant's faith
Triumphs over hell and death.
The child's toys and the old man's reasons
Are the fruits of the two seasons.

The questioner, who sits so sly,
Shall never know how to reply.
He who replies to words of doubt
Doth put the light of knowledge out.

The strongest poison ever known
Came from Caesar's laurel crown.
Nought can deform the human race
Like to the armour's iron brace.

When gold and gems adorn the plow,
To peaceful arts shall envy bow.
A riddle, or the cricket's cry,
Is to doubt a fit reply.

The emmet's inch and eagle's mile
Make lame philosophy to smile.
He who doubts from what he sees
Will ne'er believe, do what you please.

If the sun and moon should doubt,
They'd immediately go out.
To be in a passion you good may do,
But no good if a passion is in you.

The whore and gambler, by the state
Licensed, build that nation's fate.
The harlot's cry from street to street
Shall weave old England's winding-sheet.

The winner's shout, the loser's curse,
Dance before dead England's hearse.

Every night and every morn
Some to misery are born,
Every morn and every night
Some are born to sweet delight.

Some are born to sweet delight,
Some are born to endless night.

We are led to believe a lie
When we see not thro' the eye,
Which was born in a night to perish in a night,
When the soul slept in beams of light.

God appears, and God is light,
To those poor souls who dwell in night;
But does a human form display
To those who dwell in realms of day.
Title: Re: Diner Library Poetry Shelf - I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings - Maya Angelou
Post by: Golden Oxen on October 16, 2013, 05:33:53 AM

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

The free bird leaps
on the back of the wind
and floats downstream
till the current ends
and dips his wings
in the orange sun rays
and dares to claim the sky.

But a bird that stalks
down his narrow cage
can seldom see through
his bars of rage
his wings are clipped and
his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings
with fearful trill
of the things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom

The free bird thinks of another breeze
an the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
and the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright lawn
and he names the sky his own.

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing

The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.

Maya Angelou

Biography of Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou poet

(born Marguerite Ann Johnson on April 4, 1928) an American author and poet who has been called "America's most visible black female autobiographer" by scholar Joanne M. Braxton. She is best known for her series of six autobiographical volumes, which focus on her childhood and early adult experiences. The first and most highly acclaimed, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), tells of her first seventeen years. It brought her international recognition, and was nominated for a National Book Award. She has been awarded over 30 honorary degrees and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for her 1971 volume of poetry, Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water 'Fore I Diiie.

                                                           
Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on November 21, 2013, 09:59:28 AM
This one has been rattling around in my head today.


A VALEDICTION FORBIDDING MOURNING.

AS virtuous men pass mildly away,
    And whisper to their souls to go,
Whilst some of their sad friends do say,
    "Now his breath goes," and some say, "No." [1]                   

So let us melt, and make no noise,                                       5
    No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move ;
'Twere profanation of our joys
    To tell the laity our love.

Moving of th' earth brings harms and fears ;
    Men reckon what it did, and meant ;                              10
But trepidation of the spheres,
    Though greater far, is innocent.

Dull sublunary lovers' love
    —Whose soul is sense—cannot admit
Of absence, 'cause it doth remove                                     15
    The thing which elemented it.

But we by a love so much refined,
    That ourselves know not what it is,
Inter-assurèd of the mind,
    Care less, eyes, lips and hands to miss.                           20

Our two souls therefore, which are one,
    Though I must go, endure not yet
A breach, but an expansion,
    Like gold to aery thinness beat.

If they be two, they are two so                                          25
    As stiff twin compasses are two ;
Thy soul, the fix'd foot, makes no show
    To move, but doth, if th' other do.

And though it in the centre sit,
    Yet, when the other far doth roam,                                30
It leans, and hearkens after it,
    And grows erect, as that comes home.

Such wilt thou be to me, who must,
    Like th' other foot, obliquely run ;
Thy firmness makes my circle just,                                    35
    And makes me end where I begun.

                         --- John Donne
 
Title: Re: Diner Library-Poetry Shelf- Catching a Porcupine
Post by: Golden Oxen on December 15, 2013, 03:32:49 AM
Kinda wish I hadn't come across it. Hate starting the day teared up.


Catching a Porcupine

 Father used to say
that if I were sitting,
waiting for a porcupine,
the time is always best
when the Milky Way turns back—
this is the time
when a porcupine returns.
 
Father also said
I should feel the wind.
He used to say
I should be careful
always to test
the direction of the wind.
The porcupine is not a thing
which will return, he’d say,
coming with the wind.
Rather, it moves
slant-wise, across it,
so that it can better
sniff the air and tell
if danger lurks ahead.
 
Father used to say
I should breathe softly
when sitting, waiting
for a porcupine.
It is a thing, he said,
which hears everything.
I must not even
make a rustling.
I must sit deadstill.
 
Father taught me
about the stars.
He used to say
that I should,
if sitting by a burrow,
I should watch the stars,
the places where they fell,
I should, above all,
watch them keenly,
for the places where stars fall,
he often taught,
really are the places
where porcupines can be caught.


These are translations based on the “Bleek Collection,” |Xam (bushman) oral records taken down by the German linguist W.H. Bleek, and his assistant, Lucy Lloyd, in the 1870s. The “informants” listed are the |Xam people who related their poems and tales to Bleek and Lloyd. By the end of the century, the |Xam had been effectively exterminated; nobody on earth today can speak their language.
Title: Re: Diner Library/Catching A Porcupine
Post by: Karpatok on December 15, 2013, 05:33:18 AM
Sometimes, Golden Oxen, it's hard not to love you.
Title: Re: Diner Library/Catching A Porcupine
Post by: Golden Oxen on December 15, 2013, 05:50:38 AM
Sometimes, Golden Oxen, it's hard not to love you.

What a wonderful thing to say Karpatok. Thank you ever so much.

You have been missing for a while, hope all is OK. Boy, did you ever make my day, Thanks again K
Title: Re: Diner Library: Poetry Shelf - The Killers
Post by: Golden Oxen on December 31, 2013, 06:27:59 AM
The Killers

Not that anybody’s ever going to see it now
but in my very first passport photo
I look like the kind of young man
whom a West German customs official
would have been trained to stare long and hard at,

the eyes, gunmetal grey and the hair
like a metaphor for the mind,
a long and flowing mist,
a guy whose name might be likely to feature
on a government’s most wanted list.

Ten years later, things have changed, love
has clearly been and left what even
those guys you get at La Guardia
would have seen straight away presented no threat,
the hair a little bit shorter, the eyes

exposed to doubt, the face more flesh
than geist and above all else the kind of smile
which I have clearly had difficulty giving
in full like I’m thinking, perhaps,
that it might be a waste or not completely cool.

A lot less flesh than flash, like the speed
at which the years have passed have left me
a little bit stunned, this latest passport photo
looks, all of a sudden, nothing like me.
It’s laughable! What am I doing in color?

My eyes no longer grey? And the hair? Where is it?
It’s as if every border I’ve passed through,
every damned port I’ve been stuck in
has taken an inordinate pleasure in stamping out
that young man, who looked like he could kill.

Andrew Elliott


Andrew Elliott's previous collections are Lung Soup and The Creationists. He lives in London.
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry Shelf - Instructions for the Trance - Lynn Emanuel
Post by: Golden Oxen on January 06, 2014, 04:30:04 AM

I swallowed the pill/smoked the dope that gave the self a self
And fought to be mindful of the boney oak.

A river drags its scratch in the dirt,
a mountain swells in a sob.

I leave my body, blank and sweet, like taking off a dress.
I leave my breasts, spare as the backstairs,

The shoulders’ boney ledges, the sediments of sex.
And yet . . .

I’m not so sure about this, I said to friends
who were sleek with selflessness.

We’re just passing by they said
to dogs choking on their chains in yards.

If the self is a house, whose house are we?
I asked the oak

which stood on the shore of a river,
its sturdy brush strokes drowning

in the shivery foliage of  other trees.
I, too, stood on a shore,

lost, and looking myself like a river
with many currents,

forlorn, forgotten, died out, neglected,
even now disappearing into the crowds of these words.


Lynn Emanuel

Lynn Emanuel was born in Mt. Kisco, New York, in 1949. She has an MFA from the University of Iowa, an MA from City College of New York, and a BA from Bennington College.

Her books of poetry include: Noose and Hook (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2010); Then, Suddenly— (1999), which was awarded the Eric Matthieu King Award from the Academy of American Poets; The Dig (1992), which was selected by Gerald Stern for the National Poetry Series; and Hotel Fiesta (1984).

   
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on January 06, 2014, 08:34:13 AM
 Very nice poem. I re-read it a number of times to try to get the rhythm of it. I do like it. Moving. (No pun intended.)
Title: Re: Diner Library: Poetry Shelf- Goldman Sachs
Post by: Golden Oxen on February 08, 2014, 05:47:51 AM
Goldman Sachs

I owe my death as a gardener not to cheap rabbit fencing
but to a botched affair with Persephone, the Garden of Eden’s
willowy seed manager. As William James remarked
after his final Chautauqua, a dance of erotic instruction
that begins with the pH value of chicken shit
ends in a Richter-scale derangement of the senses—after which
I scavenged amongst the undecided, combing the estuaries
for bi-valves, dead set on poisoning the unswayable,

my moral high ground a barnacled rock visible at low tide.
Thank God I failed: my candidate and his churlish spouse
receding faster than a cosmic hairline,
as did my fantasies of Venus on the half shell—a goddess
who could iron shirts as if every Chinese launderer on Mott Street
had been shanghaied into arbitraging for Goldman Sachs.

Scott Coffel

Scott Coffel is author of the poetry collection Toucans in the Arctic.
Title: Re: Diner Library --- Poetry Corner --- Gary Snyder
Post by: Eddie on February 19, 2014, 06:58:32 AM
For The Children

The rising hills, the slopes,
of statistics
lie before us.
the steep climb
of everything, going up,
up, as we all
go down.

In the next century
or the one beyond that,
they say,
are valleys, pastures,
we can meet there in peace
if we make it.

To climb these coming crests
one word to you, to
you and your children:

stay together
learn the flowers
go light

--Gary Snyder  (circa 1975)
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry Shelf - The Palace of Green Jade
Post by: Golden Oxen on April 12, 2014, 09:43:12 AM

           The Palace of Green Jade
 
after The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
 
The traveler to the future meets
delicate and fragile beings, like children.
Men of the future, feeble,
unable to pay attention for long
who neither create nor remember, like plants or birds
on the point of extinction.
 
In the ruined city the traveler sees a palace
of green jade: dusty museum
of blurred inscriptions.
The books, like rags, can no longer be read.
For a frail race, this is our future,
already past.
 
Through the broken windows, the wind blows.
And this strange image is the one that lingers,
floating, intermittent.
What a pity, what could be sadder
than the wind in that palace?


Jesse Lee Kercheval

 Jesse Lee Kercheval is the author of 12 books of fiction, memoir, and poetry and the editor of América invertida: an anthology of younger Uruguayan poets, forthcoming from the University of New Mexico Press.
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poems- Odysseus Amongst the Swine Glances Towards Ithaca
Post by: Golden Oxen on April 14, 2014, 04:53:15 AM
Good Morning Diners, April is National Poetry month and I thought a contest winning poem from the many contests held this month by poetry lovers would be appropriate.

Odysseus Amongst the Swine Glances Towards Ithaca

Sometimes my flailing
burnt-by-the wind heart
grows alarmed and pushes
my sentiments aside
and in their place
grow lists enumerating
ostrich feathers and tin-can
telephones to encode
the ratification of love.
 
The only way to touch
a poem is with the mouth.
I put this one in yours
and yours in mine
and for a moment
the lonely air between
us is filled with birds, leaves
and contrails underlining
the honest sun
under which I fail
to embrace you,
 
but don’t worry, that is
all my poems are doing
these days. Know that
although my words
often overwhelm me
and I grow unable to manage
their winds, the only ships
in my heart that are listing
are listing towards your shores.


Dan Chelotti

Dan Chelotti is the author of x (McSweeney's, 2013). He is an assistant professor of English at Elms College.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Karpatok on April 14, 2014, 05:40:42 AM
  Well well GO. You have become quite prolific this morning. First, you do not want me to be respectful towards Monsta, and now you post a poem giving neither recognition to Circe nor to the famous poppies.  How are we ever to meet our destination with such backward digressions. Better to be more straight forward and out spoken. Like This:  HAIL GOLIATH YOU COWARD! COME FORTH OUT OF HIDING TO BATTLE YOU PHILISTINE!    I, DAVID , CALL YOU OUT FOR ALL THE WORLD TO SEE YOUR AVARICE AND MORAL INIQUITY,  AND WITH MY SLING AND STONE WILL PIERCE YOUR THICK BROW   UNTIL YOU  FALL AND CEASE TO BE THE COWARD NO MORE.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Surly1 on June 18, 2014, 08:09:51 AM
This in honor of the departed, the "delicately wounded..." the rank hypocrites, the cowards.

In Place Of A Curse

By Ciardi, John

“At the next vacancy for God, if I am elected...”

At the next vacancy for God, if I am elected,
I shall forgive last the delicately wounded who,
having been slugged no harder than anyone else,
never got up again, neither to fight back,
nor to finger their jaws in painful admiration.

They who are wholly broken, and they in whom mercy is understanding,
I shall embrace at once and lead to pillows in heaven.
But they who are the meek by trade, baiting the best of their betters with extortions of a mock-helplessness,
I shall take last to love, and never wholly.

Let them all in Heaven - I abolish Hell -
but let it be read over them as they enter:
Beware the calculations of the meek, who gambled nothing
gave nothing, and could never receive enough.
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry Shelf - My Period had come for Prayer - Dickinson
Post by: Golden Oxen on July 22, 2014, 06:27:43 AM

           My period had come for Prayer—
    No other Art—would do—
    My Tactics missed a rudiment—
    Creator—Was it you?
     
    God grows above—so those who pray
    Horizons—must ascend—
    And so I stepped upon the North
    To see this Curious Friend—
     
    His House was not—no sign had He—
    By Chimney—nor by Door
    Could I infer his Residence—
    Vast Prairies of Air
     
    Unbroken by a Settler—
    Were all that I could see—
    Infinitude—Had’st Thou no Face
    That I might look on Thee?
     
    The Silence condescended—
    Creation stopped—for Me—
    But awed beyond my errand—
    I worshipped—did not “pray”—


 Emily Dickinson
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry Shelf - I Took one Draught of Life - Emily Dickinson
Post by: Golden Oxen on July 22, 2014, 06:32:06 AM

    I took one Draught of Life --
I'll tell you what I paid --
Precisely an existence --
The market price, they said.

They weighed me, Dust by Dust --
They balanced Film with Film,
Then handed me my Being's worth --
A single Dram of Heaven!


Emily Dickinson
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry Shelf - Matter in Retreat- Camille Rankine
Post by: Golden Oxen on September 03, 2014, 09:03:38 AM
   Matter in Retreat
 
The stars drift
away from one another
 
tonight as every moment you
& I breathing so thoughtless a living
 
we make as we are made to
as I make another promise
 
to myself to try to mean more
to you to call out across
 
a great distance but I am not
loud enough I suspect I have not
 
enough protest in me
the arc of my throat awaits
 
a tenderness or a brutality
& what are we
 
to one another but a means
to a meaning we haven’t yet
 
discovered two points of light
on the inky dark
 
sky two paper boats
on a black lake floating further
 
away every day I awake
I roll over I hide my head
 
we get smaller our living it’s pathetic
I mean it makes you sad



Born in Portland, Oregon, poet Camille Rankine earned a BA at Harvard University and an MFA at Columbia University. Rankine’s nimble, urgent poems are often concerned with landscape, history, and intimacy. Slow Dance with Trip Wire (2011) was chosen by poet Cornelius Eady for the Poetry Society of America’s New York Chapbook Fellowship.   

Title: Re: Diner Library - September Days - Thoreau Farm
Post by: Golden Oxen on September 12, 2014, 05:30:55 AM

                                                                   

   September Days


I know the feeling.

The days of this September week have acted on me as they may have acted on Henry in 1855. His journal covers the month’s first 12 days in under a page, ending with two haiku-like entries (I have reshaped them to suggest the form, and yes, the syllable-count stricture is relaxed):


Sept. 11 loudly the
cricket mole creaks by mid-afternoon
muskrat houses begun

Sept. 12 a few
clams freshly eaten some
grapes ripe.

Perhaps the slanting light and the etched clarity of each branch and leaf kept Henry from more usual, detailed writing; perhaps he felt summoned outside, even as the year began to contract. Surely, it’s felt that way for me. Summer’s expansive and eternal mornings have been replaced by sharp, cool air and the sense that something stirs to my north. Every minute outside seems precious and won; the clear air has said, Look and see.

And I have been rewarded:

Bluest sky tall spruce
a single perch for survey
two bald eagles vie

Pebbles crunch underfoot
laughter peals from the white birch
pileated woodpecker

Sea to horizon
ripples shot with sun flight
all day to paddle

http://thoreaufarm.org/2014/09/september-days/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=september-days (http://thoreaufarm.org/2014/09/september-days/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=september-days)
 


Title: Re: Diner Library - Warhol / Blue Jackie - Peter Balakian
Post by: Golden Oxen on October 16, 2014, 05:30:31 PM
I came upon this poem this evening , it did not have the images of Jackie. I placed them there myself.


  Warhol / Blue Jackie
Peter Balakian



Her face catches you as you come around the corner
and see her on the far wall,

in the white silence after the docents and guards
have left you there alone,

(behind the veil the interior is chaos, the Lincoln slows down,
the roses slide onto the pink dress),

but she comes to you—a kitsch Mona Lisa
bella donna of the roses, face of revision.

After the black-light has gone over the mesh,
and the negative has burned itself out—

the broad planes of her cheeks, the almond eyes
glazed with valium, the numbed-out mouth

(is this just complicity with the media
or the transaesthetic fetish of a nation?)

the impossible presence, the veil almost wrapping
the spreading pixilation of her face.

                                                                      (http://leenoblemakeup.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/jackie-andy-warhol.jpg?w=440&h=240&crop=1)

                                                      (http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/09/8a/a5/098aa5ed89880991ceebf8e85c6a7f10.jpg)

                                                      (http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/f3/80/aa/f380aa9d9f6f82e6d10dd8eab513682c.jpg)

                                                       
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Surly1 on December 27, 2014, 07:57:04 AM
Confessions of an Economic Hitman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man)


Confessions of an Economic Hit Man is a book written by John Perkins (https://www.facebook.com/pages/John-Perkins/103850389654123) and published in 2004. It provides Perkins' account of his career with consulting firm Chas. T. Main (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chas-T-Main/104041746299021) in Boston. Before employment with the firm, he interviewed for a job with the National Security Agency (https://www.facebook.com/pages/National-Security-Agency/113191532024730) (NSA). Perkins claims that this interview effectively constituted an independent screening which led to his subsequent hiring by Einar Greve, a member of the firm (and alleged NSA liaison) to become a self-described "economic hit man".
According to Perkins, he began writing Confessions of an Economic Hit Man in the 1980s, but "threats or bribes always convinced [him] to stop."

According to his book, Perkins' function was to convince the political and financial leadership of underdeveloped countries to accept enormous development loans from institutions like the World Bank (https://www.facebook.com/pages/World-Bank/109509315741382)and USAID (https://www.facebook.com/pages/USAID/107959739238254). Saddled with debts they could not hope to pay, those countries were forced to acquiesce to political pressure from the United States on a variety of issues. Perkins argues in his book thatdeveloping nations (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Developing-nation/108617812503590) were effectively neutralized politically, had their wealth gaps (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Gini-coefficient/115122088499281) driven wider and economies crippled in the long run. In this capacity Perkins recounts his meetings with some prominent individuals, including Graham Greene (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Graham-Greene/112633035420967) and Omar Torrijos (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Omar-Torrijos/105637436135561). Perkins describes the role of an economic hit man as follows:
Quote
Economic hit men (EHMs) are highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. They funnel money from the World Bank (https://www.facebook.com/pages/World-Bank/109509315741382), the U.S. Agency for International Development (https://www.facebook.com/pages/US-Agency-for-International-Development/482302055115796) (USAID), and other foreign "aid" organizations into the coffers of huge corporations and the pockets of a few wealthy families who control the planet's natural resources. Their tools included fraudulent financial reports, rigged elections, payoffs, extortion, sex, and murder. They play a game as old as empire, but one that has taken on new and terrifying dimensions during this time of globalization.
The epilogue to the 2006 edition provides a rebuttal to the current move by the G8 (https://www.facebook.com/pages/G8/111943692150233) nations to forgiveThird World (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Third-World/108313659196951) debt. Perkins charges that the proposed conditions for this debt forgiveness require countries to privatise (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Privatisation/106485622721638) their health, education, electric, water and other public services. Those countries would also have to discontinue subsidies (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Subsidies/105857316121902) and trade restrictions that support local business, but accept the continued subsidization of certain G8 businesses by the US and other G8 countries, and the erection of trade barriers on imports that threaten G8 industries.

In the book, Perkins repeatedly denies the existence of a "conspiracy (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Conspiracy-civil/132917073413624)." Instead, Perkins carefully discusses the role of corporatocracy (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Corporatocracy/106124086085996).
Quote
I was initially recruited while I was in business school back in the late sixties by the National Security Agency, the nation’s largest and least understood spy organization; but ultimately I worked for private corporations. The first real economic hit man was back in the early 1950s, Kermit Roosevelt, Jr. (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kermit-Roosevelt-Jr/123536177691194), the grandson of Teddy (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Theodore-Roosevelt/105580956142808), who overthrew the government of Iran, a democratically elected government, Mossadegh (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mossadegh/110229359006470)’s government who was Time‘s magazine person of the year; and he was so successful at doing this without any bloodshed—well, there was a little bloodshed, but no military intervention, just spending millions of dollars and replaced Mossadegh with the Shah of Iran (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Shah-of-Iran/139314946097432). At that point, we understood that this idea of economic hit man was an extremely good one. We didn’t have to worry about the threat of war with Russia when we did it this way. The problem with that was that Roosevelt was a C.I.A. agent. He was a government employee. Had he been caught, we would have been in a lot of trouble. It would have been very embarrassing. So, at that point, the decision was made to use organizations like the C.I.A. and the N.S.A. to recruit potential economic hit men like me and then send us to work for private consulting companies, engineering firms, construction companies, so that if we were caught, there would be no connection with the government.
— November 4, 2004 interview


Criticism
Columnist Sebastian Mallaby (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sebastian-Mallaby/149578055124207) of The Washington Post (https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Washington-Post/104104862959787) reacted sharply to Perkins' book: "This man is a frothing conspiracy theorist, a vainglorious peddler of nonsense, and yet his book, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, is a runaway bestseller." Mallaby, who spent 13 years writing for the London Economist (https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Economist/107615139261198) and wrote a critically well-received biography of World Bank (https://www.facebook.com/pages/World-Bank/109509315741382) chief James Wolfensohn (https://www.facebook.com/pages/James-Wolfensohn/112838232061768), holds that Perkins' conception of international finance is "largely a dream" and that his "basic contentions are flat wrong". For instance he points out that Indonesia (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Indonesia/103728359665916) reduced its infant mortality (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Infant-mortality/110955282263024) and illiteracy (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Illiteracy/105807639460238) rates by two-thirds after economists persuaded its leaders to borrow money in 1970. He also disputes Perkins' claim that 51 of the top 100 world economies belong to companies. A value-added comparison done by the UN, he says, shows the number to be 29. (The 51 of 100 data comes from an Institute for Policy Studies (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Institute-for-Policy-Studies/105576412810630) December 2000 Report on the Top 200 corporations; using 2010 data from the CIA (https://www.facebook.com/pages/CIA/106289462740145)'s World Factbook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/World-Factbook/114667278550700) and Fortune Global 500 (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Fortune-Global-500/143234245689069) the current ratio is 114 corporations in the top 200 global economies.)

Other sources, including articles in The New York Times (https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-New-York-Times/111650162185336) and Boston Magazine (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Boston-Magazine/147895201931213) as well as a press release issued by the United States Department of State (https://www.facebook.com/pages/United-States-Department-of-State/109469009071654), have referred to a lack of documentary or testimonial evidence to corroborate the claim that the NSA was involved in his hiring to Chas T. Main. In addition, the author of the State Department release states that the NSA "is a cryptological (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cryptography/108785085812968) (codemaking and codebreaking) organization, not an economic organization" and that its missions do not involve "anything remotely resembling placing economists at private companies in order to increase the debt of foreign countries". Economic historian Niall Ferguson (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Niall-Ferguson/108112602551075) writes in his book The Ascent of Money (https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Ascent-of-Money/106136669416644) that Perkins's contention that the leaders of Ecuador (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ecuador/103986029639414) (President Jaime Roldós Aguilera (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jaime-Rold%C3%B3s-Aguilera/112427075439903)) and Panama (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Panama/109621439057229) (GeneralOmar Torrijos (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Omar-Torrijos/105637436135561)) were assassinated by US agents for opposing the interests of the owners of their countries' foreign debt "seems a little odd" in light of the fact that in the 1970s the amount of money that the US had lent to Ecuador and Panama accounted for less than 0.4% of the total US grants and loans, while in 1990 the exports from the US to those countries accounted for approximately 0.4% of the total US exports (approximately $8 billion). According to Ferguson, those "do not seem like figures worth killing for".


Response
In response to criticism of his first book, Perkins and publisher Berrett-Koehler, found 12 authors, journalists, and investigators to contribute their stories to A Game as Old as Empire: the Secret World of Economic Hit Men and the Web of Global Corruption. The book includes first hand reports, third-party accounts, and analysis of practices said to be used by multinational corporations, governments, quasi-governmental agencies, and financial institutions.


Documentary film
In 2009, the documentary film Apologies of an Economic Hit Man featuring interviews with Perkins, was shown at film festivals around the U.S. The film is a Greek (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Greece/106078956090444) – U.S. co-production directed by Stelios Kouloglou (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stelios-Kouloglou/137453506274825), and was filmed in 2007 and 2008. Numerous interview-style statements by John Perkins also appear in the 2008 internet-based documentary, Zeitgeist: Addendum (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Zeitgeist-Addendum/159027440798876).


References

[list=1]
   
Title: Re: Diner Library - Poetry Shelf - Girl with Ox - Paula Bohince
Post by: Golden Oxen on March 07, 2015, 07:06:58 AM
 
Girl with Ox

Paula Bohince


after Suzuki Harunobu

The sinews of the ox’s body, the muscles,
betray the limits of its independence.
Opium-white and residue-black, it balances the heavy
baskets to please its mistress.
Kneeling like a child for a punishment, or
a poem before the poet, it cannot act. The girl
commands it forward with a backward glance, anxious
as a mother or a poet in the aftermath.


                                                                   
                                                        (http://images.metmuseum.org/CRDImages/as/web-large/DP119522.jpg)

                                                            A Woman Sweeping up Her Love Letters
Artist: Suzuki Harunobu (Japanese, 1725–1770)
Period: Edo period (1615–1868)
Culture: Japan
Medium: Polychrome woodblock print; ink and color on paper

Paula Bohince

Paula Bohince’s third collection, Swallows and Waves, is forthcoming. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker and Poetry.




                                                         
                                                     


Title: Books You May Not Read
Post by: Surly1 on April 30, 2015, 09:58:17 AM
      
”Forbidden Bookshelf” Series Acquaints Public with Books Vanished by Government or Powerful Interests (http://dissenter.firedoglake.com/2014/07/10/forbidden-bookshelf-series-acquaints-public-with-books-vanished-by-government-or-powerful-interests/)

   
By: Kevin Gosztola (http://dissenter.firedoglake.com/author/kgosztola/) Thursday July 10, 2014 10:52 am
   Share on facebook (http://dissenter.firedoglake.com/2014/07/10/forbidden-bookshelf-series-acquaints-public-with-books-vanished-by-government-or-powerful-interests/#)338 (http://dissenter.firedoglake.com/2014/07/10/forbidden-bookshelf-series-acquaints-public-with-books-vanished-by-government-or-powerful-interests/#)Share on twi (http://dissenter.firedoglake.com/2014/07/10/forbidden-bookshelf-series-acquaints-public-with-books-vanished-by-government-or-powerful-interests/#)
      (http://static1.firedoglake.com/47/files/2014/07/Screen-shot-2014-07-10-at-10.06.01-AM.png) (http://static1.firedoglake.com/47/files/2014/07/Screen-shot-2014-07-10-at-10.06.01-AM.png)A digital publisher called Open Road Integrated Media has launched a series called the “Forbidden Bookshelf,” in order to acquaint the public with books that were vanished or, in one way or another, killed at birth by the government or corporate entities when they were first published.

      Mark Crispin Miller, a professor of media studies at New York University, came up with the idea. He told Firedoglake in an interview that over the years he had found a lot of books he wanted to assign in his courses were unavailable,” which he said “speaks to certain problems in the book publishing industry.”

      More importantly, he also learned repeatedly of books that had been “disappeared” by powerful interests. Those works were not targeted with “outright bans,” because such outright censorship is unconstitutional in the United States. Rather, they were undone through other means, such as malicious bad reviews, or no reviews at all, or by the publisher not doing any marketing or even shipping copies to the bookstores.
      Open Road has launched the series with five titles now available as e-books, with new introductions: The Lords of Creation: A History of America’ 1 Percent by Frederick Lewis Allen; The Search for an Abortionist by Nancy Howell Lee, Interference: How Organized Crime Influences Professional Football by Dan E. Moldea, Blowback: America’ Recruitment of Nazis and Its Destructive Impact on Our Foreign and Domestic Policy, by Christopher Simpson, and The Phoenix Program: America’ Use of Terror in Vietnam, by Douglas Valentine.

      While there are “loose criteria” for what books will be included in the series, “they have to offer truths or information that Americans need to know and, of course, they have to be out of print.”

      “We are especially interested in books that have been demonstrably undone but also books that have been conveniently forgotten,” Miller said.
      Miller provided details on each of the books released so far and why he believed they had become “forbidden books.”

      The Lords of Creation, according to Miller, is the only popular history by Frederick Lewis Allen that is out of print. He is well-known for Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s as well as Since Yesterday: The 1930s in America, a sequel volume. While both those books have stayed in print, The Lords of Creation has been unavailable since the Sixties, although “it’ more directly pertinent to our economic crisis” than those others.

      Covering the period from the late 1800s to the stock market collapse of 1929, The Lords of Creation traces the consolidation of economic power in the hands of the Rockefellers, Morgans and Vanderbilts, who were able to make the economy work for them as opposed to lower class Americans. A new introduction by Gretchen Morgenson, financial reporter for the New York Times, explains the continuities between the heyday of those “robber barons” and the great financial crimes of recent years.

      First published in 1969, The Search for an Abortionist was recommended to Miller by a writer named Katherine Silberger Stewart when he asked her what books should be featured in the “Forbidden Bookshelf” series. She said this book made a big impression on her in the 1970s, as it conveyed a vivid sense of how women had to cope with their unwanted pregnancies before Roe v. Wade.

      Lee interviewed 114 women, whose experiences differed greatly. “The Search for an Abortionist reminds us of how perilous life was for women then, and also makes quite clear that outlawing abortion doesn’t end the practice, but only makes it far more dangerous,” Miller explained. As the right continues its campaign to make abortion unavailable from coast to coast, “this book is one that all Americans should read,” he added.

      Miller clarified that he did not think that Lords of Creation and The Search for an Abortionist were “deliberately kept out of print.” They were out of print because “book publishers have overlooked their relevance, perhaps because the relevance is often uncomfortable.”

      On the other hand, there are books that did not receive attention because the powers that be did not want people to learn about particular sensitive subjects.

      Christopher Simpson’ Blowback tells how the US recruited thousands of former Nazis and fascist collaborators after the war, to help in the Cold War against the Soviets. Simpson argues that those covert programs were not only immoral and illegal in themselves, but also massively perverted US foreign and domestic policy. Despite its scholarly excellence, and its importance, Blowback got little press attention when it came out at the end of Ronald Reagan’ presidency; and the New York Times ran a dismissive review by Serge Schmemann, who accused (http://www.nytimes.com/1988/05/08/books/give-us-your-tired-your-poor-your-nazis-scientists.html) Simpson of “smearing anti-Communism with the taint of Nazism.”
      In his new introduction, Simpson tells us of his service, from 1999-2007, on an advisory panel of historians appointed by the National Archives “for the purpose of guiding their policy on declassification of documents pertaining to post-war recruitment of Nazi fascists and Japanese imperialists.” Historians were persuaded to “provide voluntarily labor and in return the National Archives would publish a collection of their writings on the subjects.”

      Simpson “wrote a piece about the difficulty that the formal historical panel— the one directly overseeing the classificationprocess—because of the obstructionism of the government agencies concerned, especially the CIA. In that piece Simpson also revealed that [President George W. Bush's] administration had actually tried to get John Yoo appointed to head the National Archives.”
      “When the National Archives report came out,” Miller continued, “it did not include Simpson’ piece. In short, they censored it. So, his new introduction includes that piece, which speaks to the obvious explosiveness of the whole subject of US involvement with Nazis after the war.”
      Thousands and thousands of former Nazis and fascists were “recruited to work for the US in some Cold War capacity. In Simpson’ view, this had a “destructive effect” on US foreign and domestic policy. He wrote this at the end of Ronald Reagan’ presidency. It did not get much review attention and there was a dismissive review in the New York Times from Serge Schmemann, where he accused (http://www.nytimes.com/1988/05/08/books/give-us-your-tired-your-poor-your-nazis-scientists.html) Simpson of “smearing anti-Communism with the taint of Nazism.”

      Investigative journalist Dan Moldea expected Interference, dealing with organized crime’ influence on the American professional football, to be challenged by sportswriters loyal to the NFL, and that the League would fight him. He did not expect to do battle with the New York Times, where he had once worked.

      As he summarized (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_nl1TQhDuI) on Keith Olbermann’ sports program on ESPN, his book came out in 1989. He alleged that no fewer than 70 NFL games had been fixed, no fewer than 26 past and present NFL team owners had documented ties to illegal gambling or an organized crime syndicate and no fewer than 50 investigations had been killed.

      The New York Times came after him with a review (http://www.nytimes.com/1989/09/03/books/unsportsmanlike-conduct.html) from sportswriter Gerald Eskenazi that was filled with lies. It crudely misrepresented what his book revealed about the NFL and what it did not reveal. The review ultimately played a role in his paperback deal being canceled, bookstores refusing to display the book and copies of the book being returned to the publisher, according to Miller.

   The apparent malicious nature of the Times’ review led Moldea to file a libel lawsuit to hold book reviewers to the same journalistic standards of factual accuracy. The legal battle, as Moldea said, lasted longer than World War II and happened right in the “heart of his career.” He won on appeal in a lower court and then the judge reversed his decision. It went on to the Supreme Court, where he lost the case.

      And then, there’ The Phoenix Program by Douglas Valentine. He managed to obtain permission from former CIA director William Colby to talk to officers who had been involved in that huge program of mass surveillance, torture and assassination in South Vietnam. But once the agency realized that Valentine would not be publishing some “puff piece,” theAgency abruptly froze him out, and urged other federal agencies to do the same. With the help of the ACLU, Valentine fought back with a Privacy Act request, and so managed to complete his research.

      When it came out in 1990, The Phoenix Program also was attacked (http://www.nytimes.com/1990/10/21/books/body-count-was-their-most-important-product.html) in a New York Times review—this one by Morley Safer of CBS, who argued Valentine had “written as turgid and dense and often incomprehensible a book as I have ever had the misfortune to open.” The rest of the review assailed the author’ writing style, with three paragraphs plucked out of context so as to seem “incomprehensible” (On this, Miller noted, the book “is very lucidly written.”)

      One might notice that for three of these books, the New York Times seems to have been a part of ensuring these books were ignored and forgotten. Miller reflected on how reviews are used to discredit and marginalize books, sharing his own personal experience:

   
Quote
[W]ith Fooled Again, my book about the theft of the 2004 election: I was really flabbergasted by the response—or non-response—to that book when it came out in 2005, after a major cover story in Harper’. Although It was a major publisher that did it—Basic Books—and though it was, and is, a very meticulously documented study, which garnered laudatory blurbs from [Representative] John Conyers and a lot of people who aren’t nuts, Fooled Again was pointedly ignored by the media, and I couldn’t get any interviews on NPR, although I’d previously done them often, on all sorts of subjects.

      It seemed like he had been put on some kind of blacklist. Even the left attacked his book. Salon and Mother Jones did not like it. “It was written off as conspiracy theory,” a phrase which he notes has been deployed for years police dissident ideas, chill vital investigations and inhibit freedom of expression.

      So far, Forbidden Bookshelf seems to be successful. Meanwhile, Miller is now hearing from others who appreciate the project and have offered their suggestions for other works that ought to be revived.

      “I had no idea how large a library there is of books that died at birth,” Miller exclaimed.

      “We’ve heard of the ones that made a splash when they came out and were discredited or fell under a cloud or slipped out of a print. But how do you know the books that you had never heard of? How do you know about the ones that only a handful of people remember or know anything about?”
   
      The series truly raises the question of whether this country has freedom of expression, and it seems like many authors whose work was unjustly written off by elites and disappeared by the powerful will finally get some of the attention they deserved when their books first came out.


***

FWIW, there are now more titles. Explore the offerings here; all ebooks:
http://www.openroadmedia.com/series/forbidden-bookshelf/ (http://www.openroadmedia.com/series/forbidden-bookshelf/)
Title: Diner Library: NEW BLOG PAGE COMING
Post by: RE on May 12, 2015, 01:26:52 AM
I am working on a NEW PAGE for the Diner Blog, which will allow Users to Submit Collapse Information Resources.

It will have a Form which allows the User to submit information by type, topic, author, title, URL etc.

I will have sub pages which sort by the various categories.

All the fields can be filled in either by picking from a drop down menu or simply copy/pasting from a website.

The new page should be ready in a day or two, at least in rudimentary form.

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library: NEW BLOG PAGE COMING
Post by: RE on May 12, 2015, 02:57:18 AM
I am working on a NEW PAGE for the Diner Blog, which will allow Users to Submit Collapse Information Resources.

It will have a Form which allows the User to submit information by type, topic, author, title, URL etc.

I will have sub pages which sort by the various categories.

All the fields can be filled in either by picking from a drop down menu or simply copy/pasting from a website.

The new page should be ready in a day or two, at least in rudimentary form.

RE

OK!

The NEW DOOMSTEAD DINER LIBRARY (http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/library/) Pages are now UP!  :icon_sunny:

Make some SUBMISSIONS Diners so I can get the table filled out some more!

I just did one test Submission myself with Carroll Quigley's Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time.

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library: NEW BLOG PAGE COMING
Post by: RE on May 12, 2015, 04:52:02 PM
I am working on a NEW PAGE for the Diner Blog, which will allow Users to Submit Collapse Information Resources.

It will have a Form which allows the User to submit information by type, topic, author, title, URL etc.

I will have sub pages which sort by the various categories.

All the fields can be filled in either by picking from a drop down menu or simply copy/pasting from a website.

The new page should be ready in a day or two, at least in rudimentary form.

RE

OK!

The NEW DOOMSTEAD DINER LIBRARY (http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/library/) Pages are now UP!  :icon_sunny:

Make some SUBMISSIONS Diners so I can get the table filled out some more!

I just did one test Submission myself with Carroll Quigley's Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time.

RE

So far only ONE additional Submission since I put up the new Library Form.   :(

Come on Diners!  Drop in a few of your favorite Books, Videos, Websites etc!

RE
Title: Diner Atavachron Library
Post by: RE on May 13, 2015, 06:35:36 PM
(http://steeljawscribe.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/image/computer2-atavachron-allouryesterdays.jpg)

I am now working together with JS, a Librarian who is a regular Commenter on OFW to get the Diner Library up to speed quickly.

JS has his own personal HUGE collection of data, and he catalogs it in typical Librarian Style using the Dewey Decimal System.  So I now have added a Dewey Decimal (DD!  :icon_sunny:) field to the Submissions form.

He has around 1400 of his own Paper Books in his catalog.  I hope to have the full table of that at least up before I croak.

If you have a Catalog of Books or other resources you would like to add to the Library, you can do it one of two ways.

You can use the form on the Library Submissions Page (http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/library/) for individual submissions.

If you have a large number of submissions to make, create a Table in Excel or Open Office in the same format as the Diner Submissions Table, enter the list there and then email me with the file attachment.

BTW, this doesn't have to be just Books.  We can have categories for Art, Stamp Collections, you name it.

Preferably this should be material available in some form on the net, with a Link to its location.  JS and I will be storing much of our material over time on Google Drive, with links to those folders.  You can make your own Google Drive repository to link to.  It's FREE!

Let's get this rolling!

RE
Title: Diner Atavachron Library: Progress Update
Post by: RE on May 14, 2015, 01:52:12 AM
The Diner Atavachron is still a Work in Progress as a result of my collaboration with JS.

I have multiple forms up because I am testing them against each other.  I also loaded a new Plugin to allow for Table Sorting, and making that work correctly has been difficult.

So don't use any forms yet to upload Data.

However, I have settled on the basic .csv format for submissions, which goes like this:

#,Date Submitted,Type,Author ("Last, First"),Title,Dewey Decimal Topic,Sub-Topic,URL

1,13/05/2015,Website,Reverse Engineer,Doomstead Diner,000-General,Economics,http://doomsteaddiner.net.

First record there is an example.

Choices for Type are Book, Website, Video, Audio

In a .csv though you can put in anything, just it won't come up in a typical search.

I hope to have this properly organized before I Buy My Ticket To the Great Beyond TM.  ::)

RE

Title: The Diner ATAVACHRON has ARRIVED
Post by: RE on May 14, 2015, 08:47:43 AM
IT IS NOW LIVE AND FUNCTIONAL.

I DROPPED IN A FEW RESOURCES THROUGH THE FORM, SO i KNOW IT WORKS.  THE SORTING WORKS.

It's a sensitive system though (it messes with the html of the page if you edit too much), so more testing still required.  Helpful if diners add more resources here so I can do further testing.

RE
Title: Re: The Diner ATAVACHRON has ARRIVED
Post by: RE on May 14, 2015, 04:13:24 PM
GOOD NEWZ

Some Diner dropped in 2 more Books into the Diner Atavachron.  I updated the Catalog with them.  :icon_sunny:

BAD NEWZ

The long URLs can mess up the page formatting of the catalog.  Please use SHORTCODES (https://goo.gl/).

GOOD NEWZ

I fixed the URL that was messing up the page format and it looks and works fine again.

Make some more submissions Diners!

RE
Title: Doomstead Diner ATAVACHRON Library of Collapse
Post by: RE on May 15, 2015, 02:16:59 AM


Off the keyboard of RE



Follow us on Twitter @doomstead666

Friend us on Facebook



Published on the Doomstead Diner on May 15, 2015



Visit the New Diner News Page for Daily Updates from around the Collapse Blogosphere



atavachron-library-allouryesterdaysThe Atavachron Computer Library was featured in the Original Star Trek Episode "All Our Yesterdays"



Discuss this article at the Kitchen Sink inside the Diner



Surfing around my favorite Collapse Blogs of Economic Undertow & Our Finite World over the last year, in the commentary more than a few Bibliophiles have suggested that we need a Library of the Information we Doomers feel is important to have as we move down the Collapse Highway to Hell TM.



http://www.bdsolid.com/gallery/DSCN7274.jpgSeeing as my goal is to make the Doomstead Diner a One-Stop-Shop Convenience Store for Kollapsniks, I set myself the task of noodling out how to do this, allow all Kollapsniks to input to the database and then have it up online in a usable form for finding Information.  I also wanted to make it fairly resilient and portable, as these things go.  More on that later.



Now, if I was a brilliant Code Jockey who could write code, I could do a custom job of this, but sadly I am not.  So I had to look for Plug-Ins other Code Jockeys have written for the WordPress platform and get them working on the Doomstead Diner.  After a few false starts, this has more or less now been accomplished, and the Dommstead Diner Atavachron Library of Collapse TM is now up and functional on the Diner.  Not too much Data stored in there yet, but hopefully before I Buy My Ticket to the Great Beyond TM we will collect up a decent pile of references.



http://justincaseyouwerewondering.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Dewey-Decimal-System1.jpgThere are many ways these days to store metadata that are way beyond the old Dewey Decimal Card Catalogs I used in my HS and College years, not to mention search engines like Google that allow you to surf the entire net looking for information.  The problem with this is Information Overload.  There is so much of it that the neophyte Kollapsnik doesn't know where to begin!  What's a good resource, and what is garbage?  So to have a decent Collapse Library that is worthwhile, it has to be curated and selections made that are worthwhile.  Who is going to make those selections?  YOU, the Expert Kollapsnik make them! My job is just to take your submissions and get them up on the Diner.  I dropped on a few to begin with as a test of the system, but I got enough here on my plate that I'm not gonna spend hours dropping on new records when everybody else can do that.



So, what is the FORM of the Atavachron, how is it organized?



The most basic form of a Database is .csv, or Comma Separated Values.  It can be opened by any computer from any era, even a TRS-80 from Radio Shack can open a .csv file.  You can also print out a .csv file and keep it on paper, though you can't search and sort it like you can with a computer.  The Atavachron is a .csv file.  In .txt form it looks like this



Header Line:    "#","Date Submitted","Type","Author (Last, First)","Title","Dewey Decimal Topic","Sub-Topic","URL"



Each Record Line after it follows this same pattern.



Example Record:   "1","13/05/2015","Website","Reverse Engineer","Doomstead Diner","000-General","Economics","http://doomsteaddiner.net"



Each field is separated by a COMMA, and each new Record is started with a CARRIAGE RETURN (aka "Enter")



Very simple, very resilient. :)



How do I USE the Atavachron?



The first way is the Table that is up on the Catalog page of the Diner Library.  It looks like this:

















































































































quot;#quot;"Date Submitted""Type""Author (Last First)""Title""Dewey Decimal Topic""Sub-Topic""URL"
quot;10quot;"14/05/2015""Book""Illich Ivan""Deschooling Society""300- Social Sciences""Economics""http://www.preservenet.com/theory/Illich/Deschooling/intro.html"
quot;9quot;"14/05/2015""Book""Illich Ivan""Energy and Equity""300- Social Sciences""Energy""https://goo.gl/CgzFHP"
quot;8quot;"14/05/2015""Book""Butler Smedley""War is a Racket""900- Geography & History""Geopolitics""http://www.ratical.org/ratville/CAH/warisaracket.pdf"
quot;7quot;"14/05/2015""Book""Quigley Carroll""Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time""900- Geography & History""Geopolitics""http://www.carrollquigley.net/pdf/Tragedy_and_Hope.pdf"
quot;6quot;"14/05/2015""Website""Lewis Tom""Daily Impact""000-General""Economics""http://www.dailyimpact.net/"
quot;5quot;"14/05/2015""Website""McPherson Guy""Nature Bats Last""500- Natural Sciences & Mathematics""Environment""http://guymcpherson.com/"
quot;4quot;"14/05/2015""Website""Tverberg Gail""Our Finite World""600- Applied Science & Engineering""Energy""http://ourfiniteworld.com/"
quot;2quot;"14/05/2015""Website""Ludlum Steve""Economic Undertow""300- Social Sciences""Economics""http://www.economic-undertow.com/"
quot;1quot;"13/05/2015""Website""Reverse Engineer""Doomstead Diner""000-General""Economics""http://doomsteaddiner.net"


 



If you MOUSE OVER the table headers, you'll see little UP/DOWN Pointers.  They let you sort the Table by that Field, Alphabetically or Numerically, Up or Down.  Once you do your sort, you just scroll down to find what you are looking for.



 



This is not however the best way to do it.  It's better to Copy the Table and Paste it into Excel or Open Office, then you can make your own .csv file and use it with any Database program ever cojured up by a Code Jockey.



The URLs in the Table are mostly not Hot Links at this point.  To use them, you need to Copy/Paste them into your Browser.  Not too difficult.



How do I Submit Records to the Atavachron?



If you are just dropping in the occasional Record, the easiest way is to use the Form on the SUBMISSIONS PAGE. It looks like this:


[ninja_forms_display_form id=15]


There are Drop Down Menus for the basic categories, then you just keyboard in the Author (Last, First), the Title and the URL (Uniform Resource Locator, the Net address).  I may add some new categories over time.



You do have to be careful dropping in URLs, because long ones that come from Search Engines mess up the Table Formatting.  Making SHORTCODES for these links before you drop them into the Database works a lot better.



If you have resources and links you wish to submit, it's better to just make your own Table in Excel or Open Office that looks like this:




































#

Date Submitted

Type

Author (Last, First)

Title

Dewey Decimal Topic

Sub-Topic

URL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Then just email me the file as an attachment, or you can paste the Text file into the Contact Form on the Diner if you don't have my email addy.



Advantage/Disadvantage to this is that you can drop whatever Topics/Subtopics you like in, however I suggest sticking to the ones I have listed in the Drop Down Menus to keep your contributions more searchable.



I look forward to getting some submissions here and growing this Library Catalog before I Buy My Ticket to the Great Beyond TM, so drop a few on here! :)



RE


Title: Re: Doomstead Diner ATAVACHRON Library of Collapse
Post by: RE on May 15, 2015, 03:38:21 AM
My PLUG for the Diner Atavacron Library started off at #5 on r/collapse (http://www.reddit.com/r/collapse/), and is already up to #3 on the Collapse Hit Parade!

Besides that, I got 3 other links now in the Top Ten.  :icon_sunny:

This was Slam Dunk Plugging!  :icon_mrgreen:

RE
Title: Re: Doomstead Diner ATAVACHRON Library of Collapse
Post by: RE on May 15, 2015, 03:46:16 AM
I now have 3 of the top 4 spots on r/collapse with my links, including the link to the Atavachron article on the Diner.  Killer Plugging, and all by the Rules there too!

Re
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: knarf on May 15, 2015, 04:08:16 AM
Very cool. Keep them coming!!!
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: RE on May 15, 2015, 05:12:15 AM
Very cool. Keep them coming!!!

I just wish I could do as well on r/politcs with 3M subscribers as with r/collapse with 35K.

First off most of those subscribers never or hardly ever hit the site.  They only have online 20-40 subscribers at a time, not much more than the Diner.  I bet most of those folks ALREADY know about the Diner too.

So it is a little bit of Preaching to the Choir.

The hard part in this Plugging Biz is reaching OUTSIDE the Choir.  :icon_scratch:

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: RE on May 15, 2015, 05:43:50 AM
Library of Collapse now at #2 right behind the Link I dropped on from Knarf of CEO vs Worker pay scales!  :icon_sunny:

It might make #1 tomorrow!  :coffee:

RE
Title: Diner Library: Jay Hanson's Brain Food Table of Contents
Post by: RE on May 15, 2015, 02:54:23 PM
Still working with JS on improving the Diner Library.  Might go with MySQL and Wiki Plugins.

Meanwhile, S from OFW sent me this link from Jay Hanson (http://www.jayhanson.org/page1.htm).

It's a long list.  Could take you a while just to read the list, forget how long to read all the material it links to!

Information Overload remains a big problem.

RE

 

"Industry deregulation of electric utilities in the U.S. has cut utility investment in energy saving programmes by 45 percent." [Reuters, 10/02/98]

ENERGETIC LIMITS TO GROWTH, by Jay Hanson, ENERGY Magazine, Spring, 1999
 FIVE FUNDAMENTAL ERRORS: The Short Version, by Jay Hanson, 11/13/2001
 METHANE MADNESS: A NATURAL GAS PRIMER, by Randy Udall & Steve Andrews, 04/13/2001
 Analysis of the IEO2001 Non-OPEC Supply Projections, by Roger D. Blanchard, Northern Kentucky University, 4/9/2001
Emergy Accounting, April 2000, Howard T. Odum, Environmental Engineering Sciences,University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA; mailto:htoeco@aol.com
"Oceanic Hydrates: more questions than answers" by Jean Laherrere e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr for Energy Exploration and Exploitation date May 3, 2000
 THE PEAK OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION AND THE ROAD TO THE OLDUVAI GORGE, by Richard C. Duncan, Ph.D., Pardee Keynote Symposia, Geological Society of America, Summit 2000, Reno, Nevada, November 13, 2000.
 THE BEST-KEPT SECRET IN WASHINGTON, Brain Food -- Third Quarter, 1999
 ENERGY AND RESOURCE QUALITY, by Charles A.S. Hall, et al. (1992)
Is USGS 2000 assessment reliable ?, by Jean Laherrere; e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr; May 2, 2000; published on the cyberconference of the WEC on May 19, 2000 
NOT ALL FIRST WORLD ECONOMIES DEPEND ON POPULATION GROWTH: IMMIGRATION SINCE THE OIL SHOCK IN FRANCE AND EUROPE, By Sheila Newman; mailto:smnaesp@alphalink.com.au
Oceanic Hydrates: an elusive resource, by e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr
THE HUBBERT CURVE : ITS STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES; by J.H. Laherrère e-mail: j.h.laherrere@infonie.fr
 An Analysis of U.S. and World Oil Production Patterns Using Hubbert-Style Curves, by Albert A. Bartlett, Department of Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, 80309-0390; Albert.Bartlett@Colorado.EDU
"Quels sont les problèmes quand on parle de réserves?", Jean Laherrère e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr  site: http://www.oilcrisis.com/laherrere ; Conférence AFTP du 31 Mars 1999 "Estimation des réserves et réduction de l'incertitude"; Pétrole et Techniques n°423 Nov./Dec. 1999 p37-47
 NEVER PUBLISHED ANYWHERE BEFORE! Oil Production Curves for all 42 Countries, by Richard Duncan.
link to THE IMMINENT PEAK OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION, by C.J. Campbell; A Presentation to a House of Commons All-Party Committee on July 7th 1999, 
 THE WORLD PETROLEUM LIFE-CYCLE: Encircling the Production Peak #3, by Richard Duncan, Institute on Energy and Man, Seattle, WA, 1999.
 The Post-Petroleum Paradigm -- and Population, by Walter Youngquist; Population and Environment, March 1999
 The Olduvai Theory: Sliding Towards a Post-Industrial Stone Age, by Dr. R. C. Duncan, July 1996
 The End of Cheap Oil, by Colin J. Campbell and Jean H. Laherrère, Scientific American, 3/98
 THE COMING OIL CRISIS, by C. J. Campbell, 1997.
 Energy and Human Evolution, by David Price, 1995
 Complexity, Problem Solving, and Sustainable Societies, by Joseph A. Tainter, 1996
 Evolution of "development lag" and "development ratio", presented at "Oil reserve conference" in Paris November 11, 1997 International Energy Agency, Jean Laherrère,  Associate consultant Petroconsultants, e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr , site: http://www.hubbertpeak.com/laherrere.
 Distribution and evolution of "recovery factor", presented at "Oil reserves conference" in Paris November 11, 1997, by International Energy Agency, Jean Laherrère, Associate consultant Petroconsultants, e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr , site: http://www.hubbertpeak.com/laherrere
The Impact of Declining Major North Sea Oil Fields Upon Future North Sea Production, by Roger D. Blanchard, Northern Kentucky University.
 THE EVOLUTION OF THE WORLD'S HYDROCARBON RESERVES, by J.H. Laherrère e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr, lecture given in French on June 17, 1998 in Paris to SPE France
 Assessing Oil and Gas Future Production, and the end of Cheap Oil?, by J. H. Laherrere, e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr, site: http://www.oilcrisis.com/laherrere, for Canadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists in Calgary April 6, 1999
 Reserve Growth: Technological Progress, or Bad Reporting and Bad Arithmetic? by J. H. Laherrère; Geopolitics of Energy Issue 22 n°4, p7-16, April 1999
 What goes up must come down: when will it peak? by J. H. Laherrère Consultant Paris France: e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr  site: http://www.oilcrisis.com/laherrere 
 Titanic Sinks, by Jay Hanson, June 24, 1998
 GeoDestinies, by Walter Youngquist PhD & Chair Emeritus, Department of Geology, University of Oregon, 1997.
 Renewable Energy: Economic and Environmental Issues, by David Pimentel, G. Rodrigues, T. Wane, R. Abrams, K. Goldberg, H. Staecker, E. Ma, L. Brueckner, L. Trovato, C. Chow, U. Govindarajulu, and S. Boerke. (Originally published in BioScience -- Vol. 44, No. 8, September 1994)
 eMergy Evaluation, by Howard T. Odum, May 27, 1998
 Scientists sense urgency to find future energy sources, Nando Times, October 28, 1998 3:08 p.m
 Here We Go Again: The Oil Surplus Won't Last as Long as we Might Wish, by James Srodes, Barrons, Oct 19, 1998
 link to Joy Ride to Global Collapse, by Jim Minter (1966)
 Life-Expectancy of Industrial Civilization, Robert L. Hickerson, August 2, 1997
 WHEN WILL THE JOY RIDE END? Community Office for Resource Efficiency
 a snip from ENERGY AND THE ECONOMICS OF SUSTAINABILITY by John Peet; Island Press, 1992.
 the prologue to BEYOND OIL: The Threat to Food and Fuel in the Coming Decades. Third Edition (1991) by John Gever, Robert Kaufman, David Skole, Charles Vorosmarty.
 Some fear the world may be running out of oil. September 5, 1998, Nando Times.
 SPENDING OUR GREAT INHERITANCE -- THEN WHAT? by Walter Youngquist. Geotimes, July 1998, pages 24-26.
 link Energy apocalypse looms as the world runs out of oil. Forget the Caspian bonanza! Peter Beaumont and John Hooper in Rome report that producers misled everybody, Sunday July 26, 1998, Observer (london)
 link June 15 issue of Forbes! CHEAP OIL: enjoy it while it lasts. p. 84 Franco Bernabe, chief executive of the Italian oil company ENI, sees a global oil production peak and 1970s-style oil shocks beginning between 2000 and 2005.
 A Peak Under the Covers, by Jay Hanson, 11/11/97.
 The Death of the Oil Economy, by Ted Trainer, Spring, 1997.
 Get Ready for Another Oil Shock, by L.F. Ivanhoe, February, 1997.
 Future world oil supplies:There is a finite limit. Ivanhoe on Hubbert (1995).

ECONOMICS


 FIVE FUNDAMENTAL ERRORS: The Short Version, by Jay Hanson, 11/13/2001
 FIVE FUNDAMENTAL ERRORS: The Long Version, by Jay Hanson, 11/13/2001
 ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY, by Jay Hanson, 11/13/2001
 A SECT WITH A CREED AND A POLITICAL PROGRAM, by Jay Hanson, 11/13/2001
 REACHING FOR HEAVEN ON EARTH, by Robert H. Nelson
 A MEANS OF CONTROL, The Last Scheduled BRAIN FOOD, by Jay Hanson, 01/01/00
 
"The Foulest of Them All", by Jay Hanson, Jan, 1999
 MAXIMUM POWER, by Jay Hanson, 01/01/2001
 The need to reintegrate the natural sciences into economics, by By Charles Hall 1 , Dietmar Lindenberger 2 , Reiner Kümmel 3 , Timm Kroeger 1 , and Wolfgang Eichhorn 4, 3/31/2001
 Is the Argentine National Economy being destroyed by the Department of Economics of the University of Chicago? , by Charles A. S. Hall, Pablo Daniel Matossian, Claudio Ghersa, Jorge Calvo,Clara Olmedo 3/31/2001
 FAITH AND CREDIT: The World Bank's Secular Empire
 
NEOLIBERAL NOSTRUMS, by Andrew McKillop,
 THIS WAY FOR THE GAS, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, by Tadeusz Borowski, # 119198
 Los Sangre Es en Tus Manos, by Jay Hanson, April, 1999
 Dangerous Currents, by Lester Thurow; Random, 1983
 "The Market" is simply "Too Cheap to Meter", by Jay Hanson, 11/01/98
 It's the Money, Stupid!, by Jay Hanson, August 10, 1998
 Energy and Economic Myths, by Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen (1975)
 What is Life?, by Erwin Shrödinger. First published in 1944
 Lunatic Politics, by Jay Hanson, June 6, 1998
 THE ECONOMICS OF THE COMING SPACESHIP EARTH, by Kenneth E. Boulding, 1966
 Decision Making and Problem Solving, by Herbert A. Simon and Associates, 1986
 Opposing Globalization Could Justify Resource-Based Basic Income, by Mary Lehmann
 FREE TRADE - NAFTA - WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING
 MYTHS OF THE POLITICAL-ECONOMIC WORLD VIEW, by John Peet, 1992.
 Energy, Entropy, Economics, and Ecology defines "entropy" and how it relates to the economy.
 SUSTAINABLE GROWTH: An Impossibility Theorem, by Herman E. Daly (1993)
 A Systems Perspective on the Interrelations Between Natural, human-made, and cultural capital, by Fikret Berkes & Carl Folke, Oct. 1991
 THE 4P APPROACH TO DEALING WITH SCIENTIFIC UNCERTAINTY, by Robert Costanza and Laura Cornwell (1992)
 THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE, is an alternative to cost/benefit analysis
 TOO MANY RICH PEOPLE: Weighing Relative Burdens on the Planet, by Paul Ehrlich (1994)
 WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE GDP is a description of the Genuine Progress Indicator-GPI.
 STEADY-STATE ECONOMICS: A Catechism of Growth Fallacies, by Herman Daly (1991).
 TOWARDS A NEW ECONOMICS: Questioning Growth, by Herman E. Daly, 1971
 MONEY AND MAGIC A review of H.C. Binswanger's Money and Magic (A Critique of the Modern Economy in Light of Goethe's Faust) University of Chicago Press. by Herman Daly (Winter, 1996)
 SUGARSCAPE A review from SCIENCE NEWS.
 OUR PERPETUAL GROWTH UTOPIA by Fred Charles Ikle (1994)
 FAREWELL LECTURE TO WORLD BANK, by Herman E. Daly, January 14, 1994

SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS

RS AND NAS STATEMENT is the official 1992 statement of the Royal Society and the National Academy of Sciences.
 WORLD SCIENTISTS' WARNING TO HUMANITY is from the Union of Concerned Scientists in 1992.
 WORLD SCIENTISTS' CALL FOR ACTION AT THE KYOTO CLIMATE SUMMIT
 Science Summit" on World Population: A Joint Statement by 58 of the World's Scientific Academies.
 ESA Passes Resolution on Human Population from the Ecological Society of America (1994)
 ECONOMIST'S STATEMENT ON GLOBAL WARMING Feb. 13, 1997
 ECOLOGIST'S STATEMENT ON GLOBAL WARMING May 20, 1997
 link to TROUBLED WATERS: A CALL FOR ACTION

FOOD, LAND, WATER AND POPULATION


 
 Humans have destroyed more than 30 per cent of the natural world since 1970 with serious depletion of the forest, freshwater and marine systems on which life depends. [Guardian, 10/2/98]

Age-adjusted mortality in Russia rose by almost 33% between 1990 and 1994.... Russia is not alone in experiencing drops in life expectancy; all the nations created from the break-up of the Soviet Union have reported a decline in life expectancy since 1990, although none has been as large as in Russia. [JAMA. 1998;279:793-800]

Africa is beginning of a full-on Malthusian dieoff. See "Worldwatch Briefing: Sixteen Dimensions of the Population Problem" at http://www.worldwatch.org/alerts/pr98924.html and "Life on Earth is Killing Us" press release at  http://www.enn.com/news/enn-stories/1998/10/100298/killingus.asp and study itself is here.

"To put this in context, you must remember that estimates of the long-term carrying capacity of Earth with relatively optimistic assumptions about consumption, technologies, and equity (A x T), are in the vicinity of two billion people. Today's population cannot be sustained on the 'interest' generated by natural ecosystems, but is consuming its vast supply of natural capital -- especially deep, rich agricultural soils, 'fossil' groundwater, and biodiversity -- accumulated over centuries to eons. In some places soils, which are generated on a time scale of centimeters per century are disappearing at rates of centimeters per year. Some aquifers are being depleted at dozens of times their recharge rates, and we have embarked on the greatest extinction episode in 65 million years." Paul Ehrlich (Sept. 25, 1998)

As capitalism fails in more-and-more countries, these countries will disintegrate too. Ultimately of course, this will lead to world wars over natural resources. See Homer-Dixon's work at http://utl2.library.utoronto.ca/www/pcs/tad.htm

BIODIVERSITY DECAY
 Recent Developments in Environmental Sciences, by Paul Ehrlich, Sept. 25, 1998
 Revisiting Carrying Capacity, by William E. Rees, 1996
 WILL LIMITS OF THE EARTH'S RESOURCES CONTROL HUMAN NUMBERS?, by David Pimentel, O. Bailey, P. Kim, E. Mullaney, J. Calabrese, L. Walman, F. Nelson, and X. Yao; February 25, 1999
 Ecology of Increasing Disease, by David Pimentel, October, 1998THE MASSIVE MOVEMENT TO MARGINALIZE THE MODERN MALTHUSIAN MESSAGE, by Albert A. Bartlett. This is a revised version of an article that was published in The Social Contract Vol. 8, No. 3, Spring 1998, Pgs. 239 - 251
 LAND, ENERGY AND WATER: THE CONSTRAINTS GOVERNING IDEAL U.S. POPULATION SIZE, by David Pimentel and Marcia Pimentel (1991)
 link to U.S. FOOD PRODUCTION THREATENED BY RAPID POPULATION GROWTH, the Pimentels (1997)
 link to Food Security for a Growing World Population 200 Years After Malthus, Still an Unsolved Problem
 Optimum Human Population Size, by Gretchen C. Daily
 Restoring Value to the WorId's Degraded Lands, by Gretchen C. Daily (1995)
 An exploratory model of the impact of rapid climate change on the world food situation, by Grechen C. Daily and Paul R. Ehrlich (1990)
 FOOD, LAND, POPULATION and the U.S. ECONOMY-FULL REPORT, by David Pimentel of Cornell University and Mario Giampietro Istituto of Nazionale della Nutrizione, Rome. November 21, 1994
 CONSTRAINTS ON THE EXPANSION OF THE GLOBAL FOOD SUPPLY, by Henery W Kindall and David Pimentel (1994)
 Response to Bartlett and Lytwak (1995): Population and Immigration Policy in the United States , by Anne H. Ehrlich Paul R. Ehrlich
 Chronic Famine and the Immorality of Food Aid, by Joseph Fletcher (1991)
 THE CORNUCOPIAN FALLACIES, by Lindsey Grant (1992)
 IMPACT OF POPULATION GROWTH ON FOOD SUPPLIES AND ENVIRONMENT, by David Pimentel, Xuewen Huang, Ana Cordova, and Marcia Pimentel (February, 1996)
 KERMIT OLSON MEMORIAL LECTURE: Food Supply and World Population, by David Pimentel (March, 6, 1995)
 Putting the Bite on Planet Earth, by Don Hinrichson, Oct. 1994
 ENERGY AND POPULATION: Transitional Issues and Eventual Limits, by Paul J. Werbos (1993?)
 FOOD, LAND, POPULATION and the U.S. ECONOMY-EXECUTIVE SUMMARY, by David Pimentel of Cornell University and Mario Giampietro Istituto of Nazionale della Nutrizione, Rome. Executive Summary Released November 21, 1994
 IMMIGRATION: NO. 1 IN U.S. GROWTH New Look Shows Greater Role in 1970-90 Population Increase, by Roy Beck (1991-1992)
 THE POPULATION EXPLOSION is from Paul and Anne Ehirlich. This is also where to find JULIAN SIMON'S BET and HIS ULTIMATE RESOURCE
 How and Why Journalists Avoid the Population-Environment Connection, by T. Michael Maher, March 1997
 Negative Population Growth, by John B. Hall, Sept. 1996
 The Food "Surplus": a Staple Illusion of Economics; a Cruel Illusion for Populations, by Jim C. Fandrem, Winter, 1988
 Rethinking the Environmental Impacts of Population, Affluence and Technology, by Thomas Dietz and Eugene A. Rosa (1994)
 WHY DO WOMEN HAVE BABIES? A book review by Robert A. McConnell (September, 1996)
 HOW TO INFLUENCE FERTILITY: The Experience So Far, by John R. Weeks (1990)
 THE TIGHTENING CONFLICT: POPULATION, ENERGY USE, AND THE ECOLOGY OF AGRICULTURE, by Mario Giampietro and David Pimentel (1994)
 LIVING WITHIN OUR ENVIRONMENTAL MEANS: Natural Resources And An Optimum Human Population, by Rachel F. Preiser (1994)
 National Security Study Memorandum 200 April 24, 1974
 The 1972 Rockefeller Commission Report on U. S. Population, July, 1969
 WHY EXCESS IMMIGRATION DAMAGES THE ENVIRONMENT from Population-Environment Balance (1992)
 IMMIGRATION, JOBS & WAGES: The Misuses of Econometrics, by Donald L. Huddle (1992)
 IMMIGRATION AND THE U.S. ENERGY SHORTAGE, by Donald Mann, President Negative Population Growth, Inc. (May 1988)
 FULL HOUSE is a Worldwatch book review.
 THE LAST OASIS is a Worldwatch book review.
 NET LOSS is a Worldwatch book review.
 TOP OF THE NINTH, by Joel Campbell

CLIMATE CHANGE

James White, co-author of a study published in the journal Science, said that the Antarctica ice cores show a temperature increase of about 20 degrees F within a very short time about 12,500 years ago. .. Ice cores from Greenland, near the Arctic, show that at the same time there was a temperature increase of almost 59 degrees in the north polar region within a 50-year period, White said. [AP, 10/1/98]

The National Climatic Data Center has just announced that last month was the warmest September on record - almost a degree F above the previous record and nearly 4 degrees F above the average. It is the 9th consecutive month to break the previous all-time record.   ... there are areas of the Earth, such as the Arctic, where the temperature increase is 3 to 4 degrees Fahrenheit. This is enough to melt permafrost, the permanently frozen ground that characterizes northern tundra bogs. And melting bogs release methane, a greenhouse gas. [UPI, 10/8/98]

U.S. government scientists said this year's “ozone hole†over Antarctica was the largest ever observed, leaving an atmospheric depletion area greater than the size of North America over the southern land mass. [Nando, 10/7/98]

THE CLIMATE BOMB: Climate Change and the Fate of the Northern Boreal Forests, Greenpeace, 1994
 SUDDEN CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH HUMAN HISTORY, by Jonathan Adams and Randy Foote
 Dead on Arrival: positive feedback in the climate system
 BP STATEMENT ON GLOBAL WARMING, by John Browne, Group Chief Executive, British Petroleum (BP America) Stanford University, 19 May 1997
 THE HEAT IS ON: The warming of the world's climate sparks a blaze of denial, by Ross Gelbspan (12/95).
 DEAD. WRONG. Is a short essay on the fundamental errors of industrial society. Also included are some references for OZONE DEPLETION and GLOBAL WARMING.
 link to Changes in Time in the Temperature of the Earth
 A series of six charts displaying variations in temperature from the Mesozoic to the present, see the web site listed below. The current "blip" is put in perspective, based on the work of a
 number of scientists. References are cited.
 link to Globally-Averaged Atmospheric Temperatures A brief discussion with figures depicting global lower stratospheric temperature variations during the period 1979 to 1997, based on data
 obtained by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration TIROS-N satellite.

BUGS

link to Questions and Answers On Bio-Warfare/Bio-Terrorism (Q & A) with Dr. Ken Alibek http://www.emergency.com/1999/alibek99.htm
 link to "The Bioweaponeers" at http://cryptome.org/bioweap.htm
HEALTH IN THE HOT ZONE How would global warming affect humans? By Richard Monastersky (April, 1996)
 DEVELOPMENT, GLOBAL CHANGE, AND THE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT, by Gretchen C. Daily & Paul R. Ehrlich, 1995
 link to The Challenge of Antibiotic Resistance Certain bacterial infections now defy all antibiotics. The resistance problem may be reversible, but only if society begins to consider how the drugs affect "good" bacteria as well as "bad", by Stuart B. Levy (Scientific American, 03/98)
 link to Drugged Waters Does it matter that pharmaceuticals are turning up in water supplies? by Janet Raloff (Science News 3/21/98)

MORAL THEORY
 A General Statement of the Tragedy of the Commons, by Herschel Elliott, Feb. 1997
 Christianity and Evolutionary Ethics , by Patricia A. Williams (June 1996)
 THE NEED FOR TRANSCENDENCE IN THE POSTMODERN WORLD a short essay by By Vaclav Havel (1994)

CARRYING CAPACITY

 

OVERSHOOT, the classic by William Catton, 1982.
 Ethical Implications of Carrying Capacity , by Garrett Hardin (1977)
 CULTURAL CARRYING CAPACITY: A biological approach to human problems, by Garrett Hardin (1986)
 THE WORLD'S MOST POLYMORPHIC SPECIES: Carrying capacity transgressed two ways, by William Catton (June 1987).
 THE INTRODUCTION, INCREASE, AND CRASH OF REINDEER ON ST. MATTHEW ISLAND - by David R. Klein (April, 1968).
 POPULATION POLITICS: The Carrying Capacity of the United States, by Dr. Virginia Abernethy (1993)
 HUMAN CARRYING CAPACITY DEFINED defines "carrying capacity".

TRAGEDY OF THE COMMONS

West Africa is becoming the symbol of worldwide demographic, environmental, and societal stress, in which criminal anarchy emerges as the real "strategic" danger. Disease, overpopulation, unprovoked crime, scarcity of resources, refugee migrations, the increasing erosion of nation-states and international borders, and the empowerment of private armies, security firms, and international drug cartels are now most tellingly demonstrated through a West African prism. West Africa provides an appropriate introduction to the issues, often extremely unpleasant to discuss, that will soon confront our civilization. ... -- Robert D. Kaplan

Tragedy of the Commons Re-stated, by Jay Hanson, 6/14/97
 THE FATAL FREEDOM (the Tragedy of the Commons), by Jay Hanson 8/29/97.
 The Tragedy of the Commons (the original) , by Garrett Hardin (1968)
 EASTER's END, by Jared Diamond
 THE TRAGEDY OF THE COMMONS, By Gary W. Harding http://oto.wustl.edu/bbears/trajcom/trajcom.htm

SUSTAINABILITY

REFLECTIONS ON SUSTAINABILITY, POPULATION GROWTH, AND THE ENVIRONMENT - REVISITED, by Albert A. Bartlett, January 1998
 LAWS, HYPOTHESES, OBSERVATIONS AND PREDICTIONS RELATING TO SUSTAINABILITY from Al Bartlett (1994)
 The Meaning of Sustainability: Biogeophysical Aspects, by John P. Holdren, Gretchen C. Daily, and Paul R. Ehrlich (1995)
 Population, Sustainability, and Earth's Carrying Capacity: A framework for estimating population sizes and lifestyles that could be sustained without undermining future generations , by Gretchen C. Daily and Paul R. Ehrlich (1992)
 Three General Policies to Achieve Sustainability , by Robert Costanza (1994).
 Sustainable Development. Conventional versus Emergent Alternative Wisdom, by David Korten (1996).
 SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING: Resource Load Carrying Capacity and K­phase Technology, by Peter Hartley (1993)
 Socioeconomic Equity: A Critical Element in Sustainability, by Gretchen C. Daily & Paul R. Ehrlich (Feb, 1995)
 Foreclosing the future, by Gretchen C. Daily (Nov. 1995)
 UNSUSTAINABILITY: A CONSENSUS is a short piece by Paul Ekins about unsustainability.
 CREATING JOBS IN A SUSTAINABLE WORLD, by Nadia Steinzor - ZPG Reporter (Sept/Oct, 1996)
 GREENING THE CORPORATION, by Ward Morehouse. Address to the Greens Gathering, Los Angeles, August 16, 1996

OTHER ECOLOGY

THE LANGUAGE OF ECOLOGY defines "overshoot", crash" and "die-off".
 HUMAN APPROPRIATION OF THE PRODUCTS OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS, by Peter Vitousek, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anne H. Ehrlich and Pamela Matson (1986).
 The Patch Disturbance Species, by John Logan, Jan. 2, 1997.
 AMERICA'S TREES ARE DYING, by Charles E. Little (1995)
 WHAT DANGERS LIE AHEAD? by James E. Lovelock (1994)
 RETURN OF THE GROUP: People may have evolved to further collective as well as individual interests, by Bruce Bower (1995)

OTHER SYSTEMS

POSITIVE FEEDBACK is an example of the catastrophic view.
 URBAN DYNAMICS a short clip from a book by Jay Forrester (1969)
 Rewards of Pejoristic Thinking, by Garrett Hardin (1977)
 WHO BENEFITS? WHO PAYS?. by Garrett Hardin (1985)
 An Ecolate View of the Human Predicament. by Garrett Hardin(date ?)
 The Problem of Induction, by Sir Karl Popper (1953, 1974)
 URBAN DYNAMICS a few quotes from Jay W. Forrester.
 LIMITS TO GROWTH discusses the Club of Rome's seminal work.

ODDS AND ENDS


 "a kind of Pontius Pilate feeling"  -- by Jay Hanson, 04/01/97

ABSTRACT:
 In this essay, I examine the economic model of "rational man" and how the model legitimizes prevailing public policy. "Rational man" supposedly weighs the important, known variables and then makes that decision which is most likely to achieve the desired end (the greatest "utility"). Thus, we can say that public policy is founded on the notion that people calculate the utility of each decision, somewhat like a computer.

Phillip Morris: "Smoking is a personal choice, and so is quitting."

But modern cognitive science has shown that people do not make decisions by calculating the utility of each decision. Thus, economic "rational man" is a fraud that leaves the public exposed to ongoing economic and political exploitation by corporate media experts. Moreover, this fraud provides economists and political leaders with effective "moral cover", or in the words of Adolph Eichmann, "a kind of Pontius Pilate feeling" that leaves them free of all guilt for their dirty deeds.

KNOW THYSELF -- A Report of the Dominant Animal Life on the Third Planet: Executive Summary, by Yaj, January 24, 1997.
Requiem, by Jay Hanson, Feb, 20, 1998
 THE INDUSTRIAL RELIGION draws a parallel between the churchmen who fought against the Copernican Revolution and the modern economic "growthmen".
 WHERE WILL IT END? by Jay Hanson.
 SYSTEMS CRASH provides three different sources-using three different data sets-showing a worldwide includes a table showing review on WHO WILL FEED CHINA , a press THE COLLAPSE OF THE WORLD'S FISHERIES , an article on FISH FARMING, a short release on THE EARTH'S CARRYING CAPACITY , a clip from THE COMING ANARCHY , and a discussion of NPP .
 CORPORATE RULE gives a short history of the modern corporation and describes its essential functions. It also contains a book review of WHEN CORPORATIONS RULE THE WORLD by David Korten.
 ENDING CORPORATE GOVERNANCE: We The People Revoking Our Plutocracy.
 THE COMING ANARCHY, by Robert D. Kaplan, The Atlantic Monthly, February 1994. Quicktime Movie of Dead Babies Being Thrown Into a Dump Truck CNN, November 1996 [ Download the Quicktime Movie Player from Apple ]
 Rural Rwanda Faces Uneasy Balance of Fear as Refugees Return New York Times, December 26, 1996.
 ELEVEN INHERENT RULES OF CORPORATE BEHAVIOR is a short essay by Jerry Mander.
 ELECTRONIC HEROIN is about the addictive qualities of television.
 TV MUTANTS is about how television alters the human brain.
 BRAINWASHING is about how television influences human actions.
 WARREN CHRISTOPHER ON U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL DIPLOMACY (1996)
 UNDERWEIGHTING OF BASE-RATE INFORMATION REFLECTS IMPORTANT DIFFICULTIES PEOPLE HAVE WITH PROBABILISTIC INFERENCE by Robert M. Ham (1994)
 VICE PRESIDENT GORE CALLS FOR "ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CARD" Challenges Federal Agencies, Scientific Community To Monitor Nation',s Ecosystems from The White House (1996)

Title: Diner Library: Meta-Meta Data
Post by: RE on May 15, 2015, 04:16:55 PM
The number of resources out there are of course ENORMOUS, and I am not the first person trying to create a good Library Catalog for this stuff.

Musashi's DB by itself is HUGE!

To drop all of that into a .csv file would make the table ridiculously large, and I doubt the Plugin I currently have installed could handle it.

However, I came up with a solution to this, which is to create a NEW META-META DATA CATEGORY!  :icon_sunny:

The Category is Libraries, and basically it's a catelog of catelogs.

We have 3 new additions to the Atavachron now.  :icon_sunny:

Make a submission!

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library: Poetry Shelf - Declaration
Post by: Golden Oxen on July 13, 2015, 04:52:42 AM

     Declaration


  Two years, two months, two days.
Henry Thoreau was wary of symbols

thoughts and things that go two
by two into the ark of the mind.

And when he took time off, absconded
with it to the pond on July 4th,

1845, he scoffed at those who saw
declaration of independence, in truth

he might have said, I am more
dependent than ever, on this pond

on this earth, on these feet, not
to mention the sky that shines

in the water, a medium really
for seeing up and down, for

seeing two ways at once, a unity
upon which I row my boat and

in which I bathe every day.



by Sandy Stott                                http://thoreaufarm.org/2015/07/declaration/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=declaration (http://thoreaufarm.org/2015/07/declaration/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=declaration)  :icon_study:
 
Double clicking Walden Pond image will reduce it to screen size viewing.

                                                        (http://thoreaufarm.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/IMG_0618.jpg)

                                                     
Title: Re: Diner Library - Hemingway Never Did This- Poem by Charles Bukowski
Post by: Golden Oxen on December 14, 2015, 05:06:59 PM

Hemingway never did this

I read that he lost a suitcase full of manuscripts on a
train and that they never were recovered.
I can't match the agony of this
but the other night I wrote a 3-page poem
upon this computer
and through my lack of diligence and
practice
and by playing around with commands
on the menu
I somehow managed to erase the poem
forever.
believe me, such a thing is difficult to do
even for a novice
but I somehow managed to do
it.

now I don't think this 3-pager was immor-
tal
but there were some crazy wild lines,
now gone forever.
it bothers more than a touch, it's some-
thing like knocking over a good bottle of
wine.

and writing about it hardly makes a good
poem.
still, I thought somehow you'd like to
know?

if not, at least you've read this far
and there could be better work
down the line.

let's hope so, for your sake
and
mine.


 Charles Bukowski
(1920 - 1994)
Title: Re: Diner Library - I Like Canadians - Poem by Ernest Hemingway
Post by: Golden Oxen on December 14, 2015, 05:15:27 PM
I Like Canadians

 
  By A Foreigner

I like Canadians.
They are so unlike Americans.
They go home at night.
Their cigarettes don't smell bad.
Their hats fit.
They really believe that they won the war.
They don't believe in Literature.
They think Art has been exaggerated.
But they are wonderful on ice skates.
A few of them are very rich.
But when they are rich they buy more horses
Than motor cars.
Chicago calls Toronto a puritan town.
But both boxing and horse-racing are illegal
In Chicago.
Nobody works on Sunday.
Nobody.
That doesn't make me mad.
There is only one Woodbine.
But were you ever at Blue Bonnets?
If you kill somebody with a motor car in Ontario
You are liable to go to jail.
So it isn't done.
There have been over 500 people killed by motor cars
In Chicago
So far this year.
It is hard to get rich in Canada.
But it is easy to make money.
There are too many tea rooms.
But, then, there are no cabarets.
If you tip a waiter a quarter
He says 'Thank you.'
Instead of calling the bouncer.
They let women stand up in the street cars.
Even if they are good-looking.
They are all in a hurry to get home to supper
And their radio sets.
They are a fine people.
I like them.

Ernest Hemingway
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: Eddie on December 14, 2015, 05:18:19 PM
 :emthup: :emthup: :emthup:
Title: Diner Library: THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON by Rudyard Kipling
Post by: jdwheeler42 on August 16, 2016, 05:44:11 PM
THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON

It was not part of their blood,
It came to them very late,
With long arrears to make good,
When the Saxon began to hate.

They were not easily moved,
They were icy — willing to wait
Till every count should be proved,
Ere the Saxon began to hate.

Their voices were even and low.
Their eyes were level and straight.
There was neither sign nor show
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not preached to the crowd.
It was not taught by the state.
No man spoke it aloud
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not suddenly bred.
It will not swiftly abate.
Through the chilled years ahead,
When Time shall count from the date
That the Saxon began to hate.

by Rudyard Kipling
Title: Re: Diner Library: THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON by Rudyard Kipling
Post by: Eddie on August 16, 2016, 06:02:40 PM
THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON

It was not part of their blood,
It came to them very late,
With long arrears to make good,
When the Saxon began to hate.

They were not easily moved,
They were icy — willing to wait
Till every count should be proved,
Ere the Saxon began to hate.

Their voices were even and low.
Their eyes were level and straight.
There was neither sign nor show
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not preached to the crowd.
It was not taught by the state.
No man spoke it aloud
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not suddenly bred.
It will not swiftly abate.
Through the chilled years ahead,
When Time shall count from the date
That the Saxon began to hate.

by Rudyard Kipling

I've never read that. Thank you. I tried to find some reference to find out what context or object Kipling was referring to...the Romans...the Normans? Do you know?

A quick google search reveals the poem seems to be an anthem for racists these days.
Title: Re: Diner Library: THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON by Rudyard Kipling
Post by: K-Dog on August 17, 2016, 09:00:23 AM
THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON

It was not part of their blood,
It came to them very late,
With long arrears to make good,
When the Saxon began to hate.

They were not easily moved,
They were icy — willing to wait
Till every count should be proved,
Ere the Saxon began to hate.

Their voices were even and low.
Their eyes were level and straight.
There was neither sign nor show
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not preached to the crowd.
It was not taught by the state.
No man spoke it aloud
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not suddenly bred.
It will not swiftly abate.
Through the chilled years ahead,
When Time shall count from the date
That the Saxon began to hate.

by Rudyard Kipling

I've never read that. Thank you. I tried to find some reference to find out what context or object Kipling was referring to...the Romans...the Normans? Do you know?

A quick google search reveals the poem seems to be an anthem for racists these days.

It looks like Kipling was paying homage to a private romanticized vision of the Englishman as his poem below shows.  I don't think much of 'The Awakend Saxon'.  That poem was a construct of Kiplings mind having few roots in reality.  Besides which the poem does not really say much of anything.  A vision of a past imagined; what Kipling wished for, and not what is or what was.  The steely resolve of the poem is a fiction.  An awakened Saxon must surly be as easily deceived as anyone else.  The average man will not maintain a steely steady resolve for if he could he would not be average. 

Would that this could be so.

But he never means anything serious till he talks about justice
      right.
When he stands like an ox in the furrow--with his sullen set eyes
     on your own,
And grumbles, 'This isn't fair dealing,' my son, leave the Saxon
     alone.

Instead average man, Saxon or otherwise would rather pay $19.95 plus shipping and handling.  To the average man fair dealing is old school.



Rudyard Kipling

Norman and Saxon
A.D. 1100

"My son," said the Norman Baron, "I am dying, and you will
    be heir
To all the broad acres in England that William gave me for
    share
When he conquered the Saxon at Hastings, and a nice little
    handful it is.
But before you go over to rule it I want you to understand this:--

"The Saxon is not like us Normans. His manners are not so polite.
But he never means anything serious till he talks about justice
      right.
When he stands like an ox in the furrow--with his sullen set eyes
     on your own,
And grumbles, 'This isn't fair dealing,' my son, leave the Saxon
     alone.

"You can horsewhip your Gascony archers, or torture your
      Picardy spears;
But don't try that game on the Saxon; you'll have the whole
     brood round your ears.
From the richest old Thane in the county to the poorest chained
              serf in the field,
They'll be at you and on you like hornets, and, if you are wise,
                  you  will  yield.

"But first you must master their language, their dialect, proverbs
              and songs.
Don't trust any clerk to interpret when they come with the tale
              of their own wrongs.
Let them know that you know what they are saying; let them feel
               that you know what to say.
Yes, even when you want to go hunting, hear 'em out if it takes
                you all day.

They'll drink every hour of the daylight and poach every hour
     of the dark.
It's the sport not the rabbits they're after (we've plenty of game
     in the park).
Don't hang them or cut off their fingers. That's wasteful as well
     as unkind,
For a hard-bitten, South-country poacher makes the best man-
     at-arms you can find.

"Appear with your wife and the children at their weddings and
     funerals and feasts.                                         
Be polite but not friendly to Bishops; be good to all poor parish
   priests.
Say 'we,' 'us' and 'ours' when you're talking, instead of 'you
    fellows'  and  'I.'
Don't ride over seeds; keep your temper; and never you tell 'em
     a lie!"

The human imagination can take us to strange places.

(http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b325/ZeroArmour/nazi_girl.jpg)

Not all of them good.


Title: Re: Kipling
Post by: Eddie on August 17, 2016, 10:52:35 AM
So, it does seem to be written in the context then of Norman vs. Saxon, and from the upper class Norman POV. That's what I was unclear on.

I don't have any problem with Kipling's version. He was writing from 800 years of looking in the rear view mirror, at a social divide that I suppose still exists, even now, although not like it was at the height of the British empire.

And he probably wasn't partisan, having been the son of an artist/academic who taught at university in India.

After Tennyson, the bar for poetry in GB was set pretty low, imho.

To me personally, being about as Saxon by blood as anyone left alive, it seems congruent with the spirit and actions of the transplanted British commoners who were my ancestors, right down to my old man. Both poems.
Title: Re: Kipling
Post by: Eddie on August 17, 2016, 11:12:43 AM
I like this one.

The Female of the Species

    WHEN the Himalayan peasant meets the he-bear in his pride,
    He shouts to scare the monster, who will often turn aside.
    But the she-bear thus accosted rends the peasant tooth and nail.
    For the female of the species is more deadly than the male.

    When Nag the basking cobra hears the careless foot of man,
    He will sometimes wriggle sideways and avoid it if he can.
    But his mate makes no such motion where she camps beside the trail.
    For the female of the species is more deadly than the male.

    When the early Jesuit fathers preached to Hurons and Choctaws,
    They prayed to be delivered from the vengeance of the squaws.
    'Twas the women, not the warriors, turned those stark enthusiasts pale.
    For the female of the species is more deadly than the male.

    Man's timid heart is bursting with the things he must not say,
    For the Woman that God gave him isn't his to give away;
    But when hunter meets with husbands, each confirms the other's tale—
    The female of the species is more deadly than the male.

    Man, a bear in most relations—worm and savage otherwise,—
    Man propounds negotiations, Man accepts the compromise.
    Very rarely will he squarely push the logic of a fact
    To its ultimate conclusion in unmitigated act.

    Fear, or foolishness, impels him, ere he lay the wicked low,
    To concede some form of trial even to his fiercest foe.
    Mirth obscene diverts his anger—Doubt and Pity oft perplex
    Him in dealing with an issue—to the scandal of The Sex!

    But the Woman that God gave him, every fibre of her frame
    Proves her launched for one sole issue, armed and engined for the same;
    And to serve that single issue, lest the generations fail,
    The female of the species must be deadlier than the male.

    She who faces Death by torture for each life beneath her breast
    May not deal in doubt or pity—must not swerve for fact or jest.
    These be purely male diversions—not in these her honour dwells—
    She the Other Law we live by, is that Law and nothing else.

    She can bring no more to living than the powers that make her great
    As the Mother of the Infant and the Mistress of the Mate.
    And when Babe and Man are lacking and she strides unclaimed to claim
    Her right as femme (and baron), her equipment is the same.

    She is wedded to convictions—in default of grosser ties;
    Her contentions are her children, Heaven help him who denies!—
    He will meet no suave discussion, but the instant, white-hot, wild,
    Wakened female of the species warring as for spouse and child.

    Unprovoked and awful charges—even so the she-bear fights,
    Speech that drips, corrodes, and poisons—even so the cobra bites,
    Scientific vivisection of one nerve till it is raw
    And the victim writhes in anguish—like the Jesuit with the squaw!

    So it comes that Man, the coward, when he gathers to confer
    With his fellow-braves in council, dare not leave a place for her
    Where, at war with Life and Conscience, he uplifts his erring hands
    To some God of Abstract Justice—which no woman understands.

    And Man knows it! Knows, moreover, that the Woman that God gave him
    Must command but may not govern—shall enthral but not enslave him.
    And She knows, because She warns him, and Her instincts never fail,
    That the Female of Her Species is more deadly than the Male.

 

Title: Re: Kipling
Post by: Eddie on August 17, 2016, 11:15:06 AM
They aren't really poems at all, are they? 

More like the ditties of soldiers or sailors. Kipling no doubt knew a great many of those, and I hear their influence in his lines, don't you?
Title: Diner Library Reading Selections Sought from the Gutenberg Project
Post by: RE on September 21, 2017, 07:01:10 PM
As I mentioned in another thread, I have started a Library of videos and audio to have on my Smart Phone for all the occasions I aam stuck sitting on my ass in some waiting area for extended periods of time, which happens to me a lot these days with all the doctor visits, plus the Jet Setting.  I'm taking another trip down to the lower 48 for Thanksgiving, so that will be more airport time and flying time to kill as well.  The last few flights on Alaska Airlines their free in-flight movies weren't working right and I had nothing stored on my phone to watch offline.  I won't pay the ridiculous fee they charge for in flight internet either, so I just mostly close my eyes and try to sleep.

Not now though!  :icon_sunny:  I already have a  nice little collection going, mostly of Documentaries in science and also some BBC TV series like Upstairs Downstaris and Rumpole of the Bailey.  Audio collected so far is some episodes of Lake Wobegone by Garrison Keillor.  By themselves, I already have more material than I could watch/listen in a year of waiting room time, but I want to have a good selection depending on my mood.

I mentioned also I went so nuts on this collecting that I burned through my 50GB of High Speed bandwidth (75mps) in about the first week of doing this.  However, under the new plan they don't cut you off completely when you use up your bandwidth this way, they flip you to a slower connection, 1mps.  At first I thought this would be intolerably slow, but it turns out not to be so.  For all the normal sites I visit which are text based, I really can't detect too big a difference.  It even will play Utoob vids, although sometimes there is a buffer problem.  I also can still download, although it is much slower.  So I just set it downloading and then do other things.  Instead of downloading in a few minutes, it takes a couple of hours.  No big deal there, I can still download a few titles each day, and this quickly builds your library.

I also figured out that the mp4 downloads of Utoob vids was not the cause of my going over bandwidth so fast.  Total I downloaded was 12GB this way.  What caused it was the two experiments I made with For Pay movies, I bought Last of the Mohicans and Pale Rider, and I downloaded both of them in HD format.  Thing is, on a screen the size of my Galaxy Mega or even my 8" El Cheapo Lenovo tablet, you don't NEED HD.  Screen size is too small.  You need HD for big screen TVs, which I don't have and have no Jones to buy either.  Anyhow, there are no recent movies that have been produced I want to spend money for, and even old favorites not that interested in.  What I can find for FREE on Utoob will keep me entertained quite well.

The reason I am writing this post though is not for suggestions on Video/Audio, it's for Literature, aka reading material.

A few years ago I downloaded a HUGE number of e-books from an online Book Club called Books Great Choice.  For $35 you got UNLIMITED downloads for the month.  In 2 months I downloaded about 1500 titles, including the Complete Works of Shakespeare, the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire and numerous contemporary novels as well.  Also medical textbooks, survival manuals, etc etc etc.  Unfortunately, the SD Card that they were stored on got corrupted, the computer I did the downloads with is defunct, and I can't find the 3rd backup of this file I made.  :(  It was the Burning of the Great Library at Alexandria for RE.  :'(

(http://www.ancient-origins.net/sites/default/files/field/image/library-alexandria-destruction.jpg)

Sadly also (but not unexpectedly) Books Great Choice has gone Outta Biz.  They had to be playing Fast & Loose with Copyright rules to run their unlimited download system.  I also can't find any other similar type of Book Club, so I am SOL for getting the same type of text library I got before on this go round of data collection.  However, there is a public site called the Gutenberg Project (https://www.gutenberg.org/) which has over 54,000 titles, most if not all of which are past copyright date.  Mostly old literature, "the classics".  By no means though have I gone through their whole card catalog, so I don't know what else might be in there.

I have already downloaded a few books, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (again  ::)), The Bible, the Bhagavit Gita & the Koran.  Probably will do the Illiad & Odyssey next.  However, the historical works of literature and history are vast, and so is this library.  I am looking for suggestions of good titles to download that maybe I didn't read already.  Or even if I did, it might be worth reading them again since the last time I read any old stuff was in my 30s.

So if you find a title in the Gutenberg Project Library (https://www.gutenberg.org/) you think is worthwhile reading, drop it here in this thread.

RE
Title: REs Diner Smart Phone Video Library Selections
Post by: RE on September 22, 2017, 09:08:59 AM
I thought I would share some of the selections I am downloading for my Video Library on my phone.  Currently, I am downloading Episode 1 of the BBC Series, "The Celts".  Druids bored in the back of a Freightliner might find this series a good way to pass the time.

http://www.youtube.com/v/AU1dKfMIEUQ

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: RE on September 22, 2017, 06:14:38 PM
The Celts Series is now completely downloaded!  :icon_sunny:  That is around 5 HOURS of waiting time video to watch while cooling my heels in doctors offices!  :o

Now I am moving on to First Nations people and Pre-Columbian Amerika.  :)

RE
Title: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: RE on September 22, 2017, 07:13:45 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/RkicPYuEv2E
Title: Re: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: Surly1 on September 23, 2017, 05:37:04 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/RkicPYuEv2E

If you want a good snapshot of pre-Columbian America, you could do worse than to download and read Charles Mann's 1491. Read it several ears ago and really left an impression.

The myth is that the Americas were sparsely populated mostly by nomadic tribes living lightly on land that was, for the most part, a vast wilderness. The truth is that is was extensively farmed, with densely populated villages generally rounded with wooden walls. And in Mexico, a very aggressive, expansionistic empire that had one of the world's largest cities as its capital, Tenutchtitlan, which is now Mexico City.

New research over the past few decades also suggests that North America was as populated as Europe. The Indians were wiped out to an extraordinary degree by disease, which went ahead of the settlers. The animals they brought were prime vectors for infections that this land had never seen before. So when the Spaniards arrived, the lands were sparsely populated.
Title: Re: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: RE on September 23, 2017, 06:52:46 AM
If you want a good snapshot of pre-Columbian America, you could do worse than to download and read Charles Mann's 1491.

Got a free link?

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: Surly1 on September 23, 2017, 07:23:45 AM
If you want a good snapshot of pre-Columbian America, you could do worse than to download and read Charles Mann's 1491.

Got a free link?

RE

Your fucking Google broken?
Title: Re: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: RE on September 23, 2017, 07:32:34 AM
If you want a good snapshot of pre-Columbian America, you could do worse than to download and read Charles Mann's 1491.

Got a free link?

RE

Your fucking Google broken?

I don't download any book that you have to pay for.  There are 55,000 Books on Project Gutenberg I can download for free.  54,000 of them I haven't read, and of the ones I did read it's mostly so long ago I only dimly remember them.  I cn spend the rest of my life reading FREE material.  Why am I going to fork over $14 for this book?

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: Surly1 on September 23, 2017, 07:35:29 AM
If you want a good snapshot of pre-Columbian America, you could do worse than to download and read Charles Mann's 1491.

Got a free link?

RE

Your fucking Google broken?

I don't download any book that you have to pay for.  There are 55,000 Books on Project Gutenberg I can download for free.  54,000 of them I haven't read, and of the ones I did read it's mostly so long ago I only dimly remember them.  I cn spend the rest of my life reading FREE material.  Why am I going to fork over $14 for this book?

RE

Nice that you have principles. By all means, hew to them.
Me, I buy a book because I want to read it. But I'm an analog guy adrift in a digital world.
Title: Diner Library: The Polynesians
Post by: RE on September 23, 2017, 07:38:31 AM
About 8 hours of documentary material on pre-Columbian First Nations people, as well as post-invasion stuff like the Indian Wars.

Now moving on to the Polynesians.

http://www.youtube.com/v/sypLmXDCBKk

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: RE on September 23, 2017, 07:42:50 AM
If you want a good snapshot of pre-Columbian America, you could do worse than to download and read Charles Mann's 1491.

Got a free link?

RE

Your fucking Google broken?

I don't download any book that you have to pay for.  There are 55,000 Books on Project Gutenberg I can download for free.  54,000 of them I haven't read, and of the ones I did read it's mostly so long ago I only dimly remember them.  I cn spend the rest of my life reading FREE material.  Why am I going to fork over $14 for this book?

RE

Nice that you have principles. By all means, hew to them.
Me, I buy a book because I want to read it. But I'm an analog guy adrift in a digital world.

For me, it's all about the $MONEY$.  Remember, I live on probably 1/3rd of your income.  You don't save money on a poverty level income by buying $14 books.

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: Surly1 on September 23, 2017, 08:30:24 AM


If you want a good snapshot of pre-Columbian America, you could do worse than to download and read Charles Mann's 1491.

Got a free link?

RE

Your fucking Google broken?


Not the book, but a good summary.
http://www.charlesmann.org/articles/1491-Atlantic.pdf (http://www.charlesmann.org/articles/1491-Atlantic.pdf)

https://ebook4expert.com/2015/03/17/1491-new-revelations-of-the-americas-before-columbus-ebook-by-charles-c-mann-epubmobi/ (https://ebook4expert.com/2015/03/17/1491-new-revelations-of-the-americas-before-columbus-ebook-by-charles-c-mann-epubmobi/)

https://www.nthurston.k12.wa.us/cms/lib/WA01001371/Centricity/Domain/747/Milpaandburningsc.pdf (https://www.nthurston.k12.wa.us/cms/lib/WA01001371/Centricity/Domain/747/Milpaandburningsc.pdf)

You're just more stubborn than thrifty.


Title: Re: Diner Library: Pre-Columbian Amerika 1
Post by: RE on September 23, 2017, 08:41:15 AM
You're just more stubborn than thrifty.

That is probably true, but I still got hours and hours of FREE material here to keep me entertained before I go and look over the summary of 1491. :P

I am on Chapter 2 of The Polynesians now.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Diner Library: Pre-Historic Man
Post by: RE on September 24, 2017, 08:39:49 AM
I now have about 6 hours worth of material on the Polynesians and 3 on the Vikings.  I have moved on to Pre-Historic Man.  This is a HUGE area with many documentaries.  I will limit this initial download on this topic to max 10 hours of material.  My first here is The Great Human Odyssey.  It's a big file, a full gigabyte for this one.  At my current slow speed, this will take several hours to download.  I get refreshed for high speed on Oct 1st, but I'm not worried about it.  I just "set it and forget it", Ron Popeil style.  My video library is over 16GB now.  :icon_sunny:

http://www.youtube.com/v/jALNCPeoqTw

RE
Title: Diner Library: Ancient Civilizations
Post by: RE on September 25, 2017, 07:49:04 AM
OK, I now have 10 documentaries on anthropology of Homo Sap and evolution.  It's more than 10 hours since some of them are 1.5 or 2 hours long.  A couple of these will cover a plane ride to Seattle easily.

I am moving on now to Ancient Civilizations.

http://www.youtube.com/v/DVngFvtZwAU

RE
Title: Diner Library: Mathematics
Post by: RE on September 25, 2017, 08:21:16 PM
I still have a long way to go with Ancient Civilizations, but I got sidetracked into Mathematics & Physics.  This is my first download on the topic.

http://www.youtube.com/v/qNlYMPmaMhs

RE
Title: Diner Library: I'm Going to Need a Bigger Boat
Post by: RE on September 26, 2017, 12:36:57 PM
Now past 32 GB in my Library File of Video, Audio & Text material to keep me entertained while waiting twidling my thumbs somewhere.  Also good for the day the Internet Goes Dark but I still can keep my Smart Phone charged up with my Solar Panels and Generator, which would be today if I lived in Puerto Rico.

My current SD Card in the phone is 32 GB, so the whole file already won't fit on it.  I have it divided into folders by topic though, so I don't have to load the whole thing at once, I can just load folders I might want to watch on any given day.  However, it's definitely more convenient to have everything all together.  I'll consider buying a 128 GB SD card for the phone.  I have a high speed one for my JVC Vidcam, very expensive though around $100 or so.

Currently downloading this documentary on the Hittites.  This is the biggest file yet at 1.6 GB by itself!

http://www.youtube.com/v/VHYn4IDi19A

RE
Title: It Takes a Thief to Spot a Heist
Post by: RE on September 27, 2017, 05:52:54 AM
I decided it was time to take a break from downloading "educational" documentaries and grab some more fluff entertainment.  :icon_sunny:

When I returned from Brasil as a pre-teen, I was already a complet TV ADDICT.  I had spent my earliest years watching Cartoons as entertainment before we left, and then in Brasil even though their TV shows of the time were positively AWFUL, they got in some Amerikan TV either with Subtitles or dubbed into Portuguese, of which the original Star Trek was one.  These shows also helped me become fluent in PPortuguese, besides entertaining me on the nights that the electricity worked.  All watched on a B&W TV that was mayybe 20" on the diagonal.  We didn't get our first Color TV until well into the 1970s back in NY Shity.

Anyhow, when I returned I had a few favorite shows I just HAD to watch every week, Star Trek among them.  By the time we got back I think it was in the last year as a First Run show on Prime Time TV, but it was on for years after that in reruns so I saw most if not all of the episodes of that series several times over.  Most of the other shows I liked were also older ones that were in reruns, but I had never seen them so they were new to me.  I watched The Rifleman as often as possible, although it was hard because it was on in the afternoon just about the time school let out so I would have to rush home to watch it, or play hookey from school which I did about once a week.  When I did this, I would spend all day watching Game Shows, Jeopardy was my favorite, in those days with Art Fleming as host, not Alex Trebek.

Other rerun shows I liked were the Twilight Zone and Outer Limits for sci-fi and Wagon Train for westerns.  I wasn't a big fan of the popular First Run westerns of the era, Gunsmoke and Bonanza.  The stuff being produced in that era had just TONS of complete GARBAGE I hated, shows like Green Acres and Petticoat Junction and the Beverly Hillbillies.

However, there were a couple of shows that went into first run just about the time I got back, Mission Impossible and It Takes a Thief.  Both featured real cool scams being pulled by the heros of the show, in both case CIA type agents but in the case of Al Mundy in It Takes a Thief he was a somewhat unwilling participant as having been recruited from prison La Femme Nikita style.  But he was suave and cool, and the women in the series were always HOT.  :icon_sunny:

One problem with ITAT was that it's air time was 10PM, which was my nominal bedtime in those years, although my mom never enforced it very much.  I had my own small 12" B&W TV I would watch into the wee hours upstairs, with the volume down low.  I also was addicted to watching the 11PM Nightly News in those years, constantly filled with footage and Death Counts from the war in Vietnam.  Also there were the assassinations of Bobby Kennedy and MLK, and numerous ongoing campus riots.  Then after that I would often stay up to watch Johnny Carson on the Tonight Show as well, which went from 11:30PM to 1AM.  Needless to say, I was often difficult to get out of bed in the morning and pretty grouchy in getting ready for another day of Skule.  lol.

It Takes a Thief never was picked up for reruns in NY Shity, so after the first run of the series which lasted about 3 years I never got to see it again.  As it turns out here though, some fan of the series has put up 66 FULL EPISODES on Utoob, and so far nobody is exercising copyright protection on them!  :icon_sunny:  So so far I have 10 of the episodes downloaded.  I've only watched the Opening Sequence of a few of the ones I downloaded, no full episodes yet.  Even of ones I saw, there is no way I will remember them today, so this will all be like new to me again.

I'm sure the acting was probably bad, and probably low quality sets also in that period.  I know when I went back and watched some old shows (actually just clips, I couldn't sit through a whole show) from the Batman series with Adam West I couldn't believe I actually LIKED that series when I was a kid.  It was just AWFUL!  lol.

Hopefully I will be able to It Takes a Thief again here as Nostalgia Entertainment on the way out the door to the Great Beyond.  Those years in the late 60's and early 70s are ones I really treasure, and anything which helps me bring back the memories of the time period brings me happiness.

Anyhow, here's the episode currently downloading of It Takes a Thief.

http://www.youtube.com/v/uSqq6vFzitM?list=PLAPGcD5LGrp7iCE90EsySBw4JxTVR-QOm

RE
Title: Kurt Vonnegut: Artist, Anarchist and Social Critic
Post by: RE on November 05, 2017, 01:13:42 AM
http://www.greanvillepost.com/2017/11/04/kurt-vonnegut-artist-anarchist-and-social-critic/ (http://www.greanvillepost.com/2017/11/04/kurt-vonnegut-artist-anarchist-and-social-critic/)

Kurt Vonnegut: Artist, Anarchist and Social Critic
November 4, 2017


HELP ENLIGHTEN YOUR FELLOWS. BE SURE TO PASS THIS ON. WE MUST BREAK THE IMPERIAL DISINFORMATION MACHINE.

(http://www.greanvillepost.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/kurt-vonnegut.jpg)

I somehow thought he would last forever, charming as always, joking, teasing, mocking, prickling, criticizing so wittily that the target of his pungent irony thought he was kidding, praising so ambiguously that those he loved thought he was criticizing, throwing mud pies in the faces of the powerful and calling them names, and boasting to one and all that he made lots of money being impolite.

“I most certainly am a member of the establishment,” Vonnegut told me that day over twenty years ago, I think it was the fall of 1985, in his town house on the East Side in Manhattan. An Amsterdam magazine had sent me to New York to interview the light of a “certain” American literature who so titillated, amused and charmed Europeans by ridiculing the ridiculous sides of America, by his playful lack of reverence for institutions and authority and for all the things that too many people take too seriously.

“No one is more in its center than me but I don’t maintain contacts with the other members. Though I don’t feel solidarity with it, I admit membership and I don’t like establishment people who play at the false role of rebels. Then the establishment needs people like me— however I’m a member only because I have money, otherwise they wouldn’t even talk to me.”

 

At the appearance of his first novel, Player Piano, in 1952, in the same year that Hemingway published The Old Man and the Sea and Steinbeck brought out East of Eden, Kurt Vonnegut was thirty and still widely considered an underground writer, despite Graham Greene’s labeling him “one of the best living American writers.”

Kurt Vonnegut (born 1922 in Indianapolis, died in New York, April 11, 2007 from the consequences of a fall two weeks earlier) was a very humorous man, so entertaining that he was deceptive, marked by broad grins, soft delivery and false modesty. I wondered, as his co-establishment members must have wondered, too, where the creative artist ends and the performer begins. Or vice-versa. Was he a real social critic or simply a cynic?

    “No one is more in its center than me but I don’t maintain contacts with the other members. Though I don’t feel solidarity with it, I admit membership and I don’t like establishment people who play at the false role of rebels. Then the establishment needs people like me— however I’m a member only because I have money, otherwise they wouldn’t even talk to me.”

After he became widely known in the sixties Vonnegut was identified with the revolt against realism and traditional forms of writing. Though he most certainly was a “social writer” from beginning to end, he was also more experimental than his contemporaries like Norman Mailer, Philip Roth and John Barth, more fascinated by the absurd and the ridiculous. His science fiction and short stories that had appeared in the best magazines in the post-war years, Atlantic Monthly, Esquire, Playboy, Colliers, Cosmopolitan, Saturday Evening Post, were marked by parody and experimental ridicule. A cult grew around him, especially among youth, so that he remained “mysterious” even after he no longer belonged to the underground. The appearance of each of his subsequent books was an event and he remained a fresh writer.

Things got underway in earnest already in that first novel. Vonnegut’s admiration for the marvels of technology had resulted in his early bent for science fiction, which he wrote a lot of. In Player Piano he was “fascinated by the wonderfully sane engineers who could process anything … do anything on their own horizontal level. Miraculous what the engineers could do. They were brilliant but didn’t seem to do anything brilliant. ” Drawn on Huxley’s Brave New World and science fiction in general, Vonnegut’s concern was that these specialists, each working in his own field, would soon produce their own leaders, a caste created by a technocracy barren of leaders capable of working on a vertical level and devoid of fresh humanistic ideas.

“Precisely this scientific system created our leaders. The problem is they brought little ideology into the factories. In general there is so little ideology left … if we ever had any at all. It’s good that we at least appeal to justice. On the other hand, I have found that one can behave ideologically within a small group related by profession or interests. I’m fascinated by the Paris Commune for example, especially its branch of anarchism. People tend to hang onto natural anarchy. The life of Bakunin is useful. Seen as useful people, anarchists offer a fascinating alternative to big government today. When I was a prisoner of war in Germany my small labor unit was left to fend for itself in destroyed Dresden. (One of his most famous novels, Slaughterhouse Five.) We dealt effectively with the thieves among us without being ferocious. We did that intuitively.”

That was Vonnegut.

One of his contorted Americas is controlled by one enormous corporation-state under the guidance of an ugly old girl whose weighty signature is her fingerprints (Jailbird). In this society the poor spend their time squirting chemicals into their bodies for the simple reason that “on this planet they don’t have doodley-squat.” That was the society that concerned the writer, Kurt Vonnegut, searching for a place for the individual. Like himself his characters are amusing, entertaining and sympathetic … and rebels all.

Yet his conclusions are seldom humorous.

“Big government is like the weather, you can’t do anything about it. People are moving away from central authority and its ineffective bureaucracy, which has created too many artificial jobs in Washington to accommodate our children. Then, let’s face it, leadership is so poor.”

In fact, Vonnegut spent his later years attacking that bureaucracy, especially the George W. Bush administration.

 

His artistic family background—his father and grandfather were architects, his daughters painters—and his association with painters and musicians engendered yearnings in him for the image of the Renaissance man. The day I spent the afternoon and early evening with him he invited me along to check in at the Greenwich Village gallery that was showing fifty of his book illustrations that he called “doodles with a felt-tip pen.” At the vernissage the vain writer-illustrator was as nervous as a Broadway musical star on opening night.

But not to worry! His fans snapped them up at one thousand dollars each.

He must have chuckled all the time to himself. That exhibit was the stuff of a typical Vonnegut literary vignette as in Breakfast of Champions in which he pokes fun at the art world, phony artists and gullible consumers in a mixture of ambivalence and pity. His fictional artist Karabekian has been paid $50,000 by the town for sticking a yellow strip of tape vertically on a piece of canvas. The whole town hates him for the swindle until he explains that it was an unwavering band of light, like each of them, like Saint Anthony.

“All you had to do was explain,” say the relieved people to their cultural hero, now convinced they have acquired one of the world’s masterpieces. “If artists would explain more people would like art more.”

Though Vonnegut repeats that workers simply want an explanation, the cynic suspects cynicism in him too.

“Sometimes I think the people of the world are begging to understand. And to be understood by the United States. They want to be understood more than they want to be ‘freed’ by America. Actually the US encourages not seeing other peoples. Disregard for other peoples is a matter of education. Making money is the point. Don’t waste your time. Conserve your resources. Withhold your time from people who can’t reward you. This started when Reagan came along and did away with social help using tax monies that Roosevelt’s New Deal had introduced. So the poor are now up the creek! (This was 1985, remember, before Iraq and Afghanistan and Iraq and East Africa and the war on terrorism.)

“And our intellectuals didn’t react at all to his re-election,” says the self-proclaimed Socialist-anarchist. “He ran unopposed.”

In Deadeye Dick a neutron bomb being transported along the Interstate goes off, killing 100,000 people of the town but leaving everything else intact. After the dead are buried under the parking lot for sanitary reasons, the question is what to do with the contaminated area. Someone proposes moving Haitian immigrants there. The point is that Vonnegut’s technological society needs the workers but it cares even less for non-Americans than for its own citizens.

“I’m convinced that slavery will come back, and Haitians were after all once slaves. With all the automation, society needs slaves. One will perhaps have the option of selling one’s services for long periods, thirty years, or for life. There will be many takers. Like the Asians and Mexicans who work here now for less than minimum wages.”

Americans who make their lives abroad see this generalized blindness to other peoples in their fellow Americans quite clearly, though they themselves are apparently unconscious of the neglect. I think Vonnegut must be right: it’s education … and some brainwash, too. Tourism and travels to Europe and Asia and South America to photograph the natives don’t really correct the blindness; sometimes it reinforces it.

 

We’re drinking scotch and black coffee and chain smoking in the kitchen of his unpretentious but large and expensive townhouse—four stories, with garden—in a swanky pretentious area of Manhattan. A cold wind is blowing down from among new high-rise buildings. Long Vonnegut in baggy pants and wool shirt is sprawled on an iron garden chair, drawling out his witticisms, descriptions and pronouncements, candid and down-to-earth, having fun at the expense of everyone—himself, me, us and them—the artist and social critic and performer, too. He runs his slim delicate fingers through long reddish hair and pulls nervously at his mustache. His talk has the quality of being quiet and breath-taking simultaneously. He seemed and acted younger than his years.

 

“I am successful,” he stresses, returning again and again to the money thing. “Privileged! When I was young and working for General Electric I was a hostage of society because I had six children. Now I’m free because I have money. I don’t like the privileged class, in the same way I will always resent the officer class. I was a private during the war and saw an infantry division wiped out its first time in combat because it was poorly led. Like America is poorly led today.” (Reading the write-ups of the two interviews I did with him in 1980 and again in 1985 is a curious experience; much of what he had to say then he could have said this year.)

Like many writers Vonnegut said that writing for him was a way to rebel against his parents’ life style. He claimed he chose writing because he wrote better than he painted, and because you have to do something to make your mark. He liked writing for newspapers because of the immediate feedback, which plays an enormous role among journalists I have known. Journalists are as vain as novelists and find it rewarding to write an article in the evening and see it in print the next day. I liked, appreciated and agreed with his social stance but he was his most entertaining and I believe most in earnest speaking of the arts.

“You can’t help but look back wistfully to the days of Cellini and Leonardo da Vinci who worked in many arts. But today there are so many things to do that we don’t have the time to dedicate ourselves wholly to the arts. Still, I believe in the arts. My children say I dance well. I can shag and that’s mysterious to the young. I can jitterbug and that impresses them. And I play the clarinette lovingly. In general the arts have held up well in catastrophic situations. Yet there are preferences. It’s true that painters like to paint and writers hate to write. Putting paint on a canvas is fun and is easy. You don’t even have to finish it. After six strokes you have a painting. At that point you can frame it and hang it. Maybe that’s why writers like to paint and draw. Norman Mailer is a good drawer. Tennessee Williams does good watercolors. Henry Miller is the best writer-painter I have known. Poetry too is fast. That’s why poets have so much time to sit around cafès and talk. But the novelist is always busy, sitting at a typewriter like a stenographer, which is boring and lonely.

“My book, Breakfast of Champions, is about art. I think art should be refreshing to everyone. But many artists are in league with the rich to make the poor feel dumb, like all the galleries downtown with walls covered in dots and blank whites. The rich organize art in such a way as to prove they have different souls from the poor, to give a biological justification to their status. Mystification is the secret. Ruling classes find it politically useful that workers can’t understand the pictures in the galleries. Inaccessible art grew out of industrialization. In the Renaissance art was of the people.”

 

Vonnegut’s heroes are outsiders, the rebels in big organizations who think the system is wrong and maybe want to change it. In a wacky and comical way he depicts the hopeless and sad human condition. His heroes care about involvement. Yet they are helpless. They have little power to decide anything.

“No man is in control,” he murmurs. “People are just born on this planet and are immediately hit over the head and yelled at. Ten per cent of the world’s children are abused. So what chance does man have? My own success is like an American dream. My growth graph is perfect. I’m prosperous. I can see clearly how it worked for me. I’m convinced we’re all programmed in a certain way. Still, big bureaucracy appalls me. Gore Vidal was right that this is the only country in the world that does nothing for its citizens. Jobs don’t go around. The auto industry is laying people off (that was twenty-two years ago and it still is!). Still, I have to say that working on the assembly line is better than doing nothing at all. But the problem is we’re just not useful anymore. We need to find new uses for man, find a simpler way of life.”

The backdrop of Vonnegut’s stage is this: While the people lament gasoline prices and call for small cars, Detroit turns out bigger cars and lays off workers. The people eat macrobiotic foods and squirt chemicals up their assholes and swallow exotic anti-hemorrhoid salves. It’s the people! But not people in his beloved New York! His settings are the wide expanses of America. Where the really funny, mad things happen. A world so far from Europe as to be incredible. A world that baffles Europeans.

 
At a certain point, still in the kitchen, and after his wife had glanced in a couple times, I think to check on the scotch level, and after he told me he never gave interviews to the American press, only to Europeans, and pouring more scotch said that interviews were hard work, and after he admitted he neglected his German heritage and the Vonnegut family tree in Münster, I asked him about his statement in a recent book—I don’t remember which—that people and nations have their story that ends, after which it’s all epilogue, and he intimated that the US story ended after World War II.

“That was only a joke,” he said wryly, smiling sheepishly.

“It didn’t sound like a joke. It sounded quite serious.”

“Well” (reluctantly, perhaps not wanting to appear too critical of the USA to the European public), “the United States story will become epilogue unless it succeeds in renewing itself. Like a play peters out if it slows down and has nothing else to say. One must invent new themes for development. Economic justice is one such theme that would make our first two hundred years seem like only Act I. That would become Act II. If that theme is not developed, then our story peters out. Our legal justice would then become mere mockery. Remember the old quip: ‘It’s no disgrace to be poor but it might as well be.’

“In the Constitution there is nothing about economic justice, only the legal utopia. The Bill of Rights is a utopia. We have laws that violate the Constitution. It’s now time to start thinking about social fairness. Our superstar government leaders deal with billions of dollars and we have individuals richer than the whole state of Wyoming. The military-industrial complex is robbing us blind, building their bizarre weapons that costs $40,000 a shot to use. Sensitive weapons that don’t work in the dark or under 50°. We can’t possibly understand all that crap. Compare the arms manufacturers to the salesmen of snake eye in the frontier days. The miracle medicine. In the 1930s we had Eugene Debs who labeled arms manufacturers ‘merchants of death.’ Then the crooks took over the labor unions and we have nothing left today so that I don’t have a banner to which I can adhere. And the same type of people are on top in our society today, selling their quack remedies, to protect us against the dread disease of Communism. (I’m certain he said the same about terrorism in later years!) And that’s what I say in my annual lectures at ten universities. I would like to see that change.

“Yet people don’t give a damn about anything. Few care what we pour into the world everyday. Few care if we go to war. People are embarrassed about life and don’t care if it all ends. Humans have decided that the experiment of life is a failure.”

One of his characters speaks of being born like a disease: “I have caught life. I have come down with life.” Speaking about experiencing the destruction of Dresden, a city of beauty like Paris, Vonnegut said he was the only there who found it remarkable that it all went up in smoke. “Not even the Germans seemed to care.”

 

The scotch flowed. The kitchen was blue with smoke. Thank God I was recording our talk or little would have remained. At some point one of us said “doodley-squat.” He loved those sounds, spicing his novels liberally with skeedee wah, skeedee wo. At critical moments his heroes mumble in skat talk of the jazz era, skeedee beep, zang reepa dop, singing a few bars to chase the blues away. Then, yump-yump, tiddle-taddle, ra-a-a-a, yump-yump-boom. And abbreviations Ramjac, epicac and euphic. Onomatopeic or symbolic nonsense. Doodley-squat for the nothing at all the poor don’t have.

It all sounded OK in the smoky blue kitchen over scotch but what do those sounds mean? Futuristic concepts? Or sounds of joy or despair? The voice of truth? Or just social chatter? Escape or mere foolishness? Is he writer or entertainer?

“Any agreement on the basis of friendliness obliterates ideas and thinking. What about that?”

“Yes, I wrote that. The stupid performance of man and his degeneration are possible because no one is thinking. There has been a warm brotherhood of stupidity. What do words mean anyway? The old Hollywood joke is expressive:

Question: How do you say, ‘fuck yourself?’

Answer: ‘Trust me.’”

I took the following information from various websites, Dutch, German and Italian, of countries where Vonnegut was immensely popular, simply in order to round out his life story. After his last novel in 1997 he left fiction writing and became a senior editor for In These Times. The magazine is dedicated to informing and analyzing popular movements for social, environmental and economic justice; to providing a forum for discussing the politics that shape our lives; and to producing a magazine that is read by the broadest and most diverse audience possible. Vonnegut wrote that if the magazine didn’t exist he would be a man without a country.

In his columns there he began a blistering attack on the administration of President George W. Bush and the Iraq war.  “By saying that our leaders are power-drunk chimpanzees, am I in danger of wrecking the morale of our soldiers fighting and dying in the Middle East?” he wrote. “Their morale, like so many bodies, is already shot to pieces. They are being treated, as I never was, like toys a rich kid got for Christmas.”

In “A Man without a Country” he wrote that “George W. Bush has gathered around him upper-crust C-students who know no history or geography.” He did not regard the 2004 election with much optimism; speaking of Bush and John Kerry, he said that “no matter which one wins, we will have a Skull and Bones President at a time when entire vertebrate species, because of how we have poisoned the topsoil, the waters and the atmosphere, are becoming, hey presto, nothing but skulls and bones.”

In 2005, Vonnegut was interviewed by David Nason for The Australian. During the course of the interview Vonnegut was asked his opinion of modern terrorists, to which he replied “I regard them as very brave people.” When pressed further Vonnegut also said that “They [suicide bombers] are dying for their own self-respect. It’s a terrible thing to deprive someone of their self-respect. It’s [like] your culture is nothing, your race is nothing, you’re nothing … It is sweet and noble — sweet and honorable I guess it is — to die for what you believe in.”
Vonnegut’s Novels

    Player Piano (1952)
    The Sirens of Titan (1959)
    Mother Night (1961)
    Cat’s Cradle (1963)
    God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater, of Pearls Before Swine (1965)
    Slaughterhouse-Five, of The Children’s Crusade (1969)
    Breakfast of Champions, of Goodbye, Blue Monday (1973)
    Slapstick, of Lonesome No More (1976)
    Jailbird (1979)
    Deadeye Dick (1982)
    Galápagos (1985)
    Bluebeard (1987)
    Hocus Pocus (1990)
    Timequake (1997)

Short Story Collections

    Canary in a Cathouse (1961)
    Welcome to the Monkey House (1968)
    Bagombo Snuff Box (1999)

Essays

    Wampeters, Foma and Granfalloons (1974)
    Palm Sunday by Kurt Vonnegut, An Autobiographical Collage (1981)
    Fates Worse than Death (1991)
    God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian (1999)
    A Man Without a Country (2005)

Theater works

    Happy Birthday, Wanda June (1970)
    Between Time and Timbuktu, of Prometheus Five (introduction by Vonnegut) (1972)
    Make Up Your Mind (1993)
    Miss Temptation (1993)

© Gaither Stewart

This is a crosspost with Southern Cross Review

About the Author
GAITHER STEWART Senior Editor, European Correspondent }  Gaither Stewart serves as The Greanville Post  European correspondent, Special Editor for Eastern European developments, and general literary and cultural affairs correspondent. A retired journalist, his latest book is the essay asnthology BABYLON FALLING (Punto Press, 2017). He’s also the author of several other books, including the celebrated Europe Trilogy (The Trojan Spy, Lily Pad Roll and Time of Exile), all of which have also been published by Punto Press. These are thrillers that have been compared to the best of John le Carré, focusing on the work of Western intelligence services, the stealthy strategy of tension, and the gradual encirclement of Russia, a topic of compelling relevance in our time. He makes his home in Rome, with wife Milena. Gaither can be contacted at gaithers@greanvillepost.com. His latest assignment is as Counseling Editor with the Russia Desk. His articles on TGP can be found here.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: luciddreams on November 05, 2017, 08:11:10 AM
Kurt Vonnegut is probably my favorite author.  I'm reading The Sirens of Titan now on my kindle.  I think I paid $8 dollars for the digital copy.  I'm like Surly, if I want to read a book I'm going to pay for it and read it. 

I got the kindle to save space OTR, but also because you get books instantly for digibits.  I really enjoy the tactile nature of a book, and I miss that with the kindle, but the kindle has plenty of redemptive qualities about it.  It doesn't require a tree to die for me to read a book.  It doesn't require bookshelves.  It's not back lit either, and supposedly the words are made from some type of ink.  It's amazing to me how well they have simulated the feel of reading a book, at least visually.  There are built in l.e.d. lights, so you can read in the dark without an external form of light like you need with a physical book.  It's also easy to read and turn the "pages" with one hand.  You just have to tap the screen to go to the next page. 

Vonnegut was the first author I downloaded onto the Kindle. 
Title: 'If only I'd been warned!'-writers choose books to give to their younger selves
Post by: RE on December 05, 2017, 03:47:35 AM
PRESERVE & PASS ON THE BOOK OF THE DINER!  IT IS THE WARNING FOR THE NEXT, WISER SPECIES OF THE GENUS HOMO TO NOT REPEAT OUR MISTAKES!

RE

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/dec/02/books-younger-self-top-writers-recommend-lord-flies-catch-22 (https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/dec/02/books-younger-self-top-writers-recommend-lord-flies-catch-22)

'If only I'd been warned!' - writers choose books to give to their younger selves

(https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/7b1317840506aa4d803686f33cba3c6f75ada07b/1084_1000_4401_2817/master/4401.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=d8c190320ba25afcfaa93505a52843fc)

Julian Barnes, Margaret Drabble, Tessa Hadley, David Nicholls and others choose reading matter that would have been useful when young
Fairy godmother type handing a youngster a book in a fairy woodland setting
From me to me … reading matter selected with the benefit of hindsight. Illustration: Daniela Terrazzini

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Julian Barnes, Margaret Drabble, David Nicholls, William Boyd, Tessa Hadley, Aminatta Forna, John Banville, Maggie O'Farrell, Philip Hensher, Nicola Barker, Charlotte Mendelson, Julie Myerson, Blake Morrison

Saturday 2 December 2017 03.00 EST
Julian Barnes
Julian Barnes
Julian Barnes. Photograph: Roberto Ricciuti/Getty Images

I don’t regret any of the literary reading I missed out on in my youth. I rather enjoy the chronological hazard of not discovering Huckleberry Finn and The Catcher in the Rye and Le Grand Meaulnes until my 40s (and I still haven’t read Le Petit Prince). Literary regret functions rather the other way round: I wish I hadn’t been given Conrad’s The Secret Sharer at the age of 11, which induced a decades-long resistance to him; and I wish I hadn’t read EM Forster before I was able to take his proper measure (though this makes his rediscovery a doubled pleasure).

So the books I would give to my younger self would all be non-fiction, aimed at undermining the automatic prejudices of a white postwar English suburbanite. Books about the true nature of war, empire and race; about the true nature of politics and economics, and how class, money and power are connected. Books that would have made me realise sooner how others – especially foreigners – don’t see us as we complacently see ourselves (I can still recall my bafflement when a Spanish friend told me Francis Drake was a pirate …). Also, books about the true nature of Nature. I was a blind townee for half my life before slowly discovering the countryside. So I would instruct my younger self to learn about soil, wind and water; trees, animals, plants and birds. And bees. That’s another thing: I’d also give my younger self some truthful books about sex.
Margaret Drabble
Daphne du Maurier The Parasites

Daphne du Maurier’s The Parasites is a book to read when young. I didn’t come across it until my 70s, on the recommendation of my novelist friend Andrea Newman, but I would have fallen in love with it when I was 15. It is a novel about three step-siblings of complicated parentage, growing up wildly in a crazy Bohemian theatrical family, inspired by Du Maurier’s own. The Delaneys are bad but talented children, indulged with champagne, chocolate eclairs and sucettes – a lovely, decadent word for lollipop, sucette, and hitherto unknown to me. They are dragged around Europe with their celebrated performing parents, staying in expensive hotels or French coastal resorts. What child from South Yorkshire would not long for this? It is Pamela Brown’s The Swish of the Curtain for the post-pubertal, a tale of dramatic longings with added sex, some of it of an ambiguous nature. The narrative mode is in itself intriguing, as the three siblings sometimes speak collectively, and it is never clear who is speaking or remembering what. Mature readers no doubt consider the Delaneys selfish and silly and amoral, and so they are, but they are captivating. I missed du Maurier entirely as a teenager, put off her possibly by some snobbish remark by my mother or my English teacher, and she cannot be said to be in the front rank: I’ve found other novels by her to be unreadable or kitsch. But this one is unexpected, and fun, and one of her own favourites.
David Nicholls
Franny and Zooey by Salinger

With the books we love, so much depends on timing. Between the ages of 16 and 22 I read a series of novels that still make up the best part of my all-time favourite list. Often, the books were read and read again in preparation for exams and though I was certainly not uncritical, I was zealously protective of the books I loved and perhaps a more generous and forgiving reader than I would be if I were coming to Hardy or Dickens, Orwell or Scott Fitzgerald for the first time in middle age.

I read Salinger’s Franny and Zooey in my late 20s, which I think was about 10 years too late. I loved the book and it remains a favourite, but it’s a novel that could have been custom-built for my 18-year-old self. The self-consciousness, the anguished debates about art and faith and literature, the earnestness and impatience and anxiety about the future, it’s all there. Franny and Zooey is one of the few books that I’ve returned to every year and while I still love it, the voice in my head grows a little more sceptical each time. Is the stuff about religion really so profound? Isn’t there something just a little bit whimsical, precious, self-satisfied about the Glass family? That famous ending still moves me, but is it just a little sentimental? And why are there so many goddam italics?

At 18, I don’t think any of this would have crossed my mind. It would have been that rare thing, a perfect book. I still treasure it and I don’t think I’ve read anything since that has affected me and inspired me as much, both as a reader and a writer. Now I love it for its comedy – Salinger’s dialogue is wonderful – for its mocking fondness and as a portrait of a troubled, loving family. But at 18, I would have put the book down and thought that is exactly how I feel.
William Boyd
Nabokov King, Queen, Knave

I was an avid and undiscriminating reader in my teens: I’d move on to Jane Austen after Ed McBain or Nevil Shute. I remember being bowled over by Catch-22 and Updike’s Couples and I couldn’t get enough of Sergeanne Golon’s Angelique books. I gave a paper on Scott Fitzgerald for the school literary society and was asked to vet Nabokov’s Ada to see if it was fit for the library’s open shelves. To be honest, Ada was beyond me, then, but the book I’d give to my teenage self would be another Nabokov – King, Queen, Knave.

King, Queen, Knave was originally published in Russian in 1928, only appearing in English 40 years later in 1968, translated by Dmitri Nabokov – with help from his dad. It’s a classic love triangle: boorish young Franz is seduced by bored Martha, the wife of his smug boss and cousin, Dreyer. The lovers conspire to kill the cuckold but it all goes terribly wrong and Martha dies. The plot is irrelevant. What is brilliant about King, Queen, Knave and why I know it would have been revelatory to my younger self is that it demonstrates how you can be, at the same time, both very funny and very literary. Nabokov’s dark, dark comedy (also a wonderful portrait of Berlin before the Nazis arrived) is exceptionally well written with immaculate precision of language. I don’t think Nabokov ever wrote a funnier novel – perhaps Pale Fire runs it close – but the way its world and its denizens are rendered through language is as magisterial and assured as Lolita and Pnin.
Tessa Hadley
Tessa Hadley
Tessa Hadley. Photograph: Colin McPherson/Corbis via Getty Images

What I wanted to send back to my younger self, when I first thought about it, was something with a message of restraint. Be cautious, don’t be in too much of a hurry, everything takes time, wait … Elizabeth Bowen’s novel The Death of the Heart, maybe, whose teenage protagonist, Portia, is poignant, comical and dangerous, blundering into life, insisting on the truth, upsetting all the fragile compromises the grown-ups have made in order to get by, confronting them with themselves. Hold back, Portia. Wait and see.

But that’s ridiculous. As if any teenager would listen to that warning. I read The Death of the Heart in those days anyway, and loved it, and all I took away from it was a passionate identification with Portia, who wanted to live now, not later: risking everything, throwing herself at whatever adventure was passing.

So I might as well send back some book with an appetite for life to match those teenage years. I’ll send myself the poems of Walt Whitman, with their hurrying energy and ambitious vision. I think I’d have found “Reconciliation” consoling then as I do now. “Word over all, beautiful as the sky, / Beautiful that war and all its deeds of carnage must in time be utterly lost, / That the hands of the sisters Death and Night incessantly softly wash again, and ever again, this soil’d world.”
Aminatta Forna
Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Dillard

A few years ago, after I had moved to America, a friend recommended to me the writer Annie Dillard. I began with her first book, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, published in 1974 when she was 28 and which won her a Pulitzer prize the following year. I was 10 that year – preoccupied with my immediate world, the gecko on my bedroom wall, the small stream at the bottom of the hill, the ant lion as it lay hidden in the sand awaiting the unsuspecting ant. I also thought of God and the universe, and whether the one existed and where the end of the other might be found.

Dillard’s book is said to have been inspired by a blind child the author had read about, who saw for the first time after cataracts had been removed. Dillard describes her own walks around a creek near her home in the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia. Tinker Creek is small, close to a highway, from which floats the sound of traffic and the occasional plastic bag. Yet in Tinker Creek Dillard finds unrestrained beauty and contemplates the infinite through the minutiae of the natural world – a moth emerging from its cocoon, the unblinking gaze of a weasel with whom she locks eyes. In Tinker Creek she also finds cruelty: the sight of a frog being eaten alive from inside by a giant water bug, “his mouth a gash of terror”. Why God allows cruelty is a question she meditates on throughout.
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In London, my Tinker Creek was my back garden, where, from my study window, I watched each year’s litter of fox cubs come of age. I watched them while I wrote books, mainly about war. Here in Virginia, not so far from where Dillard lives, my Tinker Creek is a small area of woodland next to my house.

There are books that change the way you think, and books that change the way you see the world. But Pilgrim at Tinker Creek is different for being one that reminds the reader of the way she once saw the world, in its purest, though by no means simplest, form. In my middle age her book returned that gift to me. Perhaps if I had been given Pilgrim at Tinker Creek when I was 20, I should never have lost sight of it.
John Banville
Rameau’s Nephew by Denis Diderot
Rameau’s Nephew by Denis Diderot

When I published my first book, around the close of the Bronze Age, a kindly reviewer – PJ Kavanagh, I think it was – conceded that I had some talent, but added that it was obvious I had been reading the wrong people. He was correct, of course, since I had spent my adolescence wallowing in the post-Romantic excesses of the likes of Dylan Thomas and Lawrence Durrell. It was only when I came across an enthusiastic mention of it in an essay by Lionel Trilling that I was led to one of the most bracingly subversive texts in European literature, Rameau’s Nephew, written in the 1760s by Denis Diderot.

This short work, along with Kleist’s sublime essay “On the Marionette Theatre” and Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s “Letter to Lord Chandos”, changed entirely my notions of how and what to write. Rameau’s nephew – he is not even granted a proper name – is ironical, vituperative, seething with hysterical self-loathing, and horribly wise to the sordid realities of a world that dismisses true artists in favour of panders, imposters, and mountebanks of all kinds.

Diderot, a leader among the encyclopédistes, was a splendid human being, brilliant, funny and unfailingly wise. If I could reach back and press a copy of Rameau’s Nephew into the hands of my 12-year-old self, what a lot of silliness I would have been saved. But would I have read it, and if I had, would I have understood it? Shaw was right: youth is wasted on the young.
Maggie O’Farrell
Catch 22

I wish someone had pressed Catch-22 into my perhaps 16-year-old hands. I could have done with immersing myself in Joseph’s Heller’s bracing, astringent prose. The book is a wild, startling ride through the multiple minds of airmen stuck on a base in Italy in the second world war, but don’t be deceived by the anarchy. Heller knows exactly what he is doing: this is wildness of a highly conscious, deeply cerebral kind. The novel unfolds in a non-chronological, apparently chaotic stream, with a plethora of desperate, war-crazed characters; in Heller’s hands, however, it all builds to a perfectly controlled, precisely timed apotheosis. Don’t all teenagers need a lesson in the art of chanelling chaos? There is no better example than this book.
Philip Hensher
Thackeray’s The History of Pendennis
Thackeray’s The History of Pendennis

I’m generally a great believer in books turning up when they’re supposed to. I was late to Tolstoy, but in my 30s I was very receptive to him. Similarly with Philip Roth, Elizabeth Taylor or Kingsley Amis, who I wasn’t much bothered about when young, but who were just perfect for my early middle age. The two books I regret not reading earlier were both things that I’d heard from critics weren’t worth troubling with – Thackeray’s The History of Pendennis and Conrad’s Chance. Actually, Pendennis is a perfect joy, rueful, funny and forgiving about the disasters of youth. I would have loved to have read it when I was 20. It would have put me right very quickly. And I always loved Conrad, and have no idea why I let Conrad scholars persuade me that this thrilling masterpiece was an inferior work. I didn’t read it until I was nearly 40, and immediately saw that it knew everything about men and women, money and lying, and (an illusion, but a strong one) how to tell a story. It would have saved me a lot of trouble. As it is, I will never listen to a critical consensus about a great writer’s inferior books again.
Nicola Barker
Divine Mercy in My Soul, by Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska
Divine Mercy in My Soul, by Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska

When I was a girl and my parents asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up my answer was invariably “a go-go dancer …” (it was the 1970s) “… and a nun”. I didn’t see anything remotely at odds in having these dual aspirations. As an adult, very little has changed. I am, by nature, expressive and repressive in equal measure – uninhibited but deeply disciplined. I think this weird disparity is what fuels who I am as a writer.

I have always been fascinated by outsiders, and for me, saints are apotheoses of outsiderdom. Not ancient saints – Augustine, Francis – but modern ones such as Padre Pio, and the child visionaries of Fátima, Kibeho and Medjugorje. Having been deeply religious as a child (The Cross and the Switchblade was revelatory for me), in my 20s I lost my faith. These were strange years. My discipline and indiscipline became tangled and embedded. I turned dark. And I suffered. But my suffering felt hollow and meaningless.

Saints are broadly considered to be “good people”, but this definition barely scratches the surface of what they are and do. Sainthood is suffering. It is self-negation: pain with purpose. The saint I love best is Faustina, “God’s Secretary”; uneducated, Polish, she died in obscurity in 1938. Her extensive diaries Divine Mercy in My Soul redefined my perception of both suffering and ecstasy. The diaries are truly bizarre and gorgeously restrained. Sane yet demented. They speak so directly to my paradoxical self. I dearly wish I had found them earlier.
Charlotte Mendelson

My younger self was so unfortunate, a bookish muddle of self-hating jumpers, OCD and despair: only time could help me. If a teenage girl voluntarily reads One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, I Capture the Castle can only do so much. But a big old pile of the best in current YA, plus Naomi Alderman’s The Power, and Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls might offer a little hope, and Villette. Always, Villette.
Julie Myerson
The Prime of Life, Simone de Beauvoir
The Prime of Life, Simone de Beauvoir

I suspect you find books when you need to find them, but I do know that I read Simone de Beauvoir’s The Prime of Life at the exact right point in mine. I was 19 years old, abroad, penniless, adrift, desperate to be a writer but with no real sense of how I should go about it. I sat in a park in the middle of Milan and read this book (Penguin edition with the enigmatic blue Matisse cut-out on the front) until the light had gone and I could barely see the page. De Beauvoir’s intelligent, enigmatic and fantastically calm presence staved off loneliness, hunger, worry about the future – in fact the sense of confidence and liberation it gave me was giddying, sublime. Would I still urge a young person to read it? Well, searching everywhere for my treasured old copy just now, I finally found it in my daughter’s bedroom. Which felt pleasing.
Blake Morrison

I wish I’d given my 10-year-old self William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. It would have prepared me for the following year, when I moved from a tiny village primary school (18 pupils) to a single-sex grammar school with 500 boys. I’d have learned about bullying, violence and the brutal competition to be top dog. I’d have seen how pranks and dares can get dangerously out of hand. And I’d have understood that some poor mug will always be picked on because of his accent or shyness or because (like Piggy in the novel) he’s fat and wears specs.
William Golding’s Lord of the Flies
William Golding’s Lord of the Flies

Golding knew what he was talking about: at the time he wrote the novel (a riposte to The Coral Island and The Swiss Family Robinson), he was teaching at an all-boys school not unlike the one I attended. If I’d known what he was talking about, I might have made more of school instead of spending all my time there trying not to be noticed. It wasn’t such a bad place; I did OK. Still, when I read the novel in my late teens, and reached the part where Ralph weeps for “the end of innocence” and “the darkness of man’s heart”, I felt like weeping, too: if only I’d been warned!
Title: Re: 'If only I'd been warned!'-writers choose books to give to their younger selves
Post by: Eddie on December 05, 2017, 05:59:33 AM
PRESERVE & PASS ON THE BOOK OF THE DINER!  IT IS THE WARNING FOR THE NEXT, WISER SPECIES OF THE GENUS HOMO TO NOT REPEAT OUR MISTAKES!

RE

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/dec/02/books-younger-self-top-writers-recommend-lord-flies-catch-22 (https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/dec/02/books-younger-self-top-writers-recommend-lord-flies-catch-22)

'If only I'd been warned!' - writers choose books to give to their younger selves

(https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/7b1317840506aa4d803686f33cba3c6f75ada07b/1084_1000_4401_2817/master/4401.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=d8c190320ba25afcfaa93505a52843fc)

Julian Barnes, Margaret Drabble, Tessa Hadley, David Nicholls and others choose reading matter that would have been useful when young
Fairy godmother type handing a youngster a book in a fairy woodland setting
From me to me … reading matter selected with the benefit of hindsight. Illustration: Daniela Terrazzini

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234

Julian Barnes, Margaret Drabble, David Nicholls, William Boyd, Tessa Hadley, Aminatta Forna, John Banville, Maggie O'Farrell, Philip Hensher, Nicola Barker, Charlotte Mendelson, Julie Myerson, Blake Morrison

Saturday 2 December 2017 03.00 EST
Julian Barnes
Julian Barnes
Julian Barnes. Photograph: Roberto Ricciuti/Getty Images

I don’t regret any of the literary reading I missed out on in my youth. I rather enjoy the chronological hazard of not discovering Huckleberry Finn and The Catcher in the Rye and Le Grand Meaulnes until my 40s (and I still haven’t read Le Petit Prince). Literary regret functions rather the other way round: I wish I hadn’t been given Conrad’s The Secret Sharer at the age of 11, which induced a decades-long resistance to him; and I wish I hadn’t read EM Forster before I was able to take his proper measure (though this makes his rediscovery a doubled pleasure).

So the books I would give to my younger self would all be non-fiction, aimed at undermining the automatic prejudices of a white postwar English suburbanite. Books about the true nature of war, empire and race; about the true nature of politics and economics, and how class, money and power are connected. Books that would have made me realise sooner how others – especially foreigners – don’t see us as we complacently see ourselves (I can still recall my bafflement when a Spanish friend told me Francis Drake was a pirate …). Also, books about the true nature of Nature. I was a blind townee for half my life before slowly discovering the countryside. So I would instruct my younger self to learn about soil, wind and water; trees, animals, plants and birds. And bees. That’s another thing: I’d also give my younger self some truthful books about sex.
Margaret Drabble
Daphne du Maurier The Parasites

Daphne du Maurier’s The Parasites is a book to read when young. I didn’t come across it until my 70s, on the recommendation of my novelist friend Andrea Newman, but I would have fallen in love with it when I was 15. It is a novel about three step-siblings of complicated parentage, growing up wildly in a crazy Bohemian theatrical family, inspired by Du Maurier’s own. The Delaneys are bad but talented children, indulged with champagne, chocolate eclairs and sucettes – a lovely, decadent word for lollipop, sucette, and hitherto unknown to me. They are dragged around Europe with their celebrated performing parents, staying in expensive hotels or French coastal resorts. What child from South Yorkshire would not long for this? It is Pamela Brown’s The Swish of the Curtain for the post-pubertal, a tale of dramatic longings with added sex, some of it of an ambiguous nature. The narrative mode is in itself intriguing, as the three siblings sometimes speak collectively, and it is never clear who is speaking or remembering what. Mature readers no doubt consider the Delaneys selfish and silly and amoral, and so they are, but they are captivating. I missed du Maurier entirely as a teenager, put off her possibly by some snobbish remark by my mother or my English teacher, and she cannot be said to be in the front rank: I’ve found other novels by her to be unreadable or kitsch. But this one is unexpected, and fun, and one of her own favourites.
David Nicholls
Franny and Zooey by Salinger

With the books we love, so much depends on timing. Between the ages of 16 and 22 I read a series of novels that still make up the best part of my all-time favourite list. Often, the books were read and read again in preparation for exams and though I was certainly not uncritical, I was zealously protective of the books I loved and perhaps a more generous and forgiving reader than I would be if I were coming to Hardy or Dickens, Orwell or Scott Fitzgerald for the first time in middle age.

I read Salinger’s Franny and Zooey in my late 20s, which I think was about 10 years too late. I loved the book and it remains a favourite, but it’s a novel that could have been custom-built for my 18-year-old self. The self-consciousness, the anguished debates about art and faith and literature, the earnestness and impatience and anxiety about the future, it’s all there. Franny and Zooey is one of the few books that I’ve returned to every year and while I still love it, the voice in my head grows a little more sceptical each time. Is the stuff about religion really so profound? Isn’t there something just a little bit whimsical, precious, self-satisfied about the Glass family? That famous ending still moves me, but is it just a little sentimental? And why are there so many goddam italics?

At 18, I don’t think any of this would have crossed my mind. It would have been that rare thing, a perfect book. I still treasure it and I don’t think I’ve read anything since that has affected me and inspired me as much, both as a reader and a writer. Now I love it for its comedy – Salinger’s dialogue is wonderful – for its mocking fondness and as a portrait of a troubled, loving family. But at 18, I would have put the book down and thought that is exactly how I feel.
William Boyd
Nabokov King, Queen, Knave

I was an avid and undiscriminating reader in my teens: I’d move on to Jane Austen after Ed McBain or Nevil Shute. I remember being bowled over by Catch-22 and Updike’s Couples and I couldn’t get enough of Sergeanne Golon’s Angelique books. I gave a paper on Scott Fitzgerald for the school literary society and was asked to vet Nabokov’s Ada to see if it was fit for the library’s open shelves. To be honest, Ada was beyond me, then, but the book I’d give to my teenage self would be another Nabokov – King, Queen, Knave.

King, Queen, Knave was originally published in Russian in 1928, only appearing in English 40 years later in 1968, translated by Dmitri Nabokov – with help from his dad. It’s a classic love triangle: boorish young Franz is seduced by bored Martha, the wife of his smug boss and cousin, Dreyer. The lovers conspire to kill the cuckold but it all goes terribly wrong and Martha dies. The plot is irrelevant. What is brilliant about King, Queen, Knave and why I know it would have been revelatory to my younger self is that it demonstrates how you can be, at the same time, both very funny and very literary. Nabokov’s dark, dark comedy (also a wonderful portrait of Berlin before the Nazis arrived) is exceptionally well written with immaculate precision of language. I don’t think Nabokov ever wrote a funnier novel – perhaps Pale Fire runs it close – but the way its world and its denizens are rendered through language is as magisterial and assured as Lolita and Pnin.
Tessa Hadley
Tessa Hadley
Tessa Hadley. Photograph: Colin McPherson/Corbis via Getty Images

What I wanted to send back to my younger self, when I first thought about it, was something with a message of restraint. Be cautious, don’t be in too much of a hurry, everything takes time, wait … Elizabeth Bowen’s novel The Death of the Heart, maybe, whose teenage protagonist, Portia, is poignant, comical and dangerous, blundering into life, insisting on the truth, upsetting all the fragile compromises the grown-ups have made in order to get by, confronting them with themselves. Hold back, Portia. Wait and see.

But that’s ridiculous. As if any teenager would listen to that warning. I read The Death of the Heart in those days anyway, and loved it, and all I took away from it was a passionate identification with Portia, who wanted to live now, not later: risking everything, throwing herself at whatever adventure was passing.

So I might as well send back some book with an appetite for life to match those teenage years. I’ll send myself the poems of Walt Whitman, with their hurrying energy and ambitious vision. I think I’d have found “Reconciliation” consoling then as I do now. “Word over all, beautiful as the sky, / Beautiful that war and all its deeds of carnage must in time be utterly lost, / That the hands of the sisters Death and Night incessantly softly wash again, and ever again, this soil’d world.”
Aminatta Forna
Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Dillard

A few years ago, after I had moved to America, a friend recommended to me the writer Annie Dillard. I began with her first book, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, published in 1974 when she was 28 and which won her a Pulitzer prize the following year. I was 10 that year – preoccupied with my immediate world, the gecko on my bedroom wall, the small stream at the bottom of the hill, the ant lion as it lay hidden in the sand awaiting the unsuspecting ant. I also thought of God and the universe, and whether the one existed and where the end of the other might be found.

Dillard’s book is said to have been inspired by a blind child the author had read about, who saw for the first time after cataracts had been removed. Dillard describes her own walks around a creek near her home in the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia. Tinker Creek is small, close to a highway, from which floats the sound of traffic and the occasional plastic bag. Yet in Tinker Creek Dillard finds unrestrained beauty and contemplates the infinite through the minutiae of the natural world – a moth emerging from its cocoon, the unblinking gaze of a weasel with whom she locks eyes. In Tinker Creek she also finds cruelty: the sight of a frog being eaten alive from inside by a giant water bug, “his mouth a gash of terror”. Why God allows cruelty is a question she meditates on throughout.
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In London, my Tinker Creek was my back garden, where, from my study window, I watched each year’s litter of fox cubs come of age. I watched them while I wrote books, mainly about war. Here in Virginia, not so far from where Dillard lives, my Tinker Creek is a small area of woodland next to my house.

There are books that change the way you think, and books that change the way you see the world. But Pilgrim at Tinker Creek is different for being one that reminds the reader of the way she once saw the world, in its purest, though by no means simplest, form. In my middle age her book returned that gift to me. Perhaps if I had been given Pilgrim at Tinker Creek when I was 20, I should never have lost sight of it.
John Banville
Rameau’s Nephew by Denis Diderot
Rameau’s Nephew by Denis Diderot

When I published my first book, around the close of the Bronze Age, a kindly reviewer – PJ Kavanagh, I think it was – conceded that I had some talent, but added that it was obvious I had been reading the wrong people. He was correct, of course, since I had spent my adolescence wallowing in the post-Romantic excesses of the likes of Dylan Thomas and Lawrence Durrell. It was only when I came across an enthusiastic mention of it in an essay by Lionel Trilling that I was led to one of the most bracingly subversive texts in European literature, Rameau’s Nephew, written in the 1760s by Denis Diderot.

This short work, along with Kleist’s sublime essay “On the Marionette Theatre” and Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s “Letter to Lord Chandos”, changed entirely my notions of how and what to write. Rameau’s nephew – he is not even granted a proper name – is ironical, vituperative, seething with hysterical self-loathing, and horribly wise to the sordid realities of a world that dismisses true artists in favour of panders, imposters, and mountebanks of all kinds.

Diderot, a leader among the encyclopédistes, was a splendid human being, brilliant, funny and unfailingly wise. If I could reach back and press a copy of Rameau’s Nephew into the hands of my 12-year-old self, what a lot of silliness I would have been saved. But would I have read it, and if I had, would I have understood it? Shaw was right: youth is wasted on the young.
Maggie O’Farrell
Catch 22

I wish someone had pressed Catch-22 into my perhaps 16-year-old hands. I could have done with immersing myself in Joseph’s Heller’s bracing, astringent prose. The book is a wild, startling ride through the multiple minds of airmen stuck on a base in Italy in the second world war, but don’t be deceived by the anarchy. Heller knows exactly what he is doing: this is wildness of a highly conscious, deeply cerebral kind. The novel unfolds in a non-chronological, apparently chaotic stream, with a plethora of desperate, war-crazed characters; in Heller’s hands, however, it all builds to a perfectly controlled, precisely timed apotheosis. Don’t all teenagers need a lesson in the art of chanelling chaos? There is no better example than this book.
Philip Hensher
Thackeray’s The History of Pendennis
Thackeray’s The History of Pendennis

I’m generally a great believer in books turning up when they’re supposed to. I was late to Tolstoy, but in my 30s I was very receptive to him. Similarly with Philip Roth, Elizabeth Taylor or Kingsley Amis, who I wasn’t much bothered about when young, but who were just perfect for my early middle age. The two books I regret not reading earlier were both things that I’d heard from critics weren’t worth troubling with – Thackeray’s The History of Pendennis and Conrad’s Chance. Actually, Pendennis is a perfect joy, rueful, funny and forgiving about the disasters of youth. I would have loved to have read it when I was 20. It would have put me right very quickly. And I always loved Conrad, and have no idea why I let Conrad scholars persuade me that this thrilling masterpiece was an inferior work. I didn’t read it until I was nearly 40, and immediately saw that it knew everything about men and women, money and lying, and (an illusion, but a strong one) how to tell a story. It would have saved me a lot of trouble. As it is, I will never listen to a critical consensus about a great writer’s inferior books again.
Nicola Barker
Divine Mercy in My Soul, by Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska
Divine Mercy in My Soul, by Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska

When I was a girl and my parents asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up my answer was invariably “a go-go dancer …” (it was the 1970s) “… and a nun”. I didn’t see anything remotely at odds in having these dual aspirations. As an adult, very little has changed. I am, by nature, expressive and repressive in equal measure – uninhibited but deeply disciplined. I think this weird disparity is what fuels who I am as a writer.

I have always been fascinated by outsiders, and for me, saints are apotheoses of outsiderdom. Not ancient saints – Augustine, Francis – but modern ones such as Padre Pio, and the child visionaries of Fátima, Kibeho and Medjugorje. Having been deeply religious as a child (The Cross and the Switchblade was revelatory for me), in my 20s I lost my faith. These were strange years. My discipline and indiscipline became tangled and embedded. I turned dark. And I suffered. But my suffering felt hollow and meaningless.

Saints are broadly considered to be “good people”, but this definition barely scratches the surface of what they are and do. Sainthood is suffering. It is self-negation: pain with purpose. The saint I love best is Faustina, “God’s Secretary”; uneducated, Polish, she died in obscurity in 1938. Her extensive diaries Divine Mercy in My Soul redefined my perception of both suffering and ecstasy. The diaries are truly bizarre and gorgeously restrained. Sane yet demented. They speak so directly to my paradoxical self. I dearly wish I had found them earlier.
Charlotte Mendelson

My younger self was so unfortunate, a bookish muddle of self-hating jumpers, OCD and despair: only time could help me. If a teenage girl voluntarily reads One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, I Capture the Castle can only do so much. But a big old pile of the best in current YA, plus Naomi Alderman’s The Power, and Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls might offer a little hope, and Villette. Always, Villette.
Julie Myerson
The Prime of Life, Simone de Beauvoir
The Prime of Life, Simone de Beauvoir

I suspect you find books when you need to find them, but I do know that I read Simone de Beauvoir’s The Prime of Life at the exact right point in mine. I was 19 years old, abroad, penniless, adrift, desperate to be a writer but with no real sense of how I should go about it. I sat in a park in the middle of Milan and read this book (Penguin edition with the enigmatic blue Matisse cut-out on the front) until the light had gone and I could barely see the page. De Beauvoir’s intelligent, enigmatic and fantastically calm presence staved off loneliness, hunger, worry about the future – in fact the sense of confidence and liberation it gave me was giddying, sublime. Would I still urge a young person to read it? Well, searching everywhere for my treasured old copy just now, I finally found it in my daughter’s bedroom. Which felt pleasing.
Blake Morrison

I wish I’d given my 10-year-old self William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. It would have prepared me for the following year, when I moved from a tiny village primary school (18 pupils) to a single-sex grammar school with 500 boys. I’d have learned about bullying, violence and the brutal competition to be top dog. I’d have seen how pranks and dares can get dangerously out of hand. And I’d have understood that some poor mug will always be picked on because of his accent or shyness or because (like Piggy in the novel) he’s fat and wears specs.
William Golding’s Lord of the Flies
William Golding’s Lord of the Flies

Golding knew what he was talking about: at the time he wrote the novel (a riposte to The Coral Island and The Swiss Family Robinson), he was teaching at an all-boys school not unlike the one I attended. If I’d known what he was talking about, I might have made more of school instead of spending all my time there trying not to be noticed. It wasn’t such a bad place; I did OK. Still, when I read the novel in my late teens, and reached the part where Ralph weeps for “the end of innocence” and “the darkness of man’s heart”, I felt like weeping, too: if only I’d been warned!

The Book of the Diner is well worth preserving. I only wish it had reached a broader audience when it might have mattered more. That is a testament to the blindness of our culture. If there is a future to look back from, one difficult question historians will have to ask is how we let this happen, when so many saw it coming. This site has certainly aggregated enough information and critical thinking to prove that.

I woke up and looked at this over coffee in my pre-dawn kitchen....it made me think of many books, most of them this author (obviously a female) didn't mention. I tried to think of a book I'd send myself as a young man. I couldn't think of a single one....but the Book of the Diner might have been a good choice.

Not that I didn't know the world was in trouble when I was young, because the handwriting was already on the wall. It is the timing I was wrong on......I never thought back then that we'd be here on the precipice already. Back then, to me, I figured we'd limp along for a few hundred more years, at least.

I read or was at at least aware of the important works of collapse of the time, like Silent Spring, and I was exposed to ideas, like the Tragedy of the Commons. If I knew then what I know now, maybe I'd have been more of an activist.

But this article is interesting. I ran across a review of Pilgrim At Tinker Creek when I was about 17 or so. In the Last Whole Earth Catalog, which was my primer as an autodidact. I've bought that book multiple times in my life..I probably have a copy somewhere....I still haven't finished it. Maybe because I grew up rural, and the journey of a woman's self-discovery after moving to the country didn't seem that earth-shattering to someone who was quite familiar with that lifestyle, and looking to leave it far behind.

I read plenty of books about the horrors of war. All Quiet On The Western Front, In the Company of Eagles, Catch-22, MASH. Slaughterhouse Five.

Looking back, I remember the sequential journey through literature. Huckleberry Finn was the first real literary work I read...because it was in my mother's little bookshelf. I must have been about eight. That was a life changer.

In that bookcase was also Alfred Binet's A Method of Measuring Intelligence in Young Children (many of the books in her bookcase were given to her by a friend who was a teacher, and I'm certain Mom never read that one. I did) Those are the two I remember from her books. She mostly read romance novels...but she got me a library card before I could read, which was an important and lasting gift. She also was the person who gifted me with the knowledge that books can be your friends, and that reading is a great pleasure. I never knew my father to read a book for pleasure, although he was comfortable with blueprints and technical journals.

Some friends from our church loaned me the whole set of those childrens' classics like Swiss Family Robinison, Robinson Crusoe, Gulliver's Travels, Little Women, Little Men, and maybe twenty more...they came from Reader's Digest or some publisher like that, bound two in a volume, back to back. I went through those at age nine or so.

My school library in Junior High and High School (same campus, same library) was exceptionally good, and even had great magazines. Another stroke of luck.

I read very widely, everything from Fred Gipson (Recollection Creek)  and Wilson Rawls (Where the Red Fern Grows)....I now own signed firsts of those, btw....to Lord of the Rings, to Captain Blood, to The Gulag Archipelago, to The Dharma Bums. Scott Fitzgerald, check.

College.....Stranger in a Strange Land, from the bookshelf in the first house I shared with room mates. Plus a great stack of underground comics left behind by someone who had just graduated and moved out of the house. Thank you. I don't remember your name.

Then Hunter and Tom Robbins. I remember the name of the girl who turned me on to those, and her body. She was older and really hot, but  I never got to have sex with her. I will keep her name private. I haven't seen her in more than 40 years.

In my old age I savor Hemingway, and I'm saving Billy Brammer's The Gay Place for some future idyll, maybe when I'm retired. I didn't discover Bukowski until I was in my fifties. Or the beat poet Kenneth Rexroth.

My friends, the books, seem to have come to me just at the right time. Other than the Book of the Diner, I wouldn't send anything back in time.



Title: Book of the Diner Cover Design Contest
Post by: RE on December 05, 2017, 09:23:05 AM
The Book of the Diner is well worth preserving. I only wish it had reached a broader audience when it might have mattered more. That is a testament to the blindness of our culture. If there is a future to look back from, one difficult question historians will have to ask is how we let this happen, when so many saw it coming. This site has certainly aggregated enough information and critical thinking to prove that.

Quote of the Year!  :icon_sunny:

I hope to be discovered posthumously.  Lots of writers have had many more readers after they were dead than while alive.  Homer, Shakespeare, Tolstoy, Dickens have all had many more readers after they bought their tickets to the Great Beyond.

The Book of the Diner will also contain stories and articles from other Native Diners and Admins and probably will come in 2 or 3 Volumes.  The Books can have different covers or the same cover with different sub-titles like Doomstead Diner Musings on the Collapse of Industrial Civilization: Economics & Politics.

I like the work of this Custom Bookbinder

(https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8NUk5s88hzM/Vd9hDPXAW2I/AAAAAAAAALY/PxL0g4R_1f4/s320/Oversized%2Bbook.JPG)  (https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bC_AulMjMKQ/Vd9g-cDTeZI/AAAAAAAAALM/YE3mWliXxDQ/s640/C.A.%2BTome.JPG)

I'll probably only have one set bound this way, it's expensive!  Then I'll have several sets done with more conventional binding.  The set that goes into the ground won't be bound, that is getting vaccuum sealed in plastic.  Finally, it will also be on DVD-R which you can copy and send to friends.  I'll also have it up in Cloud Storage on the web.

Ideas for cover art are :hi: !  You have time, editing work on this is going to take a while.  Hopefully I will stay above ground long enough to finish, if not Surly will have to finish the job on his own, unless Eddie volunteers to help in that task.

It does fascinate me how small the Doom Community has remained over these years, although it has grown a bit recently.  I'm not sure anything written in recent years would have changed the outcomes here even if you could send it back in time.  The dream of ever-continuing Technological Progress is simply too seductive.  The goodies and toys produced by technology also too much fun.  If you went back to 1960 with all the evidence you have today including all the videos and scientific reports and gave the population the choice:

1-  You can scale back and live as subsistence farmers with strict rules on brith control and have a sustainable planet

or

2-  You can live fast and die young, burning the fossil fuel legacy and turning the planet into a waste dump for your children

I suspect most of the population would have picked Door #2.

In any event, The Book of the Diner isn't written for people of the past.  It is for Alien Archaeologists or a New Species of the Genus Homo that will follow this one.  Homo Dinerus.

RE
Title: Re: Diner Library - Maya Angelou Born 4 April 1928 Would have been 90 Today
Post by: Golden Oxen on April 04, 2018, 08:27:29 AM

                        (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DZ7EwOGWsAEbsgI.jpg)


 Caged Bird - Poem by Maya Angelou


           The free bird leaps
on the back of the wind
and floats downstream
till the current ends
and dips his wings
in the orange sun rays
and dares to claim the sky.

But a bird that stalks
down his narrow cage
can seldom see through
his bars of rage
his wings are clipped and
his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings
with fearful trill
of the things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom

The free bird thinks of another breeze
and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
and the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright lawn
and he names the sky his own.

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing

The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.
Title: Re: Diner Library - Maya Angelou Born 4 April 1928 Would have been 90 Today
Post by: Surly1 on April 04, 2018, 08:50:48 AM

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DZ7EwOGWsAEbsgI.jpg)


 Caged Bird - Poem by Maya Angelou


           The free bird leaps
on the back of the wind
and floats downstream
till the current ends
and dips his wings
in the orange sun rays
and dares to claim the sky.

But a bird that stalks
down his narrow cage
can seldom see through
his bars of rage
his wings are clipped and
his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings
with fearful trill
of the things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom

The free bird thinks of another breeze
and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
and the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright lawn
and he names the sky his own.

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing

The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.


And THIS is why you want to keep a man like GO around the Forum. This what I'd call a grace note.

"The Caged Bird" is particularly relevant these days.

BTW, I have used that quote many times, but never knew it was Maya Angelou who said it first.

Well done.
Title: Re: Diner Library
Post by: BC2K on May 19, 2018, 05:41:46 PM
(http://i41.tinypic.com/5ot9ja.jpg)