Doomstead Diner Menu => Environment => Topic started by: RE on August 22, 2016, 09:57:36 PM

Title: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on August 22, 2016, 09:57:36 PM
The Lakota are trying to stop the pipeline between the Bakken and Illinois from being built.

The photos here are amazing.

RE

https://www.buzzfeed.com/katebubacz/lakota-standoff?utm_term=.lt2E946r8v#.xtpqakWpvY (https://www.buzzfeed.com/katebubacz/lakota-standoff?utm_term=.lt2E946r8v#.xtpqakWpvY)

Photos Show Why The North Dakota Pipeline Is Problematic

A proposed oil pipeline is set to begin construction on tribal lands in North Dakota. Members of various Native American reservations gathered Monday to try to stop it.

Riders from the Standing Rock, Rosebud, and Lower Brule Lakota reservations came together on horseback to push back a police line that had formed between a group of protesters and the entrance to the Dakota Access Pipeline construction site. Daniella Zalcman

Last week, the federal government gave final approval to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which will run for 1,172 miles to transport crude oil from North Dakota’s Bakken oilfields to Patoka, Illinois.

Hundreds of protesters, primarily Lakota and Dakota from Native American reservations within a several-hundred-mile radius, convened over the weekend at the edge of the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota to voice their anger.

The pipeline would travel through lands sacred to the Lakota people, and cross under the Missouri, Mississippi, and Big Sioux rivers.

A possible spill, which can occur with pipelines, would mean contaminating farmland and drinking water for millions.

After a series of tense interactions with North Dakota state police on Monday, the protesters succeeded in temporarily halting the beginning stages of construction.

Protesters stand at the front barricades of the protest zone, holding signs that read “Water is sacred” and “Mni Wiconi” (“Water is life” in Lakota). Daniella Zalcman

Horses and riders from the Rosebud reservation arrive to support the Standing Rock community. The horses are in traditional Lakota regalia. Daniella Zalcman

Protesters congregate next to a construction site for the Dakota Access Pipeline on Monday morning, as a crew arrives with machinery and materials to begin cutting a work road into the hillside. The flag in the foreground belongs to the American Indian Movement. Daniella Zalcman

North Dakota state police form a line between the protesters and the entrance to the construction site as a tank truck turns into the property. Daniella Zalcman

A protester is arrested for standing on the outer layer of barricades that separate the protest site from the police line and construction zone on Monday morning. Daniella Zalcman

A protester is arrested for standing on the outer layer of barricades that separate the protest site from the police line and construction zone on Monday morning. Daniella Zalcman

Two young Lakota boys watch as construction machinery drives onto the Dakota Access Pipeline construction site, just over a mile from the banks of the Missouri River. Daniella Zalcman

After the protesters disrupted the construction site and shut down work for the day, a group marched up to the main gates. Daniella Zalcman

Children play in the Missouri River, a mile from the proposed construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Daniella Zalcman

 
Kate Bubacz is a Senior Photo Editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.
Contact Kate Bubacz at kate.bubacz@buzzfeed.com.
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: Media Blackout
Post by: RE on August 26, 2016, 10:52:41 PM
http://theantimedia.org/native-american-pipeline-media-blackout/ (http://theantimedia.org/native-american-pipeline-media-blackout/)

Activism
Why There’s a Media Blackout on the Native American Oil Pipeline Blockade
August 25, 2016   |   Nick Bernabe

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(ANTIMEDIA Op-Ed) North Dakota — As the Lakota Sioux continue their peaceful blockade of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline, the story’s absence from the national media narrative is palpable. Considering the corporate media’s chronic quest for controversial stories on government versus public standoffs, you’d think this situation would garner the typical media frenzy invoked during a right-wing militia occupation of a federal building, for example, or a tense standoff between the Black Lives Matter movement and police. But it’s not.

As of late, the media has faced criticism for its selective coverage of certain events — like, say, focusing on single terror attacks in Western Europe that garner thousands of headlines while basically ignoring similar or worse attacks that occur on a constant basis in Muslim-majority countries.

But the confrontation unfolding in North Dakota, in particular, is strikingly similar to the recent standoff at the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, which involved a right-wing militia advocating land rights against the federal government. The militia was led by the controversial Bundy family, which previously drew sensationalized coverage during a similar standoff in Nevada in 2014. So why were these stories covered extensively while the other — also centered around land rights — has been mostly ignored?

The first point is actually very simple: Native Americans standing up for themselves is not polarizing. In an age of institutionalized media divisiveness and hyper-partisanship, the story of Native Americans in North Dakota fighting for land and water rights just doesn’t fit the script of deep, societal divides plaguing the nation’s law and order, nor does it fit in with the left-right paradigm. People from both sides of the political spectrum pretty much agree that Native Americans have been screwed by the U.S. government and resource-snatching corporations long enough. Considering this sentiment, there’s really no exploitable controversy on this issue from the mainstream media perspective, which inherently drives topical, superficial news narratives.

It’s easy to create a controversy out of right-wing white nationalist militias occupying an obscure federal wildlife preserve building (if that sounds petty and not exactly newsworthy, that’s because it was petty and not exactly newsworthy). I witnessed liberals so incensed by the Oregon occupiers they were calling for the FBI to literally gun them down. Meanwhile, the alt-right movement hailed them as heroes and harbingers of the second American Revolution. It made for a great, divisive controversy. But in the end, nothing was accomplished. It was topical. It was superficial. It was essentially meaningless — and the media loved it so much it dedicated a month’s worth of prime time TV coverage to it.

In contrast, the only thing the mainstream media would accomplish by publicizing the growing tribal opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline would be to effectively kill the prospects of the pipeline. Providing ongoing coverage would likely inspire national outrage toward the oil company, Dakota Access LLC, and the government agencies currently trying to evict the indigenous people from their own ancestral lands.

It’s important to understand that the media doesn’t always cover certain stories just because they’re actually newsworthy. Often, the media’s coverage is intended to promote and drive narratives, and the divisive flavor has been a top seller for a long time. This coverage has accomplished at least one thing in the United States: the country is now the most divided it’s been in a very long time. Maybe that has been the media’s intention all along.

The second and more obvious reason why mainstream outlets have not focused on the situation in North Dakota is money — oil money, to be exact. The corporate media in the United States is deeply in bed with oil interests. From fracking advertisements on MSNBC to individuals on Big Oil’s payroll literally working for Fox News and the Wall Street Journal, the ties cannot be understated. Why would mainstream media publicize a standoff that could potentially kill an oil pipeline when their own financial interests would be negatively affected? The answer is they wouldn’t.

And there you have it. That’s why right-wing militias pointlessly occupying a wildlife refuge is one of the biggest stories of the century but Native Americans stopping the construction of a multibillion-dollar pipeline isn’t worth a single headline on CNN.

This article (Why There’s a Media Blackout on the Native American Oil Pipeline Blockade) is an opinion editorial (OP-ED). The opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent the views of Anti-Media. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Nick Bernabe and theAntiMedia.org. Anti-Media Radio airs weeknights at 11pm Eastern/8pm Pacific. If you spot a typo, email edits@theantimedia.org.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on August 27, 2016, 11:29:08 AM
Yes, Bundy ranch characters can be publicised because the public will love to hate them.  They are different and weird, outsiders though and through, from the hair on their heads to the soles of their feet.  They will be shunned! 

Native Americans in contrast run the risk of engendering sympathy if they are publicised too much and Suzy cream cheese types may rally to their cause in droves.  That is not something that will please our corporate overlords so fuck the Indians.  It is not that everyone has sympathy for the American Indian but just as with cute puppies, enough feel warm and fuzzy about them to make a problem.  Media does not want problems.  They want advertiser dollars.  They also want a pipeline.

From here, $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$, to there.

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Title: Standing Rock Sioux Chairman: Dakota Access Pipeline “Is Threatening the Lives o
Post by: RE on August 28, 2016, 01:40:09 AM
http://www.greanvillepost.com/2016/08/27/standing-rock-sioux-chairman-dakota-access-pipeline-is-threatening-the-lives-of-my-tribe/ (http://www.greanvillepost.com/2016/08/27/standing-rock-sioux-chairman-dakota-access-pipeline-is-threatening-the-lives-of-my-tribe/)

Standing Rock Sioux Chairman: Dakota Access Pipeline “Is Threatening the Lives of My Tribe”
Author Rowan Wolf Date August 27, 2016

=By= DemocracyNow!
Standing Rock pipeline protest

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Protest against the pipeline at Standing Rock Reservation. John Heminger.

In North Dakota, indigenous activists are continuing to protest the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which they say would threaten to contaminate the Missouri River. More than a thousand indigenous activists from dozens of different tribes across the country have traveled to the Sacred Stone Spirit Camp, which was launched on April 1 by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The protests have so far shut down construction along parts of the pipeline. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has also sued the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers over its approval of the pipeline. For more, we’re joined by Dave Archambault, chairperson of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. He’s in Washington, D.C., where there is a hearing in the tribe’s lawsuit on Wednesday.


TRANSCRIPT
This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: We turn now to look at North Dakota, where indigenous activists are continuing to protest the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which they say would threaten to contaminate the Missouri River.

INDIGENOUS ACTIVISTS: Respect our water! Respect our lands! Honor our treaties! Honor our rights!

AMY GOODMAN: More than a thousand indigenous activists from dozens of different tribes across the country have traveled to the Sacred Stone Spirit Camp. The protests have so far shut down construction along parts of the pipeline. Protesters have included Debra White Plume, an Oglala Lakota water rights activist.

DEBRA WHITE PLUME: The need to protect this water has grown way beyond Standing Rock. I’m Oglala and Northern Cheyenne. Many red nations are here. Many more red nations are coming. We put the call out for water protectors to come, land defenders to come. And the word “resistance” is being used. And sometimes we have a problem with the English language, deciding which word to use, but if we just listen to our spirits, we’re here to protect sacred water. People will come from all along the river to protect the river that they belong to.

AMY GOODMAN: Dennis Banks, co-founder of the American Indian Movement, has also taken part in the protests against the Dakota pipeline. Banks also was part of the 1973 Wounded Knee standoff.

DENNIS BANKS: What’s happening here is equally as important, because of the stand that you’re ready to make. When they threaten the environment, they’re threatening you. We are part mountain. We are part ocean. We are part river. We are part flower and grass and tree. All of this, we are part of all of it, so that when they threaten the environment anyplace, they’re threatening you. You have to be in that mindset like that. That’s who you are. That’s who we are. And our culture, our heritage is what has made us warriors.

AMY GOODMAN: That was Dennis Banks. We’re joined now by Dave Archambault, the chair of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, who’s joining us from Washington, D.C.

Chairman, thanks very much for being with us. Can you explain for us what this whole controversy is about?

DAVE ARCHAMBAULT: There’s a lot of different components that all lead up to one, and it is a pipeline that is threatening the lives of people, lives of my tribe, as well as millions down the river. It threatens the ancestral sites that are significant to our tribe. And we never had an opportunity to express our concerns. This is a corporation that is coming forward and just bulldozing through without any concern for tribes. And the things that have happened to tribal nations across this nation have been unjust and unfair, and this has come to a point where we can no longer pay the costs for this nation’s well-being. We pay for economic development, we pay for national security, and we pay for energy independence. It is at our expense that this nation reaps those benefits. And all too often we share similar concerns, similar wrongdoings to us, so we are uniting, and we’re standing up, and we’re saying, “No more.”

AMY GOODMAN: Can you explain what exactly the Dakota Access pipeline is and how it ended up going through your land?

DAVE ARCHAMBAULT: Dakota Access pipeline is a pipeline that goes 1,200 miles, taking Bakken crude oil from the northwest side of North Dakota down to Illinois. And we were brought—made aware of this in 2014. And our biggest concern was it was—it crossed the Missouri River twice, once north of—once in Lake Sakakawea and once north of our reservation. And right away, when we first learned of it, we said, “We don’t want this. We don’t want it here.” But it’s a private pipeline from a private company out of Dallas, Texas. And so, there’s a big corporation, Energy Transfer Partners, out of Dallas, who are making decisions for the state and for North Dakota, for my reservation, and they have no sensitivity or no acknowledgment of what is in place. All they see is dollar signs and greed. So we are not happy with this private-based company.

There are portions of this pipeline that cross federal lands, like water, and so they have to get permits, but they get easements on private property. And the private landowners who do not approve of the pipeline, there’s the eminent domain taking. So, the landowners where the pipeline crosses kind of have their hands tied. But in the federal permitting process—and it’s like, of the 1,200 miles, 200 waterways, maybe 300 miles are on federal lands. That’s what we’re saying: If we can’t do anything on the private lands, we’re going to ask the federal agencies to reconsider and take a look at this, because we never had the opportunity to express our concerns.

AMY GOODMAN: I want to go back to Debra White Plume, an Oglala Lakota water rights activist, speaking at the Sacred Stone camp.

DEBRA WHITE PLUME: We’re putting a call out for warriors to come here to do direct action, to stop them from boring under this water, because that’s going to contaminate it. We can’t stand for that. We can’t let that happen. I, for one, made a commitment. They’re going to have to kill me, or they’re going to have to lock me in jail, but I’m going to stand to protect the sacred water. And I’m guided by spirit.

AMY GOODMAN: So that’s Debra White Plume, who participated in the 1973 standoff in which members of the American Indian Movement occupied Wounded Knee to demand their treaty rights. She called for focus in the action at Sacred Stone.

DEBRA WHITE PLUME: I understand that rage. I fought with cops before. I’ve been shot at by police. I’ve been shot by police. We got it on with the police on Pine Ridge back in the day. So I understand that rage. But when we’re here together to protect sacred water, let’s do it with dignity, let’s do it with training, let’s do it with unity.

AMY GOODMAN: So, Chairman Dave Archambault, explain what this camp is, where it is, and how many people are coming out to it, and how the state is responding.

DAVE ARCHAMBAULT: This camp is along the Cannonball River, close to the mouth of Missouri River. And the camp is—started out in April of 2016 as a prayer camp. And the prayers have been answered. There has been power in prayer. And it opened the eyes to everybody that, through prayer and unity, great things can happen. Since the—about two—the demonstrations started, more and more people began coming and showing overwhelming support for this, and we had to anticipate large masses of people coming, so we occupied a space just north of the Cannonball River off the Standing Rock Reservation, which is core land, and it’s on a nice flat.

Right now what’s going on is it’s about peace, and it’s about prayer, and it’s about uniting. And there’s a really good feeling, if you were to walk through the camp. There are no guns, no violence, no drugs, no alcohol. And it kind of took a life of its own. It evolved into something very special.

The state, on the other side, has taken action, which there’s no cause for. They created a barricade just south of Mandan, right before you get into Fort Lincoln, Custer’s park. It’s about 25 miles north of the camp. And this barricade creates a hardship for the members who live on Standing Rock. The state also removed its emergency assistance vehicles, that we initially got to establish and accommodate large masses of people.

AMY GOODMAN: You were arrested there, Chairman?

DAVE ARCHAMBAULT: Yes, I was.

AMY GOODMAN: I want to play Morton County, North Dakota, Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier’s comments, claims he made that there have been reports of weapons at Sacred Stone Spirit Camp, and get your response.

SHERIFF KYLE KIRCHMEIER: It’s turning into an unlawful protest with some of the things that have been done and has been compromised up to this point. We have had incidents and reports of weapons, of pipe bombs, of some shots fired.

AMY GOODMAN: So, that’s the sheriff. Dave Archambault, your response?

DAVE ARCHAMBAULT: There never was any shots fired. There never were any pipe bombs. There were never any incidents of unlawful activity taking place. When you have a large mass of people in an area, especially with social media, you have Facebook, that can create rumors. And I would ask that the sheriff and the governor validate any rumors that they come across, before they make haste decisions to create a blockade or to declare a state of emergency or to remove any of their emergency assistance vehicles. I understand they have safety concerns, but you just have to be present at the camp, and you’ll see that it’s a peaceful place, and there are happy people who share a common prayer. And that is—

AMY GOODMAN: Chairman, can you explain the lawsuit?

DAVE ARCHAMBAULT: So, what we’re filing a lawsuit on is the destruction of our ancestral burial sites and never being given the opportunity to protect them, as well as the nationwide permitting process. Rather than permitting the project as a whole and doing a full EIS, the Corps of Engineers asked that they permit chunks and pieces of it. And they require an EA. Now, the EA is less intensive as the EIS, so they’re able to kind of do unlawful things, that—such as destroy our sites that are sacred to us.

We don’t agree with the fact—they’re going to say they had consulted with us on this matter. To us, consulting doesn’t mean corresponding through letter or mail, or it doesn’t mean presenting us a final draft of what you’re going to do. Consulting, to us, would mean that we need to have deliberation and share our concerns and hope that they hear us and see a reflection of our concerns in the final plan. None of that has taken place. We asked for consultation prior to any final drafts and to survey the routes to make sure that none of the sites that we cherish would be destroyed. It’s not until after they finalized what they want to do, this Dallas-based company who is doing the EA for the Corps of Engineers tells us how or where they’re going to go. Now they come and invite us to do surveys, and we don’t think that’s right. We think it’s unlawful, and we think it’s unjust.

AMY GOODMAN: Dave Archambault, chair of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. When we come back, indigenous rights activist Winona LaDuke will also join us. Stay with us.

There is an excellent report at Indian Country Today by Sarah Sunshine Manning:
In So many Ways We Have Already Won
Colonization tragically forced many indigenous people to forget and forsake our innate connection to Earth. But many of us today are beginning to remember. What is taking place in Standing Rock is awakening what once lied dormant in so many of our people: the Earth is our Mother, and Water is Life.

It was late at night when I drove into the conjoined Oceti Sakowin and Red Warrior camp in Standing Rock. I set up camp in the rain with my sisters, crawled into bed, and eagerly anticipated waking up wrapped in the energy of unity that next morning. That is exactly what happened.
Water defenders on the frontlines on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota on August 17, 2016. Courtesy John Heminger.
Water defenders on the frontlines on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota on August 17, 2016. Courtesy John Heminger.

We woke up to sounds of joy- laughter, conversation, and warm greetings of “Good Morning.”  We woke up to lingering fragrances of camp fires, coffee, and smoldering sage and cedar.  Near our camp was the central gathering place, where early risers were already congregating over coffee, while others were making huge amounts of breakfast over open fire.

RELATED: Roadblocks Remain While Prayer Camp Stays Peaceful

People of all tribes and many ethnicities gathered. I admit, that I was a little giddy just at the site of a blond gentleman there with his family — a wife and two young children. I admit, that I have been conditioned if not traumatized while living in the Dakotas for the last decade to expect much less than warmth from the majority of non-Natives in the area. But what I immediately saw in the camps at Standing Rock was pure unity of humanity. Unity for Earth, and solidarity for life.  And it was beautiful. There were several non-Natives present, standing with the Lakota and Dakota people of Standing Rock as fellow human beings.

Friends and relatives who were there for weeks at the Sacred Stone, Red Warrior, and Oceti Sakowin camps oriented new comers, and shared emotional stories of bravery. They recounted events from the past week when the first non-violent actions of water defending were carried out and the first arrests were made.

We basked in their energy. The powerful energy and joy from those most intense moments endured, even days after the peak of the conflict between water defenders and Dakota Access Pipeline workers. Construction had been halted, and campers stand by guarding the water, awaiting a ruling.

On the weekend of August 19 through 21, the camps in Standing Rock swelled dramatically, nearing three or four thousand, according to some estimates. Caravans of several cars from out of state poured in day and night. Busloads of people, and truckloads of supplies came. The central gathering area drew more and more newcomers, many of whom took to the microphone to read resolutions passed by their respective tribe, or to offer a prayer in their indigenous language from afar.

Young men sang songs from Haudenosaunee territory in the northeast, and Navajo women from the southwest stepped up in numbers to make frybread for the growing camp. Women and men of all nations stirred huge pots of soups and hot dishes on the fire. And as new groups entered and unloaded their donations and expressed their support, that beautiful feeling grew more palpable each and every time.

We showered each other with unity, strength, and love, and the outpour flowed continuously.

What many outsiders might not know, is that the gathering of hearts and minds in Standing Rock is truly an ensemble of some of the most brilliant indigenous intellects, the most respected of spiritual leaders, the most seasoned organizers and environmentalists, and solid organizations known for defending the sacred.

It was a great surprise that I even ran into a beloved college professor, whom I hadn’t seen in over a decade.  Indigenous lawyers and paralegals were there, too, teachers, youth, and college students, veterans, government employees, entrepreneurs, medical doctors, athletes, runners, writers, journalists and photojournalists, musicians, artists, and entertainers. They were all there, and many still are. Mothers and grandmothers, children and even precious, tiny babies.  Grandpas with their horses, and young men helping individual family camps with everything under the sun, from gathering wood, to delivering supplies.
Water defenders gather along the banks of the Missouri River on August 20, 2016. Courtesy John Heminger.
Water defenders gather along the banks of the Missouri River on August 20, 2016. Courtesy John Heminger.

You couldn’t have assembled a more powerful and able group. Today, we are stronger and more capable than ever to stand up to corporate greed and American attacks on all that we hold most precious. These are the defenders who stand together in Standing Rock.

Tribes from coast to coast were everywhere in the camps, flying their tribal flags and making new relatives. And I was delighted to run into relatives from across the Rocky Mountains, fellow Shoshone and Paiute people, coming together in the land of the Lakota and Dakota.

After spending only a few days there, I regrettably returned home to tend to “life on the outside,” as some have called it. I left deeply imprinted with the love and passion of thousands. I left changed, and like many, I am still adjusting to being away, leaving behind a power unlike anything I’ve ever experienced.

Standing Rock Chairman, Dave Archambault II, articulated that feeling of longing and bitter sweet separation that so many of us can relate to as we departed camp.  In a message shared on the Standing Rock Sioux Facebook page, he wrote, “it was like coming out of the Sundance; I didn’t want to go.”

Chairman Archambault closed his message, “I just kept thinking about the camp and I’d close my eyes and pray for everyone there and the future of our people. Praying for good long lives for all our nations.”

The Sacred Stone, Red Warrior, and Oceti Sakowin camps mark a place of strength and prayer. A bona-fide place of power. Water defenders and prayerful warriors hold the post, still, along the Missouri River in Standing Rock. Many caravans continue to come and go. Supplies and bodies are still needed. Prayers must remain constant.

When I close my eyes, I can still see the mist in the camp in the morning and feel the power in the shaking voices of the women who stormed in front of moving machinery to stop the pipeline construction as they told their stories late into the night.

Standing Rock has changed us forever. Our hearts are with the water, the land, and with each other. Today, we stand armed with the medicine of unity and prayer, and the strength of our ancestors. Still standing for water. Still standing for life.

In so many ways, we have already won.

Screen Shot 2016-01-23 at 2.38.28 PM Sarah Sunshine Manning (Shoshone-Paiute, Chippewa-Cree) is a mother, educator, activist, and an advocate for youth. Follow her at @SarahSunshineM.
Title: Spirit Wins and Media Lies Lose at Standing Rock Protest
Post by: RE on August 29, 2016, 12:10:28 PM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/georgianne-nienaber/spirit-wins-and-media-lie_b_11748446.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/georgianne-nienaber/spirit-wins-and-media-lie_b_11748446.html)

Spirit Wins and Media Lies Lose at Standing Rock Protest

08/28/2016 10:13 am ET | Updated 1 day ago

“We are tipis going up to see the stars. Enjoying the campfire with drums in the distance. Who can ask for more this very blessed night.” ~~An Elder at the Standing Rock Main Camp, Cannon Ball ND

Smells of sweet burning sage linger in the late evening and drift over the main camp on Highway 1806 at Cannon Ball North Dakota. Junior Cuero of the San Diego Campo Reservation chants the Bird Song, a mesmerizing, meditative and repetitive song of respect and honor to the Standing Rock people. A gourd rattle accompanies this ancient chant; a message given to the people by the Creator. Creator sent a bird to teach the People how to sing and dance and treat each other with empathy and not indifference. The sun is setting, bathing the campsite in warm light as the prairie winds begin to calm, and people gather around the campfire, feet tapping in rhythm.

There are two camps. One is located within the “official” reservation boundary and the second “main camp” with the majority of the protesters is located on U.S. Army Corps of Engineer’s land just north of the Cannon Ball River. The North Dakota Department of Emergency Services says it is not on tribal property, but the original treaty line was moved in 1889, so if you support broken treaties, you could call it illegal. In this case legality is in the eye of the beholder.

The Dawes Act and the Allotment Act opened the reservations throughout the United States to settlement by non-Indians. The tribe maintains jurisdiction on all reservation lands, “including rights-of-way, waterways, and streams running through the reservation.” On paper, that is.

See the history of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and learn more about the broken Fort Laramie Treaty that arbitrarily moved boundaries and tried to divide the Sioux Nation.

Standing Rock lies just south of the pipeline’s path under the Missouri River. How do you stop an oil spill at a boundary drawn on a map? Ask the people of Saskatchewan, who are facing 66,000 gallons of heavy crude from a broken pipeline owned by Husky Energy, Inc. It is making its way downstream and threatening the drinking water of several communities.

Despite local media accounts to the contrary, this gathering of Nations to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline are Spirit Camps of thoughtful prayer. There is no need to prolong the misinformation and outright lies perpetuated by the North Dakota Forum News Service. A governor steeped in the sticky flow of oil and money that has all but ruined portions of the North Dakota landscape feeds the news cycle with threats and lies about behavior at the encampments and issues emergency orders.

Truth about what fuels the reactions of authorities can be found in the discarded detritus of the failed oil boom. Abandoned RVs form small mountains in salvage yards, wells are shut down, man camps are ghost towns, and the promises of great wealth are only memory. The loss of oil revenue dollars provokes great fear in the offices of politicians. The Dakota Access Pipeline is really another name for the “abandoned” Keystone XL Pipeline and the goal is to wring every last drop of Bakken crude from North Dakota.

Authorities are reacting with anxiety that the pipeline will be compromised, and believe that concrete barricades along the main road to Standing Rock will stop the people from coming to protect their life source; water flowing from the mighty Missouri river.

But people continue to come, taking the long detour meant to complicate their journey to the Spirit Camp and reduce business at the Prairie Knights Casino and Hotel. But the authorities, despite the show of force at a “safety checkpoint” and rerouting of traffic on 1806 from Bismarck to Standing Rock, have failed. The hotel is almost full and the diversion along Highway 6 is spectacularly beautiful. Those who have purpose and appreciate the land and all it has to offer do not mind this “detour.”

Descendants of the Massacre at Wounded Knee by the Seventh Cavalry come. Young riders, many teenagers, come on their horses—they are some of the Big Foot Riders who travel 300 miles every year to Wounded Knee to pay respect to the ancestors who were massacred by the U.S. 7th Calvary Regiment. They, along with tribes from across the continent, do not want this pipeline that would involve 200 water crossings and pass through 300 sacred sites. They come. They come by car.

They come by horse.

2016-08-28-1472392213-6638265-14045571_10154503046257425_7639688882138710972_n.jpg

They come on foot.

They are still coming.

Read Winona LaDuke’s excellent analysis of all that is at stake, “What Would Sitting Bull Do?”

I am not sure how badly North Dakota wants this pipeline. If there is to be a battle over the pipeline, it will be here. For a people with nothing else but a land and a river, I would not bet against them. The great Lakota leader Mathew King once said, “ the only thing sadder than an Indian who is not free, is an Indian who does not remember what it is to be free.”

Let’s for a moment reject the profane response of North Dakota authorities and focus instead on the sacred.

So many have traveled great distances to stand in solidarity. Many Nations now united as one.

An Elder from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe talks of raising his granddaughter in the old ways. Seeing the tipis fills him with “cante waste”— “heart felt good.” M. Jay Cook is a member of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) School Board and says that sometimes raising his granddaughter “is my only motivation to live.” I receive a text from him one morning and a photo that is incredibly evocative of what is at stake here. He writes of the campfires and “hearing memories of growing up in iron lightning” as the stars speak to him of days gone by. He intends to “face the storm (oil) like the Tatanka (Buffalo) Nation.”

2016-08-28-1472392353-5402601-FullSizeRender.jpg

Photo by M. Jay Cook

Hazel Red Bird is 91 years old and a regal presence around the campfire. Many stop to greet her and share stories of growing up in Fort Yates. Red Bird is now back home at Standing Rock after living a good part of her life in Wisconsin. She is a true warrior woman, having enlisted in the Army Air Corps during World War II to train as a nurse at St. Mary’s School of Nursing in Pierre, South Dakota. The Great War ended just as her training did, and she began her working life as a registered nurse in the civilian white world.

2016-08-28-1472392434-3016889-DSC_2069.jpg

Hazel Red Bird by Georgianne Nienaber

Red Bird surveys the gathering and says she is “amazed, thankful and humbled.” Then she glances down at the writer’s notepad to make certain those three words are written accurately.

“I am amazed because I didn’t think I would live long enough to witness this unity and resiliency among the Nations.”

Red Bird is quiet for a moment as her eyes narrow and she surveys the movement of the people who have gathered around the green tent that serves as a food and information center.

“I am thankful that I have lived 91 winters and humbled that prayers have been answered.”

At 91, this elegant Lakota woman still projects a warrior’s stance. There is more to learn about this fascinating woman who is also a repository of the Lakota language, and you can read more here.

There are other spiritual warriors who have gathered in joyful celebration and unity. Several young women from the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe wanted to make it very clear that they “are standing for our water.” Their ancestors fought and died along the northern and eastern shores of the Missouri River.

2016-08-28-1472392695-2648419-DSC_1984.jpg

Renee Gonzales by Georgianne Nienaber

The Crow Creek Indian Reservation was established by executive order following what was known as the Minnesota Uprising, as a prison camp for the exiled Isanti Dakota and Winnebago people. These were the survivors, mostly women and children, of the largest known public execution in American History, “The Hanging of 38 Dakota Men at Mankato Minnesota.” From 1863 to 1866 approximately 300 died at Fort Thompson suffering from starvation, sickness, disease, exposure, hardship, and heartache.

A federal judge will rule on the legality of the Dakota Access Pipeline on September 9. It remains to be seen whether the traumatic past will be repeated and define the present. How much can be endured; how much more can be stolen? This is a spiritual battle for generations to come. Clean water and air is a right, not an option.

The bird song says this is true.

Title: Standoff at Standing Rock:Among the Pipeline Fighters in Central Iowa
Post by: RE on September 02, 2016, 07:29:33 PM
http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/09/02/among-the-pipeline-fighters-in-central-iowa/ (http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/09/02/among-the-pipeline-fighters-in-central-iowa/)

September 2, 2016
Among the Pipeline Fighters in Central Iowa

(http://uziiw38pmyg1ai60732c4011.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/dropzone/2016/09/Screen-Shot-2016-09-01-at-8.50.46-PM.png)

by Paul Street

Iowa City, September 1, 2016.

“There is a time,” Mario Savio famously said just more than half a century ago, “when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part; you can’t even passively take part, and you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop.”

That’s easier said than done, but you’ve got to make a start.

Take the hideous long black Earth-poisoning and planet-baking snake that is the Bakken Pipeline. Beneath the cover of the endless presidential election season, which in Iowa started a year and a half ago, the Texas-based company Dakota Access LLC (a division of the corporation Energy Transfer Partners [ETP]) has moved methodically ahead with its plan to build this ugly, winding, and eco-cidal tube of death. The $4 billion, 1134-mile project would carry 540,000 barrels of largely fracked crude oil from North Dakota’s “Bakken oil patch” daily on a diagonal course through South Dakota, a Sioux Indian burial ground,18 Iowa counties, and a Native American reservation to Patoka, Illinois. It will link with another pipeline that will transport the black gold to terminals and refineries along the Gulf of Mexico.

Last March, five weeks after Bernie Sanders (who opposed the pipeline) essentially tied Hillary Clinton in the Iowa Caucus, the corporate-captive Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) approved the giant Iowa portion of the project, granting Dakota Access eminent domain across the entire route. It was the company’s last major administrative hurdle for Dakota Access.

The IUB’s decision last March was rich with Orwellian irony. Iowa law forbids the condemning of agricultural land for private development. It is true, as Dakota Access argues, that the law excludes utilities under the jurisdiction of the IUB from the private development limitation. And that includes pipelines, if they serve a “public purpose.” But the pipeline would simply transport oil through Iowa and therefore serves no discernible public good for the state and in fact promises to do considerable harm to the state’s environmental and financial health. Opponents rightly point out that like all pipelines, it will eventually spill, and Dakota Access, LLC will leave Iowa holding the bag for the cleanup. Like something out of Kafka, the IUB will have no power to enforce any kind of public regulations whatsoever on the operators of the private interstate pipeline they approved as a “public utility.”

The IUB’s decision was another example among many that Iowa is up for sale to Big Business under the right wing administration of Republican governor Terry Branstad.

The stakes are high. “If the Bakken Pipeline is built,” the progressive lobbying and activist organization Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement (CCI) notes, “it would seriously harm Iowa’s already impaired water quality, threaten the integrity of the fertile farmland of thousands of everyday Iowans, and contribute to our dependence on fossil fuels. This steers us away from developing renewable energy infrastructure and curbing the most catastrophic impacts of climate change.”

No small problem, that. By all scientific and lived experiential indications, anthropogenic – really capitalism-o-genic – global warming is pushing the planet at an ever escalating pace to full-on ecosystem collapse.

The IUB decision and the federal governments’ failure to intervene against the pipeline have helped DA bring in a significant capital infusion from the giant Canadian pipeline company Enbridge and from Marathon Petroleum. The two corporations recently put up $2 billion ($1.5 billion from Enbridge and $500,000 from Marathon to purchase 49 percent of the Bakken Pipeline. A likely consequence should the project be completed is that Canadian tar sands oil will flow through the pipeline and Iowa and toward the Gulf Coast. That oil is one of the most carbon-rich, planet-cooking fossil fuels on Earth. Dire environmental concern about the mining of Canadian tar sands oil was the main reason that climate activists like Bill McKibben engaged in high-profile protests of the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline – a leading news story a few years ago.

Here in Iowa, anti-pipeline activists have been playing by all the official local, state, and federal rules. They’ve gone through the established channels of law and procedure. They’ve worked the legal and regulatory machinery to the point of exhaustion. They’ve gone through all available avenues of reason and petition. They’ve written and delivered carefully worded petitions and given polite, fact-filled testimony to all the relevant public bodies. They’ve appealed to the IUB. They’ve appealed to the Army Corps of Engineers and to numerous other federal agencies and offices including the Environmental Protection Agency, the Advisory on Historic Preservation, and the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration. They’ve sued in court, defending farmers’ traditional American-as-apple-pie private property rights. Along the way they’ve presidentially caucused for Sanders (who denounced the pipeline in some of his Iowa speeches and advertisements. They’ve reached out to Hillary Clinton, who switched from pro- to anti-Keystone Pipeline for campaign purposes (but who nonetheless cozies up to leading fracking companies) after leaving her position as U.S. Secretary of State. They give citizens a flyer asking them to call the White House and tell Barack Obama that “This is the new Keystone XL. You can stop this pipeline. You must stop this pipeline.”

And it’s all been for naught because the state is stuck in the deep pockets of Big Carbon. Last week a long-awaited district court ruling in Des Moines gave DA, ETP, Enbridge, and Marathon and their big financial backers what they wanted. DA is free to complete construction on fifteen parcels where the farm owners had challenged the state’s right to enforce eminent domain on behalf of the Bakken snake. Construction crews composed disproportionately of out-of-state workers (contrary to DA’s claim that the pipeline meant a jobs windfall for Iowans) are now working feverishly to lay as much pipe as they can before landowners’ challenge can perhaps make it to the Iowa Supreme Court (where DA will win) – and before cold weather sets in. Many hundreds of acres of lush topsoil and nearly harvest-ready crops are being torn up along the pipeline’s sinister path as I write these words.

All of which has brought Iowa activists to the conclusion that while scientific evidence and legal arguments are useful and necessary, direct citizen action in defiance of corporate-rigged law and “regulation” is required to save our water, land, and livable ecology. Yesterday (I am writing on the afternoon of Thursday, September 1st, 2016), more than 100 activists connected to CCI and the anti-pipeline groups Bold Iowa and One Hundred Grannies for a Livable Future undertook civil disobedience at four entrance to a DA construction staging ground in Boon County in central Iowa. Twenty-eight of those activists were arrested and taken away by Iowa state troopers for the crime of trespassing – blocking the movement of DA vehicles.

Here is an eloquent and short speech given just prior to the direct people’s action by the leading environmental lawyer Carolyn Raffensperger:

    “I’m here on behalf of future generations…”

    “When the law is far apart from justice, the law must fall. “

    “A law that allows the private property of landowners to be taken… and given to a polluting pipeline company – that law must fall.”

    “To allow the pollution of our drinking water is insane. It is not just. The law that would allow that must fall. “

    “This is an illegitimate pipeline. Any kind of vote, any kind of ratification that allows that must fall. Justice must prevail.”

    “We stand for justice. The tree of life stands for justice.”

The indomitable Maria Kashia, a leader of One Hundred Grannies for a Livable Future, spoke with equal passion and eloquence prior to the arrests:

    “We are here to defend and protect. We are here out of love for our earth and future generations.”

    “We are not here to hate. We are here because of the illegitimate ant-democratic process that has created this great threat to rivers and our soil.”

    “We are here in solidarity with our Native American brothers and sisters to stop the black snake that threatens their water and ours.”

    “We are here because we are informed about the undeniable reality of the climate crisis that is already destroying life on our planet home.”

    “We are watching as the glaciers melt. Oceans heat and rise. People die of heat and starvation due to drought. Great fires burn our forests all over the planet. And floods wash away communities and lives.”

    “We know that those Dakota Access workers need jobs. We want clean green jobs for them. And we are working very hard toward that.”

    “But this pipeline is not going to serve the common good. This pipeline will destroy, pillage, pollute, and plunder for profit, not for people and nature.”

    “‘It is horrifying,” Ansel Adams once wrote, ‘that we have to fight our own government to save the environment.’”

Words, like science and law, are useful but then there’s the realm of deeds: the stoppage of the assembly or killing line, the burning of the draft cards, the occupation of the university administration building, the refusal to participate in war crimes, and the blocking of pipeline construction trucks enlisted in pillage, pollution, and plunder for profit, not the common good.

Let’s be very clear and honest about what we are up against here and around the world. Big Carbon and 21st century petro-capitalism are literally engaged in the Greenhouse Carbon-gassing to death of life on Earth. That is a bigger crime than even those of the Nazis, many whose top commanders justly hanged at Nuremberg.

I suppose I have some political and philosophical differences with some of my fellow pipeline opponents in Iowa. I’m more Marxist and also more anarchist and Edward Abbey-ite and less pacifist in background and spirit than many of them. But these differences do not feel all that terribly big or relevant right now. I have the greatest respect and admiration for the Iowa pipeline fighters who have put their freedom and bodies on the line for the common good – and for their many comrades fighting the petro-capitalist pillaging of the planet across the country and world. You can donate to the legal defense of these social and environmental heroes and heroines here.
Join the debate on Facebook

Paul Street’s latest book is They Rule: The 1% v. Democracy (Paradigm, 2014)
Title: Oil pipeline protest turns violent in southern North Dakota
Post by: RE on September 04, 2016, 12:17:59 AM
http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2016-09-04/oil-pipeline-protest-turns-violent-in-southern-north-dakota (http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2016-09-04/oil-pipeline-protest-turns-violent-in-southern-north-dakota)

Oil pipeline protest turns violent in southern North Dakota
A protest of a four-state oil pipeline turned violent after tribal officials say construction crews destroyed American Indian burial and other cultural sites on private land in southern North Dakota

Sept. 4, 2016, at 2:23 a.m.
MORE
Oil pipeline protest turns violent in southern North Dakota
MORE

By JAMES MacPHERSON, Associated Press

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A protest of a four-state, $3.8 billion oil pipeline turned violent Saturday after tribal officials say construction crews destroyed American Indian burial and cultural sites on private land in southern North Dakota.

Morton County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Donnell Preskey said four private security guards and two guard dogs were injured after several hundred protesters confronted construction crews Saturday afternoon at the site just outside the Standing Rock Sioux reservation. One of the security officers was taken to a Bismarck hospital for undisclosed injuries. The two guard dogs were taken to a Bismarck veterinary clinic, Preskey said.

Tribe spokesman Steve Sitting Bear said protesters reported that six people had been bitten by security dogs, including a young child. At least 30 people were pepper-sprayed, he said. Preskey said law enforcement authorities had no reports of protesters being injured.

There were no law enforcement personnel at the site when the incident occurred, Preskey said. The crowd disbursed when officers arrived and no one was arrested, she said.

The incident occurred within half a mile of an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the oil pipeline that is slated to cross the Missouri River nearby.

The tribe is challenging the Army Corps of Engineers' decision to grant permits for Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access pipeline, which crosses the Dakotas and Iowa to Illinois, including near the reservation in southern North Dakota. A federal judge will rule before Sept. 9 whether construction can be halted on the Dakota Access pipeline.

Energy Transfer Partners did not return phone calls and emails from The Associated Press on Saturday seeking comment.

The tribe fears it's a project they fear will disturb sacred sites and impact drinking water for thousands of tribal members on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and millions further downstream.

The protest Saturday came one day after the tribe filed court papers saying it found several sites of "significant cultural and historic value" along the path of the proposed pipeline.

Tribal preservation officer Tim Mentz said in court documents that the tribe was only recently allowed to survey private land north of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation. Mentz said researchers found burials rock piles called cairns and other sites of historic significance to Native Americans.

Standing Rock Sioux chairman David Archambault II said in a statement that construction crews removed topsoil across an area about 150 feet wide stretching for 2 miles.

"This demolition is devastating," Archambault said. "These grounds are the resting places of our ancestors. The ancient cairns and stone prayer rings there cannot be replaced. In one day, our sacred land has been turned into hollow ground."

Preskey said the company filmed the confrontation by helicopter and turned the video over to authorities. Protesters also have posted some of the confrontation on social media.

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said in a statement that "individuals crossed onto private property and accosted private security officers with wooden posts and flag poles."

"Any suggestion that today's event was a peaceful protest, is false," his statement said.
Title: Dakota Access Pipeline Company attacks protesters with dogs
Post by: RE on September 04, 2016, 08:13:36 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/kuZcx2zEo4k
Title: Re: Oil pipeline protest turns violent in southern North Dakota
Post by: Surly1 on September 04, 2016, 08:26:23 AM
http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2016-09-04/oil-pipeline-protest-turns-violent-in-southern-north-dakota (http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2016-09-04/oil-pipeline-protest-turns-violent-in-southern-north-dakota)

Oil pipeline protest turns violent in southern North Dakota
A protest of a four-state oil pipeline turned violent after tribal officials say construction crews destroyed American Indian burial and other cultural sites on private land in southern North Dakota

I just removed the embedded video because every time I load the DD page, it autoplays commercials from the extractors and vomits forth their propaganda. Very intrusive and consistent with their morality.
Title: Re: Oil pipeline protest turns violent in southern North Dakota
Post by: RE on September 04, 2016, 08:42:58 AM
http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2016-09-04/oil-pipeline-protest-turns-violent-in-southern-north-dakota (http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2016-09-04/oil-pipeline-protest-turns-violent-in-southern-north-dakota)

Oil pipeline protest turns violent in southern North Dakota
A protest of a four-state oil pipeline turned violent after tribal officials say construction crews destroyed American Indian burial and other cultural sites on private land in southern North Dakota

I just removed the embedded video because every time I load the DD page, it autoplays commercials from the extractors and vomits forth their propaganda. Very intrusive and consistent with their morality.

Yea, I removed one also.

Could not shut off the autoplay.

RE
Title: 10 Ways You Can Help the Standing Rock Sioux Fight the Dakota Access Pipeline
Post by: RE on September 09, 2016, 06:02:24 AM
Today is the BIG DAY on this one.

Any bets on how the Judge will rule?

Meanwhile, here are 10 ways for you to put in your 2 cents.

RE

http://www.greanvillepost.com/2016/09/08/10-ways-you-can-help-the-standing-rock-sioux-fight-the-dakota-access-pipeline/ (http://www.greanvillepost.com/2016/09/08/10-ways-you-can-help-the-standing-rock-sioux-fight-the-dakota-access-pipeline/)

10 Ways You Can Help the Standing Rock Sioux Fight the Dakota Access Pipeline
Author Rowan Wolf Date September 8, 2016

(http://www.greanvillepost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/NOdapl-350x182.jpg)

=By= Jay Syrmopoulos

Stand with the folks at Standing Rock. They are brave and committed, but it is flesh against steel as they are try to hold the line until either the courts or Obama put a stop to this drive across sacred land. Help however you can – including spreading the message about what is going on.

Cannon Ball, ND – While many Americans passively support the Standing Rock Sioux’s fight to stop the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, aside from showing up in Cannon Ball, North Dakota (which many simply can’t do) – to actively participate in the protests – most people are unsure of what they can actually do to support the Sioux at Standing Rock aside from posting on social media.

Here is a list of ten things that people can do to show their support. Some methods may be more effective than others, but the key is utilizing multiple avenues of resistance in an effort to provide full spectrum resistance against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

1. Call North Dakota governor Jack Dalrymple at 701-328-2200. When leaving a message stating your thoughts about this subject please be professional.

2. Sign the petition to the White House to Stop DAPL: https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/ (https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/)…/stop-construction…

3. Donate to support the Standing Rock Sioux at http://standingrock.org/ (http://standingrock.org/)…/standing-rock-sioux-tribe…/

4. Donate items from the Sacred Stone Camp Supply List: http://sacredstonecamp.org/supply-list/ (http://sacredstonecamp.org/supply-list/)

5. Call the White House at (202) 456-1111 or (202) 456-1414. Tell President Obama to rescind the Army Corps of Engineers’ Permit for the Dakota Access Pipeline.

6. Contribute to the Sacred Stone Camp Legal Defense Fund: https://fundrazr.com/d19fAf (https://fundrazr.com/d19fAf)

7. Contribute to the Sacred Stone Camp gofundme account: https://www.gofundme.com/sacredstonecamp (https://www.gofundme.com/sacredstonecamp)

8. Call the Army Corps of Engineers and demand that they reverse the permit: (202) 761-5903

9. Sign other petitions asking President Obama to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. Here’s the latest to cross my desk – https://act.credoaction.com/sign/NoDAPL (https://act.credoaction.com/sign/NoDAPL)

10. Call the executives of the companies that are building the pipeline:

a. Lee Hanse Executive Vice President Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. 800 E Sonterra Blvd #400 San Antonio, Texas 78258 Telephone: (210) 403-6455 Lee.Hanse@energytransfer.com

b. Glenn Emery Vice President Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. 800 E Sonterra Blvd #400 San Antonio, Texas 78258 Telephone: (210) 403-6762 Glenn.Emery@energytransfer.com

c. Michael (Cliff) Waters Lead Analyst Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. 1300 Main St. Houston, Texas 77002 Telephone: (713) 989-2404 Michael.Waters@energytransfer.com

The most effective means of showing support for this cause is to actively participate in protecting this sacred land. Anyone who is able to travel to the peaceful encampments is encouraged to do so. For those unable to make the journey to North Dakota, please utilize the alternate methods provided to show your support for the Standing Rock Sioux who have united over 100 tribes from across the U.S. Please join this effort to stop this pipeline, which desecrates sacred lands and has serious potential to damage or destroy the Standing Rock reservations lifeblood – its water.

Be the change you wish to see in this world. — Mahatma Gandhi
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: WE WON!
Post by: RE on September 09, 2016, 05:49:26 PM
We won this one!  :laughing4:

 :multiplespotting:

The bought and paid for Judge ruled against the tribes, but immediately after that the Federal Goobermint and Army Corps of Engineers pulled their permits and halted the pipeline!

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/09/09/federal-judge-denies-standing-rock-sioux-tribes-request-to-stop-work-on-four-state-oil-pipeline/?utm_term=.55246c768324 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/09/09/federal-judge-denies-standing-rock-sioux-tribes-request-to-stop-work-on-four-state-oil-pipeline/?utm_term=.55246c768324)


Federal government moves to halt oil pipeline construction near Standing Rock Sioux tribal land
By Joe Heim and Mark Berman September 9 at 7:15 PM

 
What you need to know about the Dakota Access pipeline
Play Video2:34
A U.S. Judge ruled against a Native American tribe seeking an injunction on a pipeline under construction in North Dakota. The anti-pipeline protest has become a rallying point for Native Americans across the United States. Here's what you need to know. (Daron Taylor/The Washington Post)

A federal judge ruled Friday against the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s request for a preliminary injunction to halt construction on the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline that the tribe says endangers sacred burial grounds and could threaten its water supply from Lake Oahe, a dammed section of the Missouri river.

But in a development that stunned even the tribe’s lawyers, the decision by District Judge James E. Boasberg was effectively put on hold by a federal order to stop construction near the tribe’s reservation until the Army Corps of Engineers can revisit its previous decisions in the disputed portion.

The tribe’s lawyers had argued that the Army Corps of Engineers had not properly consulted with the tribe on questions of environmental impact and historical preservation as required by law. Boasberg found that the corps had complied with the law in approving permits for the pipeline and that the tribe had not demonstrated that “irreparable harm will ensure.”

Within minutes of Boasberg’s ruling, however, the departments of Justice, Army and Interior issued an unusual joint statement related to the disputed land. Thousands of Native Americans have camped out nearby in protest, and the showdown between tribe members and construction workers had grown increasingly tense.

“We appreciate the District Court’s opinion on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act. However, important issues raised by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other tribal nations and their members regarding the Dakota Access pipeline specifically, and pipeline-related decision-making generally, remain,” read the joint statement issued by the Justice, Army and Interior departments.

“This case has highlighted the need for a serious discussion on whether there should be nationwide reform with respect to considering tribes’ views on these types of infrastructure projects. Therefore, this fall, we will invite tribes to formal, government-to-government consultations on two questions: (1) within the existing statutory framework, what should the federal government do to better ensure meaningful tribal input into infrastructure-related reviews and decisions and the protection of tribal lands, resources, and treaty rights; and (2) should new legislation be proposed to Congress to alter that statutory framework and promote those goals.”

The fight is being waged over a 1,172-mile pipeline through four states that could transport more than  a half-million barrels of oil each day.

For tribal leaders, the government’s announcement immediately following the court’s ruling against it was a huge victory.

“Our hearts are full; this an historic day for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and for tribes across the nation,” said Dave Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.“Native peoples have suffered generations of broken promises and today the federal government said that national reform is needed to better ensure that tribes have a voice on infrastructure projects like this pipeline.”

A spokeswoman for Dakota Access declined to comment for this article. A collection of business organizations supporting the pipeline, the MAIN Coalition, said the government’s action halting constructionwas “deeply troubling and could have a long-lasting chilling effect on private infrastructure development in the United States.”

In July, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. The complaint said that the Dakota Access Pipeline, or DAPL, could discharge materials “at multiple locations in the tribe’s ancestral lands” without proper permitting.

Tribal leaders have argued that leaks from the pipeline would impact the Missouri River, a source of water for 8,000 residents of a reservation about a mile away from where the pipeline would cross.

In addition, the complaint said that the pipeline “crosses areas of great historical and cultural significance to the tribe, the potential damage or destruction of which greatly injures the tribe and its members.”

Boasberg had partially granted an order in the case in advance of today’s ruling.

The Army Corps of Engineers said in a filing this week that it did not oppose a motion for a temporary restraining order until Boasberg ruled. In that filing, the agency said it believed that it “fulfilled its statutory responsibilities” and felt it would win out. But the corps added that due to the confrontations stemming from the project, the restraining order would essentially be “preserving peace” until a ruling came down.

Dakota Access has said that underground oil pipelines are safe. On its website, the company says that it will take precautions to safeguard culturally or environmentally sensitive areas.

The showdown in North Dakota has also blossomed into a larger fight that has drawn thousands of Native Americans from across the country, joining to combat what they describe as mistreatment in the case.

When workers recently plowed under locations mentioned by the tribe in a court filing as being sacred or historic, tribe members tried to intercede and were stopped by private security workers, some using guard dogs and pepper spray. The resulting photos showed snarling dogs lunging at protesters; a tribal spokesman said demonstrators were bitten, while the sheriff’s department said private security guards as well as dogs were also hurt.

The protest has made headlines around the world, and while overseas this week, President Obama was questioned about the ongoing standoff by a young Malaysian woman at a town hall in Laos.

She asked what Obama could do “to ensure the protection of ancestral land and the supply of clean water, and also environmental justice is upheld?” He did not address the pipeline directly, but acknowledged that “the way that Native Americans were treated was tragic.”

Many tribal leaders say Obama has done more for Native Americans in his two terms than all of his predecessors combined. The administration has given land back to tribes and worked one-on-one with tribal governments, and it is cracking down on crime in Indian Country. “The best thing that’s happened to Indian Country has been President Obama being elected,” said Archambault II, after the president and First Lady Michelle Obama visited Standing Rock in 2014.

Obama said later that they emerged from a private conversation at a school in Cannon Ball, N.D., “shaken because some of these kids were carrying burdens no young person should ever have to carry. And it was heartbreaking.”
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: WE WON!
Post by: Surly1 on September 09, 2016, 06:18:08 PM
We won this one!  :laughing4:

 :multiplespotting:

The bought and paid for Judge ruled against the tribes, but immediately after that the Federal Goobermint and Army Corps of Engineers pulled their permits and halted the pipeline!

RE

Federal government moves to halt oil pipeline construction near Standing Rock Sioux tribal land

It's a great victory, but I wouldn't be spiking the ball in the end zone quite yet. The oilers haven't yet run out of money, judges or lobbyists. Or Senators.

Plus, with the latest poll reversals, when #CheetoHitler wins POTUS, Secretary of Energy Sarah Palin will be cutting the ribbon for Dakota Access, with crucified protestors in the background.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: WE WON!
Post by: RE on September 09, 2016, 09:32:12 PM
We won this one!  :laughing4:

 :multiplespotting:

The bought and paid for Judge ruled against the tribes, but immediately after that the Federal Goobermint and Army Corps of Engineers pulled their permits and halted the pipeline!

RE

Federal government moves to halt oil pipeline construction near Standing Rock Sioux tribal land

It's a great victory, but I wouldn't be spiking the ball in the end zone quite yet. The oilers haven't yet run out of money, judges or lobbyists. Or Senators.

Plus, with the latest poll reversals, when #CheetoHitler wins POTUS, Secretary of Energy Sarah Palin will be cutting the ribbon for Dakota Access, with crucified protestors in the background.

It's a Stay of Execution for sure, not a permanent solution.

But, it did wake up and energize at least the First Nations people.  Iowa WHITE farmers also were filing suit.  It will be much more difficult for them to get this pipeline through now.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: WE WON!
Post by: K-Dog on September 09, 2016, 11:00:42 PM
We won this one!  :laughing4:

 :multiplespotting:

The bought and paid for Judge ruled against the tribes, but immediately after that the Federal Goobermint and Army Corps of Engineers pulled their permits and halted the pipeline!

RE

Federal government moves to halt oil pipeline construction near Standing Rock Sioux tribal land

It's a great victory, but I wouldn't be spiking the ball in the end zone quite yet. The oilers haven't yet run out of money, judges or lobbyists. Or Senators.

Plus, with the latest poll reversals, when #CheetoHitler wins POTUS, Secretary of Energy Sarah Palin will be cutting the ribbon for Dakota Access, with crucified protestors in the background.

(http://static4.businessinsider.com/image/56a0d6d3e6183e7c008baf6c-480/sarah-palin-donald-trump.jpg)

(http://chasingthesquirrel.com/pics/TwoDuces.png)

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSufkArLcfI2H8VPJhLn48KKwJYGLPOjlLELELPMe175hl9nA9cbQ)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: WE WON!
Post by: Surly1 on September 10, 2016, 06:05:54 AM
We won this one!  :laughing4:

 :multiplespotting:

The bought and paid for Judge ruled against the tribes, but immediately after that the Federal Goobermint and Army Corps of Engineers pulled their permits and halted the pipeline!

RE

Federal government moves to halt oil pipeline construction near Standing Rock Sioux tribal land

It's a great victory, but I wouldn't be spiking the ball in the end zone quite yet. The oilers haven't yet run out of money, judges or lobbyists. Or Senators.

Plus, with the latest poll reversals, when #CheetoHitler wins POTUS, Secretary of Energy Sarah Palin will be cutting the ribbon for Dakota Access, with crucified protestors in the background.

It's a Stay of Execution for sure, not a permanent solution.

But, it did wake up and energize at least the First Nations people.  Iowa WHITE farmers also were filing suit.  It will be much more difficult for them to get this pipeline through now.

RE

It also galvanized the protest movement to an extent. A friend of ours formerly from Occupy Roanoke, Paulette Moore, is a filmmaker who was livestreaming from the site.

 It's also interesting to read this site (after a couple of days being seriously distracted by work) and to read Palloy's posting about the selloff of oil from the strategic reserve, and about the Plutocracy film.

 Anyone who is ever read Howard Zinn will have the scales stripped away from their eyes in terms the first principles of the formation of this country, and for whose benefit.  The official story is, after all, a marketing story. Standing Rock is just the latest  battle in a war that has raged for centuries, and that will continue.

It also illustrates beyond a shadow of a doubt that elections have consequences. Imagine for a moment the response of a Cheney or Romney administration to Standing Rock. Tell me again why it is idiocy to vote. Cue the laugh track.
Title: Joint Statement from Justice, Department of the Army and Interior
Post by: Surly1 on September 10, 2016, 07:39:31 AM
 

Joint Statement from the Department of Justice, the Department of the Army and the Department of the Interior Regarding Standing Rock Sioux Tribe v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The Department of Justice, the Department of the Army and the Department of the Interior issued the following statement regarding Standing Rock Sioux Tribe v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers:

Friday, September 9, 2016

“We appreciate the District Court’s opinion on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act. However, important issues raised by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other tribal nations and their members regarding the Dakota Access pipeline specifically, and pipeline-related decision-making generally, remain. Therefore, the Department of the Army, the Department of Justice, and the Department of the Interior will take the following steps.

The Army will not authorize constructing the Dakota Access pipeline on Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe until it can determine whether it will need to reconsider any of its previous decisions regarding the Lake Oahe site under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) or other federal laws. Therefore, construction of the pipeline on Army Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe will not go forward at this time. The Army will move expeditiously to make this determination, as everyone involved — including the pipeline company and its workers — deserves a clear and timely resolution. In the interim, we request that the pipeline company voluntarily pause all construction activity within 20 miles east or west of Lake Oahe.

“Furthermore, this case has highlighted the need for a serious discussion on whether there should be nationwide reform with respect to considering tribes’ views on these types of infrastructure projects. Therefore, this fall, we will invite tribes to formal, government-to-government consultations on two questions: (1) within the existing statutory framework, what should the federal government do to better ensure meaningful tribal input into infrastructure-related reviews and decisions and the protection of tribal lands, resources, and treaty rights; and (2) should new legislation be proposed to Congress to alter that statutory framework and promote those goals.

“Finally, we fully support the rights of all Americans to assemble and speak freely. We urge everyone involved in protest or pipeline activities to adhere to the principles of nonviolence. Of course, anyone who commits violent or destructive acts may face criminal sanctions from federal, tribal, state, or local authorities. The Departments of Justice and the Interior will continue to deploy resources to North Dakota to help state, local, and tribal authorities, and the communities they serve, better communicate, defuse tensions, support peaceful protest, and maintain public safety.

“In recent days, we have seen thousands of demonstrators come together peacefully, with support from scores of sovereign tribal governments, to exercise their First Amendment rights and to voice heartfelt concerns about the environment and historic, sacred sites. It is now incumbent on all of us to develop a path forward that serves the broadest public interest.”
.

gettyimages-599437898_594_screen_1473099892278_5934314_ver1-0

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Surly1 on September 10, 2016, 07:48:47 AM
From Stan Goff, for my money one of the more reliable observers out there:

Do not for a minute believe that this administration will stop that pipeline. They are trying to find a way around the political embarrassment the protesters have created, which may mean extending the pipeline around the now-contested site. It will take a continued struggle for every foot along the route to halt this. The investments are huge' and the role of the capitalist state is to ensure return on investment. This state will follow through. Its character has not changed. It is retrenching. Stand by.

Investors in Dakota Access

Citibank, JP Morgan Goldman-Sachs, Bank of America, ,Morgan Stanley, HSBC, Enbridge, Marathon, Sunoco, Wells Fargo, BNP Paribas, SunTrust, Royal Bank of Scotland, Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, Mizuho Bank, TD Securities, ABN AMRO Capital, DNB First Bank (Philly, not Norway, but DNB Norway, too), ICBC London, SMBC Nikko Securities, and Société Générale.

Any questions about why the Obama Administration, and any future Clinton Administration will try to bulldoze over or work their way around these troublesome Indians? It may not work, though.

I suspect that this protest is more historic than we can yet know. It is just beginning to ramify.

The fact that Black Lives Matter has declared solidarity, that Wall Street is at the epicenter, that BLM has also raised the issue of Palestine, that the nation's largest prison strike is being prepared, and that the establishment parties are in shambles, are all indicative of a groundswell like we haven't seen in fifty years.

I can only hope that every foot of that pipeline will be contested, that armed thugs show up along the route like Bull Connor's dog-cops, that athletes continue to kneel for the anthem. The anesthesia is wearing off. We are waking.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Surly1 on September 10, 2016, 08:01:50 AM
(https://scontent.forf1-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-0/s480x480/14232987_1664661533848951_8874676231081577175_n.jpg?oh=7639c6b8e46f334f4c3a25f346751a77&oe=5841CF7A)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: WE WON!
Post by: RE on September 10, 2016, 09:24:51 AM
It also illustrates beyond a shadow of a doubt that elections have consequences. Imagine for a moment the response of a Cheney or Romney administration to Standing Rock. Tell me again why it is idiocy to vote. Cue the laugh track.

So what will the difference be between Killary or The Donald in how they would handle Standing Rock?

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: WE WON!
Post by: luciddreams on September 10, 2016, 10:47:43 AM
It also illustrates beyond a shadow of a doubt that elections have consequences. Imagine for a moment the response of a Cheney or Romney administration to Standing Rock. Tell me again why it is idiocy to vote. Cue the laugh track.

So what will the difference be between Killary or The Donald in how they would handle Standing Rock?

RE

One is attached to a bunch of strings and does what the vested interest tells her to do while lies exude from the cracks of her plastic face. 

The other is an utterly incompetent windbag of torrential ego maniacal smelly fart sounds who'd probably bomb the site with a nuke, declare moral bankruptcy, gak a line of coke, and tell America that Natives are savage throw backs to a time of self reliance which can no longer be tolerated.   

Either way the pipeline goes through in the end no matter how you slice it. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on September 10, 2016, 10:51:21 AM
I read today on Bill McKibben's site that Hillary is going to do something meaningful about climate change...lol.

 :aola: :wav: :LolLolLolLol:

Maybe she'll stop Trumps smelly fart sounds and therefore save us from some methane being released into the atmosphere. 
Title: And Kunstler deleted a comment that mentioned Standing Rock today.
Post by: K-Dog on September 12, 2016, 11:32:27 PM
I'm sure that he did shocks no diners and sadly this too seems to be of little surprise as America willingly embraces a new era of robber barons with their Pinkerton malfeasance.

North Dakota arrest warrant for Amy Goodman raises fears for press freedom

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/sep/12/amy-goodman-arrest-warrant-north-dakota-oil-pipeline-protest (https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/sep/12/amy-goodman-arrest-warrant-north-dakota-oil-pipeline-protest)

The Democracy Now! host has been accused of entering private property during her reporting on the Native American protests of an oil pipeline

(https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/05db11e66a9b572ab9bf60c2319fa4cb7c5e61ae/0_312_1335_800/master/1335.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=c8aa6777a5f05eba0de3dbb81b5f53d3)

The arrest warrant for award-winning journalist Amy Goodman has raised concerns about free speech violations and press intimidation. Photograph: Right Livelihood Foundation / HO/EPA

North Dakota police have issued an arrest warrant for the Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman, who has been reporting on the Native American protests against an oil pipeline, accusing her of entering “private property” to conduct interviews.

The charges have raised concerns about possible free speech violations and press intimidation, since the Morton county sheriff’s office accused the award-winning broadcast journalist after Democracy Now! filmed security guards working for the Dakota access pipeline using dogs and pepper spray on protesters.

“This is an unacceptable violation of freedom of the press,” Goodman said in a statement after police accused her of criminal trespass, a misdemeanor offense.

On 3 September, Goodman reported at the site of the Native American-led protest of a controversial $3.8bn oil pipeline that the Standing Rock Sioux tribe says poses a threat to its water supply and could damage its cultural heritage.

Goodman’s dispatch on the use of dogs quickly spread online and was viewed more than 13m times on the news program’s Facebook page. Many outlets rebroadcast the footage, including CBS, NBC, NPR and CNN, according to Democracy Now!.

An 8 September criminal complaint was filed against Goodman and Cody Hall, a protest organizer. The charging document from the state’s attorney for Morton County calls on the defendants to be “arrested and dealt with according to law”.

Lindsay Wold, a special agent with the North Dakota bureau of criminal investigation, wrote in an affidavit that a “large group of protesters” were blocking a highway and that employees of the Dakota access pipeline were working in a nearby field, “utilizing heavy equipment to clear the land”.

Security workers had formed a line to try to block the activists, Wold wrote.

The agent alleged that the protesters broke through a fence, crossed on to the private land, halted the employees from working, and assaulted security guards.

“Amy Goodman can be seen on video on the private property that is beyond the border of the fence,” Wold wrote. The agent also cited damage on 6 September to the pipeline’s equipment, including a flat tire and dirt placed in the fuel tanks of several vehicles.

Democracy Now! quoted a protester at the time describing the dogs violently attacking activists: “These people are just threatening all of us with these dogs. And she, that woman over there, she was charging, and it bit somebody right in the face.”

“The dog has blood in its nose and its mouth,” Goodman said. “Why are you letting their, her dog go after the protesters? It’s covered in blood.”

Denis Moynihan, special projects coordinator for Democracy Now!, declined to comment further on Monday, but confirmed that Goodman had not been arrested. Goodman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Spokespeople for the sheriff and prosecutor’s office declined to comment. Deputies stopped Hall on 9 September, allegedly for “expired tabs”, and then arrested him for two counts of criminal trespass, the sheriff’s office said in a statement.

The US army, the Department of Justice, and the Department of the Interior, which is responsible for Native American affairs, announced on Friday that it would delay issuing permits to the pipeline to dig on federal land by the Missouri river, above the Standing Rock reservation.

The government said that it would also discuss with tribes how “to better ensure meaningful tribal input into infrastructure-related reviews and decisions and the protection of tribal lands, resources, and treaty rights”.

The pipeline is slated to transport fracked crude from the Bakken oil field in North Dakota to a refinery near Chicago, inspiring an unprecedented gathering of Native American protesters.

Some protest organizers have lamented that although the pipeline threats echo the dangers of the defeated Keystone XL pipeline, the North Dakota controversy has received much less attention from the media and major environmental groups.

Democracy Now! said it is now consulting with the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) and lawyers in North Dakota. CCR’s legal director, Baher Azmy, told Democracy Now!, “This is clearly a violation of the first amendment … an attempt to repress this important political movement by silencing media coverage.”

The sheriff’s office said there have been 38 arrests associated with the protest.

There is more info at the guardian.  I could not get it all here.  The newspaper it seems does not want to easily share. If you go there you will find a video.
Title: Re: And Kunstler deleted a comment that mentioned Standing Rock today.
Post by: RE on September 13, 2016, 12:06:51 AM
I'm sure that he did shocks no diners and sadly this too seems to be of little surprise as America willingly embraces a new era of robber barons with their Pinkerton malfeasance.

They're trying to silence Amy Goodman so when they restart the pipeline she won't be there to report on it.

It won't work.  Somebody else will take her place.

Hydra with Many Heads time here.

RE
Title: Re: And Kunstler deleted a comment that mentioned Standing Rock today.
Post by: Surly1 on September 13, 2016, 03:49:51 AM
I'm sure that he did shocks no diners and sadly this too seems to be of little surprise as America willingly embraces a new era of robber barons with their Pinkerton malfeasance.

They're trying to silence Amy Goodman so when they restart the pipeline she won't be there to report on it.

It won't work.  Somebody else will take her place.

Hydra with Many Heads time here.

RE

These techniques have been used time and time again. US labor history is peppered with them. In Homestead and Blair mountain it was Pinkertons; today it's G4. Thug hirelings. And goverment hold's business's coat while it kicks protestor ass, and then provides legal cover.

Wash, rinse, repeat.

(http://lastrealindians.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/sunka1.jpg)
Title: Re: And Kunstler deleted a comment that mentioned Standing Rock today.
Post by: RE on September 13, 2016, 03:59:51 AM
These techniques have been used time and time again. US labor history is peppered with them. In Homestead and Blair mountain it was Pinkertons; today it's G4. Thug hirelings. And goverment hold's business's coat while it kicks protestor ass, and then provides legal cover.

Wash, rinse, repeat.

No worries.  They will run out of working money before we run out of Hydra Heads.

You gotta have some patience here.  Rome wasn't built (or destroyed) in a day you know.  ::)

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on October 14, 2016, 08:43:48 PM
The battle goes on.

RE

http://grist.org/briefly/a-journalist-arrested-for-filming-a-dakota-access-protest-could-face-more-prison-time-than-edward-snowden/ (http://grist.org/briefly/a-journalist-arrested-for-filming-a-dakota-access-protest-could-face-more-prison-time-than-edward-snowden/)

Briefly
Stuff that matters

Dakota Access
A journalist arrested for filming a Dakota Access protest could face more prison time than Edward Snowden.

(http://everyonesbackyard.com/uploads/3/0/9/0/3090769/1341433252.jpg)

Ten activists were arrested on Tuesday for shutting down tar-sands oil pipelines. Among them was Deia Schlosberg, producer of the documentary How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things Climate Can’t Change.

Schlosberg reportedly faces three felony conspiracy charges. If convicted, she could be sentenced to 45 years in prison. To put that in perspective:

Neil Young, Mark Ruffalo, and other celebrities called for the charges to be dropped on Thursday, arguing that Schlosberg was not participating in the protest but documenting the event as a filmmaker. That’s right, folks: In the eyes of the legal system, spilling the NSA’s secrets is less reprehensible than doing a journalist’s job.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on October 14, 2016, 11:22:37 PM
In February 1979, John Trudell led a march in Washington, D.C. to draw attention to Indian difficulties.

He had been warned against speaking out but John was and activist and the FBI hated him.  The FBI does not have a red man's soul in any way.  On the steps of the FBI building John spoke out on the agency's harassment of Indians.  Less than 12 hours later John's wife, Tina and his three children, were burned alive in their family home in Duck Valley, Nevada along with Tina's mother.

(http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/d4/5c/70/d45c7019d7ffbf9ce3ce29747ea605f2.jpg)

The hatred in Washington for the Indians goes long and deep.  The hatred was institutionalized long ago and for most people monkey see monkey do explains everything that they do; so the hatred festers as it is imitated by new occupants of the bureaucracy as generations pass.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.treasuresinwriting.com%2Fimages%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2011%2F09%2Fhigheagle.jpg%3Faoe%3D1%26q%3D100%26w%3D600%26h%3D372%26hash%3D9384c2372f44880a5ac9aaf9f04f5d91&f=1)


Title: North Dakota pipeline protest prompts more than 80 arrests
Post by: RE on October 22, 2016, 04:16:03 PM
At least they're not making it cheap for the scumbags to keep this up.  :icon_sunny:

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/north-dakota-pipeline-protest-prompts-more-than-80-arrests/2016/10/22/f76e81d2-98a1-11e6-9cae-2a3574e296a6_story.html (https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/north-dakota-pipeline-protest-prompts-more-than-80-arrests/2016/10/22/f76e81d2-98a1-11e6-9cae-2a3574e296a6_story.html)

National
North Dakota pipeline protest prompts more than 80 arrests
By Associated Press October 22 at 5:53 PM

MANDAN, N.D. — More than 80 people protesting the Dakota Access pipeline were arrested Saturday during a demonstration that gathered about 300 people at a construction site in North Dakota and prompted law enforcement officers to use pepper spray.

Morton County sheriff’s office spokesman Rob Keller said authorities were called at 5:20 a.m. Saturday to a pipeline construction site located about five miles from an area where protesters have been camping out for weeks near the confluence of the Missouri and Cannonball rivers. The confrontation between officers and protesters lasted five hours.

The sheriff’s office released a statement, saying officers used pepper spray when some protesters attempted to breach a line that law enforcement officers had formed between demonstrators and construction equipment. The statement said one protester attempted to grab an officer’s pepper spray canister, spraying the officer in the face and blinding him for five minutes.

Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said Saturday’s incident showed that “this protest is not peaceful or lawful.”

“It was obvious to our officers who responded that the protesters engaged in escalated unlawful tactics and behavior during this event,” he said. “This protest was intentionally coordinated and planned by agitators with the specific intent to engage in illegal activities.”

Protests have drawn thousands of people to the area where Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners is trying to finish building the 1,200-mile pipeline. More than 220 people have now been arrested since demonstrations began in August.

The sheriff’s office said four people who attached themselves to a sport utility vehicle parked on private property near construction equipment were among those arrested Saturday. Two of the individuals attached themselves to the outside of the vehicle, one person was attached to the steering wheel, and another had his body outside of the vehicle with his arm fed through a hole in the door and his hand in a bucket of hardened concrete.
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Those arrested Saturday are facing charges including assault on a peace officer, engaging in a riot and criminal trespass.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Title: Dakota Access pipeline protests grow: 127 arrested over weekend in police crackd
Post by: RE on October 25, 2016, 05:29:42 AM
Getting bigger...

RE

http://www.salon.com/2016/10/25/dakota-access-pipeline-protests-grow-127-arrested-over-weekend-in-police-crackdown/ (http://www.salon.com/2016/10/25/dakota-access-pipeline-protests-grow-127-arrested-over-weekend-in-police-crackdown/)


Monday, Oct 24, 2016 04:30 PM AST
Dakota Access pipeline protests grow: 127 arrested over weekend in police crackdown
Tribe reclaims territory, citing treaty; calls on DOJ to intervene as authorities clamp down on #NoDAPL protests
Ben Norton

Topics: Dakota Access Pipeline, indigenous rights, Native Americans, North Dakota, News, Politics News
Dakota Access pipeline protests grow: 127 arrested over weekend in police crackdown

(http://media.salon.com/2016/10/dakota-access-pipeline-event-620x412.jpeg)
Activists at a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of against the Dakota Access pipeline, in Los Angeles, California on October 23, 2016 (Credit: Reuters/Patrick T. Fallon)

Protests against the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline continue to grow. At least 127 activists were arrested in demonstrations over the weekend, the largest group yet.

Police detained activists on an array of serious charges, including reckless endangerment, engaging in a riot, assault on a peace officer and resisting arrest, CNN reported.

For months, indigenous groups have led protests against the enormous, nearly 1,200-mile pipeline. If constructed, it would transfer roughly 470,000 barrels of crude oil per day across several states, from North Dakota to Illinois.

Indigenous leaders warn the oil pipeline could pollute their water and land. They call themselves not protesters, but “protectors.”

Environmental justice activists have also joined the demonstrations in solidarity, stressing that the massive oil pipeline would further fuel catastrophic climate change.

Local authorities in North Dakota, particularly the Morton County Sheriff’s Department, have harshly clamped down on the protests. Activists said authorities sprayed them with mace and violently threw them to the ground over the weekend.
VIDEOPhilippine Police Van Runs Over Anti-U.S. Protesters

Indigenous activists also said that, when they were asked to disperse, they tried to do so but were surrounded by police. Their group, which included elders and children, was then attacked. A young woman was hit with a police baton, they said.

On Sunday, self-described water protectors reclaimed unceded territory that they said was “affirmed in the 1851 Treaty of Ft. Laramie as sovereign land under the control of the Oceti Sakowin,” the indigenous name for the Sioux. This camp is on the proposed path of the Dakota Access pipeline.

Activists put up road blocks on a highway and county road on Sunday, closing them for several hours. The indigenous rights group Honor the Earth said in a statement that the blockades were set up to protect their “camp from overtly militarized law enforcement.”

Mekasi Camp-Horinek, an Oceti Sakowin camp coordinator, added in the statement: “We will be occupying this land and staying here until this pipeline is permanently stopped. We need bodies and we need people who are trained in non-violent direct action. We are still staying non-violent and we are still staying peaceful.”

Indigenous leaders stressed the environmental destruction the $3.8 billion oil pipeline could bring. “I’m also taking this action to protect the water and for the future generations in alliance with and an accomplice to the first people of this nation,” activist Michael Bowersox said in a statement. “I hope other people will step up to stop this pipeline from being built; we can’t be dependent on fossil fuels if we expect the children seven generations from now to have a healthy earth, environment, and clean water to drink.”

At past protests, private security forces hired by the pipeline company have used mace and even attack dogs to intimidate peaceful protesters. One of the dogs seen in video footage captured by the independent news outlet Democracy Now had blood in its teeth and mouth.

Over the weekend, authorities also shot down a camera drone activists were using in order to document police brutality. Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier claimed the drone was “threatening” and said it violated Federal Aviation Administration rules. Police continued to use a helicopter to surveil the activists.

In an interview with NBC on Sunday night, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe called on the Department of Justice to intervene.

“The DOJ should be enlisted and expected to investigate the overwhelming reports and videos demonstrating clear strong-arm tactics, abuses and unlawful arrests by law enforcement,” tribe chairman Dave Archambault II said.

Archambault emphasized that the “intimidation by militarized police in riot gear and unlawful arrests” violated activists’ First Amendment rights.
Title: Palestinians join Standing Rock Sioux to protest Dakota Access Pipeline
Post by: azozeo on October 27, 2016, 02:55:43 PM
Palestinians join Standing Rock Sioux to protest Dakota Access Pipeline

Nadya Raja Tannous

    “Perhaps only in North Dakota, where oil tycoons wine and dine elected officials, and where the governor, Jack Dalrymple, serves as an adviser to the Trump campaign, would state and county governments act as the armed enforcement for corporate interests. In recent weeks, the state has militarized my reservation, with road blocks and license-plate checks, low-flying aircraft and racial profiling of Indians. The local sheriff and the pipeline company have both called our protest “unlawful,”and Gov. Dalrymple has declared a state of emergency.

    It’s a familiar story in Indian Country. This is the third time that the Sioux Nation’s lands and resources have been taken without regard for tribal interests. The Sioux peoples signed treaties in 1851 and 1868. The government broke them before the ink was dry.

    When the Army Corps of Engineers dammed the Missouri River in 1958, it took our riverfront forests, fruit orchards and most fertile farmland to create Lake Oahe. Now the Corps is taking our clean water and sacred places by approving this river crossing.”

    – Dave Archambault II, Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, opinion piece in the NY Times

The Bakken formation in the northern United States and southern Canada is listed by US energy companies as one of the most promising options for national oil extraction, only surpassed in size by the oil fields in Alaska. The fields in North Dakota have beenincreasingly targeted for Bakken shale oil resources over the past years and they are quite familiar with public controversy: many of us remember the proposal of the infamousKeystone XL pipeline from 2008-2015, which was held in starkly low public opinion andstruck down twice by the Obama administration. The proposed Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) is not so different from its failed counterpart. It is mapped out for the same length of 1,172 milesas the Keystone XL and is targeting the same Bakken shale reserves for carry across the upper Midwest. The proposed $3.8 billion dollar DAPL would transport 570,000 barrels of crude oil per day across four states and cross the Missouri River itself. Parent company, Energy Transfer Partners is selling the pipeline as an economic booster, job creator, and sure investment for the future of the American people. Yet, who exactly are they referring to and who did they consult?

In the hills outside of Bismarck, North Dakota is the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, sitting along the banks of the Cannonball River, a tributary to the Missouri River. The pipeline construction sites can now be seen from the reservation, but many people here saw the pipeline coming before it even arrived. Just as Energy Transfer Partners and TransCanada failed to consult Native Tribes who live along the planned pipeline route and whose sacred lands, ancestral lands, and main water sources will be compromised by construction, there has not been a single tribal consultation around the proposed DAPL.

On April 1st , Sacred Stone Spirit Camp was erected on the bank of the Cannonball as a residence for water protectors, many whom came from within and off the reservation to stand against pipeline construction, call for water preservation, and call for recognition of the Federal treaties held with the Great Sioux Nation. What started out as a few hundred people quickly increased into the thousands, stemming the creation of the Oceti Sakowin and Red Warrior Camps on the other side of the Cannonball.

Protectors, support, and solidarity with Standing Rock are arriving from all edges of the world, many of them representing Indigenous Nations. My own caravan set out from California the 2nd week of September, preceding the Palestinian Youth Movement-USA Caravan that arrived soon after. As a contingent of Indigenous peoples in diaspora and recent settlers on Turtle Island, we attest that those standing at Standing Rock are standing for our present and future as well. We must in turn stand for each other against the present, future, and historical supremacies of erasure, the active legacy of settler-colonialism, and the viciousness of greed.

The pipeline company seems to remain unconcerned by the risk of polluting the reservation’s main water source, the highly probable degradation of land and sacred sights, and their trespass against a series of federal laws, and they are becoming increasingly reactionary to the flow of protectors in and out of the protector camps and surrounding areas. Just a few weeks ago, on September 28th, alarming images and video were released of armed police and military-style vehicles cornering protectors holding a prayer ceremony at a North Dakota construction site. The video portrayed the intensity on the ground and just how vulnerable the protector camps are without the gaze of the public eye:

    “They are moving in”
    “They won’t let us leave. They have locked us in on both sides”
    “They’ve got their weapons drawn”
    “They’ve got snipers on top of the hill”
    “They’re blocking me on Facebook”
    “They are arresting everyone now. Everyone is running”
    “Share this far and wide”

    – Transcript of LiveStream video via Unicorn Riot

The militarized forces blocked the only exit from the site to the public road before arresting 21 protectors. Other attendees posted photos of a crop dusting plane releasing a gas or chemical over the crowd. There has been little clarity thereafter of the makeup of the compound or the purpose of the spray.

The participation and planning of direct actions against DAPL construction, however, are continuing, with over 100 cars caravanning out to 5 construction sites the week of October 3rd and successfully halting construction for the day. Local authorities, private security hires, and the National Guard are seemingly disturbed by the presence of protectors as well, and are going out of their way to restrict access in and out of the protector camp area and intimidate newcomers. Indeed my own caravan coming from California was discouraged from approaching the reservation on the main road running from Bismarck, ND due to the checkpoints erected by North Dakota authorities. Our longwinded encounter with the highway patrol on our way to North Dakota — who insisted on not only checking all of our IDs followed by standing on the side of the highway outside of the car for an hour but also “passed our information down the line to the authorities higher-up” including suspicions of illegal activity — seemed to be motivated to dissuade an influx of supporters into the area. Stories of license plate checks, racial profiling of Native and ethnic drivers and/or car passengers, as well as arrests at roadblocks, circulated through the camps. Democracy Now, The New York Times, Huffington Post, and many independent news sources also reported these same tactics.

Why did I go in the first place? Because somewhere in the awkward power dynamic of being a US citizen, a non-native inhabitant of Turtle Island, and a Palestinian in the Diaspora, I saw the struggle for livelihood and culture, the struggle against settler-colonialism, the struggle to protect the sacred and maintain your own legitimacy, and the ever ominous force of erasure and historical amnesia. What I later saw at Standing Rock both embodied this and became bigger than it; as a Mohawk Elder said to me, “Without water, we [humans] are infertile dust”.

At a council fire in Oceti Sakowin during my stay, 280 Indigenous Nations were thanked for their support and representation at the camps. Movement leaders at Sacred Stone Spirit Camp have repeatedly stated that the gatherings of different Indigenous Nations near Cannonball, ND is the largest in the past 150 years on the North American continent.

The council fire sits at the mouth of the main entrance of Oceti Sakowin Camp, outlined by rows of flags representing many of the Indigenous Nations who have come to stand with Standing Rock. At the end of one of the rows is the Palestinian flag. Seeing it filled me equally with joy and sadness because it confirmed two things that I had pondered throughout the long drive from California to North Dakota: the first thought is that the power of collective resistance against greed and settler-colonialism is a mighty force. That thought was embodied by my joy to see a representation of will by the presently unseen Palestinian siblings who had come to take a stand against destructive powers. The second thought was embodied by sadness for, if the struggle for protection of water, culture, land, heritage, and livelihood is truly mirrored in Standing Rock and Palestine, then the struggle ahead is both vast and uncompromising.

I spoke with many inspiring protectors from the Maori in New Zealand, indigenous representatives from Ecuador, Canadian representatives from the Blackfoot Nation who were longtime activists in the “Idle No More” mobilizations, and Dakota/Lakota/Nakota from Standing Rock and the neighboring reservations among so many others.

From a variety of perspectives and personal stories, the same foundational message was repeated back to me: this stand isn’t just about standing for Native rights, it is about protecting the water, protecting our earth and securing the livelihood of our next generations. Water is life for all of us.

Myself and fellow members of the Palestinian Youth Movement–United States Branch had reflected on the latter thought when we authored our statement of solidarity “with the Standing Rock Sioux, the Great Sioux Nation and our other native sisters, brothers and siblings in the fight against the DAPL”, circulated on September 7th. Segments read:

    “We condemn all forms of state violence against our First Nation siblings and denote that the undermining of their sovereignty and livelihood is a part of the continuing dialectic of settler-colonialism transnationally.

    Since the arrival of settlers on Turtle Island, First Nations have resisted genocide and displacement. From seizure of land to reservations, from boarding schools to massacres, the state has done everything in its power to erase and eradicate First Nation peoples. Yet, they are still with us today and they continue to resist. Protecting their land, people, and future generations from the DAPL is a testament to their strength and resilience.

    ….
As Native communities face an ongoing genocide and continue to resist the imperialist settler-colonial regime of the United States, Palestinians are too experiencing a genocide and ethnocide within our homelands from the settler-colonial state of Israel.”

The comparisons are uncanny. I had spent most of the hours on the road to North Dakota contemplating the connections between the obstacles and oppressions facing those in Standing Rock and the obstacles and oppressions facing we Palestinians under occupation and apartheid. However, upon arriving at Standing Rock, I no longer just thought about the similarities, I felt them in my bones.

When protectors at Standing Rock asked me about what Palestinians experience in our own fight against settler-colonialism, oppression, and greed, I answered sometimes through the language of statistics. Yet, more often, I told them narratives of genocide, exile, delegimitzation, broken promises, and resounding resilience.

Sitting around a fire, burning sage and cedar wood, Darlene Meguinis of the Blackfoot Nation in Canada reflected on the beginnings of the Idle No More movement, in which she is still an active organizer. She told me: “Everything must start with prayer and ceremony, especially organizing.” She reminded me that the founders ofIdle No More, elders Nina Waste, Jessica Gordon, Sheelah Mcleen, and Sylvia McAdams, had rooted the movement in ceremony. The result of doing so, Meguinis maintained, was to center the focus of the collective actions for change.

Native youth in the #NoDAPL Youth Council at Standing Rock reiterated similar ideas about DAPL actions. Two youth leaders recounted to me, “we are striving for the results that we want to see but are being directed by our ancestors. We are here, acting now, for our children.”

Intention and prayer surrounded much of the daily camp life and easily dispersed the tensions outside, even as the DAPL Company and National Guard helicopters flew low over the camps each morning, afternoon and night (something that pointedly reminded me of life in Palestine).

Some mornings along the bend of the Cannonball River, which delineates Oceti Sakowin/Red Warrior Camp from Sacred Stone Spirit Camp, Native artists reflected the beauty around them in paintings and art installations. One of the organizers was Albuquerque artist Monty Singer, whose picture is shown below.

The time set out to create art and music, to gather around fires and drum circles, toparticipate in prayer and ceremony with each other uplifted the vibrant energy of the camps and the people within them. We cheered, prayed and supported the direct actions as best we could every day; donations from across the U.S. and internationally flooded into the main entrance in the afternoons and community kitchens and donation booths ran 24/7 to maintain the swelling of protector numbers. Hundreds of people ebbed and flowed into the camps every single day.

The sheer power required to uphold the movement is sobering: in light of the failed injunction by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe against the US Army Corps of Engineers at the lower court level, a Federal Appeals court officially halted construction of the pipeline, underlining the same temporary hold parameters as the decree proposed on September 9th by the Department of Justice (DOJ). That hold applies solely within 20 miles on either side of Lake Oahe near the Missouri River.

Other locations on the planned pipeline route are still open for construction and, though direct actions at sites of DAPL construction have not wavered, they are increasingly receiving less and less media attention with increasingly severe charges being applied to protectors. For example, the 5 protectors who strapped themselves to bulldozers at an active DAPL construction site 100 miles down Hwy 94 from the reservation during my stay at Oceti Sakowin Camp were slapped with felony charges for “criminal trespassing”, the same charges outlined against Amy Goodman in her arrest warrant as a result of her coverage of the DAPL in early September (although her charges at the time constituted a misdemeanor and were thankfully dropped October 17th after a court hearing). Some of those arrested were even extradited back to their home states to face their charges from North Dakota in addition to preexisting protest charges in other states.

My last night in Standing Rock, I spoke with a woman by the name of “Terry”, a resident of Bismarck, ND. I asked her why I had met so few non-natives from the local area at Standing Rock. Her response was direct and had very little to do with the sheriff’s implemented checkpoints and roadblocks: “It is because of the media propaganda. For example, during the dog attacks, Bismarck news covered a worker’s injury at the site and the hospitalization of a guard. No one gave popular air time or writing space to cover the effects of the dog attacks on protectors.” She mentioned that an article in the conservative paper, Town Hall, soon after the attacks read: “So dogs were unleashed on these protestors. Good”. She and a few others from Bismarck came to the camps because they saw past the media pressure. “We understand that the fight for clean water and recognition of Native sovereignty affects everyone in the surrounding area”, she told me, which would become increasingly apparent if oil leakage wells up in the Bakken region.

In Geneva, on September 20th, Dave Archambault II, Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, urged the UN Human Rights Council to stand with the tribe in opposing the DAPL project and advocate for the recognition of their sovereign rights, including the protection of water and sacred places. Protectors are remaining vigilant on and off site, many walking to pay respects to the graves of the Dakota/Lakota/Nakota ancestors that have been disturbed by construction.

Martina Looking Horse, a longtime writer from Cheyenne River Reservation, has been camping at Standing Rock for over a month. She told me that she and her family plan to stay until the pipeline is defeated but stressed that the conditions at camp are not easy to live under. The torrential rainstorms, the swings of hot and cold, and the impending North Dakota winter discourage many from staying longer than a few weeks. Yet, Looking Horse affirmed her belief that she and many others will carry on, with or without the support of mainstream media. The hope, she reaffirmed, is that the national and international people of conscience will continue to support in all the ways that they can, hold the US government accountable to their promises, and not forget that the protectors are still there taking a stand.

The day that I left, the PYM-United States Branch’s official caravan came into Oceti Sakowin, bringing supplies, people power, and small gifts for the tribal council as visitors to the land. They also read our statement at the tribal council fire and met many people, as I had, who stated how glad they were to see Palestinians supporting the front lines against movement suppression. The solidarity with Palestine for all of us who participated in caravans from PYM was overwhelming. What was supposed to be a few-day trip was extended into a week.

Inspired by the stories, the people, the call to our moral responsibility to protect each other and the water that keeps us alive, we hope to return back to Standing Rock and bring supplies for winter.

Friends of Sabeel North America also sent forward a statement of solidarity, in part remarking:

    “we know that settler colonialism depends on the exploitation of land and natural resources to the detriment of indigenous communities…Today, we see you, the Sioux nation and members of the other 280 Native American tribes who have joined you to protect the water of the Missouri River and stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, taking a stand for all life, the embodiment of resilience. As the Israeli occupation continues, Palestinian land is stolen, ancient olive trees are uprooted, and blood is shed, your struggle inspires our work and we redouble our efforts to witness and nonviolently resist. We stand in full support of indigenous sovereignty and self-determination.”

The light of hope in Standing Rock is not fizzling out. Upon returning to the Bay Area, I came across many art builds and donation efforts, and have been seeing many more events publicized by friends and family in New York State, Virginia, North Carolina, Florida and Arizona.

Thanks to Caleb Duarte and the wonderful youth from Fremont High School in Oakland (recently arrived unaccompanied youth from Chimeltenango, Guatemala) who made this solidarity banner:

I remember thinking as I left Standing Rock to return to California: peoples suppressed by power and greed have strength when they rise together. There is a poignant uniting force through something as important as the world that sustains us.

The river was quiet when I left, with lots of green and tall grass on its banks. The river flats lay muddy and fertile, the slow current reflecting the sky day and night, the water turning pink and orange by sunset.

A water protector strapped to heavy machinery down the Hwy 94 shouted out, before being removed to jail,

    “This pipeline is a pipeline to the past. We need to be building sustainable infrastructure for the future, not destructive unsustainable industries that hurt land, that hurt water, that hurt people. Everything is wrong about this pipeline… We’re here standing in solidarity with millions of people from around the world that are against this pipeline.” (via Unicorn Riot)

The collective call for justice is ringing loud and clear. Mni Wiconi –Water is life.
Title: Dakota Access Pipeline: Police remove protesters; scores arrested
Post by: RE on October 28, 2016, 03:32:47 AM
Not looking like they will stop the pipeline from going through.  :(  My guess would be sabotage once it is completed.

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/27/us/dakota-access-pipeline-protests/ (http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/27/us/dakota-access-pipeline-protests/)

Dakota Access Pipeline: Police remove protesters; scores arrested
(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/161027185248-03-dakota-pipline-ach1026-exlarge-169.jpg)

By Marlena Baldacci, Emanuella Grinberg and Holly Yan, CNN

Updated 9:52 PM ET, Thu October 27, 2016
Police remove pipeline protesters

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Dakota Access pipeline protesters defy law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The months-long dispute over the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline reached a crisis point when the protesters set up camp on land owned by pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners. The disputed area is just to the north of a more permanent and larger encampment on federally-owned land where hundreds of protesters have camped for months.
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Police remove pipeline protesters
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Dakota Access pipeline protesters defy law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The months-long dispute over the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline reached a crisis point when the protesters set up camp on land owned by pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners. The disputed area is just to the north of a more permanent and larger encampment on federally-owned land where hundreds of protesters have camped for months.
Police remove pipeline protesters
shell protest hang bridge portland oregon ship #shellno_00002805.jpg
Shell protesters dangle on bridge for 36 hours
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Story highlights

    Opponents arrested protesting construction of 1,172-mile pipeline
    Authorities call in help from seven other states to help remove protesters

(CNN)Police in riot gear faced off with protesters on horseback as the monthslong protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline came to a head Thursday.
At least 117 protesters were arrested after law enforcement Humvees and helicopters began to flood the area to break up a protester encampment near the pipeline's path.
Calling themselves "water protectors," supporters of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe set up tents and teepees on the land, about an hour south of Bismarck, which they said belongs to the tribe under a 19-century treaty.
But authorities said they are trespassing on pipeline property. Officials brought in reinforcements from seven states to remove protesters and dismantle roadblocks made of hay bales and wood.
As the standoff continued, police deployed bean bag rounds and pepper spray gas and unleashed a high-pitched siren to disperse the crowd.
Protesters and law enforcement faced off on Thursday.
Protesters and law enforcement faced off on Thursday.
In response, protesters lit debris on fire near a bridge and threw Molotov cocktails at law enforcement, North Dakota Department of Emergency Services spokeswoman Cecily Fong said.
At least two people were arrested for allegedly firing gunshots; one on Highway 1806 near officers and another near a bridge north of the protester's main camp.
"Most of these people are peaceful, prayerful people," Fong said. "But we know that there is a faction that is willing to do anything to stop this pipeline. That's why our people went down there prepared."
By Thursday evening, law enforcement had cleared the area and pushed protesters about a mile down Highway 1806, to the site of a previous encampment. Law enforcement lingered in vehicles from different agencies as trucks towed burned cars.
The long-brewing standoff stems from construction of the 1,172-mile pipeline, which protesters said will threaten the environment and destroy Native American burial sites, prayer sites and culturally significant artifacts. Opponents also cite environmental concerns, including possible contamination due to breaches and eventual greenhouse gas emissions.
Aggressive tactics
Both sides have accused the other of increasingly aggressive tactics, from police strip-searches and violence, to protesters destroying construction equipment.
The conflict has become a celebrity cause, drawing the support of actors Shailene Woodley, who was arrested in an October 10 protest, and Mark Ruffalo, who provided infrastructure for the camp, including solar panels.
Ruffalo told CNN's Jack Tapper that he did not witness violence when he visited there, but he heard stories from people who claimed they were thrown in jail naked.
Ruffalo warns N.D. governor could have 'blood on his hands'
mark ruffalo north dakota pipeline protest intv lead_00002412

Ruffalo warns N.D. governor could have 'blood on his hands' 06:47
Protesters are trained in peaceful resistance, he said. No one is allowed in the protest area without training.
"The mantra of the place is 'it's not the police, it's the pipeline that we're protesting or protecting ourselves against.' They spend basically the entire day doing prayers, chanting. I've never been around so peaceful a stand."
What is the Dakota Access Pipeline?
It's a $3.7 billion project that would cross four states and change the landscape of the US crude oil supply.
The 1,172-mile pipeline, currently under construction, would stretch from the oil-rich Bakken Formation -- a vast underground deposit where Montana and North Dakota meet Canada -- southeast into South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois. An estimated 7.4 billion barrels of undiscovered oil is believed to be in its US portion, according to the US Geological Survey.
After the pipeline is completed, it would shuttle 470,000 barrels of crude oil a day, developer Energy Access Partners said. That's enough to make 374.3 million gallons of gasoline per day. From Illinois, the oil could go to markets and refineries across the Midwest, East Coast and Gulf Coast.
Depending on who you ask, the results could be an economic boon that makes the country more self-sufficient or an environmental disaster that destroys sacred Native American sites.
Supporters say it would significantly decrease American reliance on foreign oil and free up railways to transport crops and other commodities.
The Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters say pipeline construction will destroy burial sites, prayer sites and culturally significant artifacts. The tribe sued the US Army Corps of Engineers after it approved the project.
Read the complaint
But an advocacy group says the tribe's claims are misleading, saying the pipeline "does not cross into the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's reservation."
The Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now also said 100% of the affected landowners in North Dakota, where part of the tribe lives, voluntarily signed easements to allow for construction.
Oil pipeline in North Dakota in limbo
North Dakota oil pipeline 5

Oil pipeline in North Dakota in limbo 01:24
What's the environmental impact?
The developer says the pipeline would provide a safer, more environmentally friendly way of moving crude oil compared to other modes of transportation, such as rail or trucks. Pipeline supporters cite the 2013 disaster in Quebec, Canada, where a train carrying crude oil derailed and destroyed downtown Lac-Megnatic.
But Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II said he doesn't support moving more crude oil from North Dakota. He told CNN affiliate KFYR that Americans should look for alternative and renewable sources of energy.
More than 271,000 online petitioners agree.
"The Dakota Access pipeline would fuel climate change, cause untold damage to the environment, and significantly disturb sacred lands and the way of life for Native Americans in the upper Midwest," a petition on CredoAction.com states.
America's aging pipelines
rene marsh aging pipelines_00014017

America's aging pipelines 03:08
Opponents also say they're worried what would happen if the pipeline, which would go under the Missouri River, ruptured and contaminated the water supply.
But the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now backed the developer's claim that pipelines are a safe way of moving crude oil.
"Already, 8 pipelines cross the Missouri River carrying hundreds of thousands of barrels of energy products every day," the group said in a statement.
What's the economic impact?
Energy Transfer Partners estimates the pipeline would bring an estimated $156 million in sales and income taxes to state and local governments. It'll also add 8,000 to 12,000 construction jobs, the developer said. The company said it has tried to steer the pipeline away from residential areas and reach voluntary deals with property owners "at a fair price."
The US Energy Information Administration shows the network of existing crude oil pipelines across the country.
The US Energy Information Administration shows the network of existing crude oil pipelines across the country.
But Archambault said he thinks the Native Americans are getting short-changed once again.
"We're not opposed to energy independence. We're not opposed to economic development," he told CNN.
"What we're opposed to is paying for all the benefits that this country receives."

CNN's Madison Park and Alberto Moya contributed to this report.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on October 28, 2016, 01:27:18 PM
Psychopaths GET what psychopaths want  :emthdown:
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on October 28, 2016, 02:12:47 PM
BREAKING: No-Fly Zone Declared as Militarized Police Prep for Assault on ‘Front-Line Camp’ at Standing Rock.


BY IWB · PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27, 2016

by Pamela Williams

There is breaking news that a no-fly zone has been declared over the Dakota Access Pipeline area at Standing Rock, North Dakota. Protestors and Native American activists have set up a new camp called “Front-Line Camp” where they are making their last stand against the party Energy Transfer Partners, who are working on the Pipeline. The Sioux Tribe has declared eminent domain over the water rights and sacred land rights in the same area as the Pipeline is being built. They are asking for prayers as they make a great stand against the destruction of their sacred land.

 

    Pipeline opponents attempting to protect their water supply from the Dakota Access oil pipeline (DAPL), as well as prevent the continued destruction of burial grounds and cultural sites, are anticipating a confrontation with policetoday. This news come after “water protectors” refused law enforcement requests to vacate reoccupied land in the pipeline’s path, owned by Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners.

http://thesccop.com/breaking-no-fly-zone-declared-as-militarized-police-prep-for-assault-on-front-line-camp-at-standing-rock/ (http://thesccop.com/breaking-no-fly-zone-declared-as-militarized-police-prep-for-assault-on-front-line-camp-at-standing-rock/)

 



    While Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Harold Frazier sat down with President Barack Obama at a private roundtable in Los Angeles on Tuesday, October 25, Morton County, N.D. Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier was calling in police reinforcements from six states to enforce Energy Transfer Partners’ demands that “trespassers” be removed from the path of the pipeline.

    Authorities implied they may forcibly remove the water protectors from the new camp, which is on land recently purchased by Dakota Access LLC, the subsidiary that is building the pipeline.

    “We have the resources. We could go down there at any time,” Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney said, according to the Associated Press. “We’re trying not to.”

    “We are here to enforce the law as needed,” Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said. “It’s private property.”

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/10/26/police-presence-grows-civil-rights-leaders-join-water-protectors-166226 (http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/10/26/police-presence-grows-civil-rights-leaders-join-water-protectors-166226)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on October 28, 2016, 02:20:10 PM
8 to 12 thousand construction jobs for a single pipeline?  That propaganda just pisses me off.  8 to 12 hundred might be more like it and that estimate may have blue sky in it.

Why we need a pipeline for such a small amount of oil seems nuts.  Oil trains are rolling through Seattle just fine.  I was stopped for one while it went by this week.  It was about a mile long.

It would not be long before a pipeline runs empty so why build it in the first place?  Is this a new way to fleece investors prior to taxpayer dollars coming to bail out the big ones?  I suspect so.  Eventually taxpayers are going through pay for oil extraction when it can't be made profitable anyway so demanding a buissness case for the pipeline is totally appropriate.

And those Native Americans; getting so upset about a little pipe in the ground!   The way they are acting is like they think they own this place.  Where did they get such an attitude?
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on October 28, 2016, 02:55:41 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/x3xpfvU2Su8&fs=1
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on October 28, 2016, 02:59:26 PM
Meet the journalist facing 45 years in jail for filming the tar sands pipeline protest in North Dakota

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Are North Dakota authorities waging a war against the public’s right to know about the ongoing Standing Rock pipeline protests? We are joined by documentary filmmaker Deia Schlosberg, who was charged earlier this month with three felonies for filming an act of civil disobedience in which climate activists manually turned off the safety valves to stop the flow of tar sands oil through pipelines spanning the U.S. and Canada.

The actions took place in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and Washington state. Schlosberg is an award-winning filmmaker and was the producer of Josh Fox’s recent documentary, “How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things Climate Can’t Change.” She was filming the action at a valve station owned by TransCanada in Walhalla, North Dakota. She was arrested along with the activists, and her footage was confiscated. Then she was charged with a Class A felony and two Class C felonies—which combined carry a 45-year maximum sentence.


TRANSCRIPT

AMY GOODMAN: But we’re joined right now in Los Angeles by Democracy Now! video stream by Deia Schlosberg, the award-winning documentary filmmaker, producer, who was arrested on October 11th in a different area of North Dakota, while reporting on a climate change protest in Walhalla, North Dakota, charged with three felonies, facing 45 years in prison, if convicted. Also with us, Josh Fox. His article in The Nation, “The Arrest of Journalists and Filmmakers Covering the Dakota Pipeline is a Threat to Democracy—and the Planet.” His previous documentaries include Gasland, which first exposed the harms of the fracking industry, nominated for an Academy Award, also made Gasland 2, which aired on HBO.

We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Deia, describe what happened to you.

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: Well, on October 11th, I was working as a climate reporter, as I’ve done for years and years and years, as Josh and I were doing, and the rest of the How to Let Go of the World team, when we made the film. And I was documenting people taking a stand, people on the frontlines of the fight to lessen the impacts of climate change. So, there were—there were five activists across four states that had planned to turn the emergency shutoff valves on the five pipelines that bring all Canadian oil sands into the U.S. And I was documenting this occurrence at the North Dakota site, outside of Walhalla, as you said. I was—I was filming the action. I was on public land. I was on a public road and at no point trespassed, at no point, you know, broke in or destroyed any property. I had nothing to do with the planning of the event. I was there to document it. I think it’s essential for journalists to—journalists and filmmakers to go where the mainstream media is not. And there’s a major hole in the coverage of climate change and people that are already dealing with the consequences of climate change and people that are fighting climate change. So, I take that responsibility very seriously.

AMY GOODMAN: So when did the police come?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: The police came after—well, the activist that was doing the action, Michael, had called the company ahead of time to say that he was—he was going to shut off the valve, so they could—to give them ample time to take any emergency precautions. And then he turned the valve. And meanwhile, the company notified the local police. So, after the valve was closed, they came in probably about 15 minutes. I had my camera set up on a tripod on the public road. And they told me I was arrested for being an accessory to a crime, at which point I was brought to the local jail. I figured it would—things would just have to clear up once they realized what was—

AMY GOODMAN: So, they charged you with three felonies?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: —that I was just, you know, exercising my First Amendment—

AMY GOODMAN: What were the felonies?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: Conspiracy—they were all conspiracy charges: conspiracy to theft of public—theft of property, conspiracy to theft of service and conspiracy of interfering with a public—a critical public infrastructure.

AMY GOODMAN: And you face 45 years in jail? What is your comment on this?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: What is my what? Sorry, the connection is—

AMY GOODMAN: What do say about this?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: It’s absolutely outrageous. Yeah, I mean, this is what I—this is what I do for my living. This is what I’ve done for years and years. There’s absolutely no grounds for these charges.

Read more at: DemocracyNow.org

Learn more:  http://www.naturalnews.com/055793_First_Amendment_Dakota_Pipeline_criminal_journalism.html#ixzz4OOFJk4mS (http://www.naturalnews.com/055793_First_Amendment_Dakota_Pipeline_criminal_journalism.html#ixzz4OOFJk4mS)

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on October 28, 2016, 03:42:56 PM

It would not be long before a pipeline runs empty so why build it in the first place?  Is this a new way to fleece investors prior to taxpayer dollars coming to bail out the big ones?  I suspect so.  Eventually taxpayers are going through pay for oil extraction when it can't be made profitable anyway so demanding a buissness case for the pipeline is totally appropriate.


The deal and the bond issues for this pipeline were all likely made a few years ago when there were a bazillion rigs pumping oil in the Bakken.  If they don't finish the pipeline and get at least some revenue out of it, all that money is flushed down the toilet, and all the investment has to be written down.  Whoever made the loans takes a huge hit.  Right now they can still pretend it will make money at some future date if they finish it.

RE
Title: Tensions Escalate As Police Clear Protesters Near Dakota Access Pipeline
Post by: RE on October 28, 2016, 05:07:23 PM
http://www.npr.org/2016/10/28/499756362/tensions-escalate-as-police-clear-protesters-near-dakota-access-pipeline (http://www.npr.org/2016/10/28/499756362/tensions-escalate-as-police-clear-protesters-near-dakota-access-pipeline)


Tensions Escalate As Police Clear Protesters Near Dakota Access Pipeline
4:11

(http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/10/28/protesters-arrested-in-camp-edit_custom-906bfaf5d4245710e0dd17d85b9313bedc012dae-s800-c85.jpg)

October 28, 20164:30 PM ET
Heard on All Things Considered

Amy Sisk

From
Prairie Public Broadcasting

Law enforcement dressed in riot gear arrest protesters who are demonstrating against construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D. Police and National Guard moved in on an encampment of tents and teepees on Thursday.
Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

In North Dakota, tension over the 1,200-mile Dakota Access oil pipeline is escalating. Police and National Guard troops arrested more than 140 protesters near a construction site Thursday.

The Standing Rock Sioux have sued to stop the pipeline from crossing under the Missouri River next to their reservation, claiming the project would destroy sacred sites and threaten the water supply.

What started months ago as a dispute between a tribe and the federal government has escalated into clashes between protesters and police.
In Fight Over N.D. Pipeline, Tribe Leader Calls For Peace And Prayers
Around the Nation
In Fight Over N.D. Pipeline, Tribe Leader Calls For Peace And Prayers

Hundreds of law enforcement in riot gear formed a line Thursday across the prairie and moved in on an encampment of tents and teepees. The protest camp was set up over the weekend along the pipeline route on land owned by the Dakota Access pipeline company. Officers were backed up by dozens of police cars, armored vehicles and aircraft.

Surveillance helicopters circled above a makeshift roadblock of beat-up cars, tires and wooden pallets. Protesters lit it on fire, trying to keep police out.

But police pushed protesters back, trying to get them to move farther down the highway.

"We won't have it anymore. This is our stand. We'll stand. And we'll stop this pipeline," said Robert Eder, a resident of Cannon Ball, N.D., the first town downstream from the pipeline's proposed river crossing. He was joined by hundreds of Native Americans from tribes across the country and by activists camped nearby since August.

Dakota Access oil pipeline protesters burn debris as officers close in to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction on Thursday.
James MacPherson/AP

The project is slated to carry crude oil from North Dakota's Bakken oil fields to Illinois. Pipeline supporters and state officials have given assurances it's safer than transporting crude by the trains that carry it across the very same river every day.
Oregon Occupation Unites Native American Tribes To Save Their Land
Around the Nation
Oregon Occupation Unites Native American Tribes To Save Their Land

Protesters knew when they moved to private land owned by pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners last weekend that it would provoke a confrontation. And that came Thursday, with law enforcement barking orders over a speaker. Highway Patrol Lt. Tom Iverson says he was hoping not arrest anyone.

"If we could have come out here today and not made any arrests that would have been great," Iverson said. "But they forced us into arresting them."

Demonstrators remain adamant that the pipeline not cross under the water. And they unite in prayers, as well as with chants of "Black Snake Killaz." That's how some describe their purpose here: to kill the pipeline they have dubbed the black snake.

Protesters surround the Rev. Jesse Jackson on Highway 1806 on Thursday.
Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

Jeff Chavis of South Carolina's Pee Dee Tribe says they won't back down until they stop the pipeline.

"They get their pipes. They get their machines. They get their people and they leave," Chavis said. "There's no negotiation."

On Thursday, the Republican governors of Iowa and the Dakotas urged the Army Corps of Engineers to issue the easement for construction to continue. This river crossing has been on hold since the federal government decided to review the permit. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has argued in court that the Corps failed to adequately consult it.

If construction is approved, the tribe says it will do everything it can to block it.

Amy Sisk reports for Prairie Public Broadcasting and for Inside Energy, a public media collaboration focused on America's energy issues.
Title: Bundys acquitted as authorities go after Standing Rock.
Post by: RE on October 29, 2016, 06:38:46 AM
Glaring example of  selective application of "law enforcement".

RE

http://grist.org/briefly/bundys-acquitted-as-authorities-go-after-standing-rock/ (http://grist.org/briefly/bundys-acquitted-as-authorities-go-after-standing-rock/)

Briefly
Stuff that matters

oy


(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/rtx2110y.jpg?w=970&h=545&crop=1)
Reuters/Jim Urquhart

Bundys acquitted as authorities go after Standing Rock.



A jury handed down the not-guilty verdict on Thursday in Portland, Oregon. Ammon and Ryan Bundy, along with five co-defendants, were tried on conspiracy and weapons charges following a 41-day occupation of Malheur Wildlife Refuge in rural Burns, Oregon, last winter.

It’s a verdict some Burns locals found shocking, but anti-government activists applauded the decision. The defendants’ takeover of the wildlife refuge came after the Bundy family’s dispute over federal grazing fees in Nevada and long-standing battles over who should control public land.

“We’re so grateful to the jurors who weren’t swayed by the nonsense that was going on,” defendant Shawna Cox told reporters outside the courthouse. “God said we weren’t guilty.” The Bundys remain jailed due to pending charges in Nevada.

Meanwhile in North Dakota, police arrested at least 141 people and used mace and rubber bullets against hundreds of others in an attempt to break up a Dakota Access pipeline blockade.

In Portland, Jarvis Kennedy, a Burns Paiute Tribe council member, watched Bundy supporters celebrate. “What if I did that with my Native brothers and sisters, and we went and occupied something, do you think we’d be let running around free, going in and out of it?” Kennedy told NPR. “No, we’d be locked down.”
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on October 29, 2016, 12:49:29 PM
That same tired shibboleth was immediately repeated by every special group in the world of Political Correctness.

The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

The BLM people, the Native Americans, the LGBT's, illegal aliens, legal aliens, Muslim refugees, all singing the same song. No big surprise there. Not to me.

The surprise is the acquittal. I don't think they got off just because they're white.It's more complicated than that, by far. Not much surprises me anymore, but that did.

Not sure what it means, but Marty Armstrong was ranting about it today. It happened on one of his "turning point" dates. Worth a look.

https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/future-forecasts/ecm/did-something-happen-of-the-ecm-turning-point/ (https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/future-forecasts/ecm/did-something-happen-of-the-ecm-turning-point/)



Title: Ammon Bundy’s lawyer tackled, Tasered by U.S. Marshals
Post by: azozeo on October 29, 2016, 01:48:02 PM
Glaring example of  selective application of "law enforcement".

RE

http://grist.org/briefly/bundys-acquitted-as-authorities-go-after-standing-rock/ (http://grist.org/briefly/bundys-acquitted-as-authorities-go-after-standing-rock/)

Briefly
Stuff that matters

oy


(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/rtx2110y.jpg?w=970&h=545&crop=1)
Reuters/Jim Urquhart

Bundys acquitted as authorities go after Standing Rock.



A jury handed down the not-guilty verdict on Thursday in Portland, Oregon. Ammon and Ryan Bundy, along with five co-defendants, were tried on conspiracy and weapons charges following a 41-day occupation of Malheur Wildlife Refuge in rural Burns, Oregon, last winter.

It’s a verdict some Burns locals found shocking, but anti-government activists applauded the decision. The defendants’ takeover of the wildlife refuge came after the Bundy family’s dispute over federal grazing fees in Nevada and long-standing battles over who should control public land.

“We’re so grateful to the jurors who weren’t swayed by the nonsense that was going on,” defendant Shawna Cox told reporters outside the courthouse. “God said we weren’t guilty.” The Bundys remain jailed due to pending charges in Nevada.

Meanwhile in North Dakota, police arrested at least 141 people and used mace and rubber bullets against hundreds of others in an attempt to break up a Dakota Access pipeline blockade.

In Portland, Jarvis Kennedy, a Burns Paiute Tribe council member, watched Bundy supporters celebrate. “What if I did that with my Native brothers and sisters, and we went and occupied something, do you think we’d be let running around free, going in and out of it?” Kennedy told NPR. “No, we’d be locked down.”



Ammon Bundy’s lawyer tackled, Tasered by U.S. Marshals in a surreal ending to the Oregon standoff trial

By Maxine Bernstein

Moments after the Oregon standoff defendants’ acquittals were announced in court Thursday, Ammon Bundy’s lawyer Marcus Mumford stood before the judge, and argued that his client should be released from custody immediately and allowed to walk out of the courtroom a free man.

Ammon Bundy, who chose to wear blue jails scrubs throughout the trial, was dressed in a gray suit Thursday.

U.S. District Judge Anna J. Brown told him that there was a U.S. Marshal’s hold on him from a pending federal indictment in Nevada.

“No, he’s released on these charges. He’s acquitted. Nevada doesn’t have jurisdiction,” Mumford yelled, standing before the judge. “If there’s a detainer, show me.”

“Mr. Mumford, you really need to never yell at me now or never again,” the judge responded.

Brown told Mumford that she’s releasing Bundy on all federal holds in the Oregon case, but he’ll have to take up any questions about the federal holds from the Nevada case with the U.S. Marshals Service.

“If they want him, they know where to find him,” Mumford told the judge. “I don’t see any paper proving their authority to hold him.”

Suddenly, a group of about six to seven U.S. Marshals, who had been either standing or seated around the perimeter of the courtroom, slowly moved in and surrounded Mumford at his defense table. The judge directed them to move back but moments later, the marshals grabbed onto him.

“What are you doing?” Mumford yelled, as he struggled and was taken down to the floor.

As deputy marshals yelled, “Stop resisting,” the judge demanded, “Everybody out of the courtroom now!”

Mumford was taken into custody by the Federal Protective Services.

He was cited for failure to comply with a federal lawful order and disturbance and released with a Jan. 6 date to return to federal court, said Eric Wahlstrom, supervising deputy of the U.S. Marshals Service.

According to Wahlstrom, Mumford was shocked with a stun gun in what’s called a dry-stun mode, meaning no probes were fired into his body but a Taser was placed up against his body.

Wahlstrom, who was not in the courtroom, said the actions were taken because Mumford was resisting and preventing marshals from taking Ammon Bundy out of the courtroom and back into custody.

Wahlstrom said the stun gun was used because deputy U.S. marshals “attempted to handcuff him and he continued to resist.”

But observers who were close to the arrest decried the use of force against a lawyer in court.

“What happened at the end is symbolic of the improper use of force by the federal government,” Mumford’s co-counsel J. Morgan Philpot said. Philpot explained that Mumford was attempting to point out that since the judge previously had said in court that she had no authority over detention orders made by the court in Nevada, she couldn’t now maintain the right to order his client held.

“I grew up on a dairy farm, so am I used to some rough treatment, sure?” Mumford told reporters, after his release. But he said the actions of the U.S. marshals were uncalled for.

“All I was asking for was papers. Just show me you have the authority to take Mr. Bundy into custody,” Mumford said.

Defense lawyer Per C. Olson, who represented co-defendant David Fry, called the physical confrontation “a complete overreaction. Utterly disgusting.”

Olson said Mumford was getting animated, but he did nothing physical. He didn’t charge the bench, or block marshals from his client. “He raised his arm as if to say, what the hell…And they grabbed him, Tased him and took him down. It was just shocking. It was completely inappropriate,”Olson said.

Defense lawyer Matthew Schindler, standby counsel for defendant Kenneth Medenbach, said he was disappointed by Mumford’s challenge to his client’s return to custody, considering he faces more serious federal charges in Nevada.

Schindler said Mumford was exhausted, having “put out everything he had,” during the past six weeks of the case.

“Unfortunately he let his passion and desire and belief in his client overcome his good judgement,” Schindler said.

Margaret “Margie” Paris, a University of Oregon law professor and former dean, said she couldn’t believe what occurred when she learned of the confrontation.

“It just blows my mind,” Paris said. “To have a lawyer who’s making an argument in court physically restrained and taken down is extraordinary. He’s entitled to make these arguments. If he was repeating himself over and over, the more typical response is to hold him in contempt. But to physically accost him is just shocking.”

Oregonian Staff Writer Jeff Manning contributed to this story.

— Maxine Bernstein
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on October 29, 2016, 02:33:45 PM
The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

You're missing the point.  The Bundys didn't get special treatment because they're white.  If they WEREN'T White, they would have been convicted though.  No bunch of blacks or hispanics or Native Americans could have pulled that stunt and not had the book thrown at them.

The reason they got off is because they are Righties.  Righties get acquitted, Lefties go to jail. The Righty controlled MSM supports it.  Righty pigmen like the Koch brothers pay for it. That's how it goes in the Fascist States of Amerika.  Everybody Knows. 

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: g on October 29, 2016, 02:50:39 PM
The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

You're missing the point.  The Bundys didn't get special treatment because they're white.  If they WEREN'T White, they would have been convicted though.  No bunch of blacks or hispanics or Native Americans could have pulled that stunt and not had the book thrown at them.

The reason they got off is because they are Righties.  Righties get acquitted, Lefties go to jail. The Righty controlled MSM supports it.  Righty pigmen like the Koch brothers pay for it. That's how it goes in the Fascist States of Amerika.  Everybody Knows. 

RE

I have heard it all. Rightie controlled MSM.   :WTF: :spamsign:

Wake up and get with the program.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on October 29, 2016, 03:15:44 PM
The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

You're missing the point.  The Bundys didn't get special treatment because they're white.  If they WEREN'T White, they would have been convicted though.  No bunch of blacks or hispanics or Native Americans could have pulled that stunt and not had the book thrown at them.

The reason they got off is because they are Righties.  Righties get acquitted, Lefties go to jail. The Righty controlled MSM supports it.  Righty pigmen like the Koch brothers pay for it. That's how it goes in the Fascist States of Amerika.  Everybody Knows. 

RE

I have heard it all. Rightie controlled MSM.   :WTF: :spamsign:

Wake up and get with the program.

Rupert Murdoch is a lefty?  Time-Warner is lefty?  ATT is lefty?

Wake up and smell the coffee.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: g on October 29, 2016, 03:37:01 PM
The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

You're missing the point.  The Bundys didn't get special treatment because they're white.  If they WEREN'T White, they would have been convicted though.  No bunch of blacks or hispanics or Native Americans could have pulled that stunt and not had the book thrown at them.

The reason they got off is because they are Righties.  Righties get acquitted, Lefties go to jail. The Righty controlled MSM supports it.  Righty pigmen like the Koch brothers pay for it. That's how it goes in the Fascist States of Amerika.  Everybody Knows. 

RE

I have heard it all. Rightie controlled MSM.   :WTF: :spamsign:

Wake up and get with the program.

Rupert Murdoch is a lefty?  Time-Warner is lefty?  ATT is lefty?

Wake up and smell the coffee.

RE

You should consider living in the real world RE. Fantasy has it's place, but there is a time and place to be serious.

Your equating wealth and power with the Right only is just one of the childish notions you persist in presenting.

Maturity isn't that bad. Your too old now to remain a college brat; growing up might actually suit you if you gave it a try. 

The MSM is mostly a freak show put on by the Left. It's a fact, just learn to live with it.   :icon_study:
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on October 29, 2016, 04:01:57 PM
OOOOOOOOHHHHHHH
MMMMMMYYYYYYYYY
FUUUUCCCCCKKKKK ing
GOOOODDDDDDDDDD

There is no right or left, your both out to lunch.

There's the rich fucks & the useless eaters. PERIOD
Didn't either of you listen to the Putin speech I just posted ?
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on October 29, 2016, 04:10:20 PM
From what I can gather, there are several real reasons the Malheur people got off.

One was that the judge allowed them to present their narrative in a way that made the jury more sympathetic. They had a really good attorney who steered the story back to the Bundy's original stated purpose...which, according to them, was to advocate for the locals (the Hammonds) who had been screwed over by the BLM. They claimed it was just a peaceful protest...and guess what? It was, until the cops started shooting people.

They also couldn't prove that the occupiers deliberately interfered with the parks people doing their jobs, as the prosecution claimed.

They also got lucky with the jury and the venue. They got to tell everyone they were motivated by their Christian beliefs, and Christian beliefs are popular in some parts of rural Oregon, apparently.

Righties get acquitted, Lefties go to jail.

Righties always get off? They actually get killed, fairly often. Lavoy Finicum, Randy Weaver's wife and son.

No bunch of blacks or hispanics or Native Americans could have pulled that stunt and not had the book thrown at them.

What about Wounded Knee?

Alcatraz?

Mt. Rushmore?

Occupation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs?

Native Americans have been conducting protests since I was a teenager, and they haven't taken any more violence from police than the Malheur bunch, or Ruby Ridge, or Waco.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/01/04/a-look-at-10-other-government-stand-offs-like-the-one-in-oregon-most-of-which-ended-peacefully/ (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/01/04/a-look-at-10-other-government-stand-offs-like-the-one-in-oregon-most-of-which-ended-peacefully/)

What about the riots in Charlotte last month. Innocent people pulled out of cars and beaten by a crowd of angry black protesters? What about looters burning down stores in Ferguson? Those people got away scot free, for the most part.

Look, I think Ammon Bundy is a dangerous idiot. But I have to disagree with this comment of yours.




Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on October 29, 2016, 04:20:17 PM
Thank you Edward....

The turmoil twins just gotta' act out, because THEY LIKE IT !
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on October 29, 2016, 04:49:55 PM
Statistics tell us that the highest percentage by ethnicity of the incarcerated population is black, hispanic or native american.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States
Quote
Out of all ethnic groups, native Black Americans, Puerto Rican Americans, and American Indians have some of the highest rates of incarceration

Now, this demographic is ALSO heavily dominated by lefties.

Ergo, lefties go to prison in disproportionate numbers.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on October 30, 2016, 12:26:36 AM
Statistics tell us that the highest percentage by ethnicity of the incarcerated population is black, hispanic or native american.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States)
Quote
Out of all ethnic groups, native Black Americans, Puerto Rican Americans, and American Indians have some of the highest rates of incarceration

Now, this demographic is ALSO heavily dominated by lefties.

Ergo, lefties go to prison in disproportionate numbers.

RE

You are correct in this instance but your logic is not seamless.  Bayes theorem says it can come out the other way if the proportions are right. 

https://arbital.com/p/bayes_rule/?l=1zq (https://arbital.com/p/bayes_rule/?l=1zq)

You may want to learn about Bayes' rule if you are:

    A professional who uses statistics, such as a scientist or doctor;
    A computer programmer working in machine learning;
    A human being.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Thomas_Bayes.gif)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on October 30, 2016, 12:40:57 AM

You are correct in this instance but your logic is not seamless.  Bayes theorem says it can come out the other way if the proportions are right.

Well yea, but the numbers are so skewed both as far as the percentage of underclass in prison and percentage of underclass who are left wing politically that it's not going to come out the other way.

RE
Title: Indigenous Youth Occupy Hillary Clinton Campaign Headquarters
Post by: azozeo on October 30, 2016, 02:01:32 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/MYDo8potxks&fs=1
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: g on October 30, 2016, 07:41:25 AM
Thank you Edward....

The turmoil twins just gotta' act out, because THEY LIKE IT !

Consider it an Abbott and Costello Routine AZ.

Me being Abbott of course. ;D :D

                                                  (http://www.sitcomsonline.com/photopost/data/790/abbottandcostello887833.jpg)

                                                                    Abbott & Costello: "Two Tens for a Five"
                                                               

                                                                            http://www.youtube.com/v/f7pMYHn-1yA


                                                                                     


                                                     
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on October 30, 2016, 08:06:05 AM

Consider it an Abbott and Costello Routine AZ.

Me being Abbott of course.

(http://addins.whig.com/blogs/steviedirt/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/hey-abbott_thumb.jpg)

The name is Bond.  RE Bond.

(http://dgeiu3fz282x5.cloudfront.net/g/l/lgppr45223+the-names-bond-sean-connery-quote-art-print.jpg)

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on October 30, 2016, 12:23:17 PM

You are correct in this instance but your logic is not seamless.  Bayes theorem says it can come out the other way if the proportions are right.

Well yea, but the numbers are so skewed both as far as the percentage of underclass in prison and percentage of underclass who are left wing politically that it's not going to come out the other way.

RE

That's why I said you were correct.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: agelbert on October 30, 2016, 01:06:51 PM
U.S. Police Are Shooting Natives Americans At A Higher Rate Than They Are Even Killing Black People

October 3, 2016 2:04 pm  by Ivan Stamenkovic
     
Quote

Current statistics also show that US police kill citizens at a rate over 70 times higher than other “developed”, “democratic” nations.

Ever since the government’s official numbers regarding fatal police shootings were shown to be inaccurate, alternative means of tracking police killings have been necessary in order to fully understand what can only be described as an epidemic of police violence. The most notable of these efforts is the Guardian’s “The Counted” project, which seeks to offer an interactive, comprehensive database of killings carried out by US police. The database allows users to see the breakdown of US police killings based on the victim’s race, gender, age, and whether they were armed as well as filters for geographical location. The statistics themselves offer a harrowing picture of police violence in the US, but it’s not the picture that many expected.   

As of today, 801 people have been killed by US police in the first 9 months of 2016, averaging about 22 people every week. In comparison, 878 people had been killed by US police by this time last year, marking a slight decrease in police-related homicides since 2015. The states with the most killings so far have been California, Texas, and Florida, which together accounted for 237 of 2016 police homicides. However, New Mexico, Alaska, and the District of Columbia topped counts of police killings per capita. 126 of the victims this year have been unarmed and 35 of them  were Black men.     

Yet, in 2016, it is Native Americans who have been the most likely to die at the hands of police with African-Americans ranking only slightly less as potential police victims. Native American deaths, at the hands of US police, is often forgotten as most well-publicized protests and movements against racially targeted police killings focus chiefly on African-American deaths. However, though African-Americans are undeniably dying at an unjustifiably higher rate than most other ethnic groups, Native Americans make up three of the top five ethnic/age-groups most likely to be killed by law enforcement. Both Native Americans and Blacks have been twice as likely to be killed by police this year than Whites. This is actually down from last year, when Blacks were killed by police at 3 times the rate of Whites. However, the incidence of Native American police violence has shown no such decrease. Though Native Americans represent only 0.8% of the US population, they now account for nearly 2% of all fatal police shootings.

Though police violence and fatal shootings have become all but normalized within the US, there is a startling divide between police killings in the US and other “developed”, democratic nations. It turns out that US police kill more people in a few days than other countries have in years or even decades. For example, Australia recorded a total of 94 fatal police shootings in the 19 years between 1992 and 2011. To compare, 93 people were killed by US police just last month. England and Wales even had less in the last 24 years, with 55 fatal police shootings in more than two decades. US police have killed that same number of people in just the last three weeks.

Germany and Canada, which use more lethal force than either Australia or England, also trail far behind US statistics. German police fatally shot a grand total of 15 people between 2010 and 2011. That’s also how many unarmed women have been killed by US police this year. Canada’s police force, for its part, is estimated to kill 25 people a year. US police have killed claimed the lives of 25 people just in the last 12 days. Ultimately, police in the US are killing citizens at a rate more than 70 times higher than police in other “similar” nations. This proves that the US police violence is indeed a major outlier compared to other nations. This is what a crisis looks like.

( Article by: Whitney Webb; from: True Activist )

http://countercurrentnews.com/2016/10/current-statistics-of-us-police-show-natives-killed-at-a-higher-rate-than-blacks/ (http://countercurrentnews.com/2016/10/current-statistics-of-us-police-show-natives-killed-at-a-higher-rate-than-blacks/)

Agelbert NOTE: White Privileged Bigot response to the above:
(http://www.pic4ever.com/images/237.gif)   (http://www.pic4ever.com/images/290.gif)        (http://www.pic4ever.com/images/bc3.gif)            (http://www.desismileys.com/smileys/desismileys_6961.gif)             



Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on October 30, 2016, 02:05:11 PM
More like Lucy & Ethel if you ask me.

http://www.youtube.com/v/oT_k_-F9K2s&fs=1
Title: How to Support Standing Rock and Confront What It Means to Live on Stolen Land
Post by: azozeo on October 30, 2016, 03:13:50 PM


A month after President Obama told the Army Corps of Engineers to pause construction on the Dakota Access oil pipeline, the Standing Rock Sioux and those supporting them still find themselves in a dire struggle to protect their water and land. With winter approaching, the 300 tribes that are now represented at the Camp of the Sacred Stone in North Dakota are preparing for a lengthy battle.

In their effort to protect water, life, ancestors and future generations, indigenous peoples are also demanding that corporations, the US government, and settlers respect the treaties and indigenous self-determination. This is widening an existing dialogue and expanding ties of solidarity to include more of us who are of white European descent occupying indigenous land.

As support for those at Standing Rock grows, it is important that allies also confront the fundamental questions of what it means to live on stolen land and how to transform colonial relations in a way that creates a viable and just future for all communities and the planet. After almost a decade of engaging in request-based, volunteer solidarity organizing with indigenous groups fighting relocation in Black Mesa, Arizona due to coal mining, we have learned and honed a list of action steps for non-Native individuals just getting involved, as well as a set of best practices for activists already working on other organizing efforts.

As people of European descent who benefit from both white privilege and settler privilege, we understand that our work and writing is most effective when it is developing and acting upon a mutual stake in decolonization. This means focusing on the responsibilities specific to our position, which is inherently different from that of indigenous and non-Native people of color. Nevertheless, their organizing, along with much activist scholarship — some of which is linked to below — has helped inform this list of action steps and set of best practices.

1. Know whose land you are on. There are plenty of resources out there to help you educate yourself about the land that you, your school or place of worship are occupying and its original inhabitants. Here is one. Find out if the tribes or nations are still in that area. If they are not, find out why. Have they been forcefully relocated or pushed out in another way? Acknowledge that you are on occupied land when you say where you are or where you are from. This is an important way to disrupt the myth of the “disappearing native.”

2. Know your family’s history. How did your family end up in the United States? Was it through a colonial process in another country? If your ancestors are from a colonizing country, what was your family’s connection to land, spiritual traditions, economies, etc., before that country began colonizing other places? Does your family own land in the United States? If so, how did they come to acquire it?

3. Learn together. Encourage learning that is personal, emotional, spiritual, embodied and communal. Host reading groups and discussions that build an understanding of settler colonialism and your community’s relationship to it that is tied to indigenous solidarity. Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz’s “An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States” is an enormously helpful place to start, and there are numerous resources, such as the book “Unsettling America,” the website for Black Mesa Indigenous Support, the Colors of Resistance archive, the journal Decolonization, the No One Is Illegal network, queer indigenous studies, critical indigenous studies and more.

4. Ask permission. Asking permission fundamentally shifts the entitlement inherent to the settler experience. Cultural appropriation is an extension of genocide, forced removals, and land theft, as settlers take what does not belong to them as if it is rightfully theirs. This can be countered by asking permission to be on indigenous peoples’ traditional lands. This practice can be extended in a variety of ways and open up new modes of relating and relationships. As one of the first steps of planning, ask permission for any gatherings, marches, etc., from an indigenous representative of the land you are on. Invite them to collaborate in planning around gatherings, conferences, actions, and campaigns for justice work on their traditional homeland. Be open to the work shifting because of such collaboration.

5. Know where your water, heat, electricity and other resources come from. Lands that were relegated to indigenous use under the reservation system often because of their perceived barrenness are now resource colonies for the settler state. Indigenous communities in the United States are among the hardest hit by the negative impacts of climate change because of the extractive projects and processing that take place on their lands. Coal mining and burning, uranium mining and copper mining are just a few of the extractive projects that leave toxic legacies for generations to come. The profit from extraction on Native lands is rarely returned to the community that has paid the cost in destruction of lands and sacred sites, damage to health, and devastation of local economies and lifeways.

6. Take responsibility for Christian privilege/Doctrine of Discovery. If you’ve grown up in Christian culture, you may be unaware of all the ways that Christianity is culturally dominant in the United States. Work with your faith community to raise awareness about the violent legacy of Christian hegemony and move resources to shift power. If you are part of a Christian denomination that has not yet repudiated the Doctrine of Discovery — the theological justification for the theft of indigenous land — start or join a movement to do so. Challenge the notion that the settler church was divinely ordained within your church community. Start conversations about saints or lauded leaders of faith who were directly responsible for conquest. Learn how your church acquired its land and whose land it was originally. Learn the history of your denomination’s relationship to conquest. Consider that within Christian traditions there are built-in practices for atonement and reparations. Get creative with your spiritual community about what atonement and reparations might look like. If it is possible, try and connect with the indigenous tribe or nation in your area to work on this.

The Christian and Catholic Churches are incredibly well resourced not only in cash but also in land. Many, if not all, indigenous-led movements across Turtle Island — the indigenous term for North America — call for return of land to indigenous stewardship. How can the church leverage its many resources in solidarity with indigenous-led efforts for land return? There is a new project in California that is working for the return of urban land to indigenous stewardship. Could your church start a conversation about putting land in trust and working with a local indigenous group to steward it?

7. Engage in local struggles and build relationships. There are ongoing indigenous-led struggles for land and self-determination taking place all over Turtle Island. Not all indigenous spaces and organizations are looking for outside support, but many are. Educate yourself on this history of the area and current struggles. Reach out and take principled and accountable action by centering relationships in your work. The work will often be request-based and/or take on various forms of asking for permission, seeking guidance and input. This is a nuanced dance of taking initiative while ensuring there is guidance and the work upholds, not undermines, community self-determination. Your participation in decision making and giving input should be determined by the indigenous people you work with and will depend on the specific goals. For example, an indigenous community addressing its own tribal government has different objectives and requests from non-Native people than if cross-community power is being built to challenge federal and or state policies, energy policy, corporate power, etc.

8. Work for repatriations of land, upholding treaties, and funding Indigenous-led struggles and efforts for land return. This entails supporting Standing Rock, and other indigenous-led struggles in your region, building power to force the state to respect treaties, and doing creative fundraising campaigns like door knocking for reparations, as members of Resource Generation did in the Bay Area in solidarity with Poor Magazine’s “Stolen Land and Hoarded Resources Tour.” Read more here.

***

While these are helpful tips for individuals entering the sphere of solidarity work, there are also things activists already engaged in other organizing efforts can do to amplify indigenous-led struggles or incorporate a decolonial analysis into their work. It begins with incorporating an analysis of settler colonialism into all of your organizing work.

Settler colonialism is the kind of colonial control that exists in “settler states” like the United States, New Zealand, Australia, Israel/Palestine, Canada, Argentina and other countries. It incorporates elements of external colonialism — in which a colonizing power exports indigenous peoples (as slaves or laborers), resources, knowledge, plants, metals, and/or animals to increase the wealth of the colonizer — as well as internal colonialism — which is marked by the violent management of an underclass of people and lands within the “domestic” borders of the imperial nation. So, when Europeans began colonizing what is now known as the United States, settlers came for good — not just to take things and return to an imperial center based in Europe. This is why scholar Patrick Wolfe called settler colonialism a process of “destroying to replace.” It’s our responsibility as settlers to work to dismantle the settler colonial project.

Here are our tips — based on research and experience — for how to do just that, while also continuing your organizing work in other areas.

If your primary area of organizing is around the environment, recognize that indigenous cultures and lifeways are deeply tied to land, and most contemporary indigenous-led struggles center around access to land or land return. If you engage in environmental work: Consider how the environmental framework of land (or wilderness) as separate from people is an inherently colonial mindset that pits environmentalists not only against labor but also indigenous people, whose lifeways are inseparable from land.

If you engage in climate justice work, recognize the ways that indigenous communities have been disproportionately impacted by extreme extraction and climate chaos, as well as how they are resisting. Globally, indigenous communities are living as frontline blockades against extreme extraction.

If you engage in anti-racist work, consider doing the work of understanding settler colonialism as a structure and logic distinct racial capitalism (although interlocking) that is defined in terms of self-determination rather than being solely rights-based. A stance of self-determination signifies that indigenous nations pre-date the existence of the United States and aren’t always looking for recognition from the colonizing force. Rights and “equality” frameworks are most often based on the idea of the individual as the social actor and view equality under the law for all individuals as the end goal. Many indigenous frameworks don’t fully fit this and are centered more on the ideas of the collective (nation, tribe, people), as opposed to the individual. They also prioritize responsibility (to land, and future generations) as opposed to rights.

If you engage in labor justice work, familiarize yourself with the history of exploitation of indigenous labor in this country and consider ways in which your work for just workplaces may invisibilize the original inhabitants of the land your workplace occupies. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz’s “An Indigenous People’s History of the United States” and Andrés Reséndez’s “The Other Slavery” are good places to start.

If you are involved in queer and trans organizing that isn’t yet connected to two spirit/Native queer and trans perspectives and movements, learn from and build with queer and/or Two Spirit Native organizers, cultural workers and scholars. Learn the history of non-Native (particularly white) LGBTQ appropriation of indigenous alternative sexualities, genders and kinship structures. The article “Settler Homonationalism” by Scott Morgensen is a great place to start. Envision and enact queer and trans liberation that is anti/decolonial.

If you engage in food justice, or permaculture, herbalism, building alternative economies, and more broadly alternatives to capitalist institutions and modes of organizing reproduction and social life, familiarize yourself with the existing alternatives indigenous people have maintained through surviving, resisting, adapting and decolonizing. Consider the potential for connecting your work to questions of land and unsettling settler desire. As Scott Morgensen explores in the essay “Unsettling Settler Desire,” the desire to replace Native peoples and inherit their land, lifeways, alternative economies, spiritualities, modes of kinship and sexuality runs deep in settler society and permeates various alternative and radical subcultures. These desires for connection to land and land-based practices are often seen as a much needed antidote to the disconnection inherent in settler society. If, however, these connections and practices aren’t cultivated in relationship to indigenous peoples’ struggles to maintain their connections, responsibilities and traditions, then the forms of connection settlers are fostering can replicate “settler desire” and further entrench colonialism.

For non-Native people, walking a path of decolonization is the work of envisioning and enacting reciprocal relationships. Through this we can be humbled. We hold discomfort, knowing it is part of our work and our process of rekindling our dignity and interconnectedness. We can work to stop violence and environmental degradation. We can organize to build our communities’ capacity for self-determination, while struggling alongside indigenous communities as they maintain their responsibility to their homelands and future generations. We can shift entitlement and the normalizing of theft, as well as the narrative of “disappearing Indians” — the dominant colonial story that says indigenous peoples, lands and lifeways are inevitably disappearing as part of the natural passing of time. It is the narrative that relegates all things indigenous to the realm of history. We can move away from Western, colonial modes of existing as we restore traditional economies and modes of relating, community to community and nation to nation. Moving towards decolonization allows us to reckon with the violence of our collective inheritance and commit to healing, restoring and transforming our present, so as to ensure that we have a viable and liberatory future.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.
Liza Minno Bloom

Liza Minno Bloom is a contributor to Waging Nonviolence.
Berkley Carnine

Berkley Carnine is a contributor to Waging Nonviolence.
Title: Guards Who Unleashed Dogs on Pipeline Protesters Were Not Licensed in ND
Post by: azozeo on October 30, 2016, 04:57:26 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/kuZcx2zEo4k&fs=1


The Morton County Sheriff’s Department has concluded its investigation into the use of dogs to attack Native American-led water protectors opposing the Dakota Access pipeline on September 3, finding the guards lacked proper licensing. Morton County Sheriff’s Captain Jay Gruebele writes:

    “Through this investigation it has been proven that the dog handlers were not properly licensed to do security work in the State of North Dakota.”

On Saturday, September 3, Democracy Now! filmed security guards working for the pipeline company attacking Native Americans. The report showed guards unleashing dogs and using pepper spray and featured people with bite injuries and a dog with blood dripping from its mouth and nose. The video went viral online, viewed more than 14 million times on Facebook and was rebroadcast on many outlets, including CBS, NBC, NPR, CNN, MSNBC and the Huffington Post.

Following Democracy Now!’s report, Amnesty International USA called on Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier to investigate the use of force by private security working for the Dakota Access pipeline company on September 3.


Three days after the attacks Democracy Now! spoke with Jonni Joyce, an expert in law enforcement canine handling with more than 25 years of experience, about the use of canines to attack protesters. “What I witnessed on the video was absolutely horrific,” said Joyce. “It appeared that the handlers were not trained properly in order to manage a dog that has been trained in some type of controlled aggression.”





Title: Re: Guards Who Unleashed Dogs on Pipeline Protesters Were Not Licensed in ND
Post by: RE on October 30, 2016, 05:47:39 PM
The First Nations people have a team of Lawyers working pro bono out of the encampment at Standing Rock.

A big ass LAWSUIT is in order here.

Send in the Legal Dogs.

RE
Title: Re: Guards Who Unleashed Dogs on Pipeline Protesters Were Not Licensed in ND
Post by: azozeo on October 30, 2016, 06:16:18 PM
The First Nations people have a team of Lawyers working pro bono out of the encampment at Standing Rock.

A big ass LAWSUIT is in order here.

Send in the Legal Dogs.

RE

Ruby Ridge, WACO , WW 2 Japanese internment camps.
Maybe, just maybe, the tide has turned, now that the Bundy's were acquitted


Title: Auschwitz & Buchenwald Part Deux
Post by: azozeo on October 31, 2016, 01:50:52 PM
The First Nations people have a team of Lawyers working pro bono out of the encampment at Standing Rock.

A big ass LAWSUIT is in order here.

Send in the Legal Dogs.

RE


Like a “Concentration Camp” Police Mark DAPL Protesters with Numbers and Lock Them in Dog Kennels




 Activist Post

By Claire Bernish

On Thursday, police from no less than five states sporting full riot gear and armed with heavy lethal and nonlethal weaponry, pepper spray, mace, a number of ATVs, five tanks, two helicopters, and military-equipped Humvees showed up to tear down an encampment of Standing Rock Sioux water protectors and supporters armed with … nothing.

Under orders from the now-notorious Morton County Sheriff’s Office, this ridiculously heavy-handed standing army came better prepared to do battle than some actual military units fighting overseas.

But the target of their operation — a group of slightly more than 200 Native American water protectors and supporters opposing construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline — never intended to do battle with the armed, taxpayer-funded, corporate-backed, state-sponsored aggressors.

Reports vary, but no less than 141 people were arrested Thursday, and — according to witnesses — police marked numbers on arrestees’ arms and housed them in cement-floored dog kennels, without any padding, before they were transported as far away as Fargo.

“It goes back to concentration camp days,” asserted Oceti-Sakowin coordinator Mekasi Camp-Horinek, who, along with his mother, was marked and detained in a mesh kennel, reports the Los Angeles Times.

Although Thursday’s incident remained relatively peaceful for some time, with only shouts, chants, and occasional attempts by water protectors to convince this standing army to examine its motives and reconsider, clashes nonetheless broke out — solely because of gratuitous police aggression.

After facing off for a couple hours, these militant cops began closing in on the water protectors to shut down the Treaty of 1851 camp — in reference to the Fort Laramie Treaty of that year, which established a large parcel of land designated exclusively Native American territory not to be disturbed by the U.S. government. Prior to his arrest, Camp-Horinek had established the camp, stating, as cited by Indigenous Rising:

    Today, the Oceti Sakowin has enacted eminent domain on DAPL lands, claiming 1851 treaty rights. This is unceded land. Highway 1806 as of this point is blockaded. We will be occupying this land and staying here until this pipeline is permanently stopped. We need bodies and we need people who are trained in non-violent direct action.  We are still staying non-violent and we are still staying peaceful.

Despite the water protectors’ commitment to nonviolence, the militarized police response went as would be expected — horribly awry.

“A prayer circle of elders, including several women, was interrupted and all were arrested for standing peacefully on the public road,” stated a press release from Indigenous Environment Network. “A tipi was erected in the road and was recklessly dismantled, despite law enforcement statements that they would merely mark the tipi with a yellow ribbon and ask its owners to retrieve it. A group of water protectors was also dragged out of a sweat lodge ceremony erected in the path of the pipeline, thrown to the ground, and arrested.”

Claims to the contrary by Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier aside, Native American and Indigenous water protectors and supporters have refrained from violent acts on the whole, preferring instead peaceful prayer vigils and acts of civil disobedience.

No matter how peacefully the opposition acts, armed defenders of Big Oil interests seem determined to brutalize, disrespect, and generally incite and inflict violence against those who desire unsullied water for generations to come.

In fact, at the beginning of September, a private security firm hired by Energy Transfer Partners, the company responsible for pipeline construction, indiscriminately unleashed vicious attack dogs on water protectors, press, and supporters — for reasons as yet unknown.

During the savage attack, a pregnant woman, young girl, and many others suffered serious dog bites thanks to the ineptitude of the dogs’ handlers. Afterward, a warrant for inciting a riot was issued Democracy Now! journalist Amy Goodman — for doing her job, filming events as they happened — though charges were subsequently thrown out.

Although ETP and some law enforcement officers defended the barbarous actions of the private security mercenaries, the Guardian now reports that — because the guards lacked proper licensing — they could now face criminal charges. On Wednesday, the Morton County Sheriff’s Office made the determination that “dog handlers were not properly licensed to do security work in the state of North Dakota.”

Bob Frost, owner of Ohio-based Frost Kennels, told the Guardian, “All the proper protocols … were already done. I pulled my guys out the next day because we weren’t there to go to war with these protesters.”

Frost insisted he had cooperated with authorities investigating the incident — but the sheriff’s department disagrees. Seven handlers and dogs were deployed to the scene in early September, allegedly in response to reports of trespassers; but, according to the Guardian, police have only managed to identify two people.

The sheriff’s department claims Frost has not provided necessary information, and unnamed security officials cited in the report said that “there were no intentions of using the dogs or handlers for security work. However, because of the protest events, the dogs were deployed as a method of trying to keep the protesters under control.”

In a statement cited by the Guardian, Morton County Captain Jay Gruebele said, “Although lists of security employees have been provided, there is no way of confirming whether the list is accurate or if names have been purposely withheld.”

Water protectors, in the meantime, are left to deal with absurdly disproportionate state violence — and the altogether unacceptable, disrespectful, and demeaning insult of being relegated to dog kennels after being arrested for exercising their rights.

As Lakota Country Times editor, Brandon Ecoffey, wrote in an editorial Thursday,

    Over the course of the last several months the abuse of detainees by Morton County Law Enforcement has overstepped every boundary guaranteed by the American constitution. Water protectors have been seen being bound and hooded by police. People are being stripped searched and abused within their jail for misdemeanor crimes. And police have employed the use of mass surveillance through drones on the protector camps. This isn’t a war zone this is North Dakota.

Claire Bernish writes for TheFreeThoughtProject.com, where this article first appeared.


Title: ANOTHER Pipeline goes BLOOEY!
Post by: RE on November 01, 2016, 02:47:42 AM
Infrastructure not doing too well these days...

RE

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-31/largest-u-s-gasoline-pipeline-shuts-after-alabama-explosion (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-31/largest-u-s-gasoline-pipeline-shuts-after-alabama-explosion)

Largest U.S. Fuel Pipeline Shuts After Work Crew Triggers Blast
Laura Blewitt
laurablewitt
October 31, 2016 — 2:34 PM AKDT
Updated on October 31, 2016 — 9:47 PM AKDT

(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/isRfI79rMidA/v2/680x-1.jpg)
Smoke rises from the site of an explosion on the Colonial Pipeline on Oct. 31.
Photographer: Brynn Anderson/AP Photo

The biggest fuel pipeline in the U.S. shut its mainlines Monday after an explosion and fire in Alabama that killed at least one person. Gasoline futures surged and U.S. refiner stocks gained.

Colonial Pipeline Co., which carries refined products to New York Harbor from Houston, shut the lines for the second time in two months. A contract crew working miles from the site of a Sept. 9 spill ran into the pipeline with a trackhoe, igniting gasoline and causing a fire, Colonial said in a statement. One person died at the scene and five others were transported to Birmingham-area hospitals for treatment. The spill in September shut the line for 12 days, cutting supplies to 50 million Americans in the Southeast.

The pipelines remained shut and fire continued to burn as of 10:45 p.m. Monday local time, Colonial said in the statement. Emergency crews built a barrier 8 feet (2.4 meters) tall and 80 feet long to contain the burning fuel, Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley wrote on Twitter. Major fuel suppliers began notifying wholesalers in South Carolina late Monday of allocations.

The southeastern U.S. is “highly dependent on pipeline supplies from Colonial and, ultimately, Colonial flows form the baseline of U.S. East Coast supply,” Robert Campbell, head of oil products research at Energy Aspects Ltd. in New York, said in a note. The longer the mainlines are offline, “the more upward pressure will be placed on U.S. East Coast fuel prices, while downward pressure will be exerted on U.S. Gulf Coast product prices.”

December gasoline futures rose as much as 21.56 cents, or 15 percent, to $1.6351 a gallon, the biggest intraday gain for an active contract since 2008. The New York Mercantile Exchange contract, which is for supplies delivered into New York Harbor, traded at $1.5775 at 1:37 p.m. Singapore time.

The explosion and fire comes as the U.S. oil industry faces a backlash from environmentalists opposed to building new pipelines, including the controversial $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline. Last year, the Obama administration rejected the Keystone XL project. In early October, climate change activists disrupted oil flows by turning off valves in several remote pumping stations along the Enbridge Inc.’s main pipeline, which runs from Canada to the U.S. Midwest

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Colonial, owned by a group that includes Koch Capital Investments Co. and a unit of Royal Dutch Shell Plc, had to shut its 1.3 million-barrel-a-day gasoline line after an 7,370-barrel leak was discovered Sept. 9. It built a temporary bypass that allowed it to resume shipments on Sept. 22, which its had planned to remove between late-October and mid-November. Now both the gasoline mainline and the mainline that transports diesel and jet fuel are shut.

Colonial -- and to a lesser extent the smaller Plantation Pipe Line Co. -- play a key role in supplying the U.S. Southeast because there aren’t any refineries between Alabama and Pennsylvania that produce substantial quantities of transportation fuels. The region is supplied primarily by pipelines from refineries along the U.S. Gulf Coast, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

While Colonial has a capacity of 2.6 million barrels a day of refined products, the Plantation pipeline carries just 700,000 barrels a day.

Several major U.S. refiners gained in after-market trading as gasoline’s premium to Brent crude, a theoretical profit margin for many fuel makers, jumped as much as 60 percent to $18 a barrel before paring gains to about $14. Phillips 66, which operates a refinery near New York City, gained 1.7 percent to $82.50 on the New York Stock Exchange after closing at $81.15 a share Monday. Valero Energy Corp. and Marathon Petroleum Corp. also rose.
Title: Re: ANOTHER Pipeline goes BLOOEY!
Post by: RE on November 01, 2016, 02:59:25 AM
Infrastructure not doing too well these days...

"Accident" my ASS!

2nd time in two months?  SAME pipeline?

What better way to raise the prices and soak the customers?

Wonder what the gas situation will be like in SC this week? ???  :icon_scratch:

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 01, 2016, 06:38:12 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/JYJxbud_Y9Y&fs=1
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 02, 2016, 11:33:43 AM

Common Dreams

The increasingly violent attacks by North Dakota police and private security forces against peaceful, Indigenous water protectors have caught the nation’s attention as well as that of the United Nations, an arm of which has begun an investigation into the protesters’ claims of human rights abuses, including “excessive force, unlawful arrests, and mistreatment in jail,” the Guardian reported late Monday.

Observers have begun collecting testimonies from those protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and, on Monday, Grand Chief Edward John, a Native American member of the U.N. permanent forum on Indigenous issues, met with police officials in Mandan, North Dakota and visited the cages where some of the 141 arrested protesters were held after last week’s military-style police raid.

Those detained at the Morton County Correctional Center said that while they were held in the 10-by-14-foot cages they were forced to wait for basic necessities, such as “access to bathrooms, food, water, and medical attention,” the Guardian reported.

“We embarked upon a peaceful and prayerful campaign,” Standing Rock Sioux member Phyllis Young told the U.N. representatives. “They were placed in cages. They had numbers written on their arms very much like concentration camps.” Young said that the police’s treatment of native people was “not only conditions of colonialism, but conditions of war.”

“The government is allowing the police force to be used as a military force to protect an oil company,” added protester Kandi Mossett, a member of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara nation.

The Morton County Sheriff’s office has also been accused of tracking the activists through a feature on Facebook, a claim which spurred more than one million people worldwide to “check in” to the Standing Rock Sioux reservation on Monday in an attempt to “overwhelm and confuse” law enforcement and express solidarity with the demonstrators.

 

The fact that a campaign of “intimidation and repression” is being waged on behalf of a private company is not to be overlooked, according to a coalition of environmental groups, which late last week sent a letter (pdf) to the owners of the $3.7 billion tar sands pipeline, reminding them of their “complicity” in the ongoing human rights abuses.

“As joint owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline,  you have a corporate duty under international law and the laws of the United States to respect human rights and to avoid complicity in further human rights abuses.  It is imperative that you take action to stop the attacks on peaceful occupiers immediately,” states the letter, which is addressed to officials with Energy Transfer Partners, Phillips 66, Enbridge Energy Partners, and Wells Fargo bank.

The violent raid and mass arrest last week “has created a situation of urgency in which the companies must take immediate responsibility for the human rights impacts of their actions, including the companies’ complicity in the actions of others,” the letter continues:

    As a matter of international law, your companies have an affirmative responsibility to protect human rights, including the responsibility to: avoid causing or contributing to adverse human rights impacts to peaceful protestors through your companies’ own activities; and to seek to prevent or mitigate adverse human rights impacts that are directly linked to your companies’ operations. These responsibilities also apply to banks and other institutions that provide financing for a project that will cause such adverse human rights impacts.

“We emphasize and caution that the active involvement by persons acting under color of governmental authority, including state or local law enforcement, does not absolve your companies of these duties,” it further states.

The signatories, who are leaders with the Center for International Environmental Law, Honor the Earth, Bold Alliance, Climate Justice Programme, EarthRights International, Oil Change International, and Greenpeace USA, note that they “have spent decades advocating and litigating on behalf of Indigenous communities outside the United States,” whose rights are too often “violated by proponents of extractive industries around the world…And we are alarmed that these all-too-familiar patterns are playing out in the United States at Standing Rock.”

Similarly, Roberto Borrero, a Taino tribe member and representative of the International Indian Treaty Council, who is assisting the U.N. in collecting the testimonies, told the Guardian, “When you look at what the international standards are for the treatment of people, and you are in a place like the United States, it’s really astounding to hear some of this testimony.”

International human rights watchdog Amnesty International has also sent a delegation of human rights observers to monitor the police response to the ongoing protests. Meanwhile, the water protectors have vowed to maintain their vigil throughout the winter and continue their resistance as the pipeline construction encroaches upon their sacred land and water.
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Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 02, 2016, 11:34:51 AM
Whenever the UN shows, death follows  :evil4:
Title: Dakota Access Pipeline Prophecy for Worse to Come
Post by: RE on November 05, 2016, 03:59:12 AM
http://dissidentvoice.org/2016/11/dakota-access-pipeline-prophecy-for-worse-to-come/ (http://dissidentvoice.org/2016/11/dakota-access-pipeline-prophecy-for-worse-to-come/)

Dakota Access Pipeline Prophecy for Worse to Come

Treaty rights as a grim lesson

by Jess Guh / November 4th, 2016

Media coverage of the Standing Rock protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline has been hopelessly myopic. Certainly environmental justice, police brutality and the violation of sacred burial grounds are important topics, but no one has addressed the larger systemic issues at play: Native American treaty rights and how their handling portends dismally for the everyone else. Even the most self-centered and politically apathetic must realize Pastor Martin Niemöller’s warning that it’s only a matter of time before even the most mainstream of society are persecuted.

To truly appreciate the full significance of the face-off at Standing Rock, one has to understand understand the historical context of this struggle, which has seen supporters from 300 Indian tribes lining up to back the Sioux People.

Every person in the United States has the right to clean water, but for Native Americans, that right is two-fold. The treaties that set up Indian reservations were not simply land ownership agreements. The terms actually dictated a broader set of terms. This includes not just land, but also the obligation to protect tribal property and assets; in other words, natural resources such as clean water.

(http://thiscantbehappening.net/sites/default/files/images/SR%201.jpg)
Protectors at Standing RockProtectors at Standing Rock

Furthermore, the Snyder Act of 1921 delineated that the federal government is also obligated to provide health care to federally recognized tribes. While this typically takes the form of providing clinics and health insurance through Indian Health Services, ensuring clean water is obviously a basic tenant to providing basic public health care.

So when the Sioux who live on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation demand that their source of clean water is protected, it’s not simply a matter of basic human rights, but also a contractual financial obligation.

But the bigger concept at play here is that the 56.2 million acres of land that are identified as reservation land (at totally of only about 2% of the United States), are actually held “in trust.”

Most of us don’t know what that means. In life experience of the average American, you either own something or you don’t, but a “trust” is something in between. Some rich children have an idea. It’s similar to the “trust funds” that wealthy people set up for their children. The money is named to them and for their use, but with active management and significant restrictions on its use. Only at least with rich kids, at a certain age, the trust money usually is given to them outright and they can spend it however they see fit. That will never happen for the lands held in trust for Native Americans.

What that means on a practical level is that even if a specific tribe has rights to the land of reservation, it’s only in the setting of the high regulation from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Conrad Stewart the Chair of the Natural Resources Infrastructure Committee for the Crow tribe explains that even if their tribe wanted to mine coal on their lands there would be a 49-step process that involved the Bureau of Land Management, the Department of the Interior, the Department of Justice and the Commerce Department, all of which can take months, if not years. He estimates that just to dig a hole requires a $6,500 up-front payment for an application for a permit to drill.

In comparison, land just off the reservation requires about $125, 15 minutes, and a 5-step process for approval.

In a world run by capitalism, this means the land is “dead capital.” Because it’s held in trust, few people see it as a lucrative investment. Furthermore, since no individual owns it outright, it can’t be used as collateral for a loan or as an investment of wealth.

In reality, reservations do not offer true sovereignty and self-determination, but paternalism. They are a fraudulent attempt to assuage the guilt of a country built on the genocide and pillaging of other peoples.

What we need to realize is that fighting for the rights of the Sioux at Standing Rock is also fighting for the rights of every person.

The dispute at Standing Rock is not only a fight over treaty rights; it’s a fight over human rights for everyone in this country. And more than just a singular battle in the never-ending war between justice and exploitation, it’s an allegory for the continued shift in power away from the people towards corporations.

In theory, all Native Americans deserve, at the very least, what the wildly unfair treaties promised: self-government, cultural agency and independence, and the protection of natural resources and basic services such as health care and education. In actuality, the recognition and fulfillment of these rights are up to the whims of the federal government. To this day, despite the Supreme Court ruling that the federal government is contractually bound to provide healthcare, the budget comes out of the President’s Discretionary Funds. Obama’s attempts to change funding to a mandatory status have been blocked year after year.

Similarly, in theory, we all deserve law enforcement that protects individuals and maintains a peaceful society. In actuality, the rights to security and safety all too often fall prey to racism, militarism, and officers on a power-kick.

Many of the folks at Standing Rock prefer to be called “water protectors,” not protestors. As Irene Yeh, a water protector recalls, “From a hilltop, I saw groups of police officers with batons, some with rifles, armored vehicles, a tank, a helicopter droning overhead… The protectors had agreed to cooperate with police demands… That’s when a line of officers encircled the group… they began to grab people, hitting some with batons and pushing them to the ground, spraying mace and punching one protector in the face. The protectors were just standing there, calm and unarmed.”

(http://dissidentvoice.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/SR-2.jpg)

Unfortunately we are all too familiar with this sort of brutality. It’s the unchecked power that too often escalates to the murder of people of color all over the country. It’s the result of a police force that has been requested to respect our rights instead of demanding it of them.

And finally, in theory we deserve an environment, places to live, that are clean and healthy. In actuality corporations plunder and pollute, only pausing to consider environmental impact when it suits their interests.

We must stand up in outrage as the Standing Rock water protectors and their supporters are doing now because protest is the only reliable means of protecting the rights of the Great Sioux Nation. In a world where human rights are seen as a request, not an obligation, it is the only way to ensure that we all get the rights that we deserve.
Published at This Can’t Be Happening.

Jess Guh, MD, writes her thoughts on race, on privilege, on class, and on being a doctor. Read other articles by Jess, or visit Jess's website.

This article was posted on Friday, November 4th, 2016 at 4:15pm and is filed under Justice, Oil, Gas, Coal, Pipelines, Original Peoples, Water.
Title: Major Bank Considers Pulling Funds From DAPL If Violations Continue
Post by: azozeo on November 12, 2016, 02:22:15 PM
Protests Are Working! Major Bank Considers Pulling Funds From DAPL If Violations Continue

By Claire Bernish

While election madness reached full tilt in recent days, opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline experienced a quiet victory — Norway’s largest bank, DNB, will consider pulling its hefty investment in the project if concerns from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe are not addressed.

DNB, EcoWatch reports, has reportedly loaned around $350 million to Energy Transfer Partners for the construction of the pipeline — fully 10 percent of the total cost — but is worried the rights of Native Americans are being trampled in the process.

“DNB looks with worry at how the situation around the pipeline in North Dakota has developed,” the financier said in a statement cited by Reuters. “The bank will therefore take initiative and use its position to bring about a more constructive process to find a solution to the conflict.

    If these initiatives do not give appeasing answers and results, DNB will consider its further involvement in the financing of the project.

Apprehension over solicitous violence police have employed against the Standing Rock Sioux water protectors and their supporters drove the bank to review its investment in the enormously controversial pipeline. Multiple clashes between law enforcement and peaceful opposition finally began leading international headlines after American corporate media largely ignored escalating tensions.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe members — and Indigenous peoples from First Nations around the planet, as well as activists and supporters — have occupied several camps along the Missouri River near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, since spring in an attempt to obstruct further construction of Dakota Access.

In bold response, ETP hired private security mercenaries untrained in such matters, who unleashed vicious dogs indiscriminately against a crowd of unarmed but angry water protectors whose sole ‘crime’ constituted trespassing to perform a ceremonial prayer. At least six people were mauled by the dogs in the chaos, and several journalists and activists faced lengthy jail terms.

Since that time, following the mercenaries’ departure, obscenely over-militarized police with tanks better suited for a battlefield of war from at least five states were deployed to patrol on behalf of ETP — and have been no more forgiving than the private firm.

Water protectors, activists, and journalists have been pepper-sprayed, maced, beaten, shot with bean bag projectiles and rubber bullets, tasered, blasted by LRAD and sound cannons, and have been strip-searched, detained in dog kennels, had their arms marked with numbers — and generally been treated contemptibly by every law enforcement agency involved.

Police violence and tactics have been so deplorable, representatives from United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues have been amassing testimony from witnesses and victims about excessive force, unlawful arrests, and mistreatment in jail, EcoWatch reports.

Amnesty International USA (AIUSA) deployed human rights observers to monitor the situation for the same reasons.

    Our observers are here to ensure that everyone’s human rights are protected […]

    “People here just want to stand up for the rights of Indigenous people and protect their natural resources. These people should not be treated like the enemy,” asserted Eric Ferrero, director of communications for AIUSA. “Police must keep the peace using minimal force appropriate to the situation. Confronting men, women, and children while outfitted in gear more suited for the battlefield is a disproportionate response.”

Beyond appalling police interactions, ETP seemed to intentionally destroy a large swath of sacred land Standing Rock Sioux historians had only recently been able to assess for cultural value.

Unsurprisingly, tepid requests by President Obama and several federal officials for ETP to halt construction until a tribal lawsuit, currently languishing in court, and further permit reviews conclude, have been brazenly ignored. To wit, further construction of Dakota Access as opposition continues its fight have brought the pipeline to the banks of the Missouri River’s Lake Oahe reservoir — the exact point of contention as water protectors worry a leak or spill would contaminate tribal drinking water and that of around 18 million people downstream.

Using the chaos and distraction of Election Day, ETP announced it will move forward with drilling to begin installation of pipeline beneath Lake Oahe in just two weeks, intimating it would do so with or without appropriate permits — in a flagrant defiance requests to stop construction, potentially exacerbating further violence by police against angered water protectors.

DNB apparently views these acts as unacceptable, and if the situation worsens — as it likely will should ETP follow through on its Election Day declaration — it appears the bank stands ready to revoke its financial support.

If so, the bold move could inspire other major investors— fearful of ruining their reputations by supporting human rights abuses — to follow suit, particularly if the public applies pressure.

In the meantime, water protectors from the Standing Rock Sioux and their supporters face a particularly bitter North Dakota winter on the open plains. Viewing their prayerful movement as protection of water for future generations, none of those camped in the pipeline’s path have plans of leaving until the “black snake” is stopped in its tracks.

Claire Bernish writes for TheFreeThoughtProject.com, where this article first appeared.
Title: Dakota Access Announces Plan to Drill Under Missouri River Within Weeks
Post by: azozeo on November 14, 2016, 03:40:32 PM
http://www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=10713 (http://www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=10713)


Excellent drone footage of the progress up there.
Title: Re: Dakota Access Announces Plan to Drill Under Missouri River Within Weeks
Post by: MKing on November 14, 2016, 03:46:24 PM
http://www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=10713 (http://www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=10713)


Excellent drone footage of the progress up there.

Progress? Well, Trump isn't President yet. Shortly after he is Dakota Access won't be the issue, it will be completed 5 minutes later. Next up? Keystone XL is back!
Title: Oil and Water: The Dakota Access Pipeline
Post by: RE on November 15, 2016, 12:48:12 AM
http://kstp.com/article/stories/s4317952.shtml (http://kstp.com/article/stories/s4317952.shtml)

Oil and Water: The Dakota Access Pipeline

November 14, 2016 11:21 PM

5 EYEWITNESS News traveled to North Dakota to get a first-hand look at the controversy surrounding the Dakota Access Crude Oil Pipeline.


As the sun set over the Missouri River about an hour south of Bismarck, North Dakota, farmer Durant Shiermeister showed us where the Dakota Access Crude Oil Pipeline crosses his land.

Texas-based company Energy Transfer Partners says the pipeline will stretch nearly 1,200 miles from the Bakken Oil Fields in northwest North Dakota to Illinois.

The company says it will carry enough crude each day to produce 380 million gallons of gas.

At a location right now where the pipeline crosses under a highway, they have barbed wire to keep people out of the construction area. They've cleared the land to do the work. In fact, the pipeline is already in the ground.

"It's a great project for our country; it's a great project for our state,” said North Dakota Petroleum Council President Ron Ness.

Supporters say the pipeline is needed to move crude more efficiently without relying on trucks and trains.

"In the case of this particular crossing, they are going 92 feet below the bed of the river,” said North Dakota Assistant State Engineer John Paczkowski.

North Dakota's assistant state engineer says the pipeline exceeds the state's minimum safety requirements in pipe thickness, emergency shut-off systems, and depth.

"So we are going well above and beyond that,” said Paczkowski.

Shiermeister told me he's proud to support the project.

"It's the most American thing you can do to make America strong,” said Shiermeister.

But the entrance to the construction site looks more like a military base.

Opposition to the project has reached a flash-point.

"I think people who support the pipeline are in denial,” said Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II.
Dakota Access Pipeline work site

Dakota Access Pipeline work site
KSTP/Matt Belanger
Previous
Next

The pipeline crosses under the Missouri River just north of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe's reservation.

"This one pipeline is going to help tribes for once be heard,” said Archambault II.

A growing camp of teepees and tents has been rising from the plains since spring.

"There was just a part of me that was like, you have to go,” said Tonya Olsen of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

People from across the country are joining this make-shift community on federal land near the pipeline's river crossing to support the tribe's opposition.

"We're trying to stop the pipeline is what we are doing,” said Nicholas Wagner.

Some have been here for months. They call themselves "water protectors."

"I think it's about the water first,” said Jim Picotte of the Cheyenne River Reservation.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe filed a lawsuit asking a federal judge to halt construction.

They cited concerns the work would disrupt burial grounds and other sacred sites.

And, that a spill would contaminate the tribes primary water source,  the judge denied that request.

"I really think people need to wake up and realize that our water is precious,” said Picotte.

They insist their opposition is peaceful.

"So we are looking at about a hundred,” said Kirchmeier.

But authorities guarding the construction site with a camp of their own have a different view.

The two sides have clashed several times.

"We are in the middle of a company that's doing legal, lawful work and a protest that's gotten out of hand,” said Kirchmeier.

Law enforcement built a barrier and it is guarded 24 hours a day.

We only respond with the force we need to respond to,” said Kirchmeier. "If you have a mob of people coming at you what are our options?"

But Nicholas Wagner told 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS he didn't have a weapon during a recent confrontation.

"They maced us,” said Wagner.

The serene North Dakota landscape is now dotted with checkpoints and armored vehicles, barbed wire and concrete barriers.

"You're not going to solve this issue out here on the prairie,” said Kirchmeier.

Like a modern day western, it’s a standoff on the Great Plains over oil and water.

"We know that pipelines break,” said Picotte.

"This pipeline is going to be built, it needs to be built, it's what we've asked for it's what people have asked for and it's a great addition to the infrastructure of American energy,” said Ness.

"The way I look at it is everything man made will break, eventually, one day.” said Archambault II. "And for once, one time, let's not do it to the Indians anymore.”
Credits

Matt Belanger

Copyright 2016 - KSTP-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: El Trumpo and the Dakota Pipeline
Post by: RE on November 16, 2016, 12:38:59 AM
Looks like a lot of lawsuits coming down the pipeline, although they all have as much likelihood of succeeding as I have battling with SS.

For the Water Protectors after that, they have a very tough choice.  The only alternative if all the legal battles are lost would be to sabotage the pipeline, but if you do that you end up CREATING an oil spill and environmental catastrophe.

Probably the best thing to do is to just let it go, although keep protesting.  The economics will kill this pipeline anyhow.

RE

Reuters / Stephanie Keith
Standing Rock
Trump’s victory could be a big win for the Dakota Access Pipeline, but opponents stand strong

(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/dakota-access1.jpg?w=970&h=545&crop=1)

By Antonia Juhasz on Nov 11, 2016

The sound had not been heard in over 150 years. Rising over the remote plains of North Dakota, below a hot November sun and cloudless blue sky, the drums and song of the seven bands of the Sioux nation joined together as tribal elders lit the peta waken (sacred fire) for the first time since Abe Lincoln was President. They were surrounded by some 800 Native Americans and their allies, including women, toddlers, and the elderly, standing silently in a wide circle five people deep, heads bowed in prayer.

“The climate is already at a point of no return,” intoned Lakota Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader of the Sioux Nation, from within the circle. “Our waters are polluted by fracking … We must stop this contamination.”

“We are supposed to stop this snake,” Jon Eagle of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe said in reference to the nearby Dakota Access Pipeline. “We’ve already defeated them; they just don’t know it yet.”

The ceremony was held last weekend to bring renewed unity, grounding, and prayer to the “water protectors,” as they call themselves, gathered together on this windswept grassy field amidst tipis, tents, and morning camp fires at the Oceti Sakowin camp. It is the largest of three makeshift camps erected over the past seven months by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and allies near — and at times on top of — the Dakota Access Pipeline route. The 1,200-mile pipeline would carry fracked oil from the Bakken shale regions of North Dakota to Illinois and on to the Gulf Coast, passing half a mile from the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation through areas of tribal spiritual and cultural significance, including under the Missouri River: the primary drinking water source for the tribe and millions of other people downstream.

Barely one week earlier, the water protectors had a pitched battle for territory on which the pipeline was set to pass, including a sacred tribal burial ground. On a hilltop to the north, just behind those gathered for the ceremony, several pieces of bright yellow construction equipment loomed. Dakota Access Pipeline’s operations were actively underway.
Dakota Access Pipeline equipment is seen at Lake Oahe near Standing Rock.
Dakota Access Pipeline equipment is seen at the Missouri River near Standing Rock.Reuters / Stephanie Keith

The struggle to stop the pipeline has pitted the water protectors against an increasingly militarized and aggressive police force, with the camps currently under what can only be described as a siege. Floodlights, erected either by Dakota Access or the police (or both), sit atop a hill focused down on Oceti Sakowin, shining all throughout the night, every night. Law enforcement and private security surveillance drones, helicopters, and planes constantly buzz low in circles just overhead.

Highway 1806, leading from the camp to the pipeline and a main artery of rural North Dakota, is blockaded by law enforcement and the burned carcasses of two large trucks. Armored Humvees, often with snipers in their turrets, are a frequent sight. And there is the clear and ever-present danger that if protectors try to get near the pipeline, they will be repelled with extreme measures, including but not limited to: pepper spray, rubber bullets, batons, arrests, and jail. Though these measures have not stopped the protectors — rather, they seem to have strengthened both their numbers and resolve — they have succeeded in facilitating the continued progress of the pipeline construction.

Energy Transfer Partners, the company building the pipeline, said on Thursday that 84 percent of the entire project is complete. It has excavated and is laying pipe nearly up to, and on both sides of, the Missouri River, where just one area remains untouched: that which passes under the river.

In September, the Obama administration denied Energy Transfer Partners the easement it needs to build under the Missouri River in order to give the Army Corp of Engineers time to review the safety and advisability of doing so. The administration asked that during that review, the company voluntarily pause all construction activity within 20 miles east or west of the river.

The company flatly refused.

On Nov. 4 and again on Thursday, the Army Corps asked Energy Transfer Partners to voluntarily stop work “for a 30-day period to allow for de-escalation,” citing concern “for the safety of all the people involved with the continued demonstrations.” Each time, Energy Transfer Partners refused.

On Sunday, the Norwegian bank DNB, which represents 10 percent of the financing required to build the pipeline, announced that it would consider pulling its support if concerns raised by the Native Americans were not addressed.

Energy Transfer Partners kept building.

Two days later, Citibank, representing 20 percent of the financing, released a statement citing its own “commitment to sustainability and respect for human rights” and advocating for “constructive engagement with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in an effort to come to a resolution.”

Dakota Access not only kept building, but released its own statement on Election Day. “To be clear, Dakota Access Pipeline has not voluntarily agreed to halt construction of the pipeline in North Dakota,” it said. Rather, it would be moving horizontal drilling equipment into place in preparation for tunneling under the Missouri River, expecting “no significant delays in its plans to drill under the lake.”

In an interview last week, President Obama said that the Army Corps of Engineers was exploring ways to “reroute” the pipeline around Native American lands.

Asked about Obama’s comments, pipeline spokesperson Vicki Granado told the Guardian: “We are not aware that any consideration is being given to a reroute, and we remain confident we will receive our easement in a timely fashion.”

Donald Trump was elected president of the United States on Tuesday. The next day, the stock value of Energy Transfer Partners’ parent company rose by 15 percent, as “investors now expect the pipeline to proceed,” Barron’s reported.

“I do expect Trump to approve it,” said Ron Ness, head of the North Dakota Petroleum Council, an industry trade group.

“Dakota Access went from being in some doubt to being a solid bet with this election,” Ethan Bellamy, a senior financial analyst, said.

Much of this confidence is on solid footing.

Trump has between $500,000 and $1 million personally invested in Energy Transfer Partners, with a further $500,000 to $1 million holding in Phillips 66, which will have a 25 percent stake in the Dakota Access project once completed.

Kelcy Warren, chief executive of Energy Transfer Partners, donated $103,000 to elect Trump and $66,800 to the Republican National Committee since Trump became the party nominee.

Many of Trump’s campaign advisors and likely cabinet, moreover, are drawn directly from the ranks of companies involved and invested in the pipeline and in Bakken oil development. Together, they will form one of America’s most fossil-fuel-centric administrations since Warren B. Harding; perhaps even more so than that of George W. Bush. There are fossil fuel company executives, investors, rabid industry cheerleaders, and notorious climate change deniers. Trump has pledged to dramatically increase fossil fuel production from every nook and cranny of the United States, particularly the Bakken shale region.

“Fracking king” Harold Hamm, CEO of Continental Resources, was Trump’s campaign energy advisor and has long been seen as a leading candidate for energy secretary. Continental Resources’ Bakken oil will be carried via the completed Dakota Access Pipeline, according to its November update to investors.

Trump campaign advisor John Paulson — president and CEO of Paulson & Co. and “one of the titans of the U.S. hedge fund industry,” managing some $14 billion — is heavily invested in the U.S. oil and gas industry, particularly in the Bakken. After becoming the largest shareholder in Whiting Petroleum in 2013, Paulson surpassed Hamm to become the largest producer of oil in North Dakota before selling off his entire Whiting holdings earlier this year. Paulson’s continued investments in the sector include Oasis Petroleum, renowned for its role in the single worst accident in Bakken history, involving a blowout, explosion, two worker deaths, and a worker suicide.

Oasis is working to complete a 19-mile oil transmission system from its North Dakota petroleum handling facility to the Dakota Access Pipeline, thus positioning it to supply roughly one-ninth of the pipeline’s estimated 470,000 barrels of daily crude oil deliveries, records from the North Dakota Public Service Commission show.
The Dakota Access Pipeline is seen near New Salem, North Dakota.
The Dakota Access Pipeline is seen near New Salem, North Dakota.Tony Webster

According to Oasis Petroleum’s most recent financial filings, Paulson’s hedge fund owns the fourth-largest share of the company. Trump has invested between $3 million and $15 million in Paulson’s hedge funds.

Dennis Nuss of Phillips 66, a 25 percent owner of the Dakota Access Pipeline, said Wednesday that the pipeline should be fully operational in the first quarter of 2017.

Doing so, however, would require that the Army Corps of Engineers grant the easement, either under the Obama or Trump administrations.

Last week, Standing Rock Sioux Chair Dave Archambault II recommitted the tribe to the fight against the pipeline. “If there is an easement granted,” he said, “we will sue.”

The tribe has a federal lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers pending, which argues that the Corps failed to adequately consult with the tribe and that granting the easement for the pipeline to pass under the Missouri River would do irreparable harm.

U.S. District Judge James Boasberg rejected these arguments on Sept. 9, but only under the National Historic Preservation Act. The underlying lawsuit also argues that the Corps’ permitting process violated the Clean Water Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, and the Rivers and Harbors Act. None of those claims has been fully litigated.

Another lawsuit underway in Iowa goes to court next month. Landowners in six counties there argue that Energy Transfer Partners’ claims of eminent domain when using their land for the pipeline were unlawful.

Protests have also been ongoing in the state, continuing on Thursday, when three protectors — bearing food, water, and sleeping bags — locked themselves inside of the pipeline. They halted construction for 17 hours next to a sign reading: “No Eminent Domain for Private Gain.”

President Obama has 70 days left in office before Donald Trump is sworn in on Jan. 20. Late Friday, conflicting reports from the administration were reported by Politico and Reuters, originally suggesting that the Obama administration might go ahead and give its approval to the pipeline on Monday, then denying those reports, then quoting spokesperson Amy Gaskill of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that a decision “would come in the next few days, possibly by Monday.”

Lorrena Alameda, age 33, and her mother Gladys Renville, age 55, Dakota Sioux from South Dakota, are among the thousands of people from some 200 tribes who have flocked to Standing Rock to defend the water and the land, including some 6,000 people this past weekend alone. Alameda expects President Obama to take action on their behalf.

“I feel like all the promises he made to us, he needs to be there right now and tell [Energy Transfer Partners] to stop doing what they’re doing, and he needs to enforce it,” Alameda tells me. “Because, right now, everything that happens here is on his watch.”

Obama has many options. He can deny the easement and order the Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a full Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This was not done, the Sierra Club’s Catherine Collentine explains, because the pipeline was “fast-tracked” using a far less comprehensive environmental assessment.

The administration could deny the easement and remain open to the pipeline crossing the Missouri River at another location — i.e. reroute the pipeline. Regardless of whether the reroute also requires an EIS, it would by definition require additional study by both the federal government and the company — all of which would be both time-consuming and costly.

Every day the project is stalled or incomplete costs money, adds more time for action by the protectors and their allies, and builds concern among investors.

Energy Transfer Partners is already suffering financially, reporting on Thursday a whopping 82 percent collapse in profits in the third quarter of 2016 versus the same period last year. Moreover, it originally committed to completing the pipeline by Jan. 1, but now predicts that it will not be operational until April. Every day the Jan. 1 deadline is not met, shippers planning on using it can terminate their contracts.

Finally, Obama can deny this, or any other easement for crossing the Missouri, thereby killing the Dakota Access Pipeline altogether.

In the midst of the historic peta waken ceremony, a tribal elder admonished the President, saying, “Obama, he started this, saying what our children can be. I say, ‘Don’t start it if you can’t finish it!’ I learned that in Cambodia.”

Any of these decisions could be undone or reversed by the incoming Trump administration. But doing so would also open the door to further litigation, something Jan Hasselman of Earthjustice, the attorney representing the Standing Rock Sioux, says he is fully prepared to do. If Obama grants the easement, that too can be litigated.

Those at Standing Rock remain unflinching in their commitment to stop the pipeline. Most could not be reached for comment on Friday as they were busy stopping work on the pipeline for several hours by blocking the pipeline route and taking over Dakota Access construction equipment near Highway 6; while others were busy winterizing the camps.
15037260_10157705359050405_2780864512774212022_n
Facebook

Their Facebook pages are replete with responses to Trump’s election, however, including this oft-posted image. “Disappointed, but not surprised” is a common theme, as is a renewed hope that President Obama will take swift action while still in office and that support from allies will grow, such as the protests at banks that invest in the project and the “Stand for Standing Rock” day of action on Nov. 15 at Army Corps of Engineers offices around the country.

Stopping the project is the option most favored by those at Standing Rock as they do not wish the problems they seek to avoid near their home thrust upon others. Most also seek to end dependence on oil altogether.

Chair Archambault declared as the fire ceremony drew to a close: “We have to decrease the dependency on how we use oil. If not, this is just one pipeline. There will be more.”

Antonia Juhasz writes about oil. You will find her stories in many publications, including Rolling Stone, Newsweek, Harper’s Magazine, and The Nation. She is the author of three books, most recently, Black Tide: The Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: El Trumpo and the Dakota Pipeline
Post by: MKing on November 16, 2016, 07:57:05 AM
The only alternative if all the legal battles are lost would be to sabotage the pipeline, but if you do that you end up CREATING an oil spill and environmental catastrophe.

And....? if these folks were truly water protectors, they would be out there where the Missouri is being polluted to the tune of 7 tons a day...but they aren't where that pollution is happening...they are protesting a place where no pollution has happened.

So, with basic evidence that this is far more NIMBY and far less water protecting than claimed, it is obvious that sabotaging the pipe to cause an environmental mess is perfectly within their moral code, because it doesn't have anything to do with water protecting, otherwise they would be doing that.

Quote from: RE
Probably the best thing to do is to just let it go, although keep protesting.  The economics will kill this pipeline anyhow.

RE

Yes...just like it did Colonial. And Southern XL, and all the other pipelines that weren't killed by economics over the past half century. Forgive us all for taking the word of those people who are betting billions on consumers continuing to consume.

A safe bet, considering that even those protesting the pipeline are themselves consumers of the products derived from it, and seem to not even notice the irony in that one.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock - 11 yr old killed by sniper
Post by: azozeo on November 16, 2016, 11:37:54 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/CHIURkNH9Ls&fs=1
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on November 16, 2016, 12:04:55 PM
Fake, I think.

ORIGIN:In late October 2016, a video titled "Police snipers shoot 11-year-old at Dakota Pipeline protests" was shared to YouTube and circulated on Facebook.

The since-deleted video purportedly consisted of an individual providing an account (but not any actual footage) of the supposed shooting of an 11-year-girl by a police sniper at Standing Rock, the site of an ongoing protest over construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The clip (originally hosted at the URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JI_9p5-pEFg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JI_9p5-pEFg)) has since been deleted, and we were unable to locate any copies of it. However, the rumor about the young girl purportedly shot and killed at Standing Rock by a police sniper lives on in social media posts.

No news account reported any such shooting, and a concerned public unable to locate the original video asked protest leaders whether the rumor was accurate — of anyone involved, those demonstrators would be the likeliest candidates to confirm violent activity at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. As the rumor circulated, protester Dallas Goldtooth described the claim as "misinformation":


http://www.snopes.com/girl-shot-at-standing-rock/ (http://www.snopes.com/girl-shot-at-standing-rock/)
Title: Re: Shot in the back at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 17, 2016, 12:03:58 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/pKQLnDJ1YzM&fs=1


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/11/14/shot-in-the-back-at-standing-rock.html (http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/11/14/shot-in-the-back-at-standing-rock.html)



Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 17, 2016, 08:30:46 PM
Diners know about Standing Rock but I have yet to see any mainstream news cover the Standing Rock situation at all.  A quick search shows only the LA times and The NY times have an article about Standing Rock and both these articles are a half month old.  It is disgusting.  Rubber bullets are now shooting people but the whores we have for mainstream media won't cover it at all.  Even with hundreds arrested it is not news.  Only alternative media covers Standing Rock.

It is obvious from the events at Standing Rock that mainstream news is not in the news business at all.  Real news reporting been co-opted by management.  I don't mean news agency management.  I mean Uncle Sam management.

It is not rocket science to figure out the 12 year old rumoured to be shot dead yesterday was actually shot with a rubber bullet and because he was only severely injured and not killed the shooting was flat out denied in its entirety by the perpetrators.

The names of those responsible for the pipeline need to be published.

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on November 18, 2016, 06:14:44 AM
Diners know about Standing Rock but I have yet to see any mainstream news cover the Standing Rock situation at all.  A quick search shows only the LA times and The NY times have an article about Standing Rock and both these articles are a half month old.  It is disgusting. 

I've noticed it on the nightly news. And even in the local news, related to one of the protesters deciding that shooting at the cops was a good idea.

Quote from: K-Dog
Rubber bullets are now shooting people but the whores we have for mainstream media won't cover it at all.  Even with hundreds arrested it is not news.  Only alternative media covers Standing Rock.

Incorrect. I recommend watching more MSM.

Quote from: K-Dog
It is not rocket science to figure out the 12 year old rumoured to be shot dead yesterday was actually shot with a rubber bullet and because he was only severely injured and not killed the shooting was flat out denied in its entirety by the perpetrators.

The names of those responsible for the pipeline need to be published.

The American is responsible for the need for the pipeline. In other words you, me, and those of us who use petro chemical products.
Title: Mni Wiconi: The Stand at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 18, 2016, 05:45:09 PM
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 18, 2016, 08:03:12 PM
The following is a list of the board of directors of  the company building the pipeline should anyone want to contact them with questions concerning the pipeline or to tell them about the violence protesters are experiencing.  All this information is freely available on the Energy Transfer website..

"Energy Transfer is a Texas-based company that began in 1995 as a small intrastate natural gas pipeline operator and is now one of the largest and most diversified investment grade master limited partnerships in the United States. Growing from roughly 200 miles of natural gas pipelines in 2002 to approximately 71,000 miles of natural gas, natural gas liquids (NGLs), refined products, and crude oil pipelines today, the Energy Transfer Family of Partnerships remains dedicated to providing exceptional service to its customers and attractive returns to its investors."

Kelcy L. Warren
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors

Kelcy Warren is Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors of Energy Transfer Partners, L. P. (ETP). Mr. Warren also serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the general partner of Energy Transfer Equity, L. P. (ETE). Prior to the combination of the operations of ETP and Heritage Propane in 2004, Mr. Warren co-founded the entities that acquired and operated the midstream assets that were contributed in the merger. From 1996 to 2000, Mr. Warren served as a Director of Crosstex Energy, Inc. and from 1993 to 1996, he served as President, Chief Operating Officer and a Director of Cornerstone Natural Gas, Inc. Mr. Warren has more than 25 years of business experience in the energy industry.


Ted Collins, Jr.
Director

Mr. Collins has been an independent oil and gas producer since 2000. Mr. Collins previously served as President of Collins & Ware Inc. from 1988 to 2000, when its assets were sold to Apache Corporation. From 1982 to 1988, Mr. Collins was President of Enron Oil and Gas Company, and its predecessors, HNG Oil Company and HNG Internorth Exploration Co. From 1969 to 1982, Mr. Collins served as Executive Vice President of American Quaser Petroleum Company. Mr. Collins is a Director and serves on the Finance Committee of Hanover Compression Company, and is a Director and the Chairman of the Governance Committee of Encore Acquisition Company. Mr. Collins has served as a Director of our General Partner since August 2004.

Michael K. Grimm
Director

Mr. Grimm is one of the original founders of Rising Star Energy, L.L.C., a privately held upstream exploration and production company active in onshore continental United States, and has served as its President and Chief Executive Officer since 1995. Prior to the formation of Rising Star, Mr. Grimm was Vice President of Worldwide Exploration and Land for Placid Oil Company from 1990 to 1994. Prior to joining Placid Oil Company, Mr. Grimm was employed by Amoco Production Company for thirteen years where he held numerous positions throughout the exploration department in Houston, New Orleans and Chicago. Mr. Grimm has been an active member of the Independent Petroleum Association of America, the American Association of Professional Landmen, Dallas Producers Club, Houston Producers Forum, and Fort Worth Wildcatters. Mr. Grimm has served as a Director of our General Partner since December 2005.

Marshall S. McCrea
Director

Marshall S. (Mackie) McCrea, III. Mr. McCrea was appointed as a director of ETP in December 2009. He is Group Chief Operating Officer and Chief Commercial Officer for the Energy Transfer family and has served in that capacity since November 2015. Prior to that, he served as President and Chief Operating Officer of ETP’s general partner from June 2008 to November 2015 and President – Midstream from March 2007 to June 2008. Previously he served as the Senior Vice President – Commercial Development since January 2004. In March 2005, Mr. McCrea was named President of La Grange Acquisition LP, ETP’s primary operating subsidiary, after serving as Senior Vice President-Business Development and Producer Services since 1997. Mr. McCrea also currently serves on the Board of Directors of the general partner of ETE, of Sunoco Logistics and of Sunoco LP.

James R. Perry
Director

James R. (Rick) Perry. Mr. Perry has served as a director of our general partner since February 2015. Prior to joining ETP, Mr. Perry served as Governor of the State of Texas from 2000 to 2015. Mr. Perry served as Lieutenant Governor of Texas from 1998 to 2000, and as Agriculture Commissioner from 1994 to 1998. Prior to 1994, Mr. Perry also served in the Texas House of Representatives. The Board selected Mr. Perry to serve as a director because of his vast experience as an executive in the highest office of state government. In addition, Mr. Perry has been involved in finance and budget planning processes throughout his career in government as a member of the Texas House Appropriations Committee, the Legislative Budget Board and as Governor.

Matthew S. Ramsey
Director

Matthew S. Ramsey. Mr. Ramsey was appointed as a director of ETE’s general partner in July 2012 and as a director of ETP’s general partner in November 2015. Mr. Ramsey was named President and Chief Operating Officer of ETP’s general partner in November 2015. Mr. Ramsey is also a director of Sunoco LP, serving as chairman of Sunoco LP’s board since April 2015. Mr. Ramsey previously served as President of RPM Exploration, Ltd., a private oil and gas exploration partnership generating and drilling 3-D seismic prospects on the Gulf Coast of Texas. Mr. Ramsey is currently a director of RSP Permian, Inc. (NYSE: RSPP), where he serves as chairman of the compensation committee and as a member of the audit committee. Mr. Ramsey formerly served as President of DDD Energy, Inc. until its sale in 2002. From 1996 to 2000, Mr. Ramsey served as President and Chief Executive Officer of OEC Compression Corporation, Inc., a publicly traded oil field service company, providing gas compression services to a variety of energy clients. Previously, Mr. Ramsey served as Vice President of Nuevo Energy Company, an independent energy company. Additionally, he was employed by Torch Energy Advisors, Inc., a company providing management and operations services to energy companies including Nuevo Energy, last serving as Executive Vice President. Mr. Ramsey joined Torch Energy as Vice President of Land and was named Senior Vice President of Land in 1992.

David K. Skidmore
Director

Mr. Skidmore has served as Vice President of Ventex Oil & Gas, Inc. since 1995 and has been actively involved in exploration and production throughout the Gulf Coast and mid-Continent regions for over 35 years. He founded Skidmore Exploration, Inc. in 1981 and has been an independent oil and gas producer since that time. From 1977 to 1981, he worked for Paraffine Oil Corporation and Texas Oil & Gas in Houston. He holds BS degrees in both Geology and Petroleum Engineering, is a Certified Petroleum Geologist and Registered Professional Engineer, and active member of the AAPG, and SPE.

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock Chemical weapons ed.
Post by: azozeo on November 19, 2016, 02:08:03 AM
http://www.distract101.com/2016/11/chemical-weapons-sprayed-over-standing-rock/ (http://www.distract101.com/2016/11/chemical-weapons-sprayed-over-standing-rock/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/0lCJ9RDCKFM&fs=1
Title: Police clash with North Dakota pipeline protesters, arrest one
Post by: RE on November 21, 2016, 01:48:02 AM
At this point, they are approaching this all wrong.  They have all their people focused at the site, allowing the Gestapo also to mass there.  There are hundreds of miles of vulnerable pipeline left unprotected.  A few sticks of dynamite would go a long way in raising the cost of completion of the pipeline.   Right now, they are ALREADY doing "illegal" property destruction by sabotaging construction equipment, so it wouldn't be anything new.  You don't even need dynamite.  Just take used cars and crash them into the pipeline at various random intervals.

RE

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-north-dakota-pipeline-idUSKBN13G0BS (http://www.reuters.com/article/us-north-dakota-pipeline-idUSKBN13G0BS)

Police clash with North Dakota pipeline protesters, arrest one

(http://s4.reutersmedia.net/resources/r/?m=02&d=20161121&t=2&i=1162494517&w=&fh=&fw=&ll=780&pl=468&sq=&r=LYNXMPECAK0FV)
Police confront protesters with a rubber bullet gun during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S. November 20, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

By Chris Michaud

Hundreds of protesters opposed to a North Dakota oil pipeline project they say threatens water resources and sacred tribal lands clashed with police who fired tear gas at the scene of a similar confrontation last month, officials said.

An estimated 400 protesters mounted the Backwater Bridge and attempted to force their way past police in what the Morton County Sheriff's Department initially described as an "ongoing riot," the latest in a series of demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

A statement from the agency said one arrest had been made by 8:30 p.m. local time (0230 GMT Monday), about 2 1/2 hours after the incident began 45 miles (30 miles) south of Bismark, the North Dakota capital. About 100 to 200 protesters remained after midnight.
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The Backwater Bridge has been closed since late October, when activists clashed with police in riot gear and set two trucks on fire, prompting authorities to forcibly shut down a protesters encampment nearby.

The Morton County Sheriff's Department said officers on the scene of the latest confrontation were "describing protesters' actions as very aggressive."

Demonstrators tried to start about a dozen fires as they attempted to outflank and "attack" law enforcement barricades, the sheriff's statement said.

Police said they responded by firing volleys of tear gas at protesters in a bid to prevent them from crossing the bridge.

Activists at the scene reported on Twitter that police were also spraying protesters with water in sub-freezing temperatures and firing rubber bullets, injuring some in the crowd.

Police did not confirm those reports, but later said protesters had hurled rocks, striking one officer, and fired burning logs from slingshots.

The clashes began after protesters removed a truck that had been on the bridge since Oct. 27, police said. The North Dakota Department of Transportation closed the Backwater Bridge due to damage from that incident.

The $3.7 billion Dakota Access project has been drawing steady opposition from Native American and environmental activists since the summer.

Completion of the pipeline, set to run 1,172 miles (1,185 km) from North Dakota to Illinois, was delayed in September so federal authorities could re-examine permits required by the Army Corps of Engineers.
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Plans called for the pipeline to pass under Lake Oahe, a federally owned water source, and to skirt the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation by about half a mile. Most of the construction has otherwise been finished.

The Standing Rock tribe and environmental activists say the project would threaten water supplies and sacred Native American sites and ultimately contribute to climate change.

Supporters of the pipeline, owned by Energy Transfer Partners, said the project offers the fast and most direct route for bringing Bakken shale oil from North Dakota to U.S. Gulf Coast refineries and would be safer than transporting the oil by road or rail.

(Reporting by Chris Michaud in New York; Editing by Steve Gorman and Susan Fenton)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock - 13 yo shot in the face - Tribal Elder attacked
Post by: azozeo on November 21, 2016, 08:42:55 AM
http://thefreethoughtproject.com/dapl-police-elder-attack/ (http://thefreethoughtproject.com/dapl-police-elder-attack/)

Title: Police, citing ‘ongoing riot,’ use water cannons on Dakota Access protesters in
Post by: RE on November 21, 2016, 12:35:47 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/11/21/police-citing-ongoing-riot-use-water-cannons-on-dakota-access-protesters-in-freezing-weather/ (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/11/21/police-citing-ongoing-riot-use-water-cannons-on-dakota-access-protesters-in-freezing-weather/)

Police, citing ‘ongoing riot,’ use water cannons on Dakota Access protesters in freezing weather
By Derek Hawkins November 21 at 4:13 AM
Police fire water cannon on protesters during freezing temperatures
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Play Video2:11
Police sprayed water cannons in freezing temperatures on protesters just north of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota Nov. 20. In a Facebook post, law enforcement officials said they were involved in an "ongoing riot." (Zoeann Murphy, McKenna Ewen/The Washington Post)

Tensions over the Dakota Access oil pipeline flared again Sunday when North Dakota law enforcement used water cannons to disperse a group of about 400 protesters trying to move past a barricaded bridge toward construction sites for the project.

As temperatures in Cannon Ball, N.D., dropped into the 20s, police in riot gear sprayed activists with a hose mounted atop an armored vehicle and formed a line to prevent them from advancing up the road, according to the Bismarck Tribune. Protesters also reported being pelted with rubber bullets, tear gas and concussion grenades during the standoff, which lasted until late Sunday night.

A grainy Facebook Live video from the scene shows throngs of people gathered around the Backwater Bridge on Highway 1806, with flood lights shining down on the grass and road below and a haze of smoke and water vapor rising near police vehicles.

The clashes began around 6 p.m., when protesters tried to remove burned out trucks that had been blocking the bridge since authorities and activists faced off there in late October. Police have since set up wire and concrete barriers on the bridge, which is about a mile south of where the pipeline developer plans to drill.

Protesters, who call themselves “water protectors,” have argued that the barricade prevents emergency services from reaching the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and a nearby camp they have used as a staging ground for demonstrations.
What you need to know about the Dakota Access pipeline protests
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The protest of an oil pipeline that is being constructed close to the Standing Rock Indian reservation has become a rallying point for Native Americans across the United States. Here's what you need to know. (Daron Taylor/The Washington Post)

Authorities responded after protesters moved one of the trucks blocking the roadway. The Morton County Sheriff’s Department said that by 8:30 p.m. an estimated 400 people had arrived to try to “breach” the bridge and had set dozens of fires in the area. The department called the situation an “ongoing riot,” saying protesters were “very aggressive” and were trying to “flank and attack the law enforcement line.” At least one person was arrested, the sheriff’s department said.

One of the protest organizers, Dallas Goldtooth, said protesters started small fires in the area to help warm people who had been sprayed with water in the freezing cold. He told the Tribune that some activists tried to remove the burned out trucks to expose the heavily armed authorities behind them.

“Folks have a right to be on a public road,” Goldtooth said. “It’s absurd that people who’ve been trying to take down the barricade now have their lives at risk.”

[U.N. officials denounce ‘inhuman’ treatment of Native American pipeline protesters]

Another organizer, Tara Houska, told the Tribune that more than 200 people had been hit with tear gas, pepper spray or water from the hose.

“They’re using everything and anything,” she said. “This has been weeks and weeks of those vehicles on the road for no apparent reason, and it’s a huge public safety risk. It’s putting enormous pressure on the Standing Rock Sioux community and people who live and work in the area.”

Organizers said the Cannon Ball gym was being used for emergency relief, with medics from the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes treating people who were injured in the standoff. Physicians and tribal healers with the Standing Rock Medic and Healer Council called on authorities to stop using water cannons against the protesters, saying the below-freezing weather could cause hypothermia and criticizing the “potentially lethal use of these controversial methods against people peacefully assembled,” CNN reported.

The sheriff’s department said water cannons were brought in to control the crowds and extinguish fires set by protesters.

“There are multiple fires being set by protesters on the bridge and in the area of the bridge,” department spokeswoman Donnell Hushka told CNN. “We have firetrucks on the scene. They are using their fire hoses to put out the fires, wet the land around so fires don’t spread, and they are also using water as crowd control.”

The sheriff’s department told the Tribune that the bridge has been closed since October because transportation officials were concerned about its structural integrity.

The $3.8 billion pipeline is scheduled to carry crude oil nearly 1,200 miles from North Dakota to Illinois. Construction is nearly complete, but a planned segment of the project that crosses under the Missouri River has been a source of contention for months. The Standing Rock Sioux argue that the pipeline cuts within a mile of their reservation and could pollute water and disrupt cultural sites. The tribe has challenged the project in court, and protesters have camped out near the Missouri River site for months.

Energy Transfer Partners, the project developer, says the pipeline transports oil more safely than trucks and will not harm sacred lands.

In October, a group of activists tried to set up a second protest camp closer to the area where drilling is planned. They blocked the roadway with scrap wood, bales of hay and tires and used abandoned trucks to block the Backwater Bridge. After repeatedly ordering them to leave, authorities stormed the camp, using pepper spray, high-pitched warnings and rubber bullets against those who refused to leave. More than 100 people were arrested.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on November 21, 2016, 12:41:24 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/Cwpo_j4c1Hk&fs=1
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 21, 2016, 12:46:55 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/Cwpo_j4c1Hk&fs=1


The psychopaths have the death ray, we the people have prayer....

Hhhhmmmmm, seems like a fair fight to me  :emthup:
Title: 16 Arrested at North Dakota Pipeline Protest
Post by: RE on November 21, 2016, 05:28:52 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/Cwpo_j4c1Hk&fs=1


The psychopaths have the death ray, we the people have prayer....

Hhhhmmmmm, seems like a fair fight to me  :emthup:

No Death Ray yet, but the Water Cannons, Tear Gas and Rubber Bullets are out.  I wonder when they bring in the LRAD?

RE

 U.S.
16 Arrested at North Dakota Pipeline Protest

By JONAH ENGEL BROMWICHNOV. 21, 2016

(https://static01.nyt.com/images/2016/11/22/us/22xp-standingrock/22xp-standingrock-master768.jpg)
Police near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Sunday fired tear gas at protesters opposed to plans that would run the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Credit Stephanie Keith/Reuters

Tensions continued in North Dakota on Monday afternoon as law enforcement officials arrested 16 people at a demonstration, one day after hundreds clashed with the police over the Dakota Access Pipeline.

During a news conference on Monday, officials also defended their use of fire hoses against protesters the night before, despite the below-freezing weather.

“Some of the water was used to repel some of the protest activities that were occurring, and it was used at a time where they were aggressive towards the officers,” the Morton County sheriff, Kyle Kirchmeier, said at the news conference.

In a statement late on Sunday, the Morton County Sheriff’s Department characterized the demonstration as an “ongoing riot,” releasing photos that it said showed protesters “setting fires and using aggressive tactics” while trying to dismantle a police barricade on Backwater Bridge, which has for months been the site of a protest against the pipeline.

The statement did not address what dispersal methods the department had used against what it estimated to be a crowd of 400 protesters.

Rob Keller, a spokesman for the department, told The Bismarck Tribune that water was being used for crowd control, adding that water cannons had also been used to douse the fires.

The paper reported that protesters had started a dozen fires and that officers from the sheriff’s department had said that rocks and logs were being thrown at them. One officer was struck on the head, it said. The Associated Press reported that at least one person was arrested.

Dallas Goldtooth, a spokesman for the Indigenous Environmental Network, said in a phone interview on Monday that the Oceti Sakowin medical team, which had been working in tandem with medics from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, had reported that nearly 200 people were injured and 12 people were hospitalized for head injuries. One protester went into cardiac arrest and was revived by the medic team, he said.

The medical teams attributed many of the injuries to rubber bullets, pepper spray and shrapnel from concussion grenades, according to Mr. Goldtooth, and said that water sprayed from cannons caused early signs of hypothermia. The air temperature in the area was about 23 degrees at 10:15 p.m., according to the National Weather Service.

“I would love to emphasize here that this entire situation is ripe with irony,” Mr. Goldtooth said, adding that on Friday, Sheriff Kirchmeier had urged the protesters to leave their camps because they might be unfamiliar with the harshness of North Dakota winters.

Late last month, tensions boiled over at a protest camp near Backwater Bridge when law enforcement officials forced demonstrators out of the area. That confrontation led to the arrests of more than 140 protesters and resulted in the setting of multiple fires.

Reports coming out of the conflict have been highly contested, with law enforcement officials and protesters leveling substantive accusations of violence at each other.

Dave Archambault II, the chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, said in a phone interview Monday that the measures law enforcement officials took on Sunday represented a clear escalation of violence.

“The use of water in freezing temperatures just goes to show that they’re being more aggressive and they’re actually trying to hurt people,” he said. “This is far more threatening to human life than any other time of confrontation with law enforcement.”
Photo
Police officers near Cannon Ball, N.D., confronted protesters with rubber bullet guns on Sunday night near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Credit Stephanie Keith/Reuters

A live video of Sunday’s protests was posted by a demonstrator named Kevin Gilbertt, who identifies himself on Facebook as a poet and videographer. Early Monday morning, the often-grainy and unclear video had been viewed over three million times.
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Senator Bernie Sanders shared Mr. Gilbertt’s video on his Facebook page and called for President Obama to “take all appropriate measures” to protect the protesters.

Senator Sanders also reposted a tweet that said that law enforcement officials were spraying Native Americans with water cannons in 26-degree weather.

The conflict over the $3.7 billion Dakota Access Pipeline has lasted for months, as Energy Transfer Partners, a Dallas-based company, attempts to finish construction of the 1,170-mile project

In an interview with The Associated Press published on Friday, Kelcy Warren, the company’s chief executive, said that the company had no alternative but to stick to the plan for construction.

“There’s not another way. We’re building at that location,” Mr. Warren said.

Native Americans, environmental activists and others have said that the pipeline, which would carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois, threatens the local water supply and would also harm sacred Native American grounds.

In an interview with NPR last month, Mr. Archambault, the tribal chairman, said that while protesters were asked to “remain prayerful and peaceful,” it was “hard to resist reacting” given the dual pressures coming from Energy Transfer Partners and law enforcement.

“Our purpose is to protect the water,” he said. “And no matter what we do, nobody cares. They’re going to force this down our throats again.”

Niraj Chokshi contributed reporting.
Continue reading the main story
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    Judge Rejects Riot Charge Against Amy Goodman of ‘Democracy Now’ Over Pipeline Protest OCT. 17, 2016
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on November 21, 2016, 05:40:33 PM
And what rule might have been broken by commenting on the restraint shown by the authorities during these last few confrontations?

Title: Standing Rock - 100's of vets headed to support NoDAPL
Post by: azozeo on November 24, 2016, 02:23:30 AM

 Zero Hedge

Submitted by Carey Wedler via TheAntiMedia.org,

As protesters continue to stand against the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota, facing off against heavily militarized police and their water cannons, rubber bullets, tear gas, and tasers, they have gained broad support. Celebrities and millions of social media users have raised awareness about the situation in North Dakota, and now, the “water protectors” have earned support from another group: veterans.

According to an article published by Business Insider that first appeared in Task and Purpose, a military-oriented news and culture site, two veterans are leading the charge in a show of dissent against the increasingly aggressive police. In the last several months, tensions have escalated as Natives and their allies have blocked the pipeline’s construction, citing fears surrounding water will be endangered and sacred burial sites will be destroyed (not to mention the fact their lands were forcibly stolen by the U.S. government over a century ago).

“This country is repressing our people,” says Michael A. Wood Jr., a Marine Corps veteran who recently retired from the Baltimore police force to work toward reforming law enforcement. “If we’re going to be heroes, if we’re really going to be those veterans that this country praises, well, then we need to do the things that we actually said we’re going to do when we took the oath to defend the Constitution from enemies foreign and domestic,” he asserted about his plans to go to Standing Rock.

Woods Jr. is joined by Wes Clark Jr. Clark Jr. is the son of General Wesley Clark, the famous military leader who once warned that shortly after 9/11, the government had its eyes on Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Iran. Clark would later attempt to distance himself from those statements but still managed to convince his son, a member of the Army at the time, to stay away from Iraq.

“I was like, ‘I’m going back in. I’m going to go in there and fuck people up,’” Clark Jr. recalls of his desire to fight for the military after 9/11. He later changed his mind after his father warned him, as Task and Purpose summarized, “that as a soldier he would be fighting a war that had nothing to do with defeating al Qaeda.”

Now, Wood Jr. and Clark Jr. are attempting to organize a mass, nonviolent protest against police action in North Dakota. Just this past weekend, a female protester was hit with a concussion grenade, causing severe damage to her arm and requiring surgery.

Other have been tear gassed, tased, beaten, and shot with rubber bullets. Anti-Media journalist Derrick Broze was tased by law enforcement immediately after he declared he was a member of the media. Another journalist was shot with a rubber bullet while standing away from a gathering of protesters as she interviewed an attendee.

Police have made over 470 arrests since August, and the Indigenous Environmental Network claims 167 people were injured just this past Sunday when police deployed water cannons in freezing weather.

Clark, a contributor to the Young Turks, explained that aside from the flagrant violations protesters are subject to in North Dakota, Natives are especially deserving of veteran support:

“First Americans have served in the Unites States Military, defending the soil of our homelands, at a greater percentage than any other group of Americans. There is no other people more deserving of veteran support,” he said.

According to a Facebook event the two men created called “Veterans Stand for Standing Rock,” those who join the effort will arrive at the protest site on December 4, where they will stay until December 7.

The event description reads:

    “Come to Standing Rock Indian Reservation and hold the line with Wes Clark jr, Michael Wood Jr, Tulsi Gabbard and hundreds of other veterans in support of the Sioux nation against the DAPL pipeline. Bring Body armor, gas masks, earplugs AND shooting mufflers (we may be facing a sound cannon) but no drugs, alcohol or weapons.”

Clark Jr. was clear he was not looking for violence and that the protest would be unarmed.

    “We’re not going out there to get in a fight with anyone,” he said. “They can feel free to beat us up, but we’re 100% nonviolence.”

As Task and Purpose explained:

    “With an eye toward the media, old military uniforms will be donned so that if the veterans are brutalized by the police, they are brutalized not as ordinary citizens, but as people who once served the government they are protesting against.”

The event page makes it clear that the group will not tolerate “hate, violence or divisive behavior of any kind.”

    “We’re doing this to support our country,” they advise, “so let’s do it with honor, working together. We can stop this savage injustice being committed right here at home. If not us, who? If not now, when?”

Over 250 veterans have already committed, but organizers hope to have a group of 500 or more by the time they head to Standing Rock.

Once there, the  veterans intend to engage in a traditional native healing ceremony with protesters, with whom they have been coordinating, according to the veterans. Then, protective gear like gas masks and body armor will be issued to anyone who needs it. The soldiers will march to bagpipes and Sioux war songs as they head to the banks of the Missouri River to meet police.

    “Then, the veterans and their allies — or at least the ones who are brave enough — will lock arms and cross the river in a ‘massive line’ for their ‘first encounter’ with the ‘opposing forces.’”

Though the veterans have adopted a strict policy of nonviolence, they refuse to back down and apparently hope to use their military status to spotlight the egregious behavior of the police.

    “We’ll have those people who will recognize that they’re not willing to take a bullet, and those who recognize that they are,” says Wood Jr. “It’s okay if some of them step back, but Wes and I have no intention of doing so.”

Veterans Stand for Standing Rock is accepting donations to cover food, transportation, and supplies for those who travel to North Dakota. You can donate here. You can also donate directly to the water protectors.
Title: Standing Rock - Anonymous takes down grenade sales website
Post by: azozeo on November 24, 2016, 02:28:05 AM

Activist Post
By Claire Bernish

Anonymous suddenly took an active role in the battle against the Dakota Access Pipeline, knocking offline the website of ‘less-than lethal’ weapons manufacturer, Safariland.com — whose tear gas canisters, concussion grenades, and other weapons were used by police against peaceful water protectors in an all-out assault Sunday night.



One young water protector, Sophia Walinksy, now faces the possibility of amputation, after one such device exploded point blank on her arm, shredding it down to the bone. A 13-year-old girl was shot in the face with a rubber bullet, and two tribal elders suffered cardiac arrest during the brutal police offensive and had to be resuscitated on scene.

Amid a complete blackout by the negligent corporate media, police from some 20 agencies and five states, led by the Morton County Sheriff’s Department, unleashed an over six-hour assault on water protectors, launching tear gas and concussion grenades, firing rubber bullets, and — perhaps most perilously and insultingly — soaking the captive crowd of around 400 with icy cold water in frigid temperatures.

Walinsky, according to witnesses and a statement via her father, Wayne, had been delivering much-needed water to the group on the Highway 1806 Backwater Bridge when what is believed to be a concussion grenade exploded on her arm, ripping through flesh and muscle, leaving bone exposed.

Beginning early Monday morning, Unicorn Riot, which had been reporting from the bridge overnight, returned to the scene to gather evidence and discovered spent munitions shells with markings from Safariland — including fragments of Stinger grenades.

Anonymous DeadSec, under the Twitter account @AzureDeadSec, took responsibility for taking down the Safariland site, tweeting, with a link to prove the downed site:

“@TMTalways @WorldAnonLegion @UR_Ninja @NoDAPL TANGO DOWN! Stop selling weapons being used against Water Protectors.”

    @TMTalways @WorldAnonLegion @UR_Ninja @NoDAPL TANGO DOWN! Stop selling weapons being used against Water Protectors. https://t.co/F2SltHeg0g pic.twitter.com/O5Riq4DFb8

    — DeadSec (@AzureDeadSec) November 22, 2016

    #Breaking– https://t.co/mjxwf1pmTp, site of @SafarilandGroup who made “less lethal” munitions used on #NoDAPL, taken offline by Anonymous pic.twitter.com/vHXH97NgH8

    — Unicorn Riot (@UR_Ninja) November 22, 2016

Morton County Sheriff’s Department spokeswoman Maxine Herr hubristically claimed in the Los Angeles Times that Walinsky could not possibly have been hit by anything from police, and must have been rigging a makeshift explosive device of her own to receive such an injury.

“It wasn’t from our law enforcement, because we didn’t deploy anything that should have caused that type of damage to her arm,” Herr boldly contended. “We’re not sure how her injury was sustained.”

Thanks to Unicorn Riot’s careful inspection of the scene, however, the sheriff’s department appears to be lying through its teeth.

Prior to the DeadSec takedown of the Safariland site, the description of Stinger grenades — identical to the pieces found at the site of the police assault on water protectors — indeed sound as if they would readily cause the horrific injury Walinsky endured:

    The Stinger® OC Grenade is a maximum effect device that delivers four stimuli for psychological and physiological effects: rubber pellets, light, sound, and OC. The Stinger® Grenade is most widely used as a crowd management tool by Law Enforcement and Corrections. The Stinger® Grenade has an initial 1.5 second delay that initiates fuze assembly separation, followed by another .5 second delay before the blast which is sufficient to project the rubber balls and chemical agent in a 50 foot radius.

If such a grenade landed on the young water protector’s arm, that 50-foot blast radius would be concentrated in a reduced space, and could obviously cause severe injury and disfigurement.

    Piece of Stinger grenade recovered from Hwy 1806 last night appears to match this @SafarilandGroup product- https://t.co/FnWoyrjksT #NoDAPL pic.twitter.com/5fVnQw4RJe

    — Unicorn Riot (@UR_Ninja) November 22, 2016

Safariland’s CS gas (tear gas) canisters also littered the area where police launched the altogether disproportionate assault on Standing Rock Sioux and other water protectors, and — again prior to the site being taken offline by Anonymous — described symptoms such as induced panic, and possible cardiac arrest.

    Chemical/”less lethal” munitions fired at #NoDAPL water protectors by Morton County Sheriff and supporting agencies Sun night/Monday morning pic.twitter.com/Zh2lrHTIsn

    — Unicorn Riot (@UR_Ninja) November 22, 2016

Such weapons, though they might be employed by police for crowd control under the broad characterization of less-than lethal, nonetheless can and do maim and even kill.

The Morton County Sheriff’s Department noted one officer received a head wound from a projectile launched by someone in the group of water protectors. However, police at Backwater Bridge launched the offensive from behind body armor, helmets, and riot shields, and were backed by blast-proof military vehicles — water protectors, in marked contrast, had nothing to shield themselves from the onslaught of chemical weapons, projectiles, and lower-intensity water cannons.

Those present in the group reported being choked with tear gas and then inundated with water, freezing clothing to skin almost immediately in the 23° weather. Scores suffered hypothermia, at least 20 water protectors had to be hospitalized, some in serious condition — and more than 165 people reported injuries of varying degrees.

Considering Safariland’s insidious weapons directly contributed to the suffering — and, in one case, permanent disfigurement, if not amputation — of peaceful water protectors whose only goal is to preserve clean drinking water for this and future generations, Anonymous’ takedown of the site makes sense.

Sophia Walinsky is currently enduring multiple surgeries at the Minnesota hospital where she was airlifted in an attempt to preserve her arm, but it still isn’t clear whether that will be possible. A GoFundMe campaign to assist her with medical expenses can be found here — if you are unable to contribute, please consider sharing the campaign.

Standing Rock Sioux water protectors face even tougher times ahead in their battle to halt construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, with temperatures this winter expected to be even lower than the frosty average. There are many ways you can help them this winter, a list of suggested items to donate and further information can be found here. You can also voice your concerns about police treatment of water protectors by contacting those responsible for the pipeline, and a suggested list can be found here.

Claire Bernish writes for TheFreeThoughtProject.com, where this article first appeared.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 24, 2016, 05:09:39 AM
(https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8b1106ecea144f8850f600a8284045866a099b78/0_125_3828_2297/master/3828.jpg?w=1300&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=71198d5f839a104c0afddfa80e17ee74)

(http://www.trbimg.com/img-58364f8a/turbine/la-azavis-1479954343-snap-photo/750/750x422)

(http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/bismarcktribune.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/48/448f8582-9448-5c04-bc9f-15b6d09ce4be/58339c97bb5a6.image.jpg?resize=1200%2C764)

A sweep of the nation's newspapers shows that a few stories are getting out.  Maybe one story about Standing Rock in every third major US newspaper.  Out, but a flash in the pan.  A bit of sound and fury that won't amount to much.  One of the pics above is from the LA Times, another is from the Bismark Tribune.  The top one I found across the pond in the Guardian.

See no evil, speak no evil all while doing plenty of evil.  It's the American Way.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fs3.amazonaws.com%2Fink_prod%2Fphotos%2F0348%2F4742%2FBillsMonkeys_large.jpg&f=1)

Something like that!

Of significance it that the vandalism of the two trucks is pushed in the American newspapers which do not feature the emerging community at the protest camp at all.  They of course do not mention that a protesters arm was almost blown off by a grenade beyond Bismark, and there they only say a protester was in surgery for an arm injury.  An accurate but cold and empty statement.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 24, 2016, 05:15:04 AM
Quote
Standing Rock chairman will talk to public in Bismarck


Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault will be at the Bismarck Veterans Memorial Public Library to answer the public’s questions about the tribe’s response to the Dakota Access Pipeline and provide an opportunity for civil dialogue as tensions mount.

The chairman will be at the library at 7 p.m. Monday, along with tribal historian Jon Eagle and members of the Standing Rock Youth Council.

The forum will provide time for presentations by the speakers and questions from the public. It is sponsored by the Dakota Resource Council.

“With issues as complex as the problems with the Dakota Access Pipeline and projects like it, it’s vital we find ways to come together with the purpose of understanding," the council’s executive director Don Morrison said.

LAUREN DONOVAN Bismarck Tribune 6 hrs ago
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: g on November 24, 2016, 05:16:34 AM
Amazing photos K-Dog, The Real Thing for sure. Powerful

Hope you don't mind if I re post a few on the weekend photo thread of mine?

 (https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8b1106ecea144f8850f600a8284045866a099b78/0_125_3828_2297/master/3828.jpg?w=1300&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=71198d5f839a104c0afddfa80e17ee74)
Title: Re: Standing Rock - Anonymous takes down grenade sales website
Post by: MKing on November 24, 2016, 10:18:55 AM

Activist Post
By Claire Bernish

Anonymous suddenly took an active role in the battle against the Dakota Access Pipeline, knocking offline the website of ‘less-than lethal’ weapons manufacturer, Safariland.com — whose tear gas canisters, concussion grenades, and other weapons were used by police against peaceful water protectors in an all-out assault Sunday night.

Did they take out the manufacturer of propane tanks the demonstrators were preparing to use as weapons against the Defenders of Law and Private Property as well? Are they planning on paying for the vandalism  and arson they have been specializing in as of late?

(http://a57.foxnews.com/images.foxnews.com/content/fox-news/us/2016/10/28/oil-pipeline-protesters-burn-vehicles-set-roadblock/_jcr_content/par/featured-media/media-0.img.jpg/876/493/1477681868805.jpg?ve=1&tl=1)


I tell you what, if peaceful protesters were busily peacefully burning up my vehicles on my property, it wouldn't be some stupid manufacturer of non-lethals anonymous would need to hack, but Sturm Ruger and Co., and maybe DPMS.

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 24, 2016, 03:13:50 PM
Amazing photos K-Dog, The Real Thing for sure. Powerful

Hope you don't mind if I re post a few on the weekend photo thread of mine?

 (https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8b1106ecea144f8850f600a8284045866a099b78/0_125_3828_2297/master/3828.jpg?w=1300&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=71198d5f839a104c0afddfa80e17ee74)

This is something that should be on a top notch mural professionally painted on the side of a building.  It should be at least 30 feet tall and wider than that in proportion.

I reiterate.  This photo did not come from a US news agency.  Painting it on a building as a work of art or distributing it in any way is an act of defiance in itself.  Come to think of it; I could make a web-page of it myself.  I can celebrate my families Indian blood!

If a judge cannot see that the rule of the people is being violated then there is no justice in this land.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 24, 2016, 03:17:41 PM
(http://www.techplz.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Standing-Rock-Protest-Cover.jpg)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on November 24, 2016, 04:08:09 PM
If a judge cannot see that the rule of the people is being violated then there is no justice in this land.

The photo has nothing to do with the will of the people K-Dog. It has to do with NIMBY, mostly.
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: CALL BANKSY!
Post by: RE on November 24, 2016, 04:16:07 PM
This is something that should be on a top notch mural professionally painted on the side of a building.  It should be at least 30 feet tall and wider than that in proportion.

CALL BANKSY!  ASAP!

(https://plone.unige.ch/art-adr/cases-affaires/banksy-mural-2013-bioresource-inc-and-555-nonprofit-studio-gallery/leadImage_large)

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 25, 2016, 01:13:55 PM
(http://www.techplz.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Standing-Rock-Protest-Cover.jpg)


K-Dog, thanks for posting this photo.
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: Down comes the HAMMER on Dec 5th!
Post by: RE on November 25, 2016, 07:23:09 PM
Well, now we get to see how tough these protesters will be.  In all likelihood, the full force of the state will be used to drive them off.

If they really want to keep this protest going, they will need to sacrifice lives.  They will need Martyrs.

RE

(http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/11/25/gettyimages-625638068_custom-4aace11764edc23a96e72064b3a3b46fd9e537cd-s800-c85.jpg)

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/25/503379401/army-corps-of-engineers-tells-pipeline-protesters-to-leave-camp-by-dec-5 (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/25/503379401/army-corps-of-engineers-tells-pipeline-protesters-to-leave-camp-by-dec-5)


Army Corps Of Engineers Tells Pipeline Protesters To Leave Camp By Dec. 5


November 25, 20169:37 PM ET

Martha Ann Overland

Protesters — or water protectors, as they identify themselves — walk along Highway 1806, past a sprawling encampment at Standing Rock on Thursday. Thousands of people gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers notified the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe on Friday that the public will not be allowed in areas being used to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline.

In a letter to the tribe, John W. Henderson, a district commander with the Corps, said that the area will be closed by Dec. 5. Anyone found to be on "Corps-managed land" north of the Cannonball River after that date will be considered trespassing and subject to prosecution:

    "I am closing the portion of the Corps-managed federal property north of the Cannonball River to all public use and access effective December 5, 2016.

    "This decision is necessary to protect the general public from the violent confrontations between protestors and law enforcement officials that have occurred in this area, and to prevent death, illness, or serious injury to inhabitants of encampments due to the harsh North Dakota winter conditions."

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's chairman, Dave Archambault II, released a statement saying that the tribe is deeply disappointed by the move but it has not changed their resolve to prevent the pipeline from being built north of reservation lands.

    "It is both unfortunate and ironic that this announcement comes the day after this country celebrates Thanksgiving – a historic exchange of goodwill between Native Americans and the first immigrants from Europe. Although the news is saddening, it is not at all surprising given the last 500 years of the treatment of our people. We have suffered much, but we still have hope that the President will act on his commitment to close the chapter of broken promises to our people and especially our children."

Police, Protesters Clash Near Dakota Access Pipeline Route
The Two-Way
Police, Protesters Clash Near Dakota Access Pipeline Route

Henderson's letter said the Corps has set up a free speech zone on land south of the river. He said that this area will allow police, fire and medical response teams to more easily access the area.

    "I do not take this action lightly, but have decided that it is required due to the concern for public safety and the fact that much of this land is leased to private persons for grazing and/or haying purposes as part of the Corps' land management practices. To be clear, this means that no member of the general public, to include Dakota Access pipeline protestors, can be on these Corps' lands."

The Standing Rock Resistance Is Unprecedented (It's Also Centuries Old)
Code Switch
The Standing Rock Resistance Is Unprecedented (It's Also Centuries Old)

Opponents of the $3.8 billion dollar project have been protesting the pipeline for months, claiming the project could harm drinking water and will encroach on sacred sites.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: Down comes the HAMMER on Dec 5th!
Post by: g on November 25, 2016, 07:37:03 PM
Well, now we get to see how tough these protesters will be.  In all likelihood, the full force of the state will be used to drive them off.

If they really want to keep this protest going, they will need to sacrifice lives.  They will need Martyrs.

RE

(http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/11/25/gettyimages-625638068_custom-4aace11764edc23a96e72064b3a3b46fd9e537cd-s800-c85.jpg)

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/25/503379401/army-corps-of-engineers-tells-pipeline-protesters-to-leave-camp-by-dec-5 (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/25/503379401/army-corps-of-engineers-tells-pipeline-protesters-to-leave-camp-by-dec-5)


Army Corps Of Engineers Tells Pipeline Protesters To Leave Camp By Dec. 5


November 25, 20169:37 PM ET

Martha Ann Overland

Protesters — or water protectors, as they identify themselves — walk along Highway 1806, past a sprawling encampment at Standing Rock on Thursday. Thousands of people gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers notified the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe on Friday that the public will not be allowed in areas being used to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline.

In a letter to the tribe, John W. Henderson, a district commander with the Corps, said that the area will be closed by Dec. 5. Anyone found to be on "Corps-managed land" north of the Cannonball River after that date will be considered trespassing and subject to prosecution:

    "I am closing the portion of the Corps-managed federal property north of the Cannonball River to all public use and access effective December 5, 2016.

    "This decision is necessary to protect the general public from the violent confrontations between protestors and law enforcement officials that have occurred in this area, and to prevent death, illness, or serious injury to inhabitants of encampments due to the harsh North Dakota winter conditions."

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's chairman, Dave Archambault II, released a statement saying that the tribe is deeply disappointed by the move but it has not changed their resolve to prevent the pipeline from being built north of reservation lands.

    "It is both unfortunate and ironic that this announcement comes the day after this country celebrates Thanksgiving – a historic exchange of goodwill between Native Americans and the first immigrants from Europe. Although the news is saddening, it is not at all surprising given the last 500 years of the treatment of our people. We have suffered much, but we still have hope that the President will act on his commitment to close the chapter of broken promises to our people and especially our children."

Police, Protesters Clash Near Dakota Access Pipeline Route
The Two-Way
Police, Protesters Clash Near Dakota Access Pipeline Route

Henderson's letter said the Corps has set up a free speech zone on land south of the river. He said that this area will allow police, fire and medical response teams to more easily access the area.

    "I do not take this action lightly, but have decided that it is required due to the concern for public safety and the fact that much of this land is leased to private persons for grazing and/or haying purposes as part of the Corps' land management practices. To be clear, this means that no member of the general public, to include Dakota Access pipeline protestors, can be on these Corps' lands."

The Standing Rock Resistance Is Unprecedented (It's Also Centuries Old)
Code Switch
The Standing Rock Resistance Is Unprecedented (It's Also Centuries Old)

Opponents of the $3.8 billion dollar project have been protesting the pipeline for months, claiming the project could harm drinking water and will encroach on sacred sites.

Lets hope we don't get another message sent to us by our beloved FBI like the last we got, Poor Lavoy, That was an EXECUTION I will never forget. What ever happened to our country. :icon_scratch: :-\


                                                       (http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/02/01/14/309DF03200000578-3426516-Shot_dead_Rancher_Robert_LaVoy_Finicum_pictured_was_shot_in_a_cl-a-4_1454335941845.jpg)


                                                       (http://therealrevo.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/lavoy-finicum.jpg)


                                                       (http://cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/LaVoy-Finicum-Shooting-Video-2.jpg)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: Down comes the HAMMER on Dec 5th!
Post by: RE on November 25, 2016, 07:49:28 PM
What ever happened to our country.

"Our Country" is a Mirage, and always has been from when it was first stolen by the Queen of England.  It's all a bg Ponzzi scheme, nothing more and has always been so.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: Down comes the HAMMER on Dec 5th!
Post by: MKing on November 25, 2016, 09:05:10 PM
Well, now we get to see how tough these protesters will be.  In all likelihood, the full force of the state will be used to drive them off.

If they really want to keep this protest going, they will need to sacrifice lives.  They will need Martyrs.

RE

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/25/503379401/army-corps-of-engineers-tells-pipeline-protesters-to-leave-camp-by-dec-5 (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/25/503379401/army-corps-of-engineers-tells-pipeline-protesters-to-leave-camp-by-dec-5)

Beat me to it. You can only abuse land held in the public trust for so long, whether you are Oregon Occupiers or Native American NIMBYs, before the boys in blue roll up on you.

Let us hope that TPTB remain as restrained as they have been to date. I think the Dakota folks have fought a good fight, but the Corps knows who their new boss will be in another couple months, and maybe are just trying to end this peacefully before the Trump Janet Reno equivalent orders folks in with tanks and flame throwers to solve the problem.
Title: Standing Rock: ND out of Money, says Feds gotta do the Dirty Work
Post by: RE on November 26, 2016, 04:01:38 PM
So, you think Obama will call up the National Guard to do the dirty work?  That will leave a nice stain on his record on leaving office.

By giving this much advance warning also, it's easily possible the Water Protectors could get 10,000 or more people there by that time.  If they are all sitting down and praying, how many National Guard Storm Troopers will it take to get them all into paddy wagons and what prisons are they going to stuff them into?  It takes at least 2 people to lift up one person who is sitting, and that assumes the person isn't struggling.  So they would need probably 20,000 National Guard.  I don't think there are that many in ND and the states surrounding it.

Dec 5th is shaping up to be quite a show, if Da Feds follow through.

RE

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/nov/26/north-dakota-gov-dalrymple-feds-made-dakota-access/ (http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/nov/26/north-dakota-gov-dalrymple-feds-made-dakota-access/)

North Dakota governor: The feds made the Dakota Access mess, they can clean it up

(http://twt-thumbs.washtimes.com/media/image/2016/11/26/Oil_Pipeline_Protests.JPEG-61dd4_c0-136-1632-1087_s885x516.jpg?e88cf1e50515d593b97b11fdd8f9b43c24db98f8)
The protesters said Saturday that they do not plan to leave and will continue to oppose construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline. (AP photo/James MacPherson)

Pipeline protesters are preparing to fight planned Dec. 5 eviction from federal land

The Obama administration claimed more than 1 million acres in California, Texas, and Nevada, designating the land as new national monuments. The new monuments include the Berryessa Snow Mountain in California. (Image: http://berryessasnowmountain.org (http://berryessasnowmountain.org))
Lands activists urge Trump to revoke Obama’s national monuments
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland, the top Democrat on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, sees potentially serious conflicts of interest between Donald Trump's political and business dealings. (Associated Press)

By Valerie Richardson - The Washington Times - Updated: 4:45 p.m. on Saturday, November 26, 2016

Gov. Jack Dalrymple had a message Saturday for the Obama administration: Don’t expect local and state law enforcement to do your dirty work by evicting the Dakota Access pipeline protesters.

The North Dakota Republican said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers would need to take the lead after setting a Dec. 5 deadline to vacate protest camps located on federal property north of the Cannonball River, where hundreds if not thousands have been illegally camped for months.

“Our state and local law enforcement agencies continue to do all they can to keep private property and public infrastructure free from unpermitted protest activities, and it’s past time that the federal government provides the law enforcement resources needed to support public safety and to enforce their own order to vacate,” Mr. Dalrymple said in a statement.

SEE ALSO: U.S. govt. sets deadline for Dakota Access Pipeline protesters to leave federal land

He said he supports the decision to close the camp, but the state has already spent more than $10 million on additional law-enforcement costs while his pleas for federal assistance have gone largely unheeded.

“For more than 100 days now, the federal government has allowed protesters to illegally entrench themselves on Corps land and it is the federal government’s responsibility to lead the camp’s peaceful closure,” Mr. Dalrymple said.

Anyone who tries to remove the activists is all but guaranteed to take an enormous public-relations hit from environmentalists, Hollywood stars and media outlets sympathetic to the protest.
 
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The three major television networks quoted foes of the project seven times more than opponents from Oct. 27 to Nov. 15, according to the conservative Media Research Center.

North Dakota law enforcement has been vilified for months for its response, with the ACLU and Amnesty International calling for a Justice Department investigation into possible civil-rights violations.

Local sheriffs have defended their use of pepper spray, rubber bullets, sound cannons and water hoses, saying they are deploying the least-lethal means possible as they grapple with activists who have set fires, blocked highways and bridges, and thrown rocks, flaming debris and Molotov cocktails at officers.

One woman was charged last month with attempted murder after firing three shots at deputies, all of which missed.

Already, pipeline foes are gearing up for a confrontation, vowing on social media to bring thousands of activists to the campsite and resist any efforts to remove them.

“The 5th of December is the day/We sit like stone and we pray,” said the Indigenous Life Movement in a post on Facebook.

Cheyenne River Sioux chairman Harold Frazier said the Corps had made a “dangerous and grave mistake” and urged the administration to reconsider its effort to remove the protesters.

“[E]ven if I could control the water protectors, I recognize and respect their rights under the Constitution to peaceably assemble in prayerful protest against the cultural and environmental atrocity that is the Dakota Access Pipeline,” said Mr. Frazier in a Friday letter to Corps commander Col. John W. Henderson.

The Corps has asked for the Standing Rock Sioux, which is leading the protest, to encourage occupiers to leave the area and assemble instead in the “free-speech zone” south of the Cannonball River, which is also federal land.

Mr. Dalrymple said the Obama administration has made the situation worse with its lengthy delays in issuing a previously approved easement for the pipeline, which is needed to finish the final 1,100 feet in North Dakota.

The 1,172-mile, four-state project, which would carry a half-million barrels of oil per day from the Bakken field to Illinois, is roughly 87 percent complete.
Title: Pipeline protesters vow to stay camped on federal land
Post by: RE on November 27, 2016, 12:50:35 AM
SHOWDOWN AT THE DAKOTA CORRAL!

Dec 5th, 2016.

Guesstimates on how many Water Protectors can be rounded up by Dec 5th?

RE

Pipeline protesters vow to stay camped on federal land
Associated Press

    James Macpherson, Associated Press

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) — Dakota Access oil pipeline protesters will not follow a government directive to leave the federal land where hundreds have camped for months, organizers said Saturday, despite state officials encouraging them to do so.

Standing Rock Sioux tribal leader Dave Archambault and other protest organizers confidently explained that they'll stay at the Oceti Sakowin camp and continue with nonviolent protests a day after Archambault received a letter from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that said all federal lands north of the Cannonball River will be closed to public access Dec. 5 for "safety concerns."

The Corps cited the oncoming winter and increasingly contentious clashes between protesters, who believe the pipeline could harm drinking water and Native American cultural sites, and police.

"We are wardens of this land. This is our land and they can't remove us," said protester Issac Weston, who is an Oglala Sioux member from South Dakota. "We have every right to be here to protect our land and to protect our water."

The vast majority of the several hundred people fighting against the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline have created a self-sustaining community at the sprawling camp, which is on Corps land in southern North Dakota, and have put up semi-permanent structures or brought motor homes and trailers in advance of the harsh winter.

On the unseasonably warm Saturday, people were chopping wood and setting up tents at the encampment, which is more than a mile from a Missouri River reservoir where the final large segment of the pipeline is yet to be completed due to the Corps consulting with the tribe. Authorities had set up a staging area about a mile away on a hill overlooking the site.

Dallas Goldtooth, a protest organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network, said it is "an atrocious example that colonization has not ended for us here as indigenous people," and that the government's request will escalate already rocky tensions.

Representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers didn't immediately return multiple messages Friday or Saturday seeking comment and verification of the letter. Last month, the Corps said it would not evict the encampment, which started as overflow from smaller private and permitted protest sites nearby and began growing in August.

President Barack Obama raised the possibility of rerouting the pipeline in that area earlier this month, something Kelcy Warren, CEO of Texas-based pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners, told The Associated Press is not an option from the company's standpoint. Obama said his administration is monitoring the "challenging situation" but would "let it play out for several more weeks."

Some of the protests have resulted in violent confrontations — one woman suffered a serious arm injury last weekend — and more than 500 people have been arrested since August.

The Corps' letter, according to Archambault, said that those who stay on the land after Dec. 5 may be prosecuted, and that there'll be a free speech zone south of the river.

Archambault said Saturday that he doesn't believe the Corps will forcibly evict people from the camp, adding that the tribe is working to provide protesters protection from the elements on its reservation, which is south of the Cannonball River, but offered few details.

It's the federal government's job to peacefully close the camp because it allowed people to stay there in the first place, Gov. Jack Dalrymple said in a statement Saturday.

"Our state and local law enforcement agencies continue to do all they can to keep private property and public infrastructure free from unpermitted protest activities, and its past time that the federal government provides the law enforcement resources ... to enforce their own order to vacate," the Republican said.

Republican U.S. Sen. John Hoeven and Democratic U.S. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp said the protesters need to move for public safety.

"The well-being and property of ranchers, farmers and everyone else living in the region should not be threatened by protesters who are willing to commit acts of violence," Hoeven said in a statement Friday. He also called on the Obama administration to let work on the pipeline move forward, saying, "this difficult situation has gone on too long and we need to get it resolved."

Heitkamp said the Corps' order is "a needed step to support the safety of residents, workers, protesters and law enforcement."
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 27, 2016, 03:30:39 AM
I am betting they can get 10,000 on location on Dec 5th if they keep up the social media campaign.

http://www.youtube.com/v/5m1X5DBg1VY

If they can put up that many numbers, the clearing out will make Obama look very bad.  If they can put up bigger numbers, they just will not be able to do a clearing, not in a week anyhow.

This is a very good test.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 27, 2016, 07:43:55 AM
Well it's starting to look like the Water Protectors might win.  I can't imagine Obama unleashing the full might of the National Guard to forcefully remove all of the protestors from the camp.  It would be a PR nightmare for the government. 

The Corporatocracy has made their intentions clear.  DAPL will proceed.  Obama has been mute.  He's likely hoping to sit on his hands until Trump is inaugurated.  He's likely hoping that Trump can do the dirty work, and I bet he would gladly do it.  I can see Trumps first act as POTUS being to send the military in to remove the protestors.  It would be the perfect symbolic representation of where we are headed with a Trump president.  The first, out of the closet, open Corporatocracy president.  He's even not going to be moving into the White House.  More perfect symbolism for who he is and what he represents.

You are right RE, it is a good test, but it's more than that.  This is the point of no return.  The pipeline is 87% complete.   

I want to be a Water Protector.  I want to be there in North Dakota.  But I fear for the consequences of doing so.  It would take all of the money I have to make it happen.  Bills would not be paid.  I'm struggling to keep it together financially right now.  Then, more importantly, I understand that I need petroleum to keep engaging with the Matrix.  My business depends on that petroleum to be affordable which is the point of the pipeline...to keep it affordable. 

On the other hand what is more important than water and a human supporting biome?  In the end, what is better for my children?  Is it better for me to keep up with BAU as best I can to keep supplying them with the lifestyle the Matrix upholds with it's BAU?  Or is it more important for me to be a Water Protector in an attempt to provide them with a biome they can be healthy in? 

In the end, I'm jaded enough and my idealism has all but evaporated.  The Corporatocracy has been in charge for my entire life.  Unfortunately I believe that the Water Protectors are too late.  Our waters are already poisoned with radiation and agricultural chemical run off.  There is already a dead zone in the gulf.  The topsoil is all but gone.  The cake has been baked and all that's left is for us to eat it...poison and all.  So in the end I suppose I stay put, a slave to the world that's been designed by the Corporations. 

The Corporatocracy king has already been chosen.  All that's left is the inauguration.  Trump will be the first open Corporatocracy King, and he will ensure the Black Snake makes it's crossing into our ruin.  Money is more important than clean water. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 28, 2016, 02:11:38 AM
Well it's starting to look like the Water Protectors might win.  I can't imagine Obama unleashing the full might of the National Guard to forcefully remove all of the protestors from the camp.  It would be a PR nightmare for the government.

You wanna be the Diner Rep at Standing Rock?  I'll buy the plane ticket.  Only requirement is you take pics and vid, and don't get your head bashed in.  Realistically though, it's a big logistical challenge and probably not workable in the physical world for us right now.  So we need to do our job as bloggers.

I'm working on my Sunday Brunch article now, to publish on Dec 4th, the day before D-Day.  I don't know what will happen between now and then, so it is kind of tough to write.

It will be very hard for Da Goobermint to follow through on clearing the camp.  The only way to do it would be to bring in the Heavy Artillery, LRAD, Microwaves, the WORKS.  They would also have to keep it up for quite some time, since the protesters would just run off, then come back later.

TPTB are set on trying to complete the pipeline for sure, but IMHO Economics will kill it anyhow.  However, if the Water Protectors really want to keep it from getting completed, they need a new strategy.  They need to distribute long the entire length of the pipeline and begin a campaign of sabotage, before the oil starts to flow.  If/when the oil starts to flow, sabotage would set of an oil spill, damaging the environment you are trying to protect.  On a logistical basis, there is no way that a thousand miles of pipeline can be protected.  I don't think such a strategy is necessary though, as I said economics will kill  this in the not too distant future anyhow.

From Da Goobermint side of logistics and battle plans, the number of troops they will need to clear this camp is HUGE.  Given the population base of ND, SD, MT etc, I don't know if they even have NG Reserves to call up around there in the numbers necessary.  If the local cops and state troopers will not do the job, then where will the manpower come from?

It's all about the numbers.  If the Water Protectors can put 10,000 people out there, they will slow this down a lot.  If they can put 100,000 out there, the pipeline is likely finished.

RE
Title: Standing Rock Resistance (On Contact special episode w/ Chris Hedges)
Post by: RE on November 28, 2016, 02:19:45 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/nRO7arI1KNo
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 28, 2016, 08:45:54 AM

You wanna be the Diner Rep at Standing Rock?  I'll buy the plane ticket.  Only requirement is you take pics and vid, and don't get your head bashed in.  Realistically though, it's a big logistical challenge and probably not workable in the physical world for us right now.  So we need to do our job as bloggers.

Yes, I do want to go up there.  The only way I could see it working would be to fly in to Minneapolis and have WHD pick me up and drive me out there.  However, I'd have to be able to camp.  That would require more gear than I could take on a plane.  Really the only way to make it feasible would be for me to drive.  I figured 25 mpg with the vue at 1600 miles one way with an average of $2.50 per gallon.  There and back it's about $320 in gas.  My truck would be about $500 there and back.  If I go I'd want to stay a minimum of one week, probably longer. 

The main issue is that I still have a few jobs on the books for December.  So even if you paid the gas cost I'd be loosing money that I need to get through the winter.  However, come January I won't have shit going on with my business.  I think maybe we should wait and see what happens.  If there is still a resistance come January than there is a good chance, if you are willing to help financially, that I will drive up there. 


Quote
It will be very hard for Da Goobermint to follow through on clearing the camp.  The only way to do it would be to bring in the Heavy Artillery, LRAD, Microwaves, the WORKS.  They would also have to keep it up for quite some time, since the protesters would just run off, then come back later.

I don't see it being a problem for the military.  The goobermint sends in the military and they stay a few months.  Why is that out of the realm of possibility? 
Quote
TPTB are set on trying to complete the pipeline for sure, but IMHO Economics will kill it anyhow.  However, if the Water Protectors really want to keep it from getting completed, they need a new strategy.  They need to distribute long the entire length of the pipeline and begin a campaign of sabotage, before the oil starts to flow.  If/when the oil starts to flow, sabotage would set of an oil spill, damaging the environment you are trying to protect.  On a logistical basis, there is no way that a thousand miles of pipeline can be protected.  I don't think such a strategy is necessary though, as I said economics will kill  this in the not too distant future anyhow.

How is it that economics will kill this?  It's 87% complete as of now.  They already got the money to do it. 
Quote
From Da Goobermint side of logistics and battle plans, the number of troops they will need to clear this camp is HUGE.  Given the population base of ND, SD, MT etc, I don't know if they even have NG Reserves to call up around there in the numbers necessary.  If the local cops and state troopers will not do the job, then where will the manpower come from?

It will come from the Army/Marines/NG/fed groups like DHS I suppose.  Question is are we at the point where the goobermint is ready to come out of the closet entirely?  I expect once Trump is inaugurated he won't have any problems with sending in the troops to squash the resistance.  He's got stock in the energy company that's responsible for this pipeline after all doesn't he?  It's not as if his main support base in the populace will have a problem with the military shitting all over the natives is it? 

Let's wait and see what happens once King Trump is inaugurated.  If there is still a resistance left then I will go up there and join them.  With your financial support. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on November 28, 2016, 09:15:17 AM
I wouldn't go up there. Too much of a chance of coming to harm, and you have family who depend on you. It's just a pipeline. Not worth dying over. And it will most likely get built, one way or another.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 28, 2016, 09:44:36 AM
I wouldn't go up there. Too much of a chance of coming to harm, and you have family who depend on you. It's just a pipeline. Not worth dying over. And it will most likely get built, one way or another.

That's pretty much how I feel about it when I'm not being idealistic that is.  Plus, I need cheap gasoline to make my living right now, and I don't want to be a hypocrite.  We need to change BAU, but BAU won't change.  What's the end game here?  They stop DAPL and then get in their ICE cars and drive home with gasoline that costs more? 

It's sort of fubar...the whole thing. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 28, 2016, 12:45:04 PM
I wouldn't go up there. Too much of a chance of coming to harm, and you have family who depend on you. It's just a pipeline. Not worth dying over. And it will most likely get built, one way or another.

That's pretty much how I feel about it when I'm not being idealistic that is.  Plus, I need cheap gasoline to make my living right now, and I don't want to be a hypocrite.  We need to change BAU, but BAU won't change.  What's the end game here?  They stop DAPL and then get in their ICE cars and drive home with gasoline that costs more? 

It's sort of fubar...the whole thing.

The issue is that Standing Rock people do not want a very dangerous pipeline crossing the Missouri River by the reservation.  This is a case of externalities not being responsibly considered and is an issue concerning actual fossill fuel consumption only tangentially.
Title: Standing Rock- Native Tribes – Pawns of Agenda 21
Post by: azozeo on November 28, 2016, 01:21:27 PM

Gem State Patriot

Agenda 21, Chapter 26 is titled “Recognizing And Strengthening The Role Of Indigenous People And Their Communities”. That was in 1992. It is stunning how these goals have been implemented and advanced since that time. The United Nations (UN) has defined indigenous people as self-identified, pre-colonial and pre-settler, with a strong link to resources, distinct political systems, language, and beliefs, and being a non-dominant group.

Goals of Chapter 26 include strengthening policies to empower indigenous people; creating national dispute-resolution arrangements for land settlement and resource-management; strengthening indigenous peoples participation in formulation of policies and programs relating to resource management and initiation of proposals for such policies and programs; enhancing sustainable development (SD); protecting cultural property; creating inter-governmental cooperation; and providing technical and financial assistance to them. As seen in Part 2, some of these goals have been accomplished by the federal government.

The UN worked on Indigenous issues prior to Agenda 21. In 1982 the Working Group on Indigenous Populations began studying fundamental freedoms of indigenous peoples to develop international standards for indigenous people’s rights.

Although never ratified by the U.S., in 1989, the UN International Labor Organization (ILO) law, Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention (No. 169), called for countries to recognize indigenous people’s right to control their institution, life, economic development, and right to maintain their identity, languages and religions. Article 14 specifically addresses land issues, requiring states to safeguard indigenous people’s right to land “…not exclusively occupied by them, but to which they have traditionally had access…”, and procedures to resolve land claims. The Convention also calls for indigenous recognition in other areas, all of which the U.S. has achieved through federal actions.

The first action taken to accomplish Chapter 26 goals was in 1993 by WJC Executive Order (EO) 12852, the President’s Council on Sustainable Development, implementing Agenda 21. The council was comprised of federal agencies which included the Department of Interior (DOI); Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and UN non-governmental organizations (NGO). The DOI manages the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA); Bureau of Land Management (BLM); U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS); and National Park Service (NPS), all of which promote indigenous rights, while the DOI continued managing the fiduciary responsibilities.

In 1995 the Department of Justice (DOJ) established a policy to empower Tribes and government relations, and protect Tribal culture, establishing an Office on Tribal Justice in 2014. The 1996 EO 13007 by WJC declared Indian access to and protection of sacred sites on federal land. EO 12852 was expanded in 2000 with WJC EO 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments, giving Tribes a greater voice in federal policies by placing an Indian office in each federal agency. BHO reinforced EO 13175 in 2009 with a memorandum instructing all federal agencies to submit plans to implement EO 13175. In 2011 the EPA signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) to “…share common goals and objectives…”, and through this partnership how UN Sustainable Development goals are being achieved by the EPA. Other federal agencies promoting the same can be found here.

Those are some accomplishments for Agenda 21. But the UN expanded Chapter 26 goals.

In 2007 the UN revealed its United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (DRIP). The essence of this declaration is the recognition of indigenous collective rights for culture, language, identity, employment, health, education, and prohibiting discrimination. There are 46 articles in this document outlining indigenous rights. Some of those rights are directly related to U.S. history such as rights to self-determination and self-government; not being subjected to forced assimilation or cultural destruction or forcibly removed from their lands or territories; not be dispossessed of their land, territories or resources; practice cultural traditions; control educational systems in their own culture and language; administer programs through their own institutions; and right to traditional medicines. Most of these have already been enacted in U.S. law.

More terrifying however are the articles on indigenous rights to the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned, occupied or otherwise acquired; compensation for lands, territories, and resources they have traditionally owned, occupied or used, and which have been confiscated, taken, occupied, used or damaged without their free, prior and informed consent; and that compensation shall take the form of lands, territories and resources equal in quality, size and legal status or of monetary compensation or other appropriate redress.

Although never officially recognized or adopted by Congress, through BHO, this declaration is “supported” and being implemented. In 2007 the DOI appointed an individual as Counsel to Assistance Secretary-Indian Affairs who had actually worked in partnership with the UN on the rights of Indigenous Peoples. The DOI, in 2010, called for a review of DRIP and subsequently, after a “review” by federal agencies, BHO declared U.S. support in 2010 while outlining his accomplishments in meeting some of the declaration’s goals. The Department of State also supported this BHO declaration to “address the consequences of history”. A representative from Interior Indian Affairs proudly announced BHO’s decision to support DRIP at the UN in 2011. One month later that same individual announced to the UN DOI’s commitment to give land back to the Tribes (Page 4). There was no Congressional approval for this.

Not satisfied with just governments implementing their agenda, in 2011 the UN created the United Nations-Indigenous People’s Partnership (UNIPP), a full partnership with indigenous groups to advance the agenda and carry out DRIP mandates. This includes partnerships between UN organizations, indigenous groups, and other UN bodies such as non-governmental organizations (NGO). In 2012 UNEP developed a guidance policy for member states to use in policy development and bring indigenous people into closer partnership with the UN.

In 2013, EO 13647 established the White House Council on Native American Affairs that includes inter-governmental agency coordination on Indian affairs. Not surprisingly, the first meeting didn’t include any Tribal leaders. Following that in December 2014, BHO announced to Tribal leaders his intent to restore tribal homelands and resolve water right disputes, both commitments to Agenda 21 and DRIP.

The DOI strategic plan 2014-2018 actively implements DRIP. In this plan the DOI outlines commitments to strengthen tribal nations; restore tribal lands; establish strong relationships with tribes; fulfill commitments for water rights; develop and increase energy resources; preserve and enhance cultural interests and sacred sites; convert 500,000 acres from fee to trust; enhance water availability to tribes; finalize and implement water rights settlements; provide technical assistance and ecosystem restoration; secure water supplies; protect tribal water rights; improve infrastructure; honor and protect cultural resources; and protect treaty rights. This will all be accomplished through DOI partnerships with other federal agencies, that “inter-government” collaboration. If anyone wants to know the direction American citizens are headed with land and water rights, this plan tells you. An outline of the plan was presented to the Indian Affairs committee in 2011 and as a result there has been legislation introduced and passed for implementation.

 RESTORING LAND

In 2014 Michael Crapo (R-ID) was responsible for the Blackfoot River Land Exchange Act which restores previous land held by the Fort Hall Reservation and compensation for land lost in the exchange.

Jon Tester (D-MT) has taken it upon himself to sponsor laws that would restore water and land to Tribes in four states. Tester also introduced S.732 which would give the DOI the ability to take land back into trust even though a Tribe is not federally recognized, overturning a Supreme Court decision. Six bills were passed in November, 2015, four of which put land into trust on behalf of Tribes.

Having made previous attempts to extend Tribal land, Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) introduced legislation this year to declare Nevada land should be held in trust for Tribes as reservation land, including Duck Valley. Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-OR) introduced a bill that would allow the DOI to take into trust additional lands for the Siletz Tribe from the original 1855 Siletz Coast Reservation. Fortunately going nowhere, the America Indian Empowerment Act 2015 by Rep. Don Young (R-AK) would fulfill DRIP by granting fee land back to tribes.

Land at Fort Wingate in New Mexico, an abandoned military installment, was given back to the Zuni Tribe and Navajo Nation in 2014, another example of how the federal government places land “in trust” for Tribes, along with all the resources.

The DOI implemented the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPR) in 1995 granting Tribal rights to human remains and sacred objects. In 2015 the DOI pulled together other crony federal agencies for an MOU to protect Tribal sacred sites, not only on federal land but private land as well. The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) will help with this as well, along with other commitments.

The federal government is also spending 1.9 Billion to buy land back for placement into trust for Tribes per DOI Secretarial Order 3325. Here is the 2015 status report. But the truth is, that land is going into federal hands who are probably drooling at the opportunity to promote another UN goal, economic development. Tribes working with the government to implement SD practices as seen in this 2014 CDA Reservation Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, loaded with UN ideology. The government is lying to Tribes when it says this scam will restore tribal lands. It is putting land into government hands for future manipulation towards UN goals. It couldn’t be better stated in this Standing Rock Sioux Tribe agreement, “Consolidated interests are immediately transferred to Tribal governments and stay in trust for uses benefiting the tribes and their members.” What has the federal government ever done with fiduciary responsibilities for Tribes that is ethical? It was the Cobell lawsuit, filed because of fiduciary mismanagement, that created this land buyback program in the first place. And now Tribes are being deceived again. Your tax dollar, “awarded” to Tribes, then used by Tribes to buy land which goes into federal hands.

These are only a few examples of how the federal government is working to achieve the UN DRIP agenda to restore land to Tribes. Other legislation related to land issues can be found here.

According to the UN NGO National Congress of American Indians document, on pages 26-27, the DOI has placed about 9 million acres of land into trust for Tribes since 1934 stating it represents only about 10% of 90 million acres lost. Idahoans better start pulling together and revolt against any further land confiscation as this issue will only worsen.

WATER

Established in 2009, the DOI has an Indian Water Rights Office for the purpose of oversee implementation of water settlements. The Bureau of Reclamation also supports Indian water rights. The DOI was successful in getting legislation passed in December, 2015 that provides technical assistance and funds for energy while giving preference for hydroelectric licenses to Tribes.

The 2009 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Carcieri v. Salazar, held that under the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 the federal government cannot take land into trust for Indian Tribes not under Federal jurisdiction in 1934. Tester’s bill S.732 is an effort to overrule that decision so that more land, including the water rights attached to it, would be available for the government to place into trust for Tribes.

This year, DOI Secretary Jewell actively worked to give your tax dollar to Tribes, including Duck Valley, for restoration of “water rights”, fulfilling DRIP requirements. Funds for improving Tribal water and sanitation infrastructure is provided by the EPA plus grants for building water infrastructures. Senator John Barrasso (R-WY) introduced a bill to fund renovations of Tribal irrigation systems. The Claims Resolution Act of 2010 met DRIP mandates to bring water disputes to settlement. According to the DOI Deputy Secretary water right settlements are the right direction for everyone. The Omnibus Public Lands Management Act 2009 is loaded with placing large parcels of land into federal hands and turning water over to Tribes.

But, most alarming, Tribes as well as American citizens should be concerned about the trend of banks, most of which are UN business partners, buying water rights and utilities. These UN crony banks won’t care one iota whether Tribes get their perceived right to water. The whole scam is controlling water and the amount the UN thinks you should have. Wake up Idaho.

UN

Meanwhile, back at the UN, UN NGOs such as the American Indian Law Alliance, Association on American Indian Affairs, Foundation for the American Indian, Native American Rights Fund, Cherokee Nation, and Western Shoshone Defense Project are just a few groups that work to promote UN ideology and goals.

Activists have also been working with the UN to urge more emphasis on water rights issues. But going beyond that, there are now demands for “…our right to have our treaties honored and respected as binding international instruments…”, rejecting the faux U.S. support of DRIP. A UN human rights investigator called for the U.S. to return all land back to tribes in 2012.

In 2011 the UN criticized the U.S. of discriminating against indigenous people’s right to safe drinking water even though the U.S. had recently joined a UN consensus resolution that recognized the right to water is a right to an adequate standard of living.

The Doctrine of Discovery has become a focused issue with the UN including groups advocating for its removal. This would dramatically alter U.S. relations with Tribes and have a devastating impact on America as we know it. Other bills permitting the use of peyote and educating Indian children in their native culture and language have been passed. The World Conference of Indigenous People, held in 2014 includes new declarations to incorporate Agenda 21 for Sustainable Development.

More serious, a subject that is never covered in the open, Alaska and Hawaii indigenous groups are asking for UN intervention to end U.S. “occupation”. The UN has a group that works on decolonization. Beginning on page 18, the UN group discusses the possibility of Hawaii being decolonized, and concluding on page 21, “…there is a process to seek decolonization through the Decolonization Committee” for Hawaii.

CONCLUSION

Efforts to keep this issue short were impossible. The information presented in this 3 part series is only a fraction of what the federal government is doing in collusion with the UN and Tribes. And it is not going to end. EVERYONE must go back and read the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Declaration of Independence. We are a Constitutional Republic, not a democracy as so often stated by everyone now. Every aspect of the Constitution and Bill of Rights has been violated by the federal government. As a Constitutional Republic we are no longer being represented by those we elect. The federal government is in the business of representing the UN.

The federal government is so embedded with the UN that in 2010 legislation was actually introduced to have an Ambassador to the UN be in the line of succession to the presidency. Don’t be shocked if this comes up again.

“But when a long Train of Abuses and Usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object, evinces a Design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their Right, it is their Duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future Security.”

It is up to us to stop these unconstitutional acts. It is time for Idahoans to come together, develop a plan, and execute that plan to demand Idaho stand up for state rights and disengage from every unconstitutional federal law being enacted in Idaho. We must do this or we will continue to be raped of any last piece of liberty that remains.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 28, 2016, 01:26:37 PM
A friend of mine posted this story up on face palm.  I figured I'd share it here to get some opinions on it. 

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/opinion/os-ed-standing-rock-sioux-other-side-110916-20161109-story.html (http://www.orlandosentinel.com/opinion/os-ed-standing-rock-sioux-other-side-110916-20161109-story.html)


Quote
With the help of celebrities and professional activists, protests of the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota have attracted international attention. The shouting and violence have drawn sympathy from people who are hearing only one side of the story — the one told by activists. Were the full story to be heard, much, if not all, of that sympathy would vanish.

The activists tell an emotionally charged tale of greed, racism and misbehavior by corporate and government officials. But the real story of the Dakota Access Pipeline was revealed in court documents in September, and it is nothing like the activists’ tale. In fact, it is the complete opposite.

The record shows that Energy Transfer Partners, the company building the pipeline, spent years working diligently with federal, state and local officials to route the pipeline safely and with the fewest possible disruptions. The contrast between the protesters’ claims and the facts on record is stunning.

Protesters claim that the pipeline was “fast-tracked,” denying tribal leaders the opportunity to participate in the process. In fact, project leaders participated in 559 meetings with community leaders, local officials and organizations to listen to concerns and fine-tune the route. The company asked for, and received, a tougher federal permitting process at sites along the Missouri River. This more difficult procedure included a mandated review of each water crossing’s potential effect on historical artifacts and locations.




Protesters claim that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed to consult tribal leaders as required by federal law. The record shows that the corps held 389 meetings with 55 tribes. Corps officials met numerous times with leaders of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which initiated the lawsuit and the protests.


Protesters claim that the Standing Rock Sioux pursued meetings with an unresponsive Army Corps of Engineers. Court records show that the roles in that story were in fact reversed. The corps alerted the tribe to the pipeline permit application in the fall of 2014 and repeatedly requested comments from and meetings with tribal leaders only to be rebuffed over and over. Tribal leaders ignored requests for comment and canceled meetings multiple times.

In September 2014 alone, the corps made five unsuccessful attempts to meet with Standing Rock Sioux leaders. The next month, a meeting was arranged, but “when the Corps timely arrived for the meeting, Tribal Chairman David Archambault told them that the conclave had started earlier than planned and had already ended,” according to a federal judge. At a planned meeting the next month, the tribe took the pipeline off the agenda and refused to discuss it. This stonewalling by tribal leaders continued for a year and a half.

Typical of the misinformation spread during the protests is a comment made by Jesse Jackson, who recently joined the activists in North Dakota. He said the decision to reroute the pipeline so that it crossed close to the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s water intake was “racism.”

He did not mention, possibly because he did not know, that the company is paying to relocate the tribe’s water intake to a new spot 70 miles from the location of the contested pipeline crossing.

The pipeline route was adjusted based on concerns expressed by locals — including other tribal leaders — who met with company and Army Corps of Engineers officials. The court record reveals that the Standing Rock Sioux refused to meet with corps officials to discuss the route until after site work had begun. That work is now 77 percent completed at a cost of $3 billion.

In response to a lawsuit filed by the Standing Rock Sioux, the court documented “dozens of attempts” by the corps to consult with the tribe. It documented the legal and proper approval process the corps used to permit all of the contested construction sites the tribe claimed were improperly permitted. It even documented evidence that the corps had exceeded the minimum legal requirements during its earnest and lengthy efforts to receive the input of tribal leaders on the pipeline.

Pipeline protesters may have a tight grip on media coverage of the pipeline, but they have a demonstrably loose grip on the facts. The truth — as documented not by the company but by the federal court system — is that pipeline approvals were not rushed, permits were not granted illegally, and tribal leaders were not excluded. These are proven facts upheld by two federal courts.

If only this side of the story were getting the same attention as the other side. Perhaps judges should start announcing their rulings by megaphone while standing beside a few media-attracting celebrities.



Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 28, 2016, 01:42:58 PM
A friend of mine posted this story up on face palm.  I figured I'd share it here to get some opinions on it. 

The Energy Industry spin.

Hey, we're rerouting your water intake pipe for you!  We're even going to pay for it!  Don't thank us, it's our duty to protect you.  lol.

Hello.  What about the millions of people downstream?  Are you rerouting their water intake pipes too?

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on November 28, 2016, 01:47:23 PM
Fall of 2014 to fall of 2016. Sounds like a pretty fast track to me for a multi-billion dollar project. Easier than getting a vacant lot in SC rezoned commercial. Money talks.

He did not mention, possibly because he did not know, that the company is paying to relocate the tribe’s water intake to a new spot 70 miles from the location of the contested pipeline crossing.

Upstream, I hope.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on November 28, 2016, 02:00:18 PM
I wouldn't go up there. Too much of a chance of coming to harm, and you have family who depend on you. It's just a pipeline. Not worth dying over. And it will most likely get built, one way or another.

Which some of us have said several times now...but it must be against the rules.....
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 28, 2016, 02:07:38 PM
A friend of mine posted this story up on face palm.  I figured I'd share it here to get some opinions on it. 

The Energy Industry spin.

Hey, we're rerouting your water intake pipe for you!  We're even going to pay for it!  Don't thank us, it's our duty to protect you.  lol.

Hello.  What about the millions of people downstream?  Are you rerouting their water intake pipes too?

RE

I just wonder why the Native leaders didn't show up to any of the hearings...or discussions...or whatever the fuck?  Why didn't they show up then and say "um, no thank you, we would rather not have our water poisoned thank you."  Looks sort of damning doesn't it?  Not a word of dissent until after construction starts?

I'm on the natives side here, obviously, but I don't understand wtf they didn't address the issue before construction started?
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on November 28, 2016, 02:11:04 PM
A friend of mine posted this story up on face palm.  I figured I'd share it here to get some opinions on it. 

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/opinion/os-ed-standing-rock-sioux-other-side-110916-20161109-story.html (http://www.orlandosentinel.com/opinion/os-ed-standing-rock-sioux-other-side-110916-20161109-story.html)


Quote
Pipeline protesters may have a tight grip on media coverage of the pipeline, but they have a demonstrably loose grip on the facts. The truth — as documented not by the company but by the federal court system — is that pipeline approvals were not rushed, permits were not granted illegally, and tribal leaders were not excluded. These are proven facts upheld by two federal courts.

Social media, I might argue, is actually worse than yellow journalism in many regards. Rather than just circulation hunting, social media wants to make a point, and slants everything towards their advocacy position.

This was easily noticeable in the Dakota Access issue when stopping the pipeline as a general cause (which looked terribly NIMBY), became protesting water in general. Really, who is going to argue with protecting water? The problem being, 7 tons a day of pollution goes into the Missouri, and if they truly wanted to protect the water, sure, some folks would be standing around waving signs at the river crossing to stop POTENTIAL water pollution, and the other folks would be shining their social media spotlight on each of those other 7 tons that goes into the water every day, and trying to get THEM stopped.

Anyone ever see Denzel in malcolm X where he is very carefully going through the meaning of words and sentences to spot the hidden agenda contained in the very language we use? Someone at Standing Rock did, or is a PR person and began making sure the right words were used....hoping of course that people won't think for themselves, and will just buy into their version...very Orwellian. Doubleplusungood speak!

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on November 28, 2016, 02:17:59 PM
I just wonder why the Native leaders didn't show up to any of the hearings...or discussions...or whatever the fuck? 

Not just a good question, but the BEST question. Another one? Did the route change because the folks in Bismarck DID show up at the legally required, and completed, regulatory meetings...and it didn't because those now doing all the complaining couldn't be bothered?

Quote from: Luciddreams
Why didn't they show up then and say "um, no thank you, we would rather not have our water poisoned thank you."  Looks sort of damning doesn't it?  Not a word of dissent until after construction starts?

But CLASSIC NIMBY. "Nah, they ain't gonna do it." "It's happy hour at the bar, more important than sitting on some boring meeting just to make sure we have some say on where the pipe goes."

Try this one on for size...I've had people deposit their homes on TOP of pipelines I've installed, because they can't be bothered to dial up the company that owns the lease road and they just turned into a driveway, and are terribly surprised when they discover liquid hydrocarbons in raw form are only inches away from their favorite back porch smoking location...and it then goes under the foundation of their trailer.

They paid for the pipeline rerouting in that case because they didn't want to move the trailer.

You can't fix stupid.

Quote from: luciddreams

I'm on the natives side here, obviously, but I don't understand wtf they didn't address the issue before construction started?

Obviously, at the time, they had more important things to do.

I am terribly interested in why and how their priorities changed, because in that story is the real reason this is happening.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 28, 2016, 02:19:11 PM

I just wonder why the Native leaders didn't show up to any of the hearings...or discussions...or whatever the fuck?  Why didn't they show up then and say "um, no thank you, we would rather not have our water poisoned thank you."  Looks sort of damning doesn't it?  Not a word of dissent until after construction starts?

I'm on the natives side here, obviously, but I don't understand wtf they didn't address the issue before construction started?

The most likely reason would be they didn't think they could do anything to stop it and going to a hearing was a waste of time.  Sort of like you going before the City Planners to try and get your property rezoned without any money to back you up.  It was only AFTER there was a spontaneous uprising that they had means to stop this or at least delay it.  This would be like you having 1000 people show up at the Planning commision taking your back.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 28, 2016, 02:49:55 PM

I just wonder why the Native leaders didn't show up to any of the hearings...or discussions...or whatever the fuck?  Why didn't they show up then and say "um, no thank you, we would rather not have our water poisoned thank you."  Looks sort of damning doesn't it?  Not a word of dissent until after construction starts?

I'm on the natives side here, obviously, but I don't understand wtf they didn't address the issue before construction started?

The most likely reason would be they didn't think they could do anything to stop it and going to a hearing was a waste of time.  Sort of like you going before the City Planners to try and get your property rezoned without any money to back you up.  It was only AFTER there was a spontaneous uprising that they had means to stop this or at least delay it.  This would be like you having 1000 people show up at the Planning commision taking your back.

RE
I get what you are saying RE, but I don't think it adds up to the same thing. 

In my case GM and I are just property owners.  Our property was zoned the way it is now when we bought the place.  We want to change that status.  Yet still, we are just talking about 4 private acres in a city. 

Here we are talking about a pipe line carrying noxious chemicals under a water supply with a proven track record of occasional catastrophic failure resulting in flint like water for millions of people. 

They should have shown up and contested.  Had they done that it would have looked a lot better then it does. 

Of course, none of this changes my opinion on the matter.  Also, you are right that they likely would have gone ahead and ignored the natives concerns and done it anyway. 

Honestly I think this is more about the way the natives have been treated since colonization began.  It's more about the history of the U.S. government fucking them over.  Which, it has been...fucking them over...since the small pocks blankets were issued out and the trail of tears. 

They are correct that we need to stop destroying a human supporting biosphere.  We need to change our ways and get off of the petroleum titty.  People drive there in their ICE cars to protest.  On the one hand we have this way of life.  We have this BAU that we must live with.  We need to change it.  How do we do that? 

Permaculture is a good place to start.  In your own backyard, and in your own life.  You can produce more and consume less.  You can vote with your dollars at the store.  You can plant some bamboo and learn to use it. 

Somethings just not right about the whole thing.  We need to stop destroying our environment, and that's the main message I see with the No DAPL.  So what?  We stop burning gasoline in our cars?  We stop using electricity?  We go off grid?  Maybe if you are independently wealthy you can create that perfectionist/purist bubble and you can live in it all by yourself.  The rest of us need money, and therefore we have to engage with BAU.  BAU depends on affordable petroleum which is what the DAPL pipeline is about.  Keeping BAU going. 

I want the best lifestyle I can give my kids.  I also want them to have clean water and a healthy environment.  I can't provide them with what they need in this system without money.  All ways of getting money require me to participate in BAU. 

It's a rock and a hard place that we are between.  I suppose there is no way this works out. 

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on November 28, 2016, 03:02:28 PM
They are correct that we need to stop destroying a human supporting biosphere.  We need to change our ways and get off of the petroleum titty.  People drive there in their ICE cars to protest.  On the one hand we have this way of life.  We have this BAU that we must live with.  We need to change it.  How do we do that? 

Permaculture is a good place to start.  In your own backyard, and in your own life.  You can produce more and consume less.  You can vote with your dollars at the store.  You can plant some bamboo and learn to use it. 

Stop wasting gasoline to power your car. Stop flying. Insulate. Eat less beef. Install panels on your rooftop. Grow trees.

People don't want to change their behavior LD, which has far more to do with the problem than claims of faux scarcity or peaks or pipelines do.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 28, 2016, 03:06:17 PM
Honestly I think this is more about the way the natives have been treated since colonization began.  It's more about the history of the U.S. government fucking them over.  Which, it has been...fucking them over...since the small pocks blankets were issued out and the trail of tears.

That is the focus of the article I am working on for next Sunday Brunch, Dec 4th.

The history of the First Nations people being fucked over and disregard for treaties is over 2 centuries old now.  Do you really think these folks believe they can show up in a "Court of Law" and get a ruling in their favor that will be upheld?

Even with the protest and thousands showing up, their chances of success at halting this pipeline are still small.  They will need 100s of 1000s to stand a chance on this level and type of Non-Violent protest. If they can put up numbers like that, this pipeline is finished.  But they probably cannot, not at this time, not yet.  WE're not down the sewer far enough yet for such a mass protest, IMHO. They can be successful IMHO though with smaller numbers if they go the route of Sabotage.  That pipeline is vulnerable all along the whole 1000 mile route.  There is no way it can be protected by Goobermint or the Corporation.

I do not think this will be ""OVAH" on Dec 5th either way.  If they can clear the encampment, there will be another protest of another type that crops up.  Clearing the encampment will be a media and political clusterfuck if they manage it.

It will be interesting to see how it plays out.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock - The Indian Problem
Post by: azozeo on November 28, 2016, 04:01:40 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/if-BOZgWZPE&fs=1
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: jdwheeler42 on November 28, 2016, 05:17:44 PM
I just wonder why the Native leaders didn't show up to any of the hearings...or discussions...or whatever the fuck? 
Not just a good question, but the BEST question. Another one? Did the route change because the folks in Bismarck DID show up at the legally required, and completed, regulatory meetings...and it didn't because those now doing all the complaining couldn't be bothered?

    "People of Earth, your attention, please. This is Prostetnic Vogon Jeltz of the Galactic Hyperspace Planning Council. As you will no doubt be aware, the plans for development of the outlying regions of the Galaxy require the building of a hyperspatial express route through your star system. And regrettably, your planet is one of those scheduled for demolition. The process will take slightly less than two of your Earth minutes. Thank you."

    "There’s no point in acting surprised about it. All the planning charts and demolition orders have been on display at your local planning department in Alpha Centauri for 50 of your Earth years, so you’ve had plenty of time to lodge any formal complaint and it’s far too late to start making a fuss about it now. ... What do you mean you’ve never been to Alpha Centauri? Oh, for heaven’s sake, mankind, it’s only four light years away, you know. I’m sorry, but if you can’t be bothered to take an interest in local affairs, that’s your own lookout. Energize the demolition beams."

-- The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 28, 2016, 05:31:11 PM
I just wonder why the Native leaders didn't show up to any of the hearings...or discussions...or whatever the fuck? 
Not just a good question, but the BEST question. Another one? Did the route change because the folks in Bismarck DID show up at the legally required, and completed, regulatory meetings...and it didn't because those now doing all the complaining couldn't be bothered?

    "People of Earth, your attention, please. This is Prostetnic Vogon Jeltz of the Galactic Hyperspace Planning Council. As you will no doubt be aware, the plans for development of the outlying regions of the Galaxy require the building of a hyperspatial express route through your star system. And regrettably, your planet is one of those scheduled for demolition. The process will take slightly less than two of your Earth minutes. Thank you."

    "There’s no point in acting surprised about it. All the planning charts and demolition orders have been on display at your local planning department in Alpha Centauri for 50 of your Earth years, so you’ve had plenty of time to lodge any formal complaint and it’s far too late to start making a fuss about it now. ... What do you mean you’ve never been to Alpha Centauri? Oh, for heaven’s sake, mankind, it’s only four light years away, you know. I’m sorry, but if you can’t be bothered to take an interest in local affairs, that’s your own lookout. Energize the demolition beams."

-- The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Nice one JD!

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 28, 2016, 06:41:09 PM
I just wonder why the Native leaders didn't show up to any of the hearings...or discussions...or whatever the fuck? 
Not just a good question, but the BEST question. Another one? Did the route change because the folks in Bismarck DID show up at the legally required, and completed, regulatory meetings...and it didn't because those now doing all the complaining couldn't be bothered?

    "People of Earth, your attention, please. This is Prostetnic Vogon Jeltz of the Galactic Hyperspace Planning Council. As you will no doubt be aware, the plans for development of the outlying regions of the Galaxy require the building of a hyperspatial express route through your star system. And regrettably, your planet is one of those scheduled for demolition. The process will take slightly less than two of your Earth minutes. Thank you."

    "There’s no point in acting surprised about it. All the planning charts and demolition orders have been on display at your local planning department in Alpha Centauri for 50 of your Earth years, so you’ve had plenty of time to lodge any formal complaint and it’s far too late to start making a fuss about it now. ... What do you mean you’ve never been to Alpha Centauri? Oh, for heaven’s sake, mankind, it’s only four light years away, you know. I’m sorry, but if you can’t be bothered to take an interest in local affairs, that’s your own lookout. Energize the demolition beams."

-- The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Good points.  It's well taken.  I imagine they don't view white mans court with any concern.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 28, 2016, 07:19:02 PM
I imagine they don't view white mans court with any concern.

The "White Man's Court" hasn't done a damn thing to uphold aboriginal rights EVAH. After 200 years of this shit, why would anyone bother to show up in "court" ???  :icon_scratch:

(http://77759200.weebly.com/uploads/2/5/5/9/25597422/_6036281.gif)

RE
Title: North Dakota governor orders pipeline protesters expelled
Post by: RE on November 29, 2016, 01:53:48 AM
Apparently, they have 5000 Water Protectors on site already.  They could make 10,000 by Dec 5th.

That's an encampment on the scale of The Jungle in Calais that the Frogs took down a month or so ago, but it took days and days, and I'm not sure they ever really got it done.

Shaping up as an Epic Battle.

RE

http://www.reuters.com/article/uk-north-dakota-pipeline-idUSKBN13N2EU (http://www.reuters.com/article/uk-north-dakota-pipeline-idUSKBN13N2EU)


U.S. | Tue Nov 29, 2016 | 12:54am EST
North Dakota governor orders pipeline protesters expelled

(http://s3.reutersmedia.net/resources/r/?m=02&d=20161129&t=2&i=1163411073&w=&fh=&fw=&ll=780&pl=468&sq=&r=LYNXMPECAR1D5)

(http://s3.reutersmedia.net/resources/r/?m=02&d=20161129&t=2&i=1163411074&w=&fh=&fw=&ll=780&pl=468&sq=&r=LYNXMPECAR1D7)
Women hold a prayer ceremony on Backwater Bridge during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S. November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

By Terray Sylvester | CANNON BALL, N.D.

North Dakota's governor ordered the expulsion of thousands of Native American and environmental activists camped on federal property near an oil pipeline project they are trying to halt, citing hazards posed by harsh weather as a blizzard bore down on the area.

The "emergency evacuation" order from Governor Jack Dalrymple came days after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which manages the site, set a Dec. 5 deadline for the demonstrators to vacate their encampment, about 45 miles (72 km) south of Bismarck, the state capital.

The Army Corps has insisted, however, that it has no plans to forcibly remove protesters, many of them members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The agency instead urged a "peaceful and orderly transition to a safer location."
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Late Monday, Standing Rock Chairman Dave Archambault II denounced Dalrymple's order as a "menacing action meant to cause fear," and accused the Republican governor of trying to "usurp and circumvent federal authority."

Archambault noted that the evacuation order, which the governor said he issued for the campers' well-being in the face of dangerous winter weather, came a week after police turned water hoses on protesters in sub-freezing temperatures.

Activists have spent months protesting against plans to route the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline beneath a lake near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, saying the project poses a threat to water resources and sacred Native American sites.

The governor did not specify how he intended to enforce his order other than by directing state and local agencies to refuse emergency assistance and other services to anyone who remained at the site. He said the order was effective immediately and would stay in force "until rescinded."

But Standing Rock Sioux spokeswoman Phyllis Young told a news conference Monday night the tribe would stand its ground.

"We have lived for generations in this setting. That is our camp. We will continue to provide for our people there," she said. "This is Lakota territory. This is treaty territory, and no one else has jurisdiction there."

Protest leaders suggested a forced evacuation could prove more dangerous to the activists than staying put.

"We're in the heart of winter now. To even think of a forced removal is terrifying," said Dallas Goldtooth, an organizer with Indigenous Environmental Network, who estimated there were about 5,000 people in the camp.

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier added to the pressure by issuing a video statement urging protesters to avoid subjecting themselves to "life-threatening conditions" by remaining exposed to the elements with little shelter.
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The National Weather Service has posted a storm warning for most of western and central North Dakota, forecasting the possibility of heavy snow through Wednesday.

The 1,172-mile (1,885-km) pipeline project is mostly complete except for a segment that is supposed to run under Lake Oahe, a reservoir formed by a dam on the Missouri River.

The Obama administration in September postponed final approval of an Army Corps permit required to allow tunneling beneath the lake, a move intended to give federal officials more time to consult tribal leaders. The delay also led to escalating tension over the project.

The companies say the pipeline would carry Bakken shale oil more cheaply and safely from North Dakota to Illinois en route to U.S. Gulf Coast refineries than it could be shipped by railroad or tanker trucks.

(Additional reporting by Timothy Mclaughlin in Chicago; Writing by Steve Gorman; Editing by Leslie Adler, Robert Birsel)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 29, 2016, 07:14:38 AM
http://www.snopes.com/2016/11/28/army-corps-backs-away-from-plan-to-shut-down-standing-rock-camp/ (http://www.snopes.com/2016/11/28/army-corps-backs-away-from-plan-to-shut-down-standing-rock-camp/)

Just days after setting an ultimatum for demonstrators encamped at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota, the Army Corps of Engineers walked back their 5 December 2016 deadline to move the camp from its current location.

On 26 November 2016, the day after the Thanksgiving holiday, the Army Corps announced that hundreds of protesters, who have been at the campsite in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, would have to vacate the camp or face arrest (the protest site is on land managed by the Army Corps). Demonstrators would be moved to a "free speech zone" just south of the current site. The tribe's chairman, Dave Archambault II, said in a statement the tribe would stand its ground, and further pressed U.S. President Barack Obama to stop the pipeline:

    Our Tribe is deeply disappointed in this decision by the United States, but our resolve to protect our water is stronger than ever. We ask that all everyone who can appeal to President Obama and the Army Corps of Engineers to consider the future of our people and rescind all permits and deny the easement to cross the Missouri River just north of our Reservation and straight through our treaty lands.

On 27 November 2016, the Corps seemed to reverse course, and announced in a statement to media that there are "no plans for forcible removal" of protesters (or water protectors, as they have identified themselves). The Corps is instead "seeking a peaceful and orderly transition to a safer location."

Meanwhile, as many as 2,000 U.S. military veterans announced they are mobilizing in an effort to protect the camp at its current location. Michael A. Wood, Jr., a Marine Corps veteran and former Baltimore police officer, said the event drew so much interest that organizers were forced to cap the number of participants at 2,200. The group has as of 28 November 2016 raised more than half a million dollars form supporters. The veterans plan to wear their military uniforms, with the intention of drawing media attention. Wood told us:

    This is literally what we swore to do -- to protect the citizens of America from enemies both foreign and domestic. Just because someone pretties it up with a badge and uniform doesn’t mean it isn’t violence against our people.

The group had planned the event, Veterans for Standing Rock, for December 4 through December 7 in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux.

The Standing Rock Sioux have stood in opposition to the pipeline, launching their demonstration in April of 2016. They have attracted increasing attention as the loggerheads between the tribe and Energy Transfer Partners, the builder of the $3.8 billion project, have continued. The Sioux claim the pipeline threatens to destroy sacred sites and the safety of their water supply. However Energy Transfer Partners refuses to reroute the project, with CEO Kelcy Warren saying, "There's not another way. We're building at that location."

On 20 November 2016, Sophia Wilansky, a 21-year-old activist from New York, was badly injured by what witnesses say was a concussion grenade. In a statement made through her father, Wayne Wilansky, she said a police officer tossed the grenade at her, which exploded on contact with her forearm and blew away most of her lower limb. Police have said they used no such device and denied causing Wilansky's injury. Surgeons are currently working to save her arm.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 29, 2016, 12:50:53 PM
Fall of 2014 to fall of 2016. Sounds like a pretty fast track to me for a multi-billion dollar project. Easier than getting a vacant lot in SC rezoned commercial. Money talks.

He did not mention, possibly because he did not know, that the company is paying to relocate the tribe’s water intake to a new spot 70 miles from the location of the contested pipeline crossing.

Upstream, I hope.

Oh yeah!  As soon as I read 'energy partners spent years' the heavy stench of shit filled my mental nostrils.
Title: Standing Rock: A Moment of Clarity for Progressive Activists
Post by: K-Dog on November 29, 2016, 07:54:34 PM
(https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/revbilly/pages/841/attachments/original/1480421515/15109487_1146014782161972_7175156683577997372_n.jpg?1480421515)

Quote
By Reverend Billy Talen

Earth-force meets money-force at Standing Rock. I’m so relieved I’m here. It scares me to think that I might have missed this.  We get up at dawn. Four hundred people walk slowly in a light snow to the river by the camp. A teacher is talking. His headdress is a crisscrossing of long, narrow feathers. He is of the Havasupai, the people who live by the blue-green waterfalls at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. He calls out across the river. “Water is life! Take me! My heart beats with you!”  It’s cold at 7am. The children don’t seem cold though. They run around in the mud and ice. There are 80 tribes here. Some say many more. As we stand on the shore with a slow drum beating, the people shout “water” in many languages.  The Earth-force is represented by this river and these eagles and these water protectors. We see the Money-force, standing over there on the bridge, just a couple hundred feet from the edge of long meadow of white tipis along the Cannonball River. The police look like a long row of Darth Vaders.

In the environmental movement, we have yearned for the success of the Civil Rights and the Gender Rights movements. Few of us, though, face the police like the freedom-fighters of old. Arrests and trials are only one indicator of a movement’s power, but an important one. As environmentalists we fall back on soft confrontation dominated by data. Data is bloodless. Lobbying, position papers, endless graphics and electronic petitions might as well be abandoned in the age of Trump.  Evidence points to the need for a quasi-religious transformation of cultural values.  —Dr. Anne Ehrlich and Dr. Paul Ehrlich

Who has undergone this “quasi religious transformation” the Ehrlichs call for now in the time of the Earth’s crisis? I think of Wangari Maathai and her billion trees, Edward Abbey and Earth First and the dreams of freeing western rivers of their dams, Judi Bonds and Larry Gibson in their danger-filled opposition to mountaintop removal coal mining.  The transformation of Standing Rock needs to be carried to many towns and cities. The Earth’s response to its own fever is everywhere all the time, and our activism must this as our map.  We need to press up against militarized and consumerized citizens at all points, and then convert them to life.  Can we pull them across the border between death and life?

Suddenly there is clarity for Earth activists.  With extinction accelerating and climate changing, we must transform with the intensity that one associates with religion.  If some of us wouldn’t be able to convert an actual faith, at least a new Earth politics must be strong enough to break up the over-scheduling, the debt, the traditional careerism - the things that make it impossible to freely act.  We have the time if we take the time.  Three movements in recent years galvanize us.  In these citizen movements we did take the time, took the risk, and made a difference. Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter and Standing Rock. The lesson in all of them, the thing they have in common is that so many changed their own individual lives in order that they could then change the rest of us.  In all three, the spiritual element is carried by the act of living together, literally living together, without the supervision of the corporations or government.

Zuccotti Park and the stretch of sidewalk in front of the Ferguson police department and the meadow near the sacred stone… these three places are lived in. Here is where activists cared for each other and shared food, clothing and medicine. The force that upsets entrenched power the most is this compassionate living, this community in plain sight.  Standing Rock offers us our moment of clarity.  We can physically commit now. We must face the Devil. It is life and death. And living actively in a time of life and death must be a spiritual act. It should  be you and I in service getting something done, in our daily life.  Public caring and going through  the quasi-religious transformation must go hand in hand.  It was always so, from Pettis Bridge to Stonewall. 

When we are at peace with the Earth, we are able to hold our ground.  The ground is the point.  We hold our ground and the Earth holds us.  In prison and in pain and in loss the Earth holds us.  And then in the time of forgiveness after the struggle - the Earth still holds us.  We must fearlessly love until there is no hate!  Earthalujah!

http://www.revbilly.com/standing_rock_a_moment_of_clarity_for_progressive_activists (http://www.revbilly.com/standing_rock_a_moment_of_clarity_for_progressive_activists)

I agree with most of what Billy says.  A notable exception is that all lives matter, be they black brown or white.  I'll have nothing to do with the highly racist black lives matter movement.  A movement which does not inspire change but solidifies hate as it polarizes opposing points of view.  I have not always seen things this way, but blanket activism generally does not consider how an audience perceives activism.  To non-activists activism can seem criminal.  Opponents of activism know this very well so right now  mainstream media propaganda is busy spinning standing rock activists as criminal.  Activists would do well to understand and ape the sophistication of their opponents.

Quote
"Earth-force meets money-force at Standing Rock"

Earth-Force tends to be more emotional than money-force.  Money-force with a calculated precision, generates lies.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 29, 2016, 08:10:31 PM
I just finished my Standing Rock Article.  It is titled "Battle of Black Snake".

Won't go up until Sunday Brunch on Dec 4th though.

Next chapter of "How I Survived Collapse" up tomorrow.  It's a hoot. lol.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 29, 2016, 08:15:45 PM
Quote
While You Enjoy Your Thanksgiving Feast, Native Americans Are Being Violently Repressed

(http://morallowground.com/wp-content/uploads/Wilansky-e1479933163946.png)

Sophia Wilansky, 21, faces possible amputation of her arm after reportedly being hit with a police concussion grenade
during a protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota. Hundreds of #NoDAPL water protectors have been injured,
some of them seriously. (Photo: Facebook)

While millions of Americans gather with family and friends in warmly-heated homes to give thanks for their blessings and share feasts of plenty, Native Americans and their allies are suffering brutal, even life-threatening, violence at the hands of police on the bleak, sub-freezing plains of North Dakota.

Members of the Standing Rock Sioux and other tribes, along with allies from across America and around the world, are resisting construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline on sacred Native land. DAPL threatens the Missouri River, which is not only sacred to indigenous people but is the source of drinking water for millions of Americans, and will contribute to the acceleration of climate change. It also violates Native American treaty rights.

Calling themselves “water protectors,” the #NoDAPL protesters have courageously faced off against National Guard troops as well as state and local law enforcement and private security forces employed by the pipeline’s owner, the Donald Trump-linkedEnergy Transfer Partners (ETP). ETP guards sparked widespread outrage after images emerged of them unleashing attack dogs on peaceful Native American protesters in September. Video showed blood dripping from the nose and mouth of one of the dogs while water protectors screamed in agony and terror.

http://www.youtube.com/v/kuZcx2zEo4k

It gets worse than that. On Sunday, more than 300 water protectors were injured as police fired rubber-coated steel bullets, chemical agents including tear gas and pepper spray and powerful water cannons at them in sub-freezing temperatures. Dozens of people were hospitalized, some of them suffering from head and limb injuries, eye trauma, internal bleeding, seizures and hypothermia. Sophia Wilansky, a 21-year-old activist from New York, was left in critical condition and had to be airlifted for emergency surgeries in Minneapolis after a police officer allegedly threw a stun grenade at her. The blast from the “less-than-lethal” projectile blew her arm wide open, dislodging and exposing bone, shredding flesh and mangling arteries and connective tissue. Wilansky may lose her arm to amputation.

http://www.youtube.com/v/ySe5zskfyKw

“Basically, it’s an act of war,” a Yankton Sioux leader said of the brutal repression at Standing Rock. That’s nothing new in Indian Country — the day the dogs were sicced on the water protectors just happened to be the 150th anniversary of the Whitestone massacre, which occurred just miles from Standing Rock and in which hundreds of Sioux, including many women and children, were slaughtered in what one participant called “a perfect massacre.”

It’s not just Standing Rock. Across America, Native Americans are fighting the encroachment on their lands, resources and sacred heritage by rapacious corporations and the governments they control. They’re also still fighting for voting equality, as regressive forces attempt to employ similar voter suppression tactics that have been so successful at disenfranchising blacks. Speaking of blacks, while many Americans are rightfully outraged by police shootings of unarmed African Americans, Native Americans are actually the ethnic group most likely to be killed by police, a manifestation of the white racism and apathy toward the endemic poverty, substance abuse and general hopelessness  that still pervades too much of Indian Country today.

The perverse patriotism of Thanksgiving mythology omits horrific details — that the English had already been enslaving area natives for years, that the handful of surviving Wampanoag Indians who sought the protection of English settlers during that fateful winter of 1621 had been all but wiped out by a smallpox epidemic likely started or stoked by the heinous practice of distributing smallpox-infected blankets to indigenous populations, or that the pious Pilgrims (who were nonetheless prone to “drunkenness, uncleanliness and rampant sodomy,” according to their governor, William Bradford) thanked their white “god” for smiting the savages with smallpox. American school children don’t learn any of this, nor are they taught how, just months after that first — and only — integrated Thanksgiving, Myles Standish led a massacre of Massachusett Indians at Wessagusset, the vanquished warrior Wituwamat’s head displayed on a pike at Plymouth.

After the “taming” of Massachusetts, Connecticut was next. Pequot men, women and children were slaughtered with reckless abandon — this time many were burned alive — as the invaders gave thanks to their “god” for his favor. Again, William Bradford:

    Those that escaped the fire were slain with the sword; some hewed to pieces, others run through with their rapiers, so that they were quickly dispatched and very few escaped. It was conceived they thus destroyed about 400 at this time. It was a fearful sight to see them thus frying in the fire… horrible was the stink and scent thereof, but the victory seemed a sweet sacrifice, and they gave the prayers thereof to God, who had wrought so wonderfully for them, thus to enclose their enemies in their hands, and give them so speedy a victory over so proud and insulting an enemy.

“This day forth shall be a day of celebration and thanksgiving for subduing the Pequots,” John Winthrop, Bradford’s successor, proudly proclaimed in the wake of what would become known as the Mystic massacre.

(http://morallowground.com/wp-content/uploads/Mystic-massacre-e1479934113465.jpg)

Many white Americans today point to past genocidal violence (although they rarely use the “G-word”) against Native Americans to illustrate just how different, and better, things are today. They point to Indian casinos and government “handouts” as proof that justice has been served and that Indians should “get over it.” But from Plymouth Rock to Standing Rock, violent repression of indigenous peoples has never ended, as the images from North Dakota affirm. The United States has yet to properly apologize or compensate for a genocide that killed tens of millions of people and reduced once-flourishing cultures spanning the entire continent to a relative handful of survivors strewn sparsely throughout the land, largely confined to the howling wastelands of the reservation. It’s extremely difficult to “get over it” when the descendants of the perpetrators of one of the great mass killings in human history are loth to admit that “it” even happened.

So as you prepare to give thanks for all your blessings and tuck into that turkey and pumpkin pie (neither of which was served at that first Thanksgiving), please take a moment to at least acknowledge that the cornucopia of plenty we invader-descended Americans take for granted today is largely the result of the genocidal conquest of the original Americans, and that the victims of that genocide are still being subjected to horrific violence by white invaders even as you’re reading this.

http://morallowground.com/2016/11/23/while-you-enjoy-your-thanksgiving-feast-native-americans-are-being-violently-repressed/ (http://morallowground.com/2016/11/23/while-you-enjoy-your-thanksgiving-feast-native-americans-are-being-violently-repressed/)

Whites come in more flavors than 'white invader'.  This article would be a better read if it did not lump all whites together.

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 29, 2016, 08:31:37 PM
I just finished my Standing Rock Article.  It is titled "Battle of Black Snake".

Won't go up until Sunday Brunch on Dec 4th though.

Next chapter of "How I Survived Collapse" up tomorrow.  It's a hoot. lol.

RE

My son has a friend who is about to leave for Standing Rock.  I hope to talk to him before he leaves.  I want him to be careful and if he has news to report I want him to send it to me so I can post it here.

I had a great-great grandfather who used to trap in Indian country.  He always made sure to leave some of his 'take' with his traps for local Indians who did not have his tools to trap with.  This made him popular with locals and it also meant his traps would always be left alone.  When the Minnesota Massacre happened he was unharmed.  The Indian blood in my family comes from further west and comes in by way of Mrs. Dog.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 29, 2016, 08:48:22 PM
I just finished my Standing Rock Article.  It is titled "Battle of Black Snake".

Won't go up until Sunday Brunch on Dec 4th though.

Next chapter of "How I Survived Collapse" up tomorrow.  It's a hoot. lol.

RE

My son has a friend who is about to leave for Standing Rock.  I hope to talk to him before he leaves.  I want him to be careful and if he has news to report I want him to send it to me so I can post it here.

I had a great-great grandfather who used to trap in Indian country.  He always made sure to leave some of his 'take' with his traps for local Indians who did not have his tools to trap with.  This made him popular with locals and it also meant his traps would always be left alone.  When the Minnesota Massacre happened he was unharmed.  The Indian blood in my family comes from further west and comes in by way of Mrs. Dog.

The Diner will continue to cover Standing Rock for as long as it goes on in that location, and after when it migrates to another.  As long as the Internet is Up and the Diner has not been squashed as a "Fake Newz" site, it will get coverage here.

If your son gets any photos or vids, they will get published on the Diner.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 29, 2016, 11:50:56 PM
I have decided to change my Publication Schedule.  Since it is complete and Ready for Prime Time, I will publish Battle of Black Snake tomorrow instead of the next chapter of How I Survived Collapse.  This will give it more time for airplay before the SHOWDOWN on Dec 5th.  Hopefully this will encourage more non-crippled Diners to make the journey and make the LAST STAND with the Lakota at Standing Rock.  If you go, bring your Hockey Pads, Activated Charcoal Gas Filters, Swim Goggles and make a Shield out of 3/4" plywood.  Steel Toe boots and a Full Face Bell Motorcycle  Helmet also suggested for your attendance.

I am so backed up on articles now it is not even funny.  I don't like to publish more than once a week of my own material in order to give it a good amount of airplay, but I am writing more like 3-4 articles a week.  I'll have to publish at least 2/week if not 3 to catch up here.

It's all doing good though, page hits & users have increased by over 50% over the last month.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Battle of Black Snake
Post by: RE on November 30, 2016, 05:53:06 AM


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Published on The Doomstead Diner on November 30, 2016



standing-rock-black-snake



Discuss this article at the Environment Table inside the Diner



In less than a week from now as I begin writing this article, the Army Corps of Bozos threatens to dismantle the encampment of mainly First Nations people which has grown nearby the Standing Rock Reservation of the Lakota, the small neighborhood these folks  have left as they were rounded up while Europeans marched across the continent and stole everything from these people.  They stole the land, they stole their culture and they stole the lives of millions, bringing disease incubated in the agricultural system they developed to them as well.  https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/books/a-plus/disease-250.jpg Diseases like the Smallpox were intentionally inflicted on these people to clear them from the land, passing out the Smallpox infected blankets.  They had no immunity to this disease, since they were not running farming for the most part and did not live in close proximity to many other mammals that could spread such a disease.  The population was decimated, more than 90% of the aboriginal population disappeared within a century.  It was the greatest exercise in Genocide ever performed on this planet, far surpassing the genocide of the Jews during the Holocaust in the WWII era.  It was entirely purposeful, and every "law" the Europeans had on their own books was violated along the way.  Every treaty was broken, there was no justice ever in all of it. It was pure and simple theft and murder all along the way.



Disease was not the only vector for Death though, the Indian Wars were non-stop through the 1800s as the Manifest Destiny of Europeans to conquer the continent was undertaken.  They came to a close more or less with the Massacre at Wounded Knee, which occured on Dec 29, 1890.  It occured at the Lakota Reservation at Pine Ridge in South Dakota.




The Wounded Knee Massacre occurred on December 29, 1890,[4] near Wounded Knee Creek (Lakota: ÄŒhaÅ‹kpé Ópi Wakpála) on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in the U.S. state of South Dakota.



https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/52/Wounded_Knee_aftermath3.jpg/320px-Wounded_Knee_aftermath3.jpg The previous day, a detachment of the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment commanded by Major Samuel M. Whitside intercepted Spotted Elk's band of Miniconjou Lakota and 38 Hunkpapa Lakota near Porcupine Butte and escorted them 5 miles (8.0 km) westward to Wounded Knee Creek, where they made camp. The remainder of the 7th Cavalry Regiment, led by Colonel James W. Forsyth, arrived and surrounded the encampment. The regiment was supported by a battery of four Hotchkiss mountain guns.[5]



On the morning of December 29, the troops went into the camp to disarm the Lakota. One version of events claims that during the process of disarming the Lakota, a deaf tribesman named Black Coyote was reluctant to give up his rifle, claiming he had paid a lot for it.[6] A scuffle over the rifle ensued and by the time it was over, more than 150 men, women, and children of the Lakota had been killed and 51 were wounded (4 men and 47 women and children, some of whom died later); some estimates placed the number of dead at 300.[1] Twenty-five soldiers also died, and 39 were wounded (6 of the wounded later died).[7] At least twenty soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor.[8] In 2001, the National Congress of American Indians passed two resolutions condemning the awards and called on the U.S. government to rescind them.[9] The site of the battlefield has been designated a National Historic Landmark.[4] In 1990, both houses of the U.S. Congress passed a resolution formally expressing "deep regret" for the massacre.[10]




Nearly a century later, there was yet another Standoff at Wounded Knee which began on February 27, 1973, as Russell Means and Dennis Banks led a standoff between the FBI and AIM, the American Indian Movement of the 1970s on the Pine Ridge reservation.  Dennis Banks eventually got jail time, Russell Means became a famous Movie Star portraying such characters as Chingachcook in "Last of the Mohicans"







The Wounded Knee incident began on February 27, 1973, when approximately 200 Oglala Lakota and followers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) seized and occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota, on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The protest followed the failure of an effort of the Oglala Sioux Civil Rights Organization (OSCRO) to impeach tribal president Richard Wilson, whom they accused of corruption and abuse of opponents. Additionally, protesters criticized the United States government's failure to fulfill treaties with Native American people and demanded the reopening of treaty negotiations.



Oglala and AIM activists controlled the town for 71 days while the United States Marshals Service, FBI agents, and other law enforcement agencies cordoned off the area. The activists chose the site of the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre for its symbolic value. Both sides were armed, and shooting was frequent. A U.S. marshal was shot and paralyzed in March.[2] A Cherokee and an Oglala Lakota were killed by shootings in April 1973. Ray Robinson, a civil rights activist who joined the protesters, disappeared during the events and is believed to have been murdered. Due to damage to the houses, the small community was not reoccupied until the 1990s.



The occupation attracted wide media coverage, especially after the press accompanied the two U.S. senators from South Dakota to Wounded Knee. The events electrified American Indians, who were inspired by the sight of their people standing in defiance of the government which had so often failed them. Many American Indian supporters traveled to Wounded Knee to join the protest. At the time there was widespread public sympathy for the goals of the occupation, as Americans were becoming more aware of longstanding issues of injustice related to American Indians. Afterward AIM leaders Dennis Banks and Russell Means were indicted on charges related to the events, but their 1974 case was dismissed by the federal court for prosecutorial misconduct,[3] a decision upheld on appeal.



Wilson stayed in office and in 1974 was re-elected amid charges of intimidation, voter fraud, and other abuses. The rate of violence climbed on the reservation as conflict opened between political factions in the following three years; residents accused Wilson's private militia, Guardians of the Oglala Nation (GOONs), of much of it. More than 60 opponents of the tribal government died violently during those years, including Pedro Bissonette, director of the Oglala Sioux Civil Rights Organization (OSCRO).[4]




So now here we are once again, and this time it looks like the LAST STAND for the Lakota.  Thousands of "Water Protectors" have gathered at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline.  According to press releases over the last week, the Army Corps of Bozos expects these folks to leave the encampment on December 5th and go…somewhere else.  To an officially sanctioned Protest Spot where in theory they won't hinder the continuing construction of the pipeline…



http://www.commondreams.org/sites/default/files/styles/cd_large/public/headlines/oceti-sakowin-protest-camp.jpg?itok=W7iOvqrr



Now, let me ask you, how effective could a protest be if it is not actually at the site of where the problem is?  It would be like Occupiers occupying some park in New Jersey while protesting against shenanigans going on on Wall Street, rather than Zucchini Park in the Belly of the Beast.  If a State is Sanctioning a "protest", then HTF is it a protest?  If you only have Free Speech when and where the state says you have Free Speech, HTF is that Free Speech?  Not to mention of course, if you're not causing SOME kind of ruckus, nobody in the media will cover it!  That includes the alt-media as well as the MSM.  The Dakota Access protest has been ongoing and building for a solid 7 months, but even here on the Diner I only got wind of it back in August, and made my first post on this movement back then.  It had been going on since at least April before that physically, and in meetings and legal actions before that.  But nobody knew about this, including yours truly.



So, to get this particular exercise in protest going, the Water Protectors had to get publicity, which at first came just through the Social Media, but expanded to YouTube with the publication of Amy Goodman's video documentary for Democracy Now!  That REALLY revved it up for the Water Protectors, as the DAPL Security Gestapo sicked Attack Dogs on the Water Protectors.  That was such bad publicity it got Obama-sama to ask the Army Corps of Bozos to do a review of their permits, and there was a brief period of VICTORY celebration for the Water Protectors.  Destined not to last of course, and construction on the pipeline quickly resumed after this brief commercial interruption.






So now here we are this week, with the Gauntlet supposedly thrown down by the Army Corps of Bozos for these folks to get off the "Federal Property" they are currently occupying and move to a Free Speech Zone.  Ostensible reason for this is that winter is hitting any they're not "safe" where they currently are.  How stupid is that?  It's not going to be any warmer a few miles away in the FSZ.  Plus they already have their current encampment winterized.



Now, one question posed inside the Diner was, "So how come the tribal leaders didn't show up at the hearings when the original permits were granted?".



The answer to that should be obvious.  Nobody in the First Nations believes that any treaty will be upheld or they can get any real justice in the White Man's Court. You can hardly blame them after 250 years of having one treaty after another broken and watching their lands taken from them and being forced down to ever smaller reservations on the worst land.  They have the highest rates of incarceration of any group and the highest rates of poverty.  If they're not on the reservation, they're in prison.



So, particularly when facing down Big Oil and the Big Banks salivating over the big commissions they would get to seal this deal, they simply stood no chance at a hearing, and going to Washington would have been a waste of time and money.



https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/hVo1llcoCGVqPNHKdWXyoYfC3MtsE4snbbkA6YwPFiLSBPMfhDJJFVhcLey-HHC0bNTI3mDNiH2NLWmo7CAENiCSi1IlRJoRIIwnk8KSn0d_vNEnhyxY2kyfVpmz7HWemiHQ0HDniwvZ_PBQZt4grVnKEWmvq-j8DFIYm68UhknUQ29QHxZDwz81eg4O=w426-h283 What changed the equation in April was that a Movement began after one of the locals put up a video on Facepalm and asked people to come join her and make a stand.  Come they did, slowly at first just a few dozen, but then the word got out and it snowballed.  They came by the thousands, currently there are estimated to be 5000 Water Protectors on site.  A group of Veterans, the "Oath Keepers" are set to bring in another 2500 or so to stand with the First Nations people, along with many white folks from the Environmental movement.  Between when I am writing this now and when I publish,  there is time for a lot more people to show up there as well.  So you are probably looking at at least 10,000 people there on D-Day for the Water Protectors, possibly more.



From Da Goobermint side, how many Gestapo can they field or will they field to try and clear this camp?  Da Goobernator of North Dakota, Dailpimple has already spent over $10M to send in militarized police to try and intimidate the Water Protectors, and for this shindig has thrown the ball back at Da Feds saying it's THEIR job to clear the encampment.  That would mean Obama-sama has to call in the National Guard, and lots of them.  Now, how does that one look for the legacy of an outgoing POTUS who supposedly was a champion of the underclass?



http://www.thedailysheeple.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Standing-Rock-water-protectors-e1478015078825.jpg These folks are not going to leave that spot unless they are forcibly removed, a request from His Highness Obama-sama is not going to do the trick.  To do that will take a LOT of boots on the ground, along with stuff like LRAD, Water Cannon and Tear Gas.  That may get the people off the spot for now, but it will produce a lot of ugly publicity, through the Social Media at least if not on the MSM where it is sure to be whitewashed and the blame placed on the Water Protectors for not obeying the command of the state.



What seems more likely is that this will get stretched out until Trumpty-Dumpty is installed as POTUS, and he will certainly be happy to send in the Goon Squad to prove how tough he is.  Besides, he owns stock in DAPL.



Another question raised is if these folks are so concerned about their water supply, how come they aren't out protesting the millions of gallons of toxic sludge pumped into rivers every day all over the country?  Well, the thing is that is precisely what they are protesting, this particular pipeline is a symbol for that.  People have been protesting these pipelines for more than a decade now, but they virtually always get beaten down by the Energy industry and Da Goobermint which backs it up and takes it's orders from Big Money, not the will of the people.



http://read.html5.qq.com/image?src=forum&q=5&r=0&imgflag=7&imageUrl=http://mmbiz.qpic.cn/mmbiz/kKic6aX5Vqy7e31NcUDGMNckhlRxRF8EtxAqmicqg50a9GeoY9j0EO18l7YRnhcn2EFsMKUD2ZcOWEO8mHokNT4g/0?wx_fmt=jpeg There have been ongoing protests against Environmental Destruction going back at least as far as Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, with the heyday of the movement in the 1970s with the first "Earth Day".  Environmentalists won a few battles, but mostly only because factories and mining were being shipped offshore to other countries with cheaper labor.  With respect to the Energy Industry though, they have mostly lost all the battles, with all the "accidents" like the Exxon Valdez and the Deepwater Horizon, and the many pipeline leaks and oil train derailments and leaking ash ponds that occur all the time but generally don't get much new attention.



According to the DAPL press department releases, the pipeline is "safe", and they also are building a new water intake pipeline to serve the reservation, some 70 miles away from the current location.  This is a contradiction right off, because if the oil pipeline is truly safe, then why would you need to build a new water intake?  It's also ridiculous because in the event of pipeline failure, you have millions of other people living downstream of it, and you can't build new water intakes for all of them.  Even if you could, the water source would still be polluted.



https://i.redditmedia.com/UxYkZFIpljfzi8PCOv-t9WiCDLfY9FMig-vzC-OhXTQ.jpg?w=320&s=4757b191f2a369cdf46e37542b95bfad It's also ridiculous to claim such a pipeline is "safe", when everybody knows that ALL infrastructure wears out and breaks eventually.  How long does a typical car last?  Usually 5-10 years MOST before all the piping and systems are breaking down. These companies can always get the upfront money to build them, but they never have enough money to keep them maintained and replace them.  So all over the country you have aging pipelines that are starting to crack and leak.  There were two in the southeast when I took my trip to the Carolinas for the SUN☼Project.  This brand spanking new pipeline might have a low probability of leaking now, but in a few years it would be in the same sad shape as all the rest of our infrastructure, which includes not only the pipelines but the electrical grid and the roads and bridges too.



As we spin down here in the final days of the Age of Oil, people are sick and tired of being steamrolled over, particularly the underclass which never really saw many of the benefits of the industrial economy.  Many of them are so impoverished even inside the FSoA  they can't even afford a Used Car and the gas it takes to run it, so they don't get that benny.  Most of them probably don't grasp that the end of this also means the end of electricity on demand and that food will become a lot more scarce here as the system breaks down.  However, the current system is not working for them and never has, and they would like to see it ended.



TriangleofDoomAlthough protests like the DAPL may be an increasing feature of life as we move forward in collapse, in the end this is not what will kill the "Black Snake" that is supposed to bring oil from the Dakotas to Illinois, then further on down to refineries in Lousiana and Texas to be turned into gasoline and diesel to keep the Happy Motoring lifestyle going. What will kill it in the end is the economics of it.  Industrial society depends on CHEAP oil, and the Oil they can drag out of Bakken Shale deposits does not come cheap.  An increasingly impoverished population is not going to be able to afford the Oil fracked up there and ejaculated at the other end to make refined products from it.  Besides that, fracked wells deplete rapidly, so there are only at best a few years to get more product up, and that's not enough time to pay off the debt issued out to build the pipeline in the first place, much less to enable continuing maintenance on it.  One can only hope the oil stops flowing through it before it starts pouring into the Missouri River.



https://avidabloga.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/ganges6.jpg?w=300 What we are witnessing here is the Death Throes of a Civilization based on the thermodynamic energy of fossil fuels.  Through the 250 years or so since it began in Jolly Old England with the invention of the Steam Engine, the promise of a Better Tomorrow for everyone on the planet has been used to keep this system going, making a few people rich beyound measure and a relatively small group of nations in the First World living in comfort.  Third World people saw the images from Hollywood and they all aspired to the same thing.  Overall though, most of the world never got the bennies provided by industrialization, what they got were jobs at slave wages and their own subsistence farming cultures destroyed by the cheap food coming from industrial farming.  Now this is all going away, and all that is left is a disgusting sewer of pollution, which is probably worst in places like India and China, but not all that great in the FSoA either.



The realization is penetrating the minds of all now, and so you begin to see these sort of resistance movements cropping up.  The standard political dialogue is breaking down and new war theaters pop up each day, creating still more refugees streaming toward places that are already overcrowded themselves.  Goobermints try to maintain control through the use of the force of the Police State, and what is occuring in North Dakota is a prime example of that.  While they may succeed with this one, the writing is on the wall and the same type of civil wars you have seen over the last decade in MENA will come to the First World also.  Probably Europe before the FSoA, but it will make it here too.  There is no Exceptionalism in a Civilization Collapse.



If in this battle the Water Protectors lose and the Energy Profiteers win and they are forced off the land and the pipeline is completed, I believe it will only spawn a larger movement to follow.  I also highly doubt that this movement will remain non-violent if the non-violence isn't working to rectify the issues they are protesting.



Dec 5th, 2016 will not be the end of the battle against the Black Snake. It is not even the Beginning of the End. It does mark however, the End of the Beginning.




Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on November 30, 2016, 07:26:57 AM
As always, that was a great read...about doom RE. 

The article Kdog posted up by the Reverend Billy did a better job pulling at my human supporting biome heart strings than yours did however.  After reading the Reverend's article I felt like going to Standing Rock again.  After reading yours I felt like it would be a waste of time and damaging to my family seeing as how ain't nothing going to stop our civilizations collapse.

Don't feel badly about that.  You told the truth, the truth based in reality and not idealism.  The truth is that it's already to late to fix this clusterfuck.  Not because the damage we have done can't be reversed, but because of the psychology of previous (and therefore continual) investment.  What we will get at this point, if it is stopped, is more expensive gasoline which will devastate the economy which will cause more austerity and a lower quality of life for us in the once industrial first world nations.  In the end it's better to stop the Black Snake, but we will experience it as austerity and an even lower standard of living.  We have no alternative in place, and that is the main problem. 

It's like saying "our boat is sinking, better jump out into the ocean to get off of the sinking ship."  So you jump out in the ocean, and now you are shark bait, and the best you can do is be one of the lucky ones on a life boat.  There's not enough life boats for everybody.  They want to stop the Black Snake, stop the fossil fuel industry, and they are correct that it needs to be stopped, and what is it replaced with?  Without a complete collapse of the monetary system, and without a complete collapse of BAU, nothing can spring up in it's place.  Permaculturist have been trying to change the system from the ground up, grass roots level, since the 70's.  Environmentalists have been trying to change BAU for even longer.  How long have we known about green house gases and anthropogenic global warming?  How long has BAU continued in the face of it producing "leaders" such as King Trumpty Dumpty who is an active AGW denier...the next POTUS. 

Here is a snap shot from a conversation I had on facepalm...names removed.  My friend posted the article that I shared on this thread about the Native leaders not showing up to the hearings:

Quote
LD:  Thanks for posting this. It's unfortunate. I have been very sympathetic to the Water Protectors, for what they are trying to do. I happen to believe that anthropogenic global warming is real. It's simple science with an overwhelming agreement within the scientific community. In that light, to stop the burning of fossil energy is an important goal. In fact, maybe the most important for our species presently. We must maintain a human supporting biome for the future generations. I see what the Water Protectors are doing in that light. The fact that they did not take a stand beforehand is damaging to their credibility, but not to their message.

Also, the fact that I need affordable petroleum to run my business creates a lot of cognizant dissonance. We need petroleum for our way of life. There is too much previously invested in this way of life. Our infrastructure, the way we inhabit the landscape, the way we sustain ourselves...all depends on petroleum. The very burning of which is contributing to so many problems for the biome that sustains us. This is not about saving the planet. This is about saving a biosphere that will sustain a healthy human existence. The Water Protectors are right in this regard. We need to stop doing what we are doing as a species, but alas there is too much momentum to BAU.

I remain torn between my ideals and our reality. Torn between what is right and what I must do to continue supporting my family in this society. I'm sympathetic to the Water Protectors and their cause. I think the Native American prophecy on the matter is correct. Unfortunately there seems to be nothing that will change the trajectory of the Corporatocracy. So be it.

(I posted the pick of N. America showing Native land shrinking to nothing that RE used in the article)


Friend: Everyone is aware of this issue, but it doesn't effect the hundreds of times where the Army Corps of Engineers attempted to talk to the Sioux before the DAPL was even begun. Seemingly, every time, the Sioux failed to arrive, or seemed disinterested.  Believe me, I'm extremely sympathetic to the plight of Native Americans, but you can't refuse to talk about a thing for 2 years and then get all pissy when the thing is happening.

LD: Personally I don't blame them. It was originally going to go through Bismark and got rerouted.

Friend: Did you actually read the article linked?

LD:  I agree that had they shown up it would have made their case look a hell of a lot better, but I also think this is much bigger of an issue than the Native elders not showing up to white man's court. For the Native's this is about how they have been treated since the beginning of colonization, and it's about protecting the water from another pipeline. Being installed by a company with a track record of catastrophic failures leading to poisoned natural resources.

The bigger picture here is that we need to stop destroying the human supporting biome that sustains us. That's what this is really about. Them not showing up to court is simply a distraction from the main issues at this point.

LD:  yes I read it, and I posted it to my site as well. Why do you ask?

Friend:  It wasn't even court. Because you're speaking as if you had zero knowledge of the repeated attempts of the Army Corps of Engineers to get the Standing Rock Tribe's input before the construction even began. Their water intake is being moved 70 miles from the water crossing. When you step back and really look at the issue.... it's kind of absurd. It's like complaining that the cops don't do anything to fix your neighborhood, but then when the come out you refuse to talk to them.

LD:  Alright, white man's bureaucracy then

Friend: They were going TO the Native's tribal council. The Sioux kept rescheduling or cancelling. All they had to do was show up to their usual place of business. They weren't even asked to go anywhere else.

LD:  look, I agree with you that this is damaging to their cause. What I'm saying is that the issue is bigger than that. Just because they didn't show up to the hearings or meetings or whatever you want to call them, doesn't take away from the fact that we need to change business as usual in this country.

This article is an attempt to skirt the main issues.

You could also say it's like somebody threatening to kill you, you ignoring the threat, and then them killing you. You're arguing that the homicide is justifiable.

Do you believe that anthropogenic global warming is a real phenomenon? Because if you don't believe it then we're arguing about the wrong thing.

Friend: you're practicing whataboutery. I was trying to stay on topic. To be straight with you, human's have been destroying the earth for ages. But, not all climate change is associated with Humans. Let's forget about eons of climate fluctuation. But, if you really want to get ill about it, go talk to China and India. Go cry about rampant deforestation which greatly reduces the Earth's ability to filter the air. Hell, that oil is going to get burned with or without the pipeline.

LD: whataboutery? No I'm not. I've said that I agree with you on the issue of them not showing up. It's damning to their cause. I'm not arguing that. What I'm arguing is that their cause is just and we should get behind it. I'm also saying I understand why they would not show up given the history of Native American genocide at the hands of our government.

I know not all climate change is associated with humans. I know the climate has always changed. Cry about it! That oil is going to get burned and those trees are going to get cut down and what's going to change it? Nothing will change BAU with your attitude. Nothing will change it if we don't take a stand and say that it's wrong and that we should change it.

But you still didn't answer the question I asked you. Do you believe in AGW? America is supposed to lead isn't it? We can't do a damn thing about China and India.

Friend: "Taking a stand for the Earth at Standing Rock" is like trying to fight isis from the Arctic. It's not even part of the grand scheme of things.

LD: It has to start somewhere, and to my estimation it's not about taking a stand for the earth, it's about taking a stand for a human supporting biome. The Earth will be just fine with our without us. It will be just fine no matter what we do. WE will not be just fine.

Friend: It's not going to start with a bunch of people freezing to death in north dakota. The primary catalyst will be innovation. New technology always moves us away from old technology. No one is going to regress before a viable replacement is demonstrated.

LD:  I agree 100%, so where is that technology? Because what I see is pipeline after pipeline. What I see is billions of dollars being invested in fossil fuel infrastructure and industry. The Corporatocracy is not trying to change BAU. So what will change it?

Friend: Machinery moved us away from child labor and slavery. (except in 3rd world countries at least) Batteries moved us away from corded phones. Wifi is killing the casual computer user.... etc....

Friend 2: I'm glad to see there is some understanding of the real reason this protest is happening... It's been disguised in a cloak of native rights, but the real fight from those protesting is to take a symbolic stand against fossil fuels being used, period. This seems like such a strange time/place/way to go about it as it only delays an inevitable usage and does nothing really to further the cause of avoiding fossil fuels. What's interesting is I'm not sure anyone involved is arguing about the details of climate change, as this simply isn't about that--it is about how to best transport a bunch of oil that would otherwise be transported less efficiently and more dangerously by truck/train.

I am also sympathetic to the Native tribes having clean water and safety in their land, in the same way I'm sympathetic to those who lost their land in Iowa from imminent domain grabs by the government. But, there remains a way to negotiate and it seems that hasn't been a two way street.

Seems like if we want to really change we should focus on those things like innovation and efficiency (pipelines for example) and new technology (Tesla for example) before we start penalizing ourselves for the current way of doing it.

Friend 1: If you don't invest in an alternative energy source, fossil fuel will be burned. Sadly, and ignorantly for most people, the most widely used batteries for so called "green energy" cars and homes use Lithium Polymer.... Lithium is extremely poisonous the the mining required is devastating to the land used. So, again, we need another innovation.... I'm not saying we shouldn't be looking. I'm saying that the ONLY way to fix the problems that we have is to CONTINUE searching for better solutions. No one is going to just stop and give up their way of life and go back to little house on the prairie, unless there's a cataclysmic event.

LD: I have a landscaping business. I drive around a Ram 1500 with a trailer full of small engines and mowers. I need affordable petroleum to make my business work. At the same time I want clean air and water for my children to breath and drink. I want a biome that's not loaded with poison in the ground, in the food, in the air, and in the water. What do we want more? To continue BAU or to begin healing our biome for the seventh generation?

Friend 1: By your own admission, you see that we need innovation, but currently can not abandon the practices of the day.

Friend 2: I'm with you. no argument there. There should be more interest and effort in innovation, and that is a cause to get behind, and there are many people focused on just that. But the truth is, like Jason noted, many of those are also destructive, and guess who mines the stuff for solar capacitors, electric motors, etc? Really big, fossil burning earth movers... That's a great place to start: let's find a way to do nuclear powered or some similar powered land equipment. I'd love to see that... Until then, it will be diesel all the way.

I want a biome that is sustainable for another 10000 years or more, as well as clean air/water/soil/etc... As a nutritionist and parent this is hugely important. But I think my energy will be best focused on steering and investment in changing the need for destructive environmental policies rather than trying to shut down a behemoth's food supply. I'd rather change the demand over time than stop the faucet before there is an alternative

LD: It's a catch 22. I don't see how to get the change we need. Standing Rock is desperation because desperation is all we have. Technology is not helping as you have clearly demonstrated with the battery issue. Besides that, all of the renewables depend on fossil fuel infrastructure because our entire built environment depends on fossil energy. You can't build solar panels without the fossil energy it takes to mine, transport, manufacture, and then transport again. Same for wind turbines. Same for any renewable out there. So where is this technology that's supposed to save us?

Friend 2:  I think bureaucracy makes the catch 22 worse, so that's one place to work, but definitely a slower turn of the ship

LD: I don't see nuclear as an answer. Nuclear creates waste that is destructive to DNA, we currently have no way to safely dispose of it, and it's radioactive for millions of years. Fukushima Daiichi is testament to why nuclear is no option.

Friend 2: Yeah, that's true... It's a stepping stone at best. Just used that as an example of something more efficient. We here in SC get to receive the waste from all over the country

LD: I issue is that the Corporatocracy has us by the cajones. Especially for those of us with children. You can drop out and live on the margins if it's just you, and possibly a mate, but once you have children you have no choice but to participate in the Matrix of fossil energy and money. The only way to get money is to participate in society which requires your usage of the built environment which requires fossil energy. We're literally chained to it. So something like Standing Rock is at least something.

Problem is, what's the end game here? They win, pipeline is aborted, energy companies go bust, price at the pump goes up, economy gets screwed...its fubar.

In the meantime we have no technology available to even make a dent in our fossil energy dependence. Even if one were to come around it takes many years to get these types of innovations into use. I don't have an answer. I just know that we need to change NOW and not continue putting it off like the generations before us. We've known about green house gases for a long time.

I agree with you about the trees. That is a more pressing issue. At least if we weren't clear cutting the lungs of our planet out then we'd still have the ability to remove the CO2 we're adding.

I do have a solution for that problem. Plant bamboo. It's 20% more efficient at scrubbing CO2 than trees and it provides a truly sustainable harvest year after year. It's a food, fiber, fuel, and medicine. The Japanese just opened a plant that uses bamboo as the fuel feed stock. It's the most useful plant to our species on the planet and it's also the most hated in the western world for reasons of ignorance mostly.


Friend 3:  http://www.nytimes.com/.../don-t-blame-columbus-for-all... (http://www.nytimes.com/.../don-t-blame-columbus-for-all...)
Don't Blame Columbus for All the Indians' Ills
Article on wide-ranging study conducted by team of anthropologists, economists and paleopathologists that…
nytimes.com|By John Noble Wilford

 I know this wasn't exactly the point, but always found this interesting. There was a greater decline in Native American populations prior to Europeans arriving on the continent.

LD: And one more thing. The author of this article made a lot of claims about these supposed scheduled meetings but provided no proof of them. How are we to believe his claims are even true?

My friend is a very intelligent person.  The other two were his friends and they seem pretty intelligent as well.  That's the best argument that intelligent BAU cheer leaders have...technotriumphalism.  The smart scientist will save us with their spiffy technology.  A technology that hasn't and won't show up.  I guess I don't blame them for having hopium in technotriumphalism.  What else are they to do?  Realize the truth?  The truth is nothing but depression.  Most people are not equipped to realize the truth about our collapsing way of life.  It's doomed.  At best you are marinated in cognizant dissonance every fucking day.   

The fact is that there is no happy medium here.  There is no easy transition into the future.  The party is over and it's time for the fucking hang over and nothing is going to stop that. 

In the end, as much as I feel like a shitty person for saying it, as much as I want to stand at Standing Rock, I won't be.

Personally, bamboo is the only thing keeping me sane at this point.  It gives me something to believe in.  It gives me a destiny to continue working towards. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 30, 2016, 07:58:33 AM
As always, that was a great read...about doom RE. 

The article Kdog posted up by the Reverend Billy did a better job pulling at my human supporting biome heart strings than yours did however.  After reading the Reverend's article I felt like going to Standing Rock again.  After reading yours I felt like it would be a waste of time and damaging to my family seeing as how ain't nothing going to stop our civilizations collapse.

LOL.  I never promised you a Rose Garden.  The fucking name of the Blog is the "Doomstead Diner". 

Quote
My friend is a very intelligent person.  The other two were his friends and they seem pretty intelligent as well.  That's the best argument that intelligent BAU cheer leaders have...technotriumphalism.  The smart scientist will save us with their spiffy technology.  A technology that hasn't and won't show up.  I guess I don't blame them for having hopium in technotriumphalism.  What else are they to do?  Realize the truth?  The truth is nothing but depression.  Most people are not equipped to realize the truth about our collapsing way of life.  It's doomed.  At best you are marinated in cognizant dissonance every fucking day.

I don't agree with that.  I know what is going on and I am neither marinating in depression or stewing in cognitive dissonance.  To me, this is just a survival issue, which all creatures of all types in all eras since life began have to face.  So you face down the choices: Will I try to live as long as I can or will I die fast?  Will I enjoy my time walking the earth or will I brood about death all the time and feel hopeless?  I choose to try and stay alive a bit longer despite the fact I am a total wreck and in pain most of the time.  I analyze the death and destruction ahead of us, but I don't brood about it, it doesn't stop me from enjoying chatting with my friends about it, and it certainly does not prevent me from enjoying a bottle of Sam Adams Boston Lager! lol.

Quote
The fact is that there is no happy medium here.  There is no easy transition into the future.  The party is over and it's time for the fucking hang over and nothing is going to stop that. 

No, transition will not be EZ, but that doesn't mean some cannot make the transition if they are TOUGH enough and slog through.  I won't make it through to the Other Side of this one, but YOU can.

(http://img.weixinyidu.com/150723/bece632c.jpg_slt2)

RE

Title: Sheriff’s Dept to Fine People $1K for Bringing in Food/Supplies to Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 30, 2016, 12:08:58 PM

Activist Post

By Claire Bernish

In what could only be termed a potential gross violation of human rights, the Morton County Sheriff’s Department announced today it plans to block all supplies from entering Standing Rock camps — including deliveries of food.

Reuters reports: “Supplies, including food and building materials, will be blocked from entering the main camp following Governor Jack Dalrymple’s signing of an ‘emergency evacuation’ order on Monday, said Maxine Herr, a spokeswoman from the Morton County Sheriff’s Department.”

Herr flatly stated, according to Reuters, “They have deliveries, retailers that are delivering to them – we will turn around any of those services.”

Although the governor’s order went into effect immediately, North Dakota Department of Emergency Services spokeswoman Cecily Fong noted no deliveries to the camps had yet been turned away as of Tuesday morning.

However, ‘The building materials intended for the site are a top priority because the camp is not zoned for permanent structures,’ Reuters reported she said. ‘Propane tanks also will be blocked because they have been used in attacks against law enforcement.’

The latter claim has been proven false by eyewitness video from the night of November 20-21, when law enforcement assaulted peaceful water protectors for over six hours in a non-stop barrage of rubber bullets, tear gas, impact and concussion grenades, and even weaponized water — in temperatures dropping into the low 20s Fahrenheit. Sophia Wilansky’s arm was nearly ripped from her body when an impact grenade exploded. But the sheriff denies police used any weapon that could have caused such damage, despite evidence collected from the scene and by surgeons working to repair her traumatic wound.

Shortly after issuing the notice it would block supplies, the Morton County Sheriff’s Department backed away somewhat, saying it would take a passive role to try to prevent supplies from reaching the camps, by issuing hefty $1,000 fines for vehicles attempting such deliveries — saying it had interpreted the evacuation order as a reason for a blockade.

“That is the understanding that we had initially but we had to get that clarified,” Herr told Reuters. “The governor is more interested in public safety than setting up a road block and turning people away.”

This startling announcement of any attempt at a supply blockage from the Morton County Sheriff’s Department comes during a week of shocking news for Standing Rock Sioux water protectors and their allies camped near the Missouri River to block construction of the highly contentious Dakota Access Pipeline.

An eviction notice letter sent by the Army Corps of Engineers to Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Dave Archambault II and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Chairman Harold Frazier on Friday sparked furious outrage from around the world — and was met with firm resistance from both tribes.

Clarifying later that no force would be used to effect this eviction, the Army Corps stated, “Those who remain will be considered unauthorized and may be subject to citation under federal, state, or local laws.”

Before the shock wore off from that letter, on Monday, North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple confounded matters further with the issuance of an emergency evacuation order for the same Army Corps-managed, water protector-occupied land as a winter storm advanced on the area.

Although neither U.S. government-issued order would apply had treaties from the 1800s been honored, the attorneys scrambled to determine if the governor’s evacuation supplanted the Army Corps’ eviction — as the date for the camps to become officially illegal would be moved forward significantly from December 5. Archambault denounced Dalrymple’s order as an intimidation tactic and determined it invalid.

However, the Morton County Sheriff’s Department appears to have opportuned the current evacuation order to escalate its curtailment of the basic human rights of the thousands of water protectors estimated to now occupy camps north of the Cannonball River.

Legally and technically speaking, both orders effectively close the camps — except for Sacred Stone Camp, located south of the river — to access by both the public and emergency services.

Thousands of veterans have been planning to arrive at the camps on December 4 to defend water protectors from brutal police tactics employed by the multi-state coalition of police led by the Morton County Sheriff’s Department — and they haven’t yet changed those plans.

According to an update from Reuters, Governor Dalrymple’s spokesman Jeff Zent said, “There is not going to be any blockade of supplies.”

While so much about these breaking developments remains unclear thanks to a lack of information from authorities and officials, one thing is certain. Blocking food and supplies, by any means, from reaching water protectors who have vowed to stay through the winter is not only a violation of human rights and basic decency — if effective, it has the potential to be an horrific tragedy in the making.

Claire Bernish writes for TheFreeThoughtProject.com, where this article first appeared.

Image Credit: Unicorn Riot/Facebook
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 30, 2016, 12:10:37 PM
This event has turned into a major pissin' contest....
Where's George Soros when you need his dragon ass.  :evil4:
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 30, 2016, 01:43:52 PM
Where is the camp?  Who owns the land that is being used for it?  What legal mechanism can this dirt bag racist prick of a sheriff use to interrupt the delivery of supplies?

May the cosmic circle close and may there be a violent end to this sheriff's violent delights.  A severed arm followed by a total denial that it even happened does no responsibility show.  May what goes around come around, for keeping the peace in Morton county is not a priority for law enforcement but making war is.  May they learn that in war victims have the right to defend themselves by any means necessary.

Unless it is done in self defense law enforcement does not have a right to violence and any violence shown which is not employed in self defense is itself a violation of law.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on November 30, 2016, 02:29:38 PM
It would be interesting to see how many human rights lawsuits have been filed
in this county in the last few months. The county is screaming their out of money now.

WHO-WEEEEEE are they gonna' be broke in the years to come.
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: Battle of Black Snake now UP on GEI
Post by: RE on November 30, 2016, 06:08:33 PM
I asked John to give this one TIME SENSITIVE priority, so he exchanged it for the Modern Slavery article and it is now UP on Global Economic Intersection.  GEI is not Zero Hedge, but it does have a substantially larger circulation than the Diner itself.

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201611301919 (http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201611301919)

I wanted to get this one up FAST to give as much time as possible for people to make the journey to North Dakota and STAND TALL with the First Nations people at Standing Rock.

It's a battle that will probably be lost, but it should not result in any deaths unless Da Goobermint truly goes ballistic, and I don't think they will for this one.  One woman appears to have lost an arm from a shock grenade pitched out by the Gestapo in the last big confrontation though, so it's not exactly safe either to be there.

This by no means will be the last of these battles.  But it can serve a good purpose, to galvanize the resolve of those who understand what is going on, and to further spread this awareness.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on November 30, 2016, 08:23:44 PM
Quote
(ANTIMEDIA) Amid the increasingly tense standoff between Dakota Access Pipeline protesters and militarized police in North Dakota, law enforcement has taken another swipe at the opposition.

Protesters on the ground have enjoyed widespread support from individuals around the world, and as those resisting the pipeline brace for a freezing winter, they have moved to set up tents and other forms of shelter — efforts authorities claim are illegal due to zoning restrictions.

As a result, agents of the state have announced they will prevent protesters from receiving building materials, as well as food.

Reuters initially reported Maxine Herr, a spokeswoman for the Morton County Sheriff’s Department, said, “They have deliveries, retailers that are delivering to them – we will turn around any of those services.”

Reuters also reported Cecily Fong, a spokeswoman for North Dakota’s Emergency Services, said “building materials intended for the site are a top priority because the camp is not zoned for permanent structures,” as paraphrased by the outlet.

These quotes are cited in an article published by Slate, but the original Reuters story was later changed and neither of those statements remains in the article (here’s an archived version showing the outlet initially reported incoming supplies would be blocked). A later archived version of the Reuters piece shows Reuters changed the story reflect that “North Dakota officials on Tuesday backed away from plans to physically block supplies from reaching oil pipeline protesters,” citing Herr as admitting she was previously mistaken.

However, even these details were cut from the final version of the Reuters article, which removed any reference to the apparent confusion between Morton County police, Emergency Services, and the Governor’s office. The governor’s office has since reiterated it never had plans to institute a blockade, meaning it appears Morton County Sheriff’s got ahead of themselves before changing their statements.

Still, authorities have made it clear that while they don’t intend to set up a physical blockade, they will impose a $1,000 fine to anyone who shows up to the camp to deliver supplies.
Sign up for the free Anti-Media newsletter the establishment doesn't want you to receive

This could affect individuals like local minister Karen Van Fossen, who along with members of the Bismarck-Mandan Unitarian Universalist Congregation, has been bringing food, diapers, tents, sleeping bags, and other necessary items to the protesters at Standing Rock over the last several months.

Van Fossen is undeterred by the latest police order.

“As people of faith and conviction, we are committed to peaceful, prayerful solidarity with Standing Rock. If supplies are needed to survive the long winter, we will do our best to provide them,” she told the Bismarck Tribune.

So far, Herr has said officers “will warn people carrying goods to camp that they could be subject to an infraction with a maximum penalty of $1,000,” apparently indicating law enforcement will not ticket first-time ‘offenders.’

The so-far tepid enforcement of the new policy parallels recent demands from various authorities for protesters to leave the Army Corps of Engineer land where they’re currently stationed. Last week, the Army Corps of Engineers issued an evacuation notice to protesters but shortly after clarified they had no plans to forcibly remove them. The agency asserted those who remain may be subject to citation. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe vowed to remain where they are.

Similarly, on Monday, Governor Dalrymple issued a mandatory evacuation order but failed to stipulate any specific enforcement actions. The order simply demands that protesters leave. The decision to block supplies followed shortly after, but it remains to be seen how strictly and consistently the new policy will be enforced.

As Standing Rock Chairman Dave Archambault II said:

“The governor cites harsh weather conditions and the threat to human life. As I have stated previously, the most dangerous thing we can do is force well-situated campers from their shelters and into the cold.”

Even as authorities at different levels appear to waffle on enforcing their demands, their previous actions have provoked global outrage. Between the heavy-handed use of eminent domain, abuses of journalists, and violent attacks on peaceful protesters, Energy Transfer Partners — the company behind the pipeline — and government agencies are losing the public relations battle.

Even so, they are continuing to sanction dangerous, hypocritical behavior.

On November 18, Morton County police urged demonstrators to leave the protest camp, warning of subzero temperatures and expressing concern for those exposed to the elements. They cautioned about the dangers of hypothermia. But the very same police proved their lack of sincerity when just days later, they blasted hundreds of protesters with water cannons, soaking them with water in already freezing temperatures and prompting many to require treatment for … hypothermia.

In the same contradictory manner, government agents who have routinely violated hundreds of individuals’ constitutional rights are now claiming to be concerned with rule of law, using the guise of zoning permits and “public safety” to justify forcing the potential starvation and hypothermia of protesters dedicated to their cause.

While some might argue that because protesters are violating codes, they have incited their own mistreatment, the system deeming their behavior unlawful is the same one that has allowed the historical usurpation of their property rights, relegating them to the whims and rulings of overarching governments with special interests at heart.

Further, in spite of officers’ claims they are in danger, making their violence against protesters is warranted, it’s worth noting that in the most recent widespread clash on November 20, police saw one officer harmed by a rock thrown by a demonstrator; on the same evening, hundreds of protesters sustained injuries, including one young woman whose arm was reportedly ripped open by a concussion grenade.

Regardless of the measures authorities take to silence dissent at the site of the pipeline, it’s doubtful protesters will be backing down anytime soon. This week, they filed a class action suit against the Morton County Sheriff’s Department over its aggressive policing tactics. Next week, they will be joined by over 2,000 veterans who are heading to the scene to defend protesters from law enforcement.

The above article is from 'the list'.

http://theantimedia.org/dapl-protesters-food-shelter/ (http://theantimedia.org/dapl-protesters-food-shelter/)

And this is a photo of the Sheriff.  He is the lump of dick sucking flesh which is front and center.

(http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/statesville.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/2f/02faed76-6976-5add-97da-4884a110f129/583afc1c62320.image.jpg)

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier says he won't "allow people to become unlawful."

That is a right he reserves for his deputies.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 30, 2016, 09:04:26 PM
Starving people out is of course a very tried and true Siege Warfare techinque, going back to Biblical Times at least.

This IS probably the best method to get these people off the spot, Da Goobermint does have control over the roads in and out of the place.  But it will take some time and they will get a lot of bad publicity if they pursue the method.

From the Water Protector side, they'll need to find some work arounds.  There are Hollywood Stars supporting them and smaller individuals are making contributions too. So they have some money.  Do you remember the Berlin Airlift?

(http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/airlift/homeimages/main.jpg)

I suggest they purchase some large Drones and start airlifting in the food.  Force the Gestapo to shoot down the drones.

Short of that, they probably can establish an Off Road trail and use 4 wheelers for food transport.  Tunneling might also be in order.

RE
Title: Logistics at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on November 30, 2016, 11:07:09 PM
The Newz that Da Goobermint will attempt to stop the inflow of Food Supplies to the DAPL Protest site brings up a few important issue to consider in such a Mass Protest and Movement.

First off, what will occur with any new Buses full of Veteran Oath Keepers who try to get to the site in the next few days?  Will there be Roadblocks preventing the buses from getting through?  Will any of the Bus Drivers attempt to run the roadblocks if they are set up?  Will Water Protectors lease Heavy Equipment to crash through roadblocks?  One good size Caterpillar front end loader will take several squad cars and SUVs off the road, no problem there, except of course somebody would start shooting, so your non-violence ends at this point.

From the POV of the Protesters, having a Single Site with many people congregated in one place is an accident waiting to happen.  Especially in a remote place like this spot in North Dakota, it is EZ for the Gestapo to take control over their supply lines.  There just are not too may roads going in or out of the spot.

My advice to them would be to GO MOBILE.  They are using Tents, TeePees and RVs for shelter.  On the evening of Dec 4th, PACK UP and GTFO of Dodge!  "Capitulate".  Da Goobermint meanwhile would have had to mass up the Goon Squad to eliminate an encampent which...so sorry...is no longer THERE! lol.

Wait a week, then zip back in and set up your encampment AGAIN, loaded with food supplies for the next month.  Next time they tell you to clear, you rinse and repeat.

Of course, they will probably set up roadblocks to prevent a new setup, but this will cost a lot of MONEY.  They'll need to post squad cars and checkpoints all along the routes into the neighborhood.  But they still can only do even that in the small section of the pipeline that is scheduled to go under the Missouri River.  So fuck the idea of one encampment, sprinkle out the 5000 Water Protectors and 2500 Veteran Oath Keepers and 2500 White Environmentalist Tree Huggers along the whole fucking LENGTH of the pipeline.  Make this clearing process REALLY EXPENSIVE!    They would need to engage every fucking police dept from ND to IL to do this!  lol.

I wish I was in charge of the logistics for this operation.

RE
Title: 30 Years of Oil and Gas Pipeline Accidents, Mapped
Post by: RE on December 01, 2016, 03:33:08 AM
No worries, it's "safe".  ::)

There's more Interactive Maps on the website.

RE

http://www.citylab.com/weather/2016/11/30-years-of-pipeline-accidents-mapped/509066/ (http://www.citylab.com/weather/2016/11/30-years-of-pipeline-accidents-mapped/509066/)
30 Years of Oil and Gas Pipeline Accidents, Mapped

The sheer number of incidents involving America’s fossil fuel infrastructure suggests environmental concerns should go beyond Standing Rock.

 

Sept. 9, 2010: A fire caused by an oil pipeline accident roars through San Bruno, California. (Paul Sakuma/AP)

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The increasingly brutal police response to protests over the construction of The Dakota Access Pipeline has pushed the debate over the safety of oil infrastructure into the national spotlight. From the beginning of their anti-pipeline organizing, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has voiced their concerns about the environmental impact of the project, pointing to the fact that an earlier proposal for the pipeline route was rejected due to concerns over potential contamination of Bismarck, North Dakota’s water supply.

 Oil industry supporters argue that pipelines are safer alternative to hauling fuel by tanker trucks or freight trains. “Environmental analysis comparing pipelines to rail finds pipelines will result in fewer incidents, barrels released, personal injuries, and greenhouse gas emissions,” says John Stoody, a spokesperson for the Association of Oil Pipe Lines, in a statement to CityLab. He cites an environmental impact statement conducted by the U.S. State Department comparing the impact of rail delivery of crude oil to that of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. Additionally, a 2013 study from the conservative Manhattan Institute found that road transportation had an annual accident rate of 19.95 incidents per billion ton miles and rail transportation had 2.08 incidents per billion ton miles, compared to 0.89 incidents per billion ton miles for natural gas transmission and 0.58 serious incidents per billion ton miles for hazardous liquid pipelines.

 Environmentalists, however, point to a lack of adequate state and federal regulation and the difficulties of maintaining millions of miles of aging pipeline infrastructure in their warnings about the dangers of spills, fires, and other accidents. And data from the federal government suggests such concerns should be taken seriously. Over the last twenty years, more than 9,000 significant pipeline-related incidents have taken place nationwide, according to data from the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. The accidents have resulted in 548 deaths, 2,576 injuries, and over $8.5 billion in financial damages. (Not counted in this total are thousands of less “significant" pipeline-related malfunctions.)

To better understand the extent of this damage, CityLab mapped out all significant pipeline accidents between 1986 and 2016, based on federal data compiled by Richard Stover, an environmental advocate and former research astronomer at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

 In the map above, you can see the locations of all significant oil and gas pipeline incidents since 1986 in which the federal government provided location data. (Note: In incident cases without longitude and latitude information in the federal data, Stover geolocated incidents based on their county data.) The incidents are sized bigger and shaded darker as the financial damage associated with each incident increases. Zoom in on the map to get a more fine-grained view of the incident clustering and click on individuals dots to see specifics about related fatalities, injuries, and financial costs.

 Stover points out the locations reflect the footprint of oil and gas pipeline distribution networks nationwide, suggesting that wherever pipelines are extended, deadly accidents will follow. Incidents are particularly common, for example, in Texas and Louisiana, where numerous lines carry oil and gas, extracted on- and off-shore, to serve the rest of the country.

George Joseph

“The oil industry says this is the safer way, but that doesn’t mean this is safe,” says Stover. “Property is damaged. People are killed. There is no way to safely transport fossil fuels.”

To illustrate other dimensions of this damage, we created time lapse maps to show the accumulation of fatalities and injuries associated with pipeline incidents. Below is a time lapse map of fatalities resulting from pipeline incidents between 1986 and 2016. Incidents with fatalities accounted for 372 of all significant 9,006 pipeline related incidents that have occurred over the last twenty years. Red dots indicate incidents that resulted in fatalities and black dots indicate incidents without fatalities that could be geolocated.

 The map below illustrates significant incidents that resulted in injuries (in yellow) that could be geolocated. Such incidents accounted for 1,438 of all 9,006 pipeline-related accidents.



 As the time lapse shows, significant pipeline-related incidents have picked up in recent years in certain states. In Texas, for example, the effects of the state’s drilling boom may be seen in its increased accident rate: since 2009 the state has had 497 incidents, over a hundred more than in the seven years before.

Anti-pipeline activist Isabella Zizi, a member of the Northern Cheyenne, Arikara, and Muskogee Creek tribes, is an organizer with Idle No More SF Bay, which has been leading a national call to divest from financial institutions funding the Dakota Access Pipeline. “All spills and explosions—they’re going to keep happening and messing with life,” she says.This happens everywhere, but with everyone supporting Standing Rock, people are now realizing what we have been always saying about the fossil fuel industry.”

 But industry spokesman Stoody maintains that, overall, America’s pipeline transportation is safe—and the fuel it moves is crucial. “Last year, pipelines delivered 16.2 billion barrels of crude oil and petroleum products across America,” he says. “As long as Americans continue to heat their homes, drive their cars, benefit from medicine, cosmetics, food and other consumer products all produced with raw materials from petroleum products, pipelines will help America meet their needs.”

The 1,172 mile Dakota Access Pipeline, stretching from North Dakota to Illinois, would carry 470,000 barrels of crude oil a day if completed. But its future is still uncertain. Last week, the Army Corps of Engineers announced plans to close the Standing Rock Sioux camp by Dec. 5, but later claimed it had “no plans for forcible removal” and “is seeking a peaceful and orderly transition to a safer location," after public backlash. In recent weeks, police have used increasingly aggressive means to confront protesters, including water cannons, tear-gas grenades, and sound weapons. In response, thousands of veterans have pledged to travel to Standing Rock next week to serve as human shields for the protesters, who call themselves “water protectors.”

 Regardless of what happens at Standing Rock, Zizi says he expects deadly pipeline accidents will continue to flare up nationwide. “I live in Richmond, California and experienced the 2012 Chevron refinery explosion,” says Zizi. “That was scary, living six blocks away and seeing the black smoke covering the sun. They said there’s nothing wrong with this, just stay in your house. But this is contaminating our land, our soil, our air, our water. Once things are contaminated, it is hard to go back.”

Title: Over 2000 Veterans To Form Human Shield At Dakota Pipeline Protest
Post by: RE on December 01, 2016, 04:00:06 AM
Here comes the Cavalry.

(https://doubtfulsea.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/remingtoncav.jpg)

This time they're fighting FOR the Indians.

Sounds like they are suiting up properly.

RE

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-30/over-2000-veterans-form-human-shield-dakota-pipeline-protest (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-30/over-2000-veterans-form-human-shield-dakota-pipeline-protest)

Over 2000 Veterans To Form Human Shield At Dakota Pipeline Protest

Tyler Durden's picture

Following the overwhelming interest in the newly formed group "Veterans Stand for Standing Rock", Reuters reports more than 2,000 U.S. military veterans plan to form a human shield to protect protesters of a pipeline project near a Native American reservation in North Dakota, organizers said, just ahead of a federal deadline for activists to leave the camp they have been occupying.

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As we previously noted, the group has a strict no weapons policy but is stocking up on body armor and protective gear like gas masks to withstand potential attacks from the heavily militarized police, who have arrested at least 400 of protesters so far. According to on-site medics, hundreds of protesters have also been injured. Last week, a 21-year-old woman was reportedly hit with a concussion grenade, leading to a severe injury that may require her arm to be amputated. Though police have blamed protesters for what happened to her, at least one witness claims law enforcement’s version of events is untruthful.

Outrage against incidents like these, as well as attacks on journalists via tasersrubber bullets, and felony charges has made the ongoing situation ripe for outside intervention.

 

“This country is repressing our people,Wood Jr. said last week.If we’re going to be heroes, if we’re really going to be those veterans that this country praises, well, then we need to do the things that we actually said we’re going to do when we took the oath to defend the Constitution from enemies foreign and domestic.”

 

With 2,100 veterans signed up to make a stand, it appears police will be forced to reconcile their aggressive behavior with the nonviolent show of veterans, who intend to march toward police on site.

 

The group has gained substantial financial backing since word of their mission spread. According to their GoFundMe page, they have already raised over $500,000 to fund their trip, which is planned for December 4 to December 7.

Notably, Reuters reports that this comes as North Dakota law enforcement backed away from a previous plan to cut off supplies to the camp – an idea quickly abandoned after an outcry and with law enforcement’s treatment of Dakota Access Pipeline protesters increasingly under the microscope.

State officials issued an order on Monday for activists to vacate the Oceti Sakowin camp, located on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers land near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, citing harsh weather conditions.

 

The state's latest decision not to stop cars entering the protest site indicated local officials will not actively enforce Monday's emergency order to evacuate the camp issued by Governor Jack Dalrymple.

 

Dalrymple warned on Wednesday that it was "probably not feasible" to reroute the pipeline, but said he had requested a meeting with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council to rebuild a relationship.

 

Veterans Stand for Standing Rock, a contingent of more than 2,000 U.S. military veterans, intends to go to North Dakota by this weekend and form a human wall in front of police, protest organizers said on a Facebook page. Organizers could not immediately be reached for comment.

 

"I figured this was more important than anything else I could be doing,” Guy Dull Knife, 69, a Vietnam War Army veteran, told Reuters at the main camp.

 

Dull Knife, a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe from the Pine Ridge Reservation of South Dakota, said he has been camping at the protest site for months.

 

Morton County Sheriff's Office spokesman Rob Keller said in an email his agency was aware of the veterans' plans, but would not comment further on how law enforcement will deal with demonstrators.

Local law enforcement said on Tuesday they planned a blockade of the camp, but local and state officials later retreated, saying they would only check vehicles for certain prohibited supplies like propane, and possibly issue fines. Dalrymple on Wednesday said state officials never contemplated forcibly removing protesters and there had been no plans to block food or other supplies from the camp. "That would be a huge mistake from a humanitarian standpoint," he said on the conference call.

Protesters, who refer to themselves as “water protectors,” have been gearing up for the winter while they await the Army Corps decision on whether to allow Energy Transfer Partners to tunnel under the river. That decision has been delayed twice by the Army Corps.

Title: In Seattle’s Past, a Harbinger of Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 01, 2016, 09:03:37 PM
Quote
In Seattle’s Past, a Harbinger of Standing Rock

What Hiram Chittenden’s life tells us about the government and the land it conquered.

David Lewis Wed Nov 30th, 2016

If Hiram Chittenden had been present at the big solidarity-for-Standing Rock rally held outside the Army Corps of Engineers’ Hiram Chittenden Locks in Ballard two weeks ago, he probably wouldn’t have been surprised that Native Americans were once again going head-to-head with the Corps.

After all, be it an Army Corps dam that’s going to flood Native land or a pipeline that’s going to poison it, the Corps has never been popular with the continent’s original inhabitants. To Chittenden, who spent his career with the agency and designed the Locks, the most surprising thing about the protest would have been that 99 years after his death, Natives still survived. He was so positive they’d all be dead by now that he even wrote a poem from the perspective of the last Native on Earth, “The Redman’s Farewell”:

List, list, stormy waters, this once and no more,’Tis the last of the Redmen who calls from your shore… . Farewell now to mountain and prairie and shore,Their empire the Redman possesses no more.

The full poem goes on for pages, but its gist is that Natives are naturally allergic to the future, and would die out no matter what. With all the Earth’s “barbarian” races subdued, and war between the “civilized” nations becoming unthinkable, it seemed as if the future wouldn’t even have need for a military, Chittenden thought, which is why in his 1911 book War or Peace (published five years before the first World War) he proposed that all the world’s armies be dismantled and replaced with a one-world government to solve future disputes. He was still firm that non-whites not be allowed to enter the United States, even under the one-world government, for fear of racial mixing. He also acknowledged that without war we would need a new form of population control, and proposed that society should gather those with “natural infirmities and put them out of the way by any of the painless processes known to science, thus accomplishing at insignificant cost the double purpose of restricting population and improving its quality.”

Chittenden’s peace doesn’t sound like a great improvement over war, and similarly many of his employers’ projects have caused a huge amount of irreversible environmental destruction in the name of improvement. Due to its nebulous legal standing as a half-military, half-civilian organization that receives authorization directly from Congress (often to the opposition of local government), the Army Corps of Engineers has enjoyed enormous latitude in its projects, freed from many of the legal constraints that would plague lesser federal bureaucracies.

The 1986 classic Cadillac Desert by Marc Reisner is still the most complete and readable account of the Corps’ history of seizing Native land, draining wetlands, and using crypto-government authority to override state laws. This standard operating procedure didn’t end in Chittenden’s time. Right now, just north of the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota, the Corps is being used by oil companies to try to run a pipeline through Native graves and beneath the lake and river which provide the Sioux’s drinking water. Of course, without the Army Corps of Engineers’ involvement, this would all be illegal. This past weekend, the Corps announced it would clear protesters from the area in the name of safety, a striking metaphor for what the U.S. government has been doing to Natives since its creation: clearing them off the land in the name of “progress.”

Related coverage: Home From Standing Rock, Seattle Protesters Bring Pipeline Fight to the Corps

Chittenden enlisted in the Corps in 1884, just as the agency’s civilian division was transitioning away from its previous duty of clearing sunken ships out of harbors and into what it is now, an agency that physically reshapes the continent. Chittenden was one of the first army engineers to propose that the Corps get involved in building reservoirs for agricultural irrigation.

In general, Chittenden never revealed more about his personal outlook on life than when he thought he was simply stating an objective truth. In an essay titled Manifest Destiny he outlines every possible path for American expansion, and argues that no matter what, things would have wound up the way they did for both whites and Native Americans. As there was nothing the individual could do about it, he argued, the only option was to embrace it: “Nations, like individuals, grow with years and the truly rational view is to foster such growth in every legitimate way,” he wrote in his three-volume The American Fur Trade of the Far West. He felt free will was largely an illusion. Because he didn’t think much of freedom, it is fitting that he worked for an organization whose insignia is a castle—the ultimate symbol of undemocratic, received authority.

Chittenden writes that he often felt trapped in the Corps, as he was sent from assignment to assignment without much control over his own life. He was assigned as a district engineer to Seattle in 1906 shortly after a partially completed dam on the Osage River in Missouri collapsed due to an error in his engineering.

Topographically, Chittenden declared, Seattle had more “scenic beauty than any other city of ancient or modern times.” Of the native Salish population, he wrote, “They were less strong physically than the plains Indians, of inferior build, and in no sense comparable to them as specimens of physical manhood.” The most striking thing about that passage isn’t that it is racist, but that he is already referring to them in the past tense.

Though the Salish still had a large presence in turn-of-the-century Seattle, Chittenden basically went about his Army Corps of Engineers duties as if they no longer existed. His charge was to design a system by which cargo ships could travel from Puget Sound to Lake Washington. The solution: a new canal through Montlake, Fremont, and Ballard.

The Locks were necessary to account for the elevation difference between the two bodies of water. Since the project would create a new, deep outlet for Lake Washington, it would lower the lake level significantly. While working on the Locks and canal, Chittenden pondered what effects lowering Lake Washington’s water level would have on the environment. He argued that the main effect would just be aesthetic, and even that would be minor. White people with lakefront property had nothing to worry about: “The change in shoreline along residence districts will be only slight and will become inappreciable within one or two years.” That turned out to be totally untrue; after the opening of the ship canal, Lake Washington’s water level was lowered by nine feet, shrinking more than 10 miles of shoreline and permanently destroying over 93 percent of the wetlands around the lake. Chittenden goes on to say that the lowering of Lake Washington is “a case where utilitarian ends can be accomplished without any sacrifice of sentimental interest.”

It was a bold move to talk about what constituted “sentimental interest” in a region he had lived in for only a couple of years. The lowering of Lake Washington permanently cut off the flow to its natural outlet, the Black River, which ran through present-day Renton en route to the Duwamish River and had far more than “sentimental” interest for the people who’d been here since the time of the glaciers. Many Duwamish still lived along the Black River in the early 20th century; in fact, those who lived on the Black River were often considered to be the “true” Duwamish, and in many ways life continued on it the way it had before the settlers showed up.

According to David Buerge, author of an upcoming, long-awaited biography of Chief Seattle, the Duwamish believed the Black River was home to many supernatural beings, including “Weeping Mother,” a river goddess who caused the springtime floods. A hole at the bottom of the river was the lair of a powerful spirit disguised as a long-haired man, who granted wealth to those brave enough to dive into the dark, sediment-rich waters in search of his powers. On the river’s bank was a hill crawling with piles of slithering garter snakes, the “hill of the earth beings,” which had existed even before the Changer created the modern world, and not even his magic had been able to touch it. Inside the hill lived a race of primordial dwarves, older than humanity, who jealously loved the land and cared for it like doctors.

Less esoterically, the river was home to a vibrant ecosystem, including seals, the occasional lost whale, and, most important, thousands of salmon that the Duwamish had relied on since their creation. Weeping Mother and salmon alike vanished forever on the day in 1916 when the Army Corp of Engineers lowered the lake, cutting off the flow to the Black River. In the 1950s, one of the very last Duwamish who used to live on the river still remembered the day it died. “That was quite a day for the white people at least. The waters just went down, down, until our landing and canoes stood dry and there was no Black River at all. There were pools of course, and the struggling fish trapped in them. People came from miles around, laughing, and hollering, and stuffing the fish into gunny sacks.”

For all the environmental destruction and displacement of Native people they caused, no other place in Seattle seems to so live up to the Northwest idea of man and nature living together as the Locks do. The gray cement buildings mix perfectly with the green slopes of grass, great blue heron, seals, and salmon. That’s by design. As Chittenden himself said, “True architecture rears its edifices in harmony with the environment in which they stand.” In terms of environmental stewardship, the inclusion of a fish ladder in his designs for the Locks puts him several tiers above Floyd Dominy, Commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation a generation after Chittenden. After the Reclamation-built Grand Coulee Dam cut off salmon from huge swaths of spawning grounds, Dominy was asked about the dam’s impact on the fish. His response: “There’s substitutes for eating salmon. You can eat cake.” Then he smirked at his own joke.

Chittenden didn’t personally benefit that much from his work for the Corps. In 1907, President Teddy Roosevelt decided that anybody manly enough to be an officer in the U.S. army had to be able to ride a horse for 50 miles, unless they were in the infantry. This new requirement was added to the annual physical examination, and those who didn’t pass would be forced to retire. The task was daunting for Chittenden, who had suffered from bouts of typhoid and other ailments contracted from a life outdoors. But there was no way Chittenden could have been able to support his wife and three children on his then-current pension, so he took the ride on his 49th birthday, October 25, 1907.

He passed the test, but after getting off the horse his health quickly deteriorated, with the occasional paralysis in his legs becoming more frequent. He began to suffer from depression; and two months after the horse incident he checked into Seattle’s Pacific Hospital for electroshock therapy. By 1911 his legs were almost completely paralyzed, and he had to retire from the Army to spend the rest of his life in a wheelchair. Despite a lifetime military career in which he never engaged in combat against anything besides the Earth, he wound up just as mangled as those of his generation who fought Native American tribes more directly.

Physical construction of the Locks did not begin until immediately after Chittenden’s retirement in 1911, but the construction so closely followed his plans that in 1956 the generically named Government Locks became the Hiram M. Chittenden Locks.

It would be interesting to know if, while he sat in a wheelchair on the porch of his Ballard home a few months before his death in 1917, watching the ships go by for the Lake Washington Canal’s opening ceremony, Chittenden thought about his former neighbor, who had experienced the dark side of peace first-hand. The last headman (a term closer to “community organizer” than Chief) of the Shilshole, Salmon Bay Charlie, was a fixture in turn-of-the-century Ballard.

Even before white settlers arrived in Ballard the native Shilshole had already been hit hard by smallpox, and other tribes took advantage of their diminished population to capture them as slaves. By the time Chittenden arrived in Ballard, Salmon Bay Charlie and his wife Madeleine would have been one of the few reminders that like everywhere else in America, Ballard used to be Native. According to a 1990 piece in the history journal The Columbia, local kids remembered the way Charlie used to show off all his scars from fighting the northern slave raiders that tried to kidnap him and his people. It wasn’t until Charlie’s old age, toward the end of the Locks’ construction in 1915, and a few months after the death of his wife, that Indian Agents were able to come in and calmly carry him off without a struggle—in a way that war-canoe-loads of armed Haida couldn’t. He lived out the rest of his life at Chief Seattle’s Port Madison reservation.

As to why exactly Salmon Bay Charlie was carried off by the government, there is no clear explanation. Many local historians have claimed that he was moved because his land was in an area about to be flooded by the Locks; but according to Buerge, Charlie’s house was too far west to be harmed (the precise location has been lost to history). Buerge’s own suspicion is that with Ballard property becoming more valuable because of the Locks, Charlie’s white neighbors just wanted his land, and now they could take it because he was old and there were barely any of his people left.

Whether or not he was aware of Charlie, the old headman’s fate wouldn’t have surprised Chittenden for a couple of reasons. He believed that Natives were so destined to lose their land that the government shouldn’t even have bothered to make treaties; also, Chittenden was fully aware that peace can hold as much danger as war. In an essay on the importance of heroism in peacetime, he said, “The ancient feudal castle, so often used as a base of operations in despoiling the surrounding country and exacting tribute from the weak, no longer exists as a physical fact; but there do exist more powerful and relentless tyrannies,” which he goes on to describe as people in unjustly-won positions of supremacy using their powers corruptly. It’s unlikely his mention of a “feudal castle” referred to the Army Corps of Engineers’ castle insignia, but that is probably the first thing that would come to mind to the protesters at Standing Rock.

Native Americans know the dangers of peace probably better than any demographic in America. Right now in North Dakota, if they weren’t getting maced and mauled by cops and attack dogs, the Corps would not hesitate to build that pipeline through their water supply. If it leaked, there would be less physical violence than with the demonstration, but more people would be harmed. One of the main lessons to take from Chittenden’s good and bad examples is that the ultimate goal shouldn’t be peace, but good peace. The first step should be trying to find a word for it. It’s not in anything written by Chittenden.

Regarding the current situation I don't fathom how the local sheriff can act on an Army Corps of engineers eviction notice.  It would be out of his jurisdiction and he would have to hand over anyone he arrested to the FEDS for prosecution.  The sheriff could legally ignore the eviction notice and defend the protesters right to their camp if he so wished.  That he does not makes him an enemy to be reckoned with.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 01, 2016, 11:01:03 PM
Testing one two three.
Title: Honest Government Advert - Dakota Access Pipeline
Post by: azozeo on December 02, 2016, 02:31:34 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/a9TR9G5bd7w&fs=1
Title: The backstory on Standing Rock, the federal government, and tribal sovereignty
Post by: RE on December 03, 2016, 12:13:33 AM
http://grist.org/article/the-backstory-on-standing-rock-the-federal-government-and-tribal-sovereignty/ (http://grist.org/article/the-backstory-on-standing-rock-the-federal-government-and-tribal-sovereignty/)

   
REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Dakota Access
The backstory on Standing Rock, the federal government, and tribal sovereignty
By Aura Bogado on Dec 2, 2016

(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/cannonballriverbanner.jpg?w=970&h=545&crop=1)

Police in riot gear forming a wall across a road. Water cannons spraying water protectors in the night. The movement to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline has yielded many arresting images. But what you don’t see is just as important.

It’s the legal battle underway as the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tries to stop a pipeline that would cross ceremonial and burial grounds, and also put a sole source of drinking water at risk. A federal court ruled earlier this year that the Army Corps of Engineers “has likely complied” with federal obligations to preserve these sites sacred to the Standing Rock Sioux. But the Corps still halted construction to review its handling of the process. And then the company building the pipeline sued to restart construction.

These lawsuits hinge on questions around tribal sovereignty, the body of law that steers tribal nations’ relationship with the United States government.

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It’s a subject that’s crucial to understanding the effort to stop the pipeline, says Rebecca Tsosie, an expert on the subject and a professor at the University of Arizona Law School. In a recent interview with Grist, Tsosie talked about the unique relationship between tribal governments and the feds. The interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Q. Can you explain the origin of the legal concept of tribal sovereignty?

A. It comes from a famous trilogy of cases in the 19th century authored by Chief Justice John Marshall, the fourth chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. He was looking at the Cherokee Nation, which was in a treaty relationship with the United States. The Cherokee Nation had sovereignty that pre-existed the United States, and it had a territory confirmed by a federal treaty.

Marshall said that they’re nations like any other nation in the world. They govern themselves without any dependence on the United States; they govern their lands, their territory, and their people; and they engage in government-to-government relationships with the United States. He basically confirmed the self-governing nature of the Cherokee Nation on its territory and its immunity from state law.

Tribal sovereignty is an inherent aspect of a people organizing themselves as a nation and exerting authority over their members and their territory. Foreign nations do that, the United States does that, and Indian nations do that.

Q. So it’s not like Marshall handed tribal nations their sovereignty. He recognized that they possessed it already?

A. Indian nations existed before the United States was even a country — there are treaties between Great Britain and Native nations. They didn’t get their sovereignty from the United States because their sovereignty existed before the United States.

Within the United States today, there are many federally recognized Indian nations. These governments may or may not have a land base. They have jurisdiction over their members and over their reservation land. Tribes have police powers; they have the ability to regulate health, safety, and welfare within the reservation.

Q. How is a tribal government like the Navajo Nation, for example, distinct from a foreign government?

A. Today, the Navajo Nation is not a foreign nation within the U.S. It exists as a domestic-dependent nation — that’s the technical term used under federal Indian Law. That means it’s a nation with all the powers a nation has, except for those that would be inconsistent with the supremacy of the United States. So, if the Navajo Nation wanted to secede from the union, it couldn’t because it’s within the territory of the United States.

Domestic-dependent nations are under the protection of the U.S. government. We call that the trust relationship. The role of the federal government is to mediate between tribes and the states and various citizens.

Q. Has the federal government been holding up its end of that trust relationship when it comes to the Dakota Access Pipeline?

A. The Army Corps of Engineers presides over the federal land around and under Lake Missouri [where the pipeline is supposed to be built]. The federal government is under a duty to consult with indigenous nations before any project goes through on federal land that would endanger or jeopardize the multiple interests that indigenous nations have. The question now is whether the quality of the consultation was sufficient before the project started. That’s why the Army Corps suspended the permit.

Q. How should the federal government have handled it? 

A. In my view, the process should have started much earlier than it did, and it should have been aligned with other processes. For example, with the Keystone XL pipeline, the agencies identified federally recognized tribes that had cultural and environmental interests in the area, and that was way before anyone even started construction. There were substantive, detailed consultations. That’s the type of approach that should have been taken with Dakota Access.

Q. The Supreme Court has shaped tribal sovereignty over the years. How do you think President-elect Donald Trump might shape the court?

A. What I always ask my students is: Do you feel that the court is neutral? Is it a tribunal that is devoted to justice? Because the last thing we would want as a country, I think, is to say the executive can do whatever he wants, or that Congress can do whatever it wants, the Supreme Court can do whatever it wants. In that kind of a regime, everybody is in danger, because there is no structure for justice.
Title: SHOWDOWN at the DAPL Corral
Post by: RE on December 03, 2016, 05:27:52 AM
T MINUS 1 Day and counting...

RE

http://abcnews.go.com/US/showdown-looms-dakota-access-pipeline-protest-vets-civil/story?id=43930600 (http://abcnews.go.com/US/showdown-looms-dakota-access-pipeline-protest-vets-civil/story?id=43930600)

Showdown Looms at Dakota Access Pipeline Protest as Vets, Civil Rights Observers Converge Before Evacuation Deadline

    By Catherine Thorbecke

Dec 3, 2016, 6:02 AM ET

Stephanie Keith/Reuters

(http://a.abcnews.com/images/US/gty-DAPL_hb-161202_4x3_992.jpg)

There may be a looming showdown in the coming days in the already contentious demonstrations in North Dakota against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Local authorities have issued a mandatory evacuation order for the site near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's reservation where hundreds of activists are camping out in protest of the controversial crude oil pipeline. Those who have not cleared out by Monday could be arrested, authorities said.

Authorities said they issued this evacuation order as a safeguard against the winter conditions.

Meanwhile, a military veterans group announced that at least 2,000 vets would "deploy" to the area on Sunday to defend the demonstrators if local authorities move in to clear out the camp this weekend. In addition, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights told ABC News on Friday that it would send commissioners to North Dakota because of the commission's civil rights concerns.

"We are concerned with numerous reports and testimony regarding the use of military-style equipment and excessive force against protesters," the USCCR said in a statement. "Our concerns are compounded by the disproportionate police use of excessive force against Native Americans, who are more likely than any other racial group to be killed by police."

Despite the looming possibility of confrontations, arrests and the below-freezing temperatures, many demonstrators said they will continue their protests.

"I'm not going anywhere," Terrell Iron Shell, 23, who came to Standing Rock from Rapid City, South Dakota, in early August, told ABC News from inside a yurt, a traditional nomadic home, erected on the contested land. "I'm willing to set my life on the line to protect this water, to protect this way of life, Unci Maka, mother earth. And so, I’m willing to do whatever it takes." Unci Maka is Lakota for "grandmother earth."

"I’m willing to give my life for this cause. I hope it doesn't come down to that. But you know Crazy Horse once said, 'Today is a good day to die,’” he added, referencing a historical Native American leader.

Iron Shell, a member of the Oglala Lakota Tribe, is one of the original members of the International Indigenous Youth Council, an advocacy group that has become known for its commitment to remaining peaceful during confrontations with police.

The activist is also a descendant of Chief Iron Shell, a widely respected Brule Sioux chief who was among the first tribal leaders to sign the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, which established the Great Sioux Reservation, a vast territory that has since been cut down by acts of Congress into checkerboard remnants of its original version.

Iron Shell said there's a lot of talk among the protesters about what's going to happen on Monday.

PHOTO: Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Nov. 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Scott Olson/Getty Images
Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Nov. 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota.
more +

Since this summer, Native American groups and environmental activists have been battling to block construction of the 1,172-mile pipeline that is slated to traverse four states and transport crude oil from North Dakota's oil fields to refinery markets in Illinois. The activists, who call themselves "water protectors," say that the pipeline traverses culturally sacred sites and poses a risk to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's water supply.

Kelcy Warren, CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, the Texas-based company behind the project, has argued that those claims are unfounded, writing in an internal memo to staff in September that "concerns about the pipeline’s impact on the local water supply are unfounded" and "multiple archaeological studies conducted with state historic preservation offices found no sacred items along the route."

Iron Shell said it's important that people understand the protesters’ concerns.

"We've been silent for so long, with the historical trauma that we face," he said. "A lot of these things that happened to us in the past, our identities were taken from us, our voices were taken from us, and now we have them back and we're fighting for the water, we're protecting the water."

Why a Previously Proposed Route for the Dakota Access Pipeline Was Rejected

Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters Confront Police as Tension Mounts Over Sacred Site

Broken Promises: Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Cites History of Government Betrayal in Pipeline Fight

Wesley Clarke, Jr., who is among those mobilizing fellow veterans, said on the GoFundMe page he established that he and fellow organizers "are calling for our fellow veterans to assemble as a peaceful, unarmed militia at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation." That GoFundMe campaign has raised over $900,000 in support.

Their mission is to "defend water protectors from assault and intimidation at the hands of the militarized police force and DAPL security," Clarke added.

PHOTO: Demonstrators sit on a closed bridge across from police protecting the Dakota Access oil pipeline site next to the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D., Nov. 30, 2016.David Goldman/AP Photo
Demonstrators sit on a closed bridge across from police protecting the Dakota Access oil pipeline site next to the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D., Nov. 30, 2016.
more +

The leader of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Dave Archambault II, called on the United Nations and President Obama to "take immediate action to prohibit North Dakota from engaging in its retaliatory actions and practices," in response to the mandatory evacuation order issued for demonstrators by North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple earlier this week.

“This week is the anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre. It’s time for the United States to end its legacy of abuses against Native Americans," Archambault said in a statement Thursday.

“As a tribal nation, we call on the President to take all the appropriate steps to ensure water protectors are safe and that their rights to free speech and peaceful assembly are protected," Archambault added.

PHOTO: Women hold a demonstration on Backwater Bridge during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, Nov. 27, 2016. Stephanie Keith/Reuters
Women hold a demonstration on Backwater Bridge during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, Nov. 27, 2016.
more +

The advocacy group Amnesty International, which has dispatched a delegation of human rights observers to the protest site, sent a letter earlier this week to U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, requesting that the Department of Justice investigate the "policing of the Dakota Access Pipeline demonstrators."

“[T]he Civil Rights Division should deploy observers to the area to ensure that the rights of people opposed to the pipeline are respected, protected and fulfilled," Amnesty International U.S. Executive Director Margaret Huang states in the letter. "Should your investigators uncover any civil rights violations by law enforcement, individual officers should be charged and prosecuted as warranted.”

Energy Transfer Partners filed for a court order two weeks ago asking for the right-of-way to complete construction of the pipeline without further intervention from the federal government. The court has yet to rule on the matter.

ABC News' Evan Simon contributed to this report from Cannon Ball, North Dakota.
Title: Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters, Ordered to Leave, Dig In
Post by: RE on December 03, 2016, 04:23:27 PM
It sounds to me like they're not going to try to physically push them off the land.  They don't have the manpower to do it.  They would have had to be massing National guard already.  What they will do is start handing out fines and then locking up people's bank accounts, if they have them.  However, to do that on an individual level, first they would need to arrest the person and get his/her identity.  They might try fining the Lakota Tribal Nation, but they don't have control over what the people will do.

I don't think the camp will be emptied on Monday, but the pipeline will still go through.  Once oil starts flowing, the camp will eventually disperse unless they find another issue to keep them glued together.

RE

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/03/us/standing-rock-pipeline-protest-north-dakota.html (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/03/us/standing-rock-pipeline-protest-north-dakota.html)

Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters, Ordered to Leave, Dig In

Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters, Ordered to Leave, Dig In

Photo
 
Protesters facing off with the police on Friday outside the Oceti Sakowin camp in North Dakota. The authorities have ordered the protesters to evacuate the camp by Monday. Credit Cassi Alexandra for The New York Times

CANNON BALL, N.D. — Lee Plenty Wolf knows the government wants him to clear out of the snowbound tepee where he stokes the fire, sings traditional Oglala songs and sleeps alongside a pair of women from France and California who came to protest an oil pipeline in the stinging cold. But he and thousands of other protesters are vowing to make what may be their last stand at Standing Rock.

The orders to evacuate the sprawling protest camp on this frozen prairie just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation came down last week from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the North Dakota governor’s office. After four months of prayer marches and clashes with law enforcement officials who responded with tear gas and water cannons, the protesters now have until Monday to leave.

The government said it would not forcibly remove anyone, but could cite people for trespassing or other offenses.

At the camp, defiance is rising like smoke from the stovepipe of Mr. Plenty Wolf’s tepee. People are here to stay. They are building yurts and hammering together plywood for bunkhouses and lodges. The communal kitchen stops serving dinner at 9:30 p.m.; it reopens a half-hour later as a sleeping space.

Continue reading the main story

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“I ain’t going nowhere,” Mr. Plenty Wolf said one night as he cradled a buffalo-hide drum and reflected on grievances that run deeper than groundwater among Native Americans here. “We’re getting tired of being pushed for 500 years. They’ve been taking, taking, taking, and enough’s enough.”

The approaching deadline to leave the camps and the dwindling days of President Obama’s term create a feeling that any opportunity to stop the Dakota Access pipeline is fading. The fight has drawn thousands of tribal members, veterans, activists and celebrities and transformed a frozen patch of North Dakota into a focal point for environmental and tribal activism.

The main camp sits on federal lands that people at the camps say should rightfully belong to the Standing Rock Sioux under the terms of an 1851 treaty. To Mr. Plenty Wolf, closing it amounts to one more broken treaty.

The Standing Rock Sioux’s concerns about an oil spill just upriver from their water source has resonated with environmentalist and clean-water groups across the country, and dozens have rallied to support the tribes. Climate-change activists who fought the Keystone XL pipeline have also joined the protests. “Keep it in the ground” is a rallying cry on banners.

Photo
 
With winter storms arriving, children took the opportunity to go sledding down a hill near the protest camp on Thursday. Credit Cassi Alexandra for The New York Times

Even as violent confrontations erupted in fields and along creeks and about 600 people were arrested, crews kept digging and burying the pipeline. Its 1,170-mile path from the oil fields of North Dakota to southern Illinois is nearly complete.

Since September, the Obama administration has blocked construction on a critical section where the pipeline would burrow underneath a dammed section of the Missouri River that tribes say sits near sacred burial sites.

The tribe and activists are pushing Mr. Obama to order up a yearslong environmental review or otherwise block the project before he leaves office. President-elect Donald J. Trump said on Friday that he supported finishing the $3.7 billion pipeline.

Nobody here knows what to expect. The Army Corps of Engineers, which manages the federal land on which the main camp sits, says it wants protesters to make a “peaceful and orderly transition” out of the camps and to a “free speech zone” nearby. Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier of Morton County, a critic of the protesters who leads the law enforcement response, said his officers would not go into the camps to remove people.

The divide between law enforcement officials and the tribe and protesters now feels more brittle than ever.

Dave Archambault II, the Standing Rock Sioux chairman, has asked the Justice Department to investigate allegations of civil rights violations. He criticized officers for using rubber bullets and sprays of freezing water against what he called unarmed, peaceful “water protectors.”

“I’m worried about the next confrontation,” he said. “The escalation has continued to rise. They have concertina wire all over the place. They’re almost daring the water protectors. That’s not safe.”

Sheriff Kirchmeier dismissed the claims.

“I reject it all,” he said in an interview in the basement of the county offices, where stacks of snacks, fruit and juice donated by the public sat beside scuffed riot shields. “The protesters are forcing police and us into taking action. They’re committing criminal activities.”

Photo
 
Lee Plenty Wolf, an Oglala Lakota spiritual leader, at Oceti Sakowin Camp in North Dakota on Saturday. Credit Cassi Alexandra for The New York Times

He said protesters had used sling shots to attack officers and thrown rocks and bottles. He and other local officials continue to criticize the federal government’s response. They say the decision to delay the pipeline created months of instability that have cost Morton County $8 million. They say federal officials have offered little in the way of manpower or money to help.

On Friday, Attorney General Loretta Lynch said she had asked Justice Department officials who handle tribal-justice issues and community policing, as well as the United States attorney for North Dakota, to help mediate.

In recent days, conflicting statements from local and state officials have stirred confusion about how vigorously officials will enforce the closing of the camps. A Morton County spokeswoman initially said people could face $1,000 fines for trying to bring supplies to the camp, only to be contradicted by a governor’s spokesman who said that North Dakota had no plans to block supplies.

The authorities are still enforcing a blockade of the fastest, most direct route into the camp. But other roads — and supply lines — were still open. Pickup trucks and U-Hauls carried in lumber and propane tanks, pallets of bottled water, firewood and food. A container truck managed to crawl down the icy, flag-lined ramp into camp.

Cusi Ballew, a Pottawatomie member from southern Ohio making his second trip to the camp, was up on a ladder drilling pieces of plywood together to make a bunkhouse for Sioux tribal members. “Humans have been surviving winters for over 250,000 years,” he said. “What’s important isn’t how we’re doing it but why we’re doing it. We’re here for prayer and for action.”

And more people were pouring in.

Veterans’ groups were hoping to bring 2,000 Native and non-Native veterans to Standing Rock over the weekend. The Bismarck airport was a hive one morning: the actress Patricia Arquette could be seen heaving a suitcase off the baggage carousel; the director of a clean-water group was on the phone figuring out transportation; California friends from the Burning Man festival arrived with $5,000 worth of turmeric and medicinal herbs and oils.

At the camp, children sledded down the icy hills and horses cantered through the snow, and as night fell and people clustered around campfires to cook chili and fry bread, Laurie Running Hawk made her way to a small camp by the banks of the river. In the distance were the sounds of Native men drumming and singing, and the sight of tall floodlights along a ridge that marked the path of the pipeline.

Ms. Running Hawk grew up on the southern end of the Standing Rock Reservation and said she had been home from Minnesota for a powwow this summer when she and her 7-year-old and 15-year-old sons chanced onto one of the first major confrontations to block the pipeline. They joined in, and four months later, she was back, sleeping in a yurt with four teenagers from Minnesota who nearly froze to death on their first night in camp.

“I’m here,” she said. “You’re not going to kick me out. This is my land.”

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 03, 2016, 04:24:50 PM
Having to get on a separate computer just to access a single thread (Standing Rock) sucks. 

Without explicit speculation perhaps the gentile reader might ponder the connections between American news being decimated, the current advocacy of the Fake News point of view, and my inability to access a single thread in the Doomstead Diner Forum (this one) on a brand new screaming fast machine running the exact same OS and browser.  They are both 64 bit machines.

Shallow coverage of Standing Rock is part of a bigger problem

http://www.poynter.org/2016/shallow-coverage-of-standing-rock-is-part-of-a-bigger-problem/440410/ (http://www.poynter.org/2016/shallow-coverage-of-standing-rock-is-part-of-a-bigger-problem/440410/)

I spent some time on Google Earth checking out the Standing Rock area today.  It is good background to put things into perspective with.  I also suggest this:

http://standwithstandingrock.net/ (http://standwithstandingrock.net/)

The menu link at the top 'CAMP INFO' is a good place to start.
Title: Re: Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters, Ordered to Leave, Dig In
Post by: luciddreams on December 04, 2016, 07:30:25 AM
It sounds to me like they're not going to try to physically push them off the land.  They don't have the manpower to do it.  They would have had to be massing National guard already.  What they will do is start handing out fines and then locking up people's bank accounts, if they have them.  However, to do that on an individual level, first they would need to arrest the person and get his/her identity.  They might try fining the Lakota Tribal Nation, but they don't have control over what the people will do.

I don't think the camp will be emptied on Monday, but the pipeline will still go through.  Once oil starts flowing, the camp will eventually disperse unless they find another issue to keep them glued together.

RE



Maybe the sheriff will walk into camp and start arresting the leaders.  He could walk into camp dressed like a sheriff and not a corporatocracy boot licking military thug.  Maybe the DHS will show up with a hand full of personnel dressed in suits and arrest their leaders.  They are all non-violent Water Protectors.  If it got violent then they could send in the armored guard to break it up, with cameras rolling. 

Americans will roll over and get back to the regularly scheduled bread and circus program on netflix.  BAU will continue unabated.  We will continue burning and spilling petroleum, polluting the ground and the water.  Flint will still have flammable tap water.  I mean Flint has flammable tap water for crying out loud.  It seems to me that if American's really gave a shit about the environment and our drinking water than we would have done something about it when Flint started demonstrating the flammable characteristics of their tap water.  Nobody did shit. 

Now the Native Americans are trying to stop the Black Snake from crossing the river just before it's crossing.  That 1700 miles of pipe didn't get placed over night.  Isn't it sort of the 11th hour four our biosphere? 

I want clean water and air and soil for my children.  I suppose it's a good thing I believe in other dimensions of existence.  I can look forward to a better world to inhabit, a better world for my children.  But this one...this one is fucked. 
Title: Re: Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters, Ordered to Leave, Dig In
Post by: RE on December 04, 2016, 07:54:41 AM
It sounds to me like they're not going to try to physically push them off the land.  They don't have the manpower to do it.  They would have had to be massing National guard already.  What they will do is start handing out fines and then locking up people's bank accounts, if they have them.  However, to do that on an individual level, first they would need to arrest the person and get his/her identity.  They might try fining the Lakota Tribal Nation, but they don't have control over what the people will do.

I don't think the camp will be emptied on Monday, but the pipeline will still go through.  Once oil starts flowing, the camp will eventually disperse unless they find another issue to keep them glued together.

RE



Maybe the sheriff will walk into camp and start arresting the leaders.  He could walk into camp dressed like a sheriff and not a corporatocracy boot licking military thug.  Maybe the DHS will show up with a hand full of personnel dressed in suits and arrest their leaders.  They are all non-violent Water Protectors.  If it got violent then they could send in the armored guard to break it up, with cameras rolling. 

Americans will roll over and get back to the regularly scheduled bread and circus program on netflix.  BAU will continue unabated.  We will continue burning and spilling petroleum, polluting the ground and the water.  Flint will still have flammable tap water.  I mean Flint has flammable tap water for crying out loud.  It seems to me that if American's really gave a shit about the environment and our drinking water than we would have done something about it when Flint started demonstrating the flammable characteristics of their tap water.  Nobody did shit. 

Now the Native Americans are trying to stop the Black Snake from crossing the river just before it's crossing.  That 1700 miles of pipe didn't get placed over night.  Isn't it sort of the 11th hour four our biosphere? 

I want clean water and air and soil for my children.  I suppose it's a good thing I believe in other dimensions of existence.  I can look forward to a better world to inhabit, a better world for my children.  But this one...this one is fucked.

11th hour?  Hello.  They've been protesting physically there since April!  Before that obviously some of them who knew about it were worried.  Really LD, get a clue.

Sheriff walks onsite and arrests the "Leaders"?  Who's the leaders?  The cooks?  The guys building yurts?

Their local court system is already backed up from the 600 arrested in previous confrontations.  The MOST they could arrest now might be another 300.  There are minimum 5000 people on site.  Arresting people only clogs their courts more and doesn't do a damn thing to clear the camp.

Anyhow, as I said, in the end this pipeline will go through in all likelihood.  However, there will be more and bigger fights to come.

This is not the end.  It is not even the beginning of the end.  It is however, the end of the beginning.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 04, 2016, 08:41:49 AM
A Clinton-era directive used mainly for natural disaster relief has drawn in law enforcement from faraway states.

(http://www.motherjones.com/files/imagecache/top-of-content-image/sr_police.jpeg)

When protests at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation began in April, there were only a handful of activists camping out in defiance of the Dakota Access Pipeline project. As their numbers have grown into the thousands, so too has the police presence confronting them. Police departments from 24 counties and 16 cities in 10 different states (including North Dakota) have poured into Standing Rock, according to the Morton County Sheriff's Department, the local law enforcement agency.

It's rare for police forces to cross state lines to handle problems in neighboring places, much less travel more than 1,500 miles to respond to protests, as the St. Charles Parish (Louisiana) Sheriff's Department has. So why is Standing Rock teeming with cops from across the country? The answer lies in an obscure federal law that's usually deployed to help states deal with environmental disasters.

In 1996, then-President Bill Clinton signed the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC). The statute was created in response to Hurricane Andrew, which wrought an estimated $25 billion in damages when it hit Louisiana and Florida in 1992, necessitating large-scale, interstate relief coordination. EMAC, an agreement eventually entered into by all 50 states, allows for states to share resources and coordinate emergency personnel in case of a crisis. The good-neighbor style law was invoked for disaster relief for Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and, more recently, Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

Governors have almost always employed EMAC in the wake of natural disasters, but the bill contains a stipulation that makes it applicable during other types of emergencies including "community disorders, insurgency, or enemy attack." On August 19, when North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple declared a state of emergency at Standing Rock, he relied on this language to issue an EMAC request.

Standing Rock is one of the few times that EMAC has been called upon to respond to social activism. In April 2015, during Black Lives Matter protests in Baltimore in the wake of Freddie Gray's death while in police custody, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency and sent out an EMAC request. About three hundred state troopers from Pennsylvania and another 150 from New Jersey responded. The city racked up an estimated $20 million in extra policing costs.

Since the state issuing the EMAC request is on hook for the tab, that means North Dakota taxpayers will pay for the out-of-state officers at Standing Rock. This will include wages, overtime costs, meals, lodging, and mileage reimbursement. On November 2, North Dakota officials agreed to borrow $4 million to cover escalating policing costs and extend the state's line of credit for emergency law enforcement to $10 million. (The state was already staring down a $1 billion revenue shortfall in 2016.) Governor Jack Dalrymple said state officials have asked for contributions from the federal government, the pipeline company, "and any entity we can think of," though the federal government has thus far declined to pitch in. North Dakota Emergency Services spokesperson Cecily Fong told the Associated Press that total state law enforcement costs for the protests had reached $10.9 million as of November 22, while Morton County had spent an additional $8 million. Meanwhile, local courts and jails have struggled to process around 575 arrests.

The increased law enforcement presence at Standing Rock has coincided with mounting concerns over police brutality. The deployment of military-grade equipment, including landmine-resistant trucks and armored personnel carriers, as well as the use of pepper spray, rubber bullets, and alleged strip searches led Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman Dave Archambault II to ask the Justice Department to investigate civil rights abuses. "Local and state law enforcement have increasingly taken steps to militarize their presence, to intimidate participants who are lawfully expressing their views, and to escalate tensions and promote fear," Archambault wrote in his letter.

Some of the police details that have arrived in Standing Rock are among the largest recipients of military transfers from the federal government, according to an In These Times investigation. The South Dakota Highway Patrol has received $2 million worth of military equipment since 2006. The Lake County Sheriff's Office in Northwest Indiana obtained $1.5 million worth of military equipment over the same time period. The Pennington County Sheriff's office in South Dakota, the Anoka County Sheriff's office in Minnesota, and the Griffith Indiana Police Department have all received assault rifles through military equipment transfer programs as well.

Police departments answer EMAC requests on a voluntary basis. Some forces, like Minnesota's Hennepin County Sheriff's Department, have been deployed to North Dakota amid objections from their local communities. Others are withdrawing from the action. A phone-banking and email-writing effort led Montana's Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin to turn his detail around before they even arrived at Standing Rock. Gootkin told Yes Magazine that people who contacted his department expressed concern that EMAC was meant to address natural disasters and catastrophic events, not for protecting a corporation's pipeline construction. Sheriff Dave Mahoney from Wisconsin's Dane County, who withdrew his force after one week, said he did so after talking with "a wide cross-section of the community who all share the opinion that our deputies should not be involved in this situation," he said. "We have enough priorities here in our community to address."
Title: Re: Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters, Ordered to Leave, Dig In
Post by: luciddreams on December 04, 2016, 11:14:12 AM
It sounds to me like they're not going to try to physically push them off the land.  They don't have the manpower to do it.  They would have had to be massing National guard already.  What they will do is start handing out fines and then locking up people's bank accounts, if they have them.  However, to do that on an individual level, first they would need to arrest the person and get his/her identity.  They might try fining the Lakota Tribal Nation, but they don't have control over what the people will do.

I don't think the camp will be emptied on Monday, but the pipeline will still go through.  Once oil starts flowing, the camp will eventually disperse unless they find another issue to keep them glued together.

RE



Maybe the sheriff will walk into camp and start arresting the leaders.  He could walk into camp dressed like a sheriff and not a corporatocracy boot licking military thug.  Maybe the DHS will show up with a hand full of personnel dressed in suits and arrest their leaders.  They are all non-violent Water Protectors.  If it got violent then they could send in the armored guard to break it up, with cameras rolling. 

Americans will roll over and get back to the regularly scheduled bread and circus program on netflix.  BAU will continue unabated.  We will continue burning and spilling petroleum, polluting the ground and the water.  Flint will still have flammable tap water.  I mean Flint has flammable tap water for crying out loud.  It seems to me that if American's really gave a shit about the environment and our drinking water than we would have done something about it when Flint started demonstrating the flammable characteristics of their tap water.  Nobody did shit. 

Now the Native Americans are trying to stop the Black Snake from crossing the river just before it's crossing.  That 1700 miles of pipe didn't get placed over night.  Isn't it sort of the 11th hour four our biosphere? 

I want clean water and air and soil for my children.  I suppose it's a good thing I believe in other dimensions of existence.  I can look forward to a better world to inhabit, a better world for my children.  But this one...this one is fucked.

11th hour?  Hello.  They've been protesting physically there since April!  Before that obviously some of them who knew about it were worried.  Really LD, get a clue.

Sheriff walks onsite and arrests the "Leaders"?  Who's the leaders?  The cooks?  The guys building yurts?

Their local court system is already backed up from the 600 arrested in previous confrontations.  The MOST they could arrest now might be another 300.  There are minimum 5000 people on site.  Arresting people only clogs their courts more and doesn't do a damn thing to clear the camp.

Anyhow, as I said, in the end this pipeline will go through in all likelihood.  However, there will be more and bigger fights to come.

This is not the end.  It is not even the beginning of the end.  It is however, the end of the beginning.

RE

Yes, the 11th hour for our biosphere.  Also, I have more than a clue, I've got a bag full of clues.  It's so heavy i can't even carry it around any longer. 

So the courts are clogged up in N. Dakota?  I'm sure that won't stop the DHS or some other federal acronym from showing up to make arrests if they really intend to clear that camp.

For the record, I hope the Water Protectors prevail.  I also hope that gasoline prices stay affordable so that my business stays viable.  There is no solution to this clusterfuck we have.  Just more BAU. 
Title: Re: Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters, Ordered to Leave, Dig In
Post by: RE on December 04, 2016, 11:42:42 AM


Yes, the 11th hour for our biosphere.  Also, I have more than a clue, I've got a bag full of clues.  It's so heavy i can't even carry it around any longer. 

So the courts are clogged up in N. Dakota?  I'm sure that won't stop the DHS or some other federal acronym from showing up to make arrests if they really intend to clear that camp.

For the record, I hope the Water Protectors prevail.  I also hope that gasoline prices stay affordable so that my business stays viable.  There is no solution to this clusterfuck we have.  Just more BAU.

It might be the 11th hour for the biosphere, but most of these folks certainly had no idea about this pipeline or it's particular route much before April.  DAPL changed the route to circumvent Bismark to avoid pissing off white people.  The First Nations People began opposing it well before it made it to their land.  For you to accuse them of being 11th hour activists is utter bullshit.

The DHS and Da Fed Goobermint at the moment are concerned, they do not appear to have the resolve to clear the camp.  They would need a HUGE  force of National Guard, which as of today has not been amassed, unless they are secretly doing it and will suddenly on Monday roll in with the APCs from all over the country, because there definitely are not enough NG troops in North Dakota to do the job.

Some folks might get arrested on Monday, but that camp will still be there on Tuesday.  The protest won't finish until they actually get oil flowing down the pipeline.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on December 04, 2016, 11:58:01 AM
When did I accuse them of being 11th hour activists?  I said it was the 11th hour for our biosphere.  Which the Native's prophecy would agree with me on...if the pipeline crosses the Missouri at least. 

Don't attribute words to me that I never typed. 

As I have said, I'm on the side of the Water Protectors, I hope they win, but I also hope I can afford to stay in business with low gas prices.  The pipeline is about keeping gasoline affordable is it not?  It's about making money first, but the consumer has to be able to afford the price of gasoline or it's game over.  So for them to continue making money using our current BAU we need affordable gasoline.  We have no alternative to a fossil fueled BAU. 

The only result I see coming of this is higher gas prices. 

It's been the 11th hour for our biosphere since about the time I was born into this incarnation on this planet. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 04, 2016, 12:20:44 PM
When did I accuse them of being 11th hour activists?  I said it was the 11th hour for our biosphere.  Which the Native's prophecy would agree with me on...if the pipeline crosses the Missouri at least. 

Don't attribute words to me that I never typed. 

Your memory of your posting has some problems.

Quote from: Lucid Dreams
I just wonder why the Native leaders didn't show up to any of the hearings...or discussions...or whatever the fuck?  Why didn't they show up then and say "um, no thank you, we would rather not have our water poisoned thank you."  Looks sort of damning doesn't it?  Not a word of dissent until after construction starts?

Quote
As I have said, I'm on the side of the Water Protectors, I hope they win, but I also hope I can afford to stay in business with low gas prices.  The pipeline is about keeping gasoline affordable is it not?  It's about making money first, but the consumer has to be able to afford the price of gasoline or it's game over.  So for them to continue making money using our current BAU we need affordable gasoline.  We have no alternative to a fossil fueled BAU.

Of COURSE this pipeline is about getting gas to your Hemi and Zero-Turn Mower!  But you can't be on the side of the Water Protectors at the same time you are on the side of keeping your engines running!  Cognitive Dissonance has its problems in this regard.

RE
Title: Victory at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 04, 2016, 04:02:51 PM
It is strange that I can get into this thread using my laptop but not my new box.

But you can't be on the side of the Water Protectors at the same time you are on the side of keeping your engines running! 

RE

You certainly can be!  If you think that the Lakotas might have a say in what crosses their river upstream from the reservation and that they also have some sovereign rights then you can be against the pipeline and still be for gas in your leaf blower.  Cognitive dissonance would happen if the pipeline were downstream.  It's not, and has been deliberately routed where it is because neighbouring counties preferred to force the risk of pipeline failure on the Lakotas.

This is a picture from Standing Rock.  My son's friend is in the picture.  He is a vet and is a member of 'Veterans for Standing Rock'


(http://chasingthesquirrel.com/pics/StandingRock.jpg)
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BREAKING: Dakota protesters WIN their bid to stop pipeline being built through Standing Rock

Quote
The Dakota Access Pipeline will not go ahead at the Standing Rock Indian reservation, it was announced Sunday.

Moments after the decision was announced Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Council Chairman Harold Frazier told DailyMail.com that he was 'shocked' by the news, which he'd received from Jo-Ellen Darcy, United States Assistant Secretary of the Army.

The camp erupted into cheers as the news spread that the US Army Corps of engineers would not enforce an easement that would have allowed a pipeline to run under Lake Oahe half a mile south of their reservation, potentially affecting the tribe's drinking water and infringing on land rights.

Areas including what was believed to be a native burial site had already been affected by construction work.

Faith Spotted Eagle, an elder of the Ihanktonwan tribe, said: 'The easement has been denied. We have all come to this gathering being hosted by Mother Earth. I love you all.'

Shailene Woodley, star of the 'Divergent' movies and 'The Fault in Our Stars', who had previously been arrested while protesting told a huge crowd: 'We feel so honored to have been a small part of this movement.'

Cries of Mni Wiconi - 'Water is life' - went up from the crowd. 


Protesters at the Standing Rock Indian reservation triumphed today as the US Army Corps of engineers backed down in its plan to enforce an easement that would allow a pipeline to be built on their land

Protesters at the Standing Rock Indian reservation triumphed today as the US Army Corps of engineers backed down in its plan to enforce an easement that would allow a pipeline to be built on their land
Native American protesters and their allies were delighted as it was announced by the US government that the Dakota Access Pipeline would be re-routed away from the reservation

Native American protesters and their allies were delighted as it was announced by the US government that the Dakota Access Pipeline would be re-routed away from the reservation
Demonstrators embrace after a daily water ceremony in the Oceti Sakowin Camp
Pictured, those at the Oceti Sakowin Camp celebrating the rerouting of the Dakota Access Pipeline

Protesters signaled their happiness after the announcement. Standing Rock tribal chairman Dave Archambault II said 'The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe will forever be grateful to the Obama administration for this historic decision'
The camp erupted into cheers as the news spread and cries of Mni Wiconi - 'Water is life' - went up from the crowd

The camp erupted into cheers as the news spread and cries of Mni Wiconi - 'Water is life' - went up from the crowd
The Army's Assistant Secretary for Civil Works said a new route will be explored with consideration to the Environmental Impact Statement along 'with full public input and analysis' (pictured, water protectors celebrating the decision)

The Army's Assistant Secretary for Civil Works said a new route will be explored with consideration to the Environmental Impact Statement along 'with full public input and analysis' (pictured, water protectors celebrating the decision)
Protesters against the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline believe the project could harm drinking water and Native American cultural sites

Protesters against the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline believe the project could harm drinking water and Native American cultural sites
Protesters numbering in the thousands were present when the announcement was made. Numbers at the Oceti Sakowin campsite swelled in numbers since Friday despite an order issued by Governor Jack Dalrymple to evacuate

Protesters numbering in the thousands were present when the announcement was made. Numbers at the Oceti Sakowin campsite swelled in numbers since Friday despite an order issued by Governor Jack Dalrymple to evacuate

Bernie Sanders - one of few prominent politicians who voiced opposition to the pipeline - tweeted that he was happy with the result, and cautioned that America should stop being dependent on fossil fuels

In a statement, Standing Rock tribal chairman Dave Archambault II said: 'Today, the US Army Corps of engineers announced that it will not be granting the easement to cross Lake Oahe for the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline.

'Instead, the Corps will be undertaking an environmental impact statement to look at possible alternate routes.

'We wholeheartedly support the decision of the administration and commend with the utmost gratitude the courage it took on the part of President Obama, the Army Corps, the Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior to take steps to correct the course of history and do the right thing.

'The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe will forever be grateful to the Obama administration for this historic decision.'

He went on to thank all of those who had given moral, physical and financial support from around the globe, and in particular thanked those who had joined the protesters at Standing Rock.

'We hope that [Energy Transfer Partner CEO] Kelcy Warren, [North Dakota Governor Jack] Dalrymple and the incoming Trump administration respect this decision and understand the complex process that led us to this point,' he added.

Members of the Sioux Nation celebrate minutes after the announcement that the Dakota Access Pipeline would not go ahead (from left Shawn and Ashley, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Harold Frazier and Wanda DuBray)

Sunday's announcement came just one day before December 5, the date by which the US Army Corp of Engineers said they would close off the area above the Cannonball River, which included the Oceti Sakowin camp

Sunday's announcement came just one day before December 5, the date by which the US Army Corp of Engineers said they would close off the area above the Cannonball River, which included the Oceti Sakowin camp
Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader of the Sioux nation, participates in a ceremony in Oceti Sakowin camp on Sunday, shortly before the announcement that the army would change its plans

Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader of the Sioux nation, participates in a ceremony in Oceti Sakowin camp on Sunday, shortly before the announcement that the army would change its plans
Thousands of veteran US soldiers recently arrived at the camp to support the protesters against the US Army Corps of engineers. Some were Native American; others were allies to the cause

Thousands of veteran US soldiers recently arrived at the camp to support the protesters against the US Army Corps of engineers. Some were Native American; others were allies to the cause
A Native American man signals for the veterans to arrive at Standing Rock camp early on Sunday

A Native American man signals for the veterans to arrive at Standing Rock camp early on Sunday
A large group of veterans stood on Highway 1806 just outside the Oceti Sakowin camp earlier on Sunday. Temperatures over the weekend hovered around 30F and authorities had ordered protesters to evacuate citing harsh winter conditions last week

A large group of veterans stood on Highway 1806 just outside the Oceti Sakowin camp earlier on Sunday. Temperatures over the weekend hovered around 30F and authorities had ordered protesters to evacuate citing harsh winter conditions last week

'Treaties are paramount law and must be respected, and we welcome dialogue on how to continue to honor that moving forward,' Archambault said.

'We are not opposed to energy independence, economic development, or national security concerns but we must ensure that these decisions are made with the considerations of our Indigenous peoples.'

He also said he hoped to 'heal' the tribe's relationship with local law enforcement and that he looked 'forward to a future that reflects more mutual understanding and respect'.

In an official statement, Darcy, the Army's Assistant Secretary for Civil Works, decided not to approve the easement, would have allowed the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe, based on 'a need to explore alternate routes for the Dakota Access Pipeline crossing'.

'Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it's clear that there's more work to do,' Darcy said in the statement.

'The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.' 

That pipeline would have covered 1,172 miles under the existing plans, connecting the Bakken and Three Forks oil production areas in North Dakota with an existing crude oil terminal near Pakota, Illinois.

The 30-inch-diameter pipe was designed to transport 470,000 barrels of oil per day - putting Lake Oahe at risk of serious contamination in the case of a breach, the protesters said.

Darcy said the new routes would be explored using an Environmental Impact Statement, 'with full public input and analysis'.

While demonstrators at the scene rejoiced, supporters across the country, including several celebrities like Michael Moore and Solange Knowles shared their reactions to the news on social media.


I lifted the above from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3999630/Dakota-protesters-WIN-bid-stop-pipeline-built-Standing-Rock.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3999630/Dakota-protesters-WIN-bid-stop-pipeline-built-Standing-Rock.html)

There are many pictures there.
Title: Victory at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 04, 2016, 04:16:47 PM
(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/12/04/22/3B0A231000000578-3999630-image-a-119_1480889451547.jpg)

Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader of the Sioux nation

VICTORY !

http://www.youtube.com/v/fetub0FvEwk
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on December 04, 2016, 07:11:42 PM
This is good news for the Lakota!  Personally I think Obama doesn't want his pretend legacy here at home threatened this close to leaving office.  I think he probably put a stop to it...temporarily. 

Something like 90% of 1200 miles of pipe laid already.  How many billions invested?  What, they are just going to peacefully eat all of that and reroute it? 

Wait till His Trumpness is inaugurated and then lets see what happens.  I bet the XL and DAPL both get pushed through within months.  I bet he pulls troops home and starts using them domestically to squash any DAPL type protests like bugs.  I don't believe for one second that this is any type of lasting victory. 

As far as being on the side of the Lakota with No Dapl, and wanting cheap gas goes...well I think that's going to be a blog that I'm going to start writing now. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on December 04, 2016, 08:01:14 PM
Something like 90% of 1200 miles of pipe laid already.  How many billions invested?  What, they are just going to peacefully eat all of that and reroute it? 

No they are not. They built it on the good faith of the existing permit issued by the Corps, guess who they will seek redress with if the Corps costs them extra $$?

Quote from: luciddreams
Wait till His Trumpness is inaugurated and then lets see what happens.  I bet the XL and DAPL both get pushed through within months. 

Bingo.

Funny thing about races, it doesn't matter who is ahead all along the way, only who is ahead at the finish line.
Title: Re: Victory at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 04, 2016, 08:02:55 PM
The THRILL OF VICTORY!

http://www.youtube.com/v/04854XqcfCY

For now...

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 04, 2016, 08:42:09 PM
This is good news for the Lakota!  Personally I think Obama doesn't want his pretend legacy here at home threatened this close to leaving office.  I think he probably put a stop to it...temporarily. 

Something like 90% of 1200 miles of pipe laid already.  How many billions invested?  What, they are just going to peacefully eat all of that and reroute it? 

Wait till His Trumpness is inaugurated and then lets see what happens.  I bet the XL and DAPL both get pushed through within months.  I bet he pulls troops home and starts using them domestically to squash any DAPL type protests like bugs.  I don't believe for one second that this is any type of lasting victory. 

Oh, Trumpty-Dumpty will no doubt try to get it rolling again, but meanwhile this has cost the DAPL folks $MILLIONS$ and they're losing month's and months of projected revenue.  They have $BILLIONS$ in bonds they gotta either pay up on or roll over, and who will buy the re-fi bonds right now?  Anyone who owns stock or DAPL bonds is taking a fucking BLOODBATH right now.  You could probably buy DAPL Junk Bonds for 10 cents on the dollar tomorrow.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 05, 2016, 12:55:20 AM
This is good news for the Lakota!  Personally I think Obama doesn't want his pretend legacy here at home threatened this close to leaving office.  I think he probably put a stop to it...temporarily. 

Something like 90% of 1200 miles of pipe laid already.  How many billions invested?  What, they are just going to peacefully eat all of that and reroute it? 

Wait till His Trumpness is inaugurated and then lets see what happens.  I bet the XL and DAPL both get pushed through within months.  I bet he pulls troops home and starts using them domestically to squash any DAPL type protests like bugs.  I don't believe for one second that this is any type of lasting victory. 

Oh, Trumpty-Dumpty will no doubt try to get it rolling again, but meanwhile this has cost the DAPL folks $MILLIONS$ and they're losing month's and months of projected revenue.  They have $BILLIONS$ in bonds they gotta either pay up on or roll over, and who will buy the re-fi bonds right now?  Anyone who owns stock or DAPL bonds is taking a fucking BLOODBATH right now.  You could probably buy DAPL Junk Bonds for 10 cents on the dollar tomorrow.

RE

I'm going contrarian on this.

Trump will not seek to get the pipe routed past Standing Rock a second time.  The publicity of possibly violent clashes with veterans cased the Corps of Engineers to back off and Trump can figure out that it is best not to piss people off right at the beginning of his term.  Trump's desire to cultivate a positive image will make him smoke the peace pipe but he won't like it.  My son's friend and his buddies with 'Veterans for Standing Rock' had body armor and gas masks and they were seriously ready to take some rubber bullets, tear gas, and pepper spray.  They would not have backed down.

This time the people prevailed but only determined resistance made it happen and only determined resistance will make it happen again.

Now that the Standing Rock situation has resolved I am also now able to post in this thread without having to use my laptop.  I'm typing this out on 'Comrade' right now!

(http://chasingthesquirrel.com/pics/comrade.png)

Standing Rock diffuses and the 'strange bug' that was not letting me post in the Standing Rock thread is now gone.  Could it be a coincidence?

Yes it could,  it could also be that nine times out of ten an activist would not have a second computer to fire up in case his main machine was blocked and would never suspect that the bug was artificial.  If it is a coincidence then only the shadow knows.  If it is not a coincidence then Homeland Security knows.  I have plane flights this week and I have not flown for a few years.  If it turns out I am on a no-fly list we can rule out coincidence.



Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 05, 2016, 01:15:03 AM
This is good news for the Lakota!  Personally I think Obama doesn't want his pretend legacy here at home threatened this close to leaving office.  I think he probably put a stop to it...temporarily. 

Something like 90% of 1200 miles of pipe laid already.  How many billions invested?  What, they are just going to peacefully eat all of that and reroute it? 

Wait till His Trumpness is inaugurated and then lets see what happens.  I bet the XL and DAPL both get pushed through within months.  I bet he pulls troops home and starts using them domestically to squash any DAPL type protests like bugs.  I don't believe for one second that this is any type of lasting victory. 

Oh, Trumpty-Dumpty will no doubt try to get it rolling again, but meanwhile this has cost the DAPL folks $MILLIONS$ and they're losing month's and months of projected revenue.  They have $BILLIONS$ in bonds they gotta either pay up on or roll over, and who will buy the re-fi bonds right now?  Anyone who owns stock or DAPL bonds is taking a fucking BLOODBATH right now.  You could probably buy DAPL Junk Bonds for 10 cents on the dollar tomorrow.

RE

I'm going contrarian on this.

Trump will not seek to get the pipe routed past Standing Rock a second time.  The publicity of possibly violent clashes with veterans cased the Corps of Engineers to back off and Trump can figure out that it is best not to piss people off at the beginning of his term.  Trump's desire to cultivate a positive image will make him smoke the peace pipe but he won't like it.  My son's friend and his buddies with 'Veterans for Standing Rock' had body armor and gas masks and they were seriously ready to take some rubber bullets, tear gas, and pepper spray.  They would not have backed down.

This time the people prevailed but only determined resistance made it happen and only determined resistance will make it happen again.

Now that the Standing Rock situation has resolved I am also now able to post in this thread without having to use my laptop.  I'm typing this out on 'Comrade' right now!

(http://chasingthesquirrel.com/pics/comrade.png)

Standing Rock diffuses and the 'strange bug' that was not letting me post in the Standing Rock thread is now gone.  Could it be a coincidence?

Yes it could,  it could also be that nine times out of ten an activist would not have a second computer to fire up in case his main machine was blocked and so would never suspect that the bug was artificial.  If it is a coincidence then only the shadow knows.  If it is not a coincidence then Homeland Security knows.  I have plane flights this week and I have not flown for a few years.  If it turns out I am on a no-fly list we can rule out coincidence.

Not that contrarian, I tend to agree with you it will be quite hard for Trumpty-Dumpty to get this restarted in a new direction on a new route.  There just are not that many routes possible that won't go through SOMEBODY's backyard, and WTF wants something like this in their back yard?

With this VICTORY, the camp will likely disperse.  But they still do have 90% of this pipeline built with only the short section under the Missouri River to go.  Once the camp disperses, they could reverse the ruling and then the pipeline goes through.  Getting so many people back there in a short time would be quite difficult.  It took since April to form up this protest and encampment.

It's a LOT of infrastructure and a LOT of money to just quit on. I don't think it is quite OVAH yet.

Good luck with the flights.  Where are you going?

RE                                                                                                       
Title: Army will deny easement, halting work on Dakota Access Pipeline
Post by: RE on December 05, 2016, 02:31:33 AM
Today is a good day to be a Diner.  :icon_sunny:

Today, Frackers Eat Shit.

More Battles to come of course.

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/04/army-will-deny-easement-halting-work-on-dakota-access-pipeline/?utm_term=.37b2db6e0001 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/04/army-will-deny-easement-halting-work-on-dakota-access-pipeline/?utm_term=.37b2db6e0001)

Energy and Environment
Army will deny easement, halting work on Dakota Access Pipeline
By Brady Dennis and Steven Mufson December 4 at 8:53 PM
Celebrations at Standing Rock after pipeline victory
Embed Share
Play Video1:07
Protesters celebrate after an announcement Sunday that the Army would not grant an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe in North Dakota. (Zoeann Murphy/The Washington Post)

The Army said Sunday that it will not approve an easement necessary to permit the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota, marking a monumental victory for the Native American tribes and thousands of others who have flocked in recent months to protest the oil pipeline.

“I’m happy as heck,” said Everett Iron Eyes, a retired director of natural resources for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and one of the organizers of a camp protesters set up near the pipeline site. “All our prayers have been answered.”

Officials in November had delayed the key decision, saying more discussion was necessary about the proposed crossing, given that it would pass very near the reservation of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, whose leaders have repeatedly expressed fears that a spill could threaten the water supplies of its people.

“Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it’s clear that there’s more work to do,” Jo-Ellen Darcy, the Army’s assistant secretary for civil works, said in a statement Sunday. “The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.”

The decision averts a possible showdown on Monday, the date the Army Corps, which owns land on either side of the lake, had set for cutting off access to the protesters’ camp. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch, worried about violence, had sent mediators to the area over the weekend.

The victory for the Standing Rock Sioux and its allies could be short-lived, though. President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to support pipelines such as this one. And Kelcy Warren, the chief executive of the pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners, has been a major contributor to the Republican Party and Trump’s campaign.

Trump, who once owned a stake worth between $500,000 and $1 million in Energy Transfer Partners, has sold the shares, his spokeswoman Hope Hicks said. At the time of his most recent disclosure statement in May, Trump owned $100,000 to $250,000 of stock in Phillips 66, which has a 25 percent stake in the Dakota Access project.
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Iron Eyes said that “we shall remain vigilant regardless. We have witnessed the power of being peaceful and prayerful.”
The Army says it won't grant easement at Standing Rock
Embed Share
Play Video1:54
The Army announced on Dec. 4 that it will not grant an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline. Protesters and environmental groups celebrated the news. (Victoria Walker, McKenna Ewen/The Washington Post)

What started as a small but fierce protest in a remote spot along the Missouri River months ago has evolved into an epic standoff involving hundreds of tribes, various celebrities and activists from around the country. It has involved heated confrontations — police have sometimes employed water cannons, pepper spray and rubber bullets — and has carried on through the swelter of summer into the snowy cold of winter. Hundreds of veterans arrived in recent days.

[Why Hollywood, environmentalists and Native Americans have converged on North Dakota]

On Sunday, news of the Army’s decision triggered a wave of celebration and relief among those who have fought to stop the 1,170-mile-long pipeline’s progress.

A procession of tribe members and activists marched along the main dirt road at the Oceti Sakowin encampment set up by protesters. A crowd numbering in the thousands gathered around the camp’s sacred fire, the hub of activity here, as tribal elders sang prayer songs and beat drums.

Activists acknowledged that it was only one step forward in a larger fight over Native American rights.

Denise McKay, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux standing by the sacred fire Sunday afternoon, said she expects Energy Transfer Partners to push back on the decision.
“It is a temporary victory,” said McKay, 54. “We’ve got to stay put and stay united.” McKay’s daughter, Chelsea Summers, 25, chimed in, saying “everybody is still here for the long haul.”
Nearby, Bruce Gali took drags from a cigarette and watched the festivities. He made his second trip to the camp last week and said he would keep returning from his home in northeastern California until authorities left the area and the pipeline was shut down.

“Until all the razor wire comes down, until the helicopters stop flying overhead, the spotlights turn off, the drill pad is dismantled, this isn’t the end,” said Gali, a 67-year-old member of the Pitt River Tribe. “It’s not just about this pipeline.”
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We “commend with the utmost gratitude the courage it took on the part of President Obama, the Army Corps, the Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior to take steps to correct the course of history and to do the right thing,” Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Dave Archambault II said in a statement. “With this decision we look forward to being able to return home and spend the winter with our families.”

 

Rhea Suh, president of the Natural Resources Defense Council, said the outcome was a reminder of the power of individuals to “demand environmental justice.” She said, “Today, the voices of indigenous people were heard.”

In the Dakota language, the word “oahe” signifies “a place to stand on.”

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and its allies in the environmental and activist movements had said they were doing just that: using Lake Oahe in North Dakota as a place to take a stand by setting up camps and obstructing roads to block the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline.

The steel pipeline, developed and majority owned by Energy Transfer Partners, would connect the Bakken and Three Forks oil production areas in North Dakota to an existing crude oil terminal and pipeline terminus in Illinois. At 30 inches in diameter, it could transport an estimated 470,000 to 570,000 barrels of oil per day.

The company says the project, which traverses four states, is 92 percent complete overall and 99 percent complete in North Dakota.

Army officials said that the consideration of alternative routes would be best accomplished through an environmental-impact statement with full public input and analysis, a process likely to take many months.

Ordinarily, the Army Corps, which has jurisdiction over domestic petroleum pipelines, does not require a detailed environmental-impact statement but it does require environmental assessments of the impact on water crossings.

 

[Voices from Standing Rock: A glimpse into both sides of the standoff]

North Dakota elected officials criticized the Army Corps.

“It’s long past time that a decision is made on the easement going under Lake Oahe,” said Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D). “This administration’s delay in taking action — after I’ve pushed the White House, Army Corps and other federal agencies for months to make a decision — means that today’s move doesn’t actually bring finality to the project. The pipeline still remains in limbo.”
Rep. Kevin Cramer (R) said Sunday’s decision “sends a very chilling signal to others who want to build infrastructure in this country,” arguing that Obama had stymied a perfectly legal pipeline project.
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“I’m encouraged we will restore law and order next month when we get a President who will not thumb his nose at the rule of law,” Cramer said in a statement. “I feel badly for the Corps of Engineers because of the diligent work it did on this project, only to have their Commander-in-Chief throw them under the bus.”

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The science and policy of environmental issues.

Gov. Jack Dalrymple (R) called Sunday’s decision a “serious mistake” that “does nothing to resolve the issue.” He said it would prolong a dangerous situation by having protesters camping out on federal land during the brutally cold winter.

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, however, praised the Army’s decision.

“The thoughtful approach established by the Army today ensures that there will be an in-depth evaluation of alternative routes for the pipeline and a closer look at potential impacts,” she said Sunday. “The Army’s announcement underscores that tribal rights reserved in treaties and federal law, as well as Nation-to-Nation consultation with tribal leaders, are essential components of the analysis to be undertaken in the environmental impact statement going forward.”

Derek Hawkins contributed to this report from a camp near Cannonball, N.D.
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: It Ain't OVAH until is is OVAH!
Post by: RE on December 05, 2016, 05:15:49 AM
The Water Protectors are not leaving just cause TPTB pretend capitulation.

This will take a while.

Meanwhile, Fracker Scumbags Eat Shit.  :icon_sunny:

RE

http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2016-12-05/after-major-victory-nd-pipeline-protesters-to-defy-deadline (http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2016-12-05/after-major-victory-nd-pipeline-protesters-to-defy-deadline)


North Dakota Protesters to Ignore Deadline
Oil pipeline protesters are pledging to remain camped on federal land in North Dakota, despite a favorable government ruling and an imminent deadline to leave.

Dec. 5, 2016, at 2:22 a.m.
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North Dakota Protesters to Ignore Deadline
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Campers gather around a fire to sing and drum traditional Native American social songs at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers spokeswoman Moria Kelley said in a news release Sunday that the administration will not allow the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir where construction had been on hold.

Campers gather around a fire to sing and drum traditional Native American social songs at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., on Sunday. David Goldman/AP

By JAMES MacPHERSON, Associated Press

CANNON BALL, N.D. (AP) — Protesters celebrated a major victory in their push to reroute the Dakota Access oil pipeline away from a tribal water source but pledged to remain camped on federal land in North Dakota anyway, despite Monday's government deadline to leave.

Hundreds of people at the Oceti Sakowin, or Seven Council Fires, encampment cheered and chanted "mni wichoni" — "water is life" in Lakota Sioux — after the Army Corps of Engineers refused Sunday to grant the company permission to extend the pipeline beneath a Missouri River reservoir.

[READ: Some Native Americans Lack Access to Safe, Clean Water]

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters argue that extending the project beneath Lake Oahe would threaten the tribe's water source and cultural sites. The segment is the last major sticking point for the four-state, $3.8 billion project.

"The whole world is watching," said Miles Allard, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux. "I'm telling all our people to stand up and not to leave until this is over."
Local Native American tribe reacts to the latest Dakota Acess Pipeline decision
KJRH - Tulsa, OK

Despite the deadline, authorities say they won't forcibly remove the protesters.

The company constructing the pipeline, Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, released a statement Sunday night slamming the Army Corps' decision as politically motivated and alleging that President Obama's administration was determined to delay the matter until he leaves office.

"The White House's directive today to the Corps for further delay is just the latest in a series of overt and transparent political actions by an administration which has abandoned the rule of law in favor of currying favor with a narrow and extreme political constituency," the company said.

President-elect Donald Trump, a pipeline supporter, will take office in January, although it wasn't immediately clear what steps his administration would be able to take to reverse the Army Corps' latest decision or how quickly that could happen.

That uncertainty, Allard said, is part of the reason the protesters won't leave.

"We don't know what Trump is going to do," Allard said.

Assistant Secretary for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy said in a news release that her decision was based on the need to "explore alternate routes" for the pipeline's crossing. Her full decision doesn't rule out that it could cross under the reservoir or north of Bismarck.

"Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it's clear that there's more work to do," Darcy said. "The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing."

North Dakota's leaders criticized the decision, with Gov. Jack Dalrymple calling it a "serious mistake" that "prolongs the dangerous situation" of having several hundred protesters who are camped out on federal land during cold, wintry weather. U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer said it's a "very chilling signal" for the future of infrastructure in the United States.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Sunday that the Department of Justice will "continue to monitor the situation" and stands "ready to provide resources to help all those who can play a constructive role in easing tensions."

"The safety of everyone in the area - law enforcement officers, residents and protesters alike - continues to be our foremost concern," she added.

Carla Youngbear of the Meskwaki Potawatomi tribe made her third trip from central Kansas to be at the protest site.

"I have grandchildren, and I'm going to have great grandchildren," she said. "They need water. Water is why I'm here."
RELATED CONTENT
Why Are People Checking in to Standing Rock Indian Reservation?

The social media campaign that started with #NoDAPL has expanded into an attempt to confuse police.

Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman Dave Archambault didn't respond to messages left seeking comment.

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier, whose department has done much of the policing for the protests, said that "local law enforcement does not have an opinion" on the easement and that his department will continue to "enforce the law."

U.S. Secretary for the Interior Sally Jewell said in a statement that the Corps' "thoughtful approach ... ensures that there will be an in-depth evaluation of alternative routes for the pipeline and a closer look at potential impacts."

Earlier Sunday, an organizer with Veterans Stand for Standing Rock said tribal elders had asked the military veterans not to have confrontations with law enforcement officials, adding the group is there to help out those who've dug in against the project.

About 250 veterans gathered about a mile from the main camp for a meeting with organizer Wes Clark Jr., the son of former Democratic presidential candidate Gen. Wesley Clark. The group had said about 2,000 veterans were coming, but it wasn't clear how many actually arrived.

"We have been asked by the elders not to do direct action," Wes Clark Jr. said. He added that the National Guard and law enforcement have armored vehicles and are armed, warning: "If we come forward, they will attack us."

Instead, he told the veterans, "If you see someone who needs help, help them out."

Some veterans will take part in a prayer ceremony Monday, during which they'll apologize for historical detrimental conduct by the military toward Native Americans and ask for forgiveness, Clark said. He also called the veterans' presence "about right and wrong and peace and love."

Authorities moved a blockade from the north end of the Backwater Bridge with the conditions that protesters stay south of it and come there only if there is a prearranged meeting. Authorities also asked protesters not to remove barriers on the bridge, which they have said was damaged in the late October conflict that led to several people being hurt, including a serious arm injury.

"That heavy presence is gone now and I really hope in this de-escalation they'll see that, and in good faith . the leadership in those camps will start squashing the violent factions," Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney said in a statement, reiterating that any violation will "will result in their arrest."

Steven Perry, a 66-year-old Vietnam veteran who's a member of the Little Traverse Bay band of Odawa Indians in Michigan, spoke of one of the protesters' main concerns: that the pipeline could pollute drinking water. "This is not just a native issue," he said, "This is an issue for everyone."
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: jdwheeler42 on December 05, 2016, 04:23:41 PM
Not that contrarian, I tend to agree with you it will be quite hard for Trumpty-Dumpty to get this restarted in a new direction on a new route.  There just are not that many routes possible that won't go through SOMEBODY's backyard, and WTF wants something like this in their back yard?
I'm going contrarian in a different vein.

I think the Battle of Standing Rock is truly over.  Why?

THE BUREAUCRATS HAVE SPOKEN.

I think it will be no easier for the DAPL to cross the Missouri River at Standing Rock than for LD to start a bamboo nursery on his property in town.

Once a bureaucrat has made up his or her mind, and from what I'm reading this looks like that is the case for the Army Corps of Engineers, it is practically impossible to change it.  And if Trump tries, he is going to get a quick lesson on the real limits of Presidential power.

Is this the end for the DAPL?  Heck no!  They will figure out another place to cross the river, somewhere the resistance is less well organized, and maybe even figure out a nice little payout to keep the locals passive.  But it will be an expensive delay.
Title: Protesters' Dakota pipeline win may be both short- and long-lived
Post by: RE on December 05, 2016, 11:17:29 PM
http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/Inhabit/2016/1205/Protesters-Dakota-pipeline-win-may-be-both-short-and-long-lived (http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/Inhabit/2016/1205/Protesters-Dakota-pipeline-win-may-be-both-short-and-long-lived)

(http://images.csmonitor.com/csm/2016/12/1017041_1_1205-Dakota-pipeline-protest-2_standard.jpg?alias=cinema_1200x640)
David Goldman/AP | Caption

Protesters' Dakota pipeline win may be both short- and long-lived
Environment

(http://static2.businessinsider.com/image/584617bdba6eb69a018b79b5-2400)

The decision to block construction of a controversial portion of the Dakota Access Pipeline could be overturned by Donald Trump. But it could also kindle new activism. 

    Henry Gass
    @henrygass

December 5, 2016 —The Dakota Access Pipeline could get rerouted, but Wilma Teton’s friends are still on their way to join the protest opposing it.

The US Army Corps of Engineers blocked construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline Sunday, marking a monumental – though likely short-term – victory for Native American protesters and thousands of allies who have flocked to North Dakota to protest the project this year.

It is this sense of only temporary relief – with the Army Corps of Engineers pledging to look at alternative routing for a project that's already mostly built – that has Ms. Teton’s friends heading from across the country.

With the mercury plunging and the North Dakota snows deepening, Teton and her husband, who live in nearby Fort Yates, N.D., have been making almost daily visits to the camp to bring food, firewood, and clean laundry. There are thousands at the camp, the Shoshone tribe member says, "and more people are coming."

The protesters' fight isn’t over, but winning a halt to the existing route has undeniably emboldened them. And, although it’s too soon to know, it appears possible that they have not only drawn sympathy and support from beyond the Great Plains, they may also be inspiring a new generation of environmental activism from Indian country to the political left.

True, the circumstances here are unusual. The stand-off on the Missouri is partly a moment where a narrative aligned in a rare way that captured national attention. The struggle combined the simple goal of protecting water, the urgency of the pipeline bearing down on the river, and the resonance of historically disenfranchised native Americans on horseback confronting armored police.

But in the process, it has also energized people beyond state or national boundaries, and shown what some see as a potential model.

“The good thing for me about the protest was framing it as a water versus oil issue, rather than a local issue, because that will be a confrontation we have over and over again,” says Kevin DeLuca, an associate professor at the University of Utah who researches environmental movements.

“All those explorations of oil threaten water at same time that water is becoming a more precious and endangered resource for people,” he explains. And where climate change may seem like a distant threat, access to clean drinking water is one of the most pressing problems a human can face.

“If you can’t have safe water, if you have lead in your water, nothing else matters at that point,” Professor DeLuca says.
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Larger than one tribe

The planned route would have seen the Dakota Access pipeline cross under the Missouri River less than a mile upstream of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation. Members of the tribe, whose leaders fear the pipeline could rupture and contaminate a key water source, have been camping and protesting nearby since February, calling themselves “water protectors.”

But the protest has grown larger than one tribe. Thousands have joined them at the confluence of the Missouri and Cannonball rivers, including members of indigenous tribes from around the world, to create perhaps the largest gathering of Native American tribes in modern history.

Sympathizers have rallied in Los Angeles, Chicago, and other cities nationwide. And most recently, an estimated 2,000 military veterans have descended on the snow-blanketed hills near Bismarck, N.D., willing to serve as human shields as protesters faced possible eviction from federal land.

Recent months have seen increasingly violent clashes between protesters and police. The Army Corps announcement headed off the potential for another clash Monday, the deadline set by the Corps for protesters to leave the land it controls on either side of the Missouri.

An Army Corps statement said that "the best way to complete that [pipeline] work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing."

Standing Rock tribal chairman Dave Archambault II issued a statement that struck a conciliatory tone: "When it comes to infrastructure development in Indian Country and with respect to treaty lands, we must strive to work together to reach decisions that reflect the multifaceted considerations of tribes.” And by video, he said the Army Corps decision prevents the company from trying to drill under the river, as the options are being reviewed, so “it’s OK to go home” during the bitter winter weather.
What happens next

Many protesters want to see construction canceled outright. Yet the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline was scheduled to be finished last month and is 92 percent completed. Expected battles over its completion could set the stage for one of the first challenges of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Energy Transfer Partners, the Dallas-based company developing the pipeline, blasted the announcement as "a purely political action" taken by the Obama administration to curry favor with "a narrow and extreme political constituency."

We "are fully committed to ensuring that this vital project is brought to completion and fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting," the company added in a statement. "Nothing this Administration has done today changes that in any way."

But the determination of pipeline opponents has also become clear. The main Oceti Sakowin camp has been growing in recent weeks as the pipeline inched closer to the Missouri, including the recent influx of military veterans.

Climate activist Bill McKibben has said Standing Rock could mark a turning point in climate activism, writing that indigenous groups have “managed to build not just resistance to a project, but a remarkable new and unified force that will, I think, persist."

“This is a big step forward in showing what can happen when tribes step up and stand up for their rights collectively,” says Garrit Voggesser, national director for tribal partnerships at the National Wildlife Federation.

Tribes “have always been involved, but we’re seeing a real increase in the weight of their positions,” he adds. “It’s really attracting more people and getting more people active.”

First Nations groups are already discussing forming “Standing Rock North” in response to the Canadian government's recent approval of an oil pipeline running to the coast of British Columbia. Tribes recently scored a victory there blocking the construction of a large coal export terminal.

The widespread public outcry that ultimately led President Obama to block the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline last year was one thing, but this latest pipeline win was on another level, according to Dallas Goldtooth, an organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network.

"Previous success on pipelines in Canada and the United States has been accomplished in the permitting process of projects. This is one that’s being put into the ground right now," he told the Monitor in October. "We're making history right now."
Where Trump stands

The pipeline, which seeks to connect North Dakota oil fields to an existing pipeline nexus in Illinois, would transport up to 570,00 barrels of oil a day to refineries on the Gulf Coast. Energy Transfer Partners has also said the project would create thousands of local construction jobs and millions in tax revenue.

Its fate could rest in the hands of President-elect Trump, who spoke during his campaign of supporting the fossil fuel industry, and said last week that he supports completing the pipeline.

He also appears to have financial interests in the pipeline. He once owned between $500,000 and $1 million of shares in Energy Transfer Partners, the Dallas-based company building the pipeline, but has since sold the shares, his spokeswoman Hope Hicks said. And as of his most recent disclosure statement in May, he owned $100,000 to $250,000 of stock in Phillips 66, which has a 25 percent stake in the pipeline, The Washington Post reported.

If Trump does continue to support the pipeline, he will be applauded by Americans, including many in North Dakota, who see oil and gas development as a source of jobs and economic growth. But he’ll also confront a diverse opposition, one now emboldened by the belief they can not only fight but win.

"It's not just Indians that are coming to this realization that we've got to secure our drinking water," Bob Gough, secretary of the Intertribal Council on Utility Policy, told the Monitor in October, referencing the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Mich. "It's just where the country and the planet is moving now."

Mr. Voggesser points to data showing that almost two-thirds of Americans are concerned about global warming, the highest proportion since 2008.

“We have questions about what’s going to happen in the new administration, but the data does show that people are aware of climate change,” he says. “That awareness is something that any administration is going to have to consider.”

[Editor's note: This story was updated with new reporting on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016.]
Title: State Power and Terror: From Wounded Knee to Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 06, 2016, 04:09:26 AM
December 6, 2016
State Power and Terror: From Wounded Knee to Standing Rock

by David Rosen

The showdown at Standing Rock is a long way from being resolved.  The battle began over the re-routing of a $3.6 billion crude oil pipeline from near Bismarck, ND, to just upstream from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s reservation.  The re-routing was intended to protect the property values of the predominately white populace in the state’s capital.

The pipeline is being built by Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) to transport oil 1,200 miles east, from North Dakota’s Bakken field to a refinery in central Illinois.  The Sioux and other Native people fighting the pipeline argue that it will disturb sacred lands and burial grounds as well as harm the Missouri River, which provides the tribe’s drinking water.

Pitched battles between “water protectors” and corporate enforcers, including local police, national guards-people and hired thugs, have taken place over the last few months and will likely continue.  As bitter winter weather descends of Standing Rock, tensions will rise.  The arrival of some 2,000 veterans to serve the protectors as “human shields” illustrates the deepening conditions. The Army Corp. of Engineers’ ruling puts a temporary halt to the construction.  More troubling, Donald Trump’s inauguration as president on January 20, 2017, promises to make a difficult situation worse.

One confusing factor in the ongoing struggle is Trump’s financial interests in ETP.

Bloomberg reports that the president-elect “owned between $15,000 and $50,000 in stock in Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners. That’s down from between $500,000 and $1 million a year earlier.”  It also notes that he “owns between $100,000 and $250,000 in Phillips 66, which has a one-quarter share of Dakota Access.”

Compounding this problem is the fact that Kelcy Warren, ETP’s CEO, donated $103,000 to Trump’s campaign as well as $66,800 to the Republican National Committee.  The contribution was made, as the Guardian reports, “after the property developer secured the GOP’s presidential nomination.”

One can only envision a worst-case showdown at Standing Rock once Trump and his yet-to-be-named Secretary of Interior take state power.  Among those rumored to be on Trump’s shortlist for Interior Secretary are Mary Fallin, governor of Oklahoma; Sarah Palin, former VP candidate and governor of Alaska; and Forrest Lucas, co-founder of Lucas Oil.  Each is a carbon-industry stalwart, questions the science of global warming and have expressed little support for the interest of America’s Native people.

The battle at Standing Rock is but the latest in a long, sad history of the use of terror to enforce corporate authority.  The use of terror takes one of two forms.  One involves “passive” state involvement in which local activists, often racists, terrorize those challenging custom or property relations.  The other involves “active” state involvement in which local, state or federal law-enforcement forces are deployed to suppress acts of popular resistance.

The final showdown at Standing Rock might be Trump’s first test as a democratically-elect tyrant.  It could serve as a symbolic act of power like the fake deal struck with Carrier air-conditioner – a subsidiary for United Technologies, a military contractor — to “save” working-class jobs by essentially paying the company to not relocate to Mexico for the time being.  Sadly, Trump’s need to show his macho power might lead to the arrest and killing of many Native water protectors.

***

Only about 300 miles separate Standing Rock, ND, and Wounded Knee, SD.  But 40 years ago, another battle broke out between Sioux activists and the U.S. government, this battle involved a 71-day siege and armed conflict.  On February 27, 1973, some 200 Oglala Lakota activists and members of the American Indian Movement (AIM) took control of Wounded Knee, on the Pine Ridge reservation, and began a battle with the FBI and National Guard considered the longest “civil disorder” in U.S. history.  The 1973 showdown recalled the more tragic Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890 when the U.S. Seventh Cavalry slaughtered 300 Sioux warriors who refused to disarm.

Wounded Knee was one of the poorest communities in the United States and shared with the other Pine Ridge settlements some of the country’s lowest rates of life expectancy.  In the 1973 showdown, two Native activists were killed and a federal agent was shot and paralyzed.  On May 8th, AIM ended the occupation after federal officials promised to investigate their complaints.  However, two AIM leaders, Russell Means and Dennis Banks, were arrested, but the charges against them were ultimately dismissed.

The standoff at Wounded Knee was but one action undertaking by Native activists.

From November 1969 to June 1971, AIM members occupied Alcatraz Island off San Francisco. In November 1972, AIM members occupied the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington, D.C., to protest programs controlling reservation development.  After the standoff ended, violence continued on the Pine Ridge Reservation.  In 1975, two FBI agents and a Native man were killed in a shoot-out and, in the trial that followed, AIM member Leonard Peltier was found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to two consecutive life terms.  He remains in federal prison to this day.

Some 500 miles south and six decades earlier, in the spring of 1914, a bitter showdown took place in Ludlow, CO, between coal miners trying to organize with the United Mine Workers of American and old-line capitalists fighting unionization.  On April 20th, private guards of the Baldwin Felts Detective Agency attacked striking workers at the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, killing 18 men, women and children. The standoff became known as the Ludlow Massacre – and the Rockefellers owned the mine and JDR, Jr., was on the board.

New Yorkers from nearly all segments of the left, including socialists and anarchists, mobilized to express their outrage over the “massacre.”  Mass rallies took place in Union Square, drawing thousands, with the anarchist Alexander Berkman often a principle speaker.  Though JDR, Jr., had largely given up daily involvement in his father’s businesses, he became the target of their political rage, for Ludlow and for the miserable working and living conditions experienced by New York City’s laboring poor.

On the morning of Independence Day, July 4th, 1914, an explosion shattered the side of a New York tenement building at 1626 Lexington Avenue at 103rd Street.  Local residents were showered by shattered window glass, brick fragments, cracked piping and splintered wood.  The explosion came from an apartment that was home to a group of anarchists and the bodies of three of them, Charles Berg, Arthur Caron and Carl Hanson, were found amidst the rubble.

The police determined that a cache of Russian nitroglycerine had detonated.  The press reported that is was the largest dynamite explosion in the city’s history and the intended target was John D. Rockefeller, Jr.  For most of his life, JDR, Jr., lived in the shadow of JDR, Sr., and his vast corporate enterprises and fortune.  By ’14, he was a respected philanthropist who helped establish the family foundation and other public institutions.

On March 6, 1970, a blast exploded in the sub-basement of a Greenwich Village townhouse at 18 West 11th Street, reducing the building to rubble and triggered a six-hour fire.  The explosion was due to the premature detonation of a bomb to be used the Weather Underground in a planned attack on a U.S. servicemen’s party at Fort Dix, NJ.

Unpopular U.S. foreign military campaigns have long precipitated domestic political battles.  Not unlike the WW-I era that culminated in the Palmer Raids, the drawn-out war in Vietnam and Southeast Asia – 1956 to 1975 — occurred during a period of domestic social strife.  It was a historical moment fueled by assassinations, mass civil rights protests, urban riots, the counterculture, political terrorism and FBI and police agent provocateurs infiltration of radical groups.  Social unrest also included the Weathermen’s attacks on the U.S. Congress in 1971 as well as numerous assassinations of public figures including Robert Kennedy, Martin Luther King and Malcolm X.

The Report of the Presidents Commission on Campus Unrest (i.e., the 1970 Scanton Commission report) claims that between January 1, 1969, and April 15, 1970, there were 8,200 bombings, attempted bombings and bomb threats attributed to “campus disturbances and student unrest.”  Most revealing, the report only tangentially considers the Weatherman, but fails to mention other political groups of the era like the Black Panther Party (BPP), the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA), the Fuerzas Armadas de Liberación Nacional (Armed Forces of National Liberation), Black Liberation Army and the Jewish Defense League.

Confrontations between member of the BPP and SLA and the FBI and local law officers during this tumultuous period are representative of the state’s use of political violence to put down perceived threats.  The first involved Black Panther Party members in Chicago and Los Angeles in December 1969.  In Chicago, local police and FBI agents raided an apartment at 2337 W. Monroe St. at about 4:45 am and killed two leading Panthers, Fred Hampton and Mark Clark.  Police were reported to have fired 82 to 99 shots, but only one shot was fired by the Panthers.   A few days later in Los Angeles, some 200 police and SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) officers used a dubious warrant to raid the Panther’s headquarters at 41st and Central Ave.  The events of December grew out of a series of confrontations that started in January between the Panthers and a group known as Us that worked with the FBI’s COINTELPRO (counterintelligence) program; in January, two Panthers Bunchy Carter and John Huggins, were shot to death at UCLA by Us members.

The showdown with the SLA took place in 1974 and is remembered today, if at all, because the group kidnapped Patty Hearst and turned her into what she called an “urban guerrilla.”  Their first acts of political terror involved the murder of the black Oakland school superintendent, Marcus Foster.  It was followed by the Hearst kidnapping and the robbery of a San Francisco bank.  These acts were followed by a bungled shoplifting effort at a Los Angeles sporting goods store and Hearst, who was sitting outside in the get-away car, shot 27 rounds into the storefront to pull-off the getaway.

The police tracked the group to Compton and a gun battle took place that was broadcast live on TV.  Finally, the police set the house on fire with gas canisters and six SLA members were killed.  A couple of months later, four surviving SLA members held up a bank in Carmichael, CA, killing a bystander.  In September ’74, Hearst and three other SLA members were arrested in San Francisco.  While the other SLA members got long prison sentence, Hearst, a child of the 1 percent, served only 22 months before receiving a pardon from Pres. Jimmy Carter

***

As of early December, the showdown at Standing Rock has turned into a stalemate.  The Native water protectors and their allies are reported to be pleased with the Army’s decision; Energy Transfer Partners has vowed to press-on and complete the pipeline.

Trump’s inauguration may ultimately determine the fate of Standing Rock and the pipeline.  Like his gesture involving Carrier that appears to fulfill a campaign promise, he may feel the needs to take a tough stand against “illegal” protesters in North Dakota to show that he’s a macho leader.  But he’s also wiggled on some campaign statements, most notably about the prosecution of Hillary Clinton and the vast round-up of undocumented aliens.

Let’s hope for a meaningful, non-violent resolution to Standing Rock otherwise a bloody confrontation will likely result and we all know who will be the big losers.


David Rosen is the author of Sex, Sin & Subversion:  The Transformation of 1950s New York’s Forbidden into America’s New Normal (Skyhorse, 2015).  He can be reached at drosennyc@verizon.net; check out www.DavidRosenWrites.com (http://www.DavidRosenWrites.com).
Title: Pipeline Protesters, Battered By Blizzard, Vow To Stay
Post by: RE on December 06, 2016, 06:58:10 PM
Tough Winter Days ahead for the Water Protectors.

RE

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/06/504590591/pipeline-protesters-battered-by-blizzard-vow-to-stay (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/06/504590591/pipeline-protesters-battered-by-blizzard-vow-to-stay)

 America
Pipeline Protesters, Battered By Blizzard, Vow To Stay

(http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/12/06/ap16341620186576_custom-7272db995b1261d273deda5b90cc1e60d147756e-s800-c85.jpg)

December 6, 20168:14 PM ET

Nathan Rott

A motorist checks the condition of an exit ramp before attempting to drive out of the Oceti Sakowin camp tonight.
David Goldman/AP

The sun was shining on opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline on Sunday, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it would not approve the final and key part of the controversial project. Less than 24 hours later, many of those people were huddling in shelters or trying to escape the rural camp as a brutal winter storm bore down on them.

Cars slid off roads and tents were blown over as winds gusted to more than 50 mph, causing near white-out conditions on the short stretch of highway between the protesters' camp and the small town of Cannon Ball, N.D.

A large section of Interstate 94, which travels the length of the state, was shut down. Forecasters warned of snowdrifts and dangerous wind chills of minus 25 degrees Fahrenheit.

At Camp Oceti Sakowin, where those protesting the nearly completed pipeline have been camped for months, people gathered in larger structures and designated heating areas. Camp leadership closed the entrance and exits to the camp for a short time, citing the dangerous road conditions.

In Cannon Ball, locals and veterans groups organized rescue missions through the night and into Tuesday, collecting the elderly and young at the camp, and helping others who wanted to leave.

"Our focus is to get the veterans and anyone who doesn't want to be there out," says Michael Wood Jr., who helped organize the group Veterans for Standing Rock.

Despite blizzard conditions, Martan Mendenhall, an Army veteran and Blackfoot Indian, joined other military veterans in a march to support the "water protectors" at Oceti Sakowin Camp on Monday.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

The chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Dave Archambault II, has asked protesters to leave the campsites because of the severe weather. But many at the camp are insistent on staying.

Morning Star Gali, of the Achomawi Band of the Pit River Tribe, left the camp with her two daughters and sheltered in Cannon Ball after the storm hit. But she was preparing to return Tuesday, regardless of the request and subzero temperatures.

"[The pipeline] hasn't left yet, the machinery hasn't left yet, the floodlights have been turned off, the barbed wire hasn't been removed," she says. "Until that occurs, it's not over with and we plan to be here."

The Army Corps' decision to not approve a key easement for the 1,170-mile long pipeline was a victory for the thousands gathered to protest against its completion, but it was by no means a knockout punch.

"Water protectors" and veterans march to the front lines at Backwater Bridge on Monday.
Cassi Alexandra for NPR

Energy Transfer Partners, the company building the pipeline, said in a statement that it is "fully committed to ensuring that this vital project is brought to completion and fully expects to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting."

Incoming president Donald Trump has expressed support for the pipeline and his transition team reaffirmed that Monday, saying it would look into the situation fully when they were in the White House.

Despite challenges and weather, spirits were still high in Standing Rock. Hundreds took shelter at the Prairie Knights Casino and Lounge, about 10 miles south of the protesters' camps, as the storm buried cars in snowdrifts outside.

Water protectors and veterans march to the front lines at Backwater Bridge on Monday after the announcement that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will not approve an easement for the final and key part of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline.
Cassi Alexandra for NPR

The casino opened a large convention room with stadium seating for people who were trapped. Veterans, locals, protesters and journalists laid camping pads out on the room's concrete floors and watched an ad hoc open-mic show on Monday night.

On Tuesday, Native Americans held a large prayer for the people still at the camp, for those traveling in the dangerous weather conditions and for a final defeat of the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Title: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on December 08, 2016, 02:43:07 PM
December 5, 2016

Balking at an earlier decision by the Army Corps of Engineers, Energy Transfer Partners — the company responsible for constructing the Dakota Access Pipeline — says the denial of an easement necessary to drill under the Missouri River is of no consequence for its plans to complete the project.

According to a statement from Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics, which is acquiring ETP in a merger:

“As stated all along, ETP and SXL are fully committed to ensuring that this vital project is brought to completion and fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe. Nothing this Administration has done today changes that in any way.”

In short, ETP will complete the Dakota Access Pipeline — no matter what the federal government says.

Earlier on Sunday, celebrations erupted over the Army Corps’ announcement the permitting necessary for the Dakota Access Pipeline to pass beneath the Missouri River’s Lake Oahe reservoir would not be granted — a decision some perceived would have direct implications for the future of the project.

Leery of such official decisions after a string of disappointments, however, many water protectors immediately questioned whether ETP CEO Kelcy Warren had contingency plans to ensure completion of the pipeline. Considering the lengths ETP has undertaken with the Dakota Access Pipeline — even justifying abhorrently brutal policing against unarmed protectors — news the project will proceed unhindered hardly came as a shock. ETP states:

“In spite of consistently stating at every turn that the permit for the crossing of the Missouri River at Lake Oahe granted in July 2016, comported with all legal requirements, including the use of an environmental assessment, rather than an environmental impact statement, the Army Corps now seeks to engage in additional review and analysis of alternative locations for the pipeline.

“The White House’s directive today to the Corps for further delay is just the latest in a series of overt and transparent political actions by an administration which has abandoned the rule of law in favor of currying favor with a narrow and extreme political constituency.”

Technically speaking, ETP did perhaps follow the letter of the law — and that fact both doesn’t sit well with Indigenous water protectors who see the U.S. government once again acting to exploit Native peoples on land never officially ceded, but usurped, in the breaking of several treaties.

Indeed, to attain the desired path for Dakota Access, Energy Transfer Partners was able to take land from reluctant private property owners through eminent domain. Most controversy over the pipeline centers on the contextually-striking fight by Native Americans to preserve the integrity of their drinking water supply in North Dakota — but the fight to halt Dakota Access also grips South Dakota, Iowa, and Illinois.

Unconfirmed reports claim ETP has opted to pay $50,000 per day in fines for violating the Army Corps decision rather than sidelining the project for months while awaiting conclusions of an environmental impact statement.

Politicians were quick to denounce the decision to deny the easement, and — like Energy Transfer Partners — deemed the choice starkly political. North Dakota Congressman Kevin Cramer excoriated the Army Corps’ announcement, asserting,

“I hoped even a lawless president wouldn’t continue to ignore the rule of law. However, it was becoming increasingly clear he was punting this issue down the road.  Today’s unfortunate decision sends a very chilling signal to others who want to build infrastructure in this country. Roads, bridges, transmission lines, pipelines, wind farms and water lines will be very difficult, if not impossible, to build when criminal behavior is rewarded this way. In my conversation with Assistant Secretary of the Army Jo-Ellen Darcy today, she was unable to give any legal reasons for the decision and could not answer any questions about rerouting the pipeline. I’m encouraged we will restore law and order next month when we get a President who will not thumb his nose at the rule of law. I feel badly for the Corps of Engineers because of the diligent work it did on this project, only to have their Commander-in-Chief throw them under the bus. But he’s been doing that to the military for eight years, so why not one more time on his way out the door.”

Others quickly joined the tirade.

“It’s long past time that a decision is made on the easement going under Lake Oahe. This administration’s delay in taking action — after I’ve pushed the White House, Army Corps, and other federal agencies for months to make a decision — means that today’s move doesn’t actually bring finality to the project. The pipeline still remains in limbo. The incoming administration already stated its support for the project and the courts have already stated twice that it appeared the Corps followed the required process in considering the permit,” said Senator Heidi Heitkamp (ND) in a statement.

“For the next month and a half, nothing about this project will change. For the immediate future, the safety of residents, protesters, law enforcement, and workers remains my top priority as it should for everyone involved. As some of the protesters have become increasingly violent and unlawful, and as North Dakota’s winter has already arrived — with a blizzard raging last week through the area where protesters are located — I’m hoping now that protesters will act responsibly to avoid endangering their health and safety, and move off of the Corps land north of the Cannonball River.”

Heitkamp, incidentally, met with President-Elect Donald Trump last week, to the delight of Morton County Commission Chairman Cody Schulz, who noted:

“I sincerely hope Senator Heitkamp is able to make a direct plea to the new Administration for the help and resources from the federal government that are desperately needed to assist local law enforcement in their efforts to provide public safety, and to expedite a decision on the final easement for the Dakota Access pipeline so that our citizens may return to their normal lives. We have seen nothing but foot-dragging and unhelpful directives from the Obama administration. I trust Senator Heitkamp will use her meeting and her influence to ensure that help is on the way for the people of North Dakota when the President-Elect is sworn in on January 20th.”

Questions also swirled concerning the nine-state, multiple agency coalition of law enforcement led by the Morton County Sheriff’s Department, which has aggressively and barbarously policed the unarmed water protectors for months, and if taxpayer funding could possibly be justified if ETP violates the easement decision.

Standing Rock water protectors still reeling from Sunday’s fleeting victory against the pipeline now ironically face their own decisions about an eviction notice from the Army Corps of Engineers and must choose whether or not to vacate several camps north of the Cannonball River. Reports from the camps say although a few people have indeed vacated the area, thousands more have arrived to support the Standing Rock Sioux in just the past few days — including more than 5,000 veterans.

With water protectors vowing to stay camped at Standing Rock until the Dakota Access Pipeline is halted for good, and Energy Transfer Partners openly dismissing the Army Corps of Engineers decision, a confluence of polemic circumstances has crafted a powder keg near the Missouri River.

 

image: http://thefreethoughtproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/army-corps-etp.jpg (http://thefreethoughtproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/army-corps-etp.jpg)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 08, 2016, 02:59:31 PM
Why would the masters of the universe stop trying to build the pipeline?  Most of America does not even know about Standing Rock.  News by the MSM has been quite fake.  The protesters have been portrayed as criminal in the scant coverage the MSM has given them.  Only consequences will stop the masters of the universe and attention is not on them.  Attention is focused on an inanimate pipeline instead of the builders of it.  Without attention on the builders the pipeline gets built and can't be stopped.
Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 08, 2016, 03:22:45 PM
Standing Rock water protectors still reeling from Sunday’s fleeting victory against the pipeline now ironically face their own decisions about an eviction notice from the Army Corps of Engineers and must choose whether or not to vacate several camps north of the Cannonball River. Reports from the camps say although a few people have indeed vacated the area, thousands more have arrived to support the Standing Rock Sioux in just the past few days — including more than 5,000 veterans.

With water protectors vowing to stay camped at Standing Rock until the Dakota Access Pipeline is halted for good, and Energy Transfer Partners openly dismissing the Army Corps of Engineers decision, a confluence of polemic circumstances has crafted a powder keg near the Missouri River.


Now up to 5000 Veterans?  How many First Nations?  How many Tree Hugger Greenies?  I need some real NUMBERS here on the Army of the Water Protectors!

They're not going to stop the pipeline by shouting.  They're going to need a Bigger Boat.

http://www.youtube.com/v/VquLerRp-ps

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: MKing on December 08, 2016, 04:50:46 PM
The protesters have been portrayed as criminal in the scant coverage the MSM has given them. 

Are you implying that arson and vandalism aren't criminal acts? Because that is what the Black Rock folks have been doing on a semi-regular basis. Perhaps arson and vandalism isn't a crime where you live, but it is where I live. And I'm betting...pretty sure here...that if I spray painted your house and car before torching  both because I am irritated at how you dug a ditch in your back yard, that you wouldn't be too lenient towards the perpetrators.

Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: jdwheeler42 on December 08, 2016, 04:53:29 PM
December 5, 2016

Balking at an earlier decision by the Army Corps of Engineers, Energy Transfer Partners — the company responsible for constructing the Dakota Access Pipeline — says the denial of an easement necessary to drill under the Missouri River is of no consequence for its plans to complete the project.

According to a statement from Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics, which is acquiring ETP in a merger:

“As stated all along, ETP and SXL are fully committed to ensuring that this vital project is brought to completion and fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe. Nothing this Administration has done today changes that in any way.”

In short, ETP will complete the Dakota Access Pipeline — no matter what the federal government says.
OMFG.... how is someone that stupid allowed to run a company?

I take back what I said earlier... at this point I predict the DAPL will NEVER be finished, and ETP will be bankrupt in a few years.

Whether or not they realize it, they have just given the bird to the entire Federal government.  They should not expect any further assistance in their efforts, and quite a bit of resistance, from the US government. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Surly1 on December 09, 2016, 05:30:49 AM
Why would the masters of the universe stop trying to build the pipeline?  Most of America does not even know about Standing Rock.  News by the MSM has been quite fake.  The protesters have been portrayed as criminal in the scant coverage the MSM has given them.  Only consequences will stop the masters of the universe and attention is not on them.  Attention is focused on an inanimate pipeline instead of the builders of it.  Without attention on the builders the pipeline gets built and can't be stopped.

Part of the genius of the corporation is to diffuse responsibility and provide cover from individual responsibility.
Don't expect a corporately-owned MSM to start naming names.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 09, 2016, 06:11:31 AM
Why would the masters of the universe stop trying to build the pipeline?  Most of America does not even know about Standing Rock.  News by the MSM has been quite fake.  The protesters have been portrayed as criminal in the scant coverage the MSM has given them.  Only consequences will stop the masters of the universe and attention is not on them.  Attention is focused on an inanimate pipeline instead of the builders of it.  Without attention on the builders the pipeline gets built and can't be stopped.

Part of the genius of the corporation is to diffuse responsibility and provide cover from individual responsibility.
Don't expect a corporately-owned MSM to start naming names.

You are right for the surgeon cannot heal himself.  We must do it because nothing else will.

'I know a gal that lives on a hill; she won't do it but her sister will.'

We must be the sister knowing that the MSM won't put out.
Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on December 09, 2016, 07:52:58 AM
December 5, 2016

Balking at an earlier decision by the Army Corps of Engineers, Energy Transfer Partners — the company responsible for constructing the Dakota Access Pipeline — says the denial of an easement necessary to drill under the Missouri River is of no consequence for its plans to complete the project.

According to a statement from Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics, which is acquiring ETP in a merger:

“As stated all along, ETP and SXL are fully committed to ensuring that this vital project is brought to completion and fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe. Nothing this Administration has done today changes that in any way.”

In short, ETP will complete the Dakota Access Pipeline — no matter what the federal government says.
OMFG.... how is someone that stupid allowed to run a company?

I take back what I said earlier... at this point I predict the DAPL will NEVER be finished, and ETP will be bankrupt in a few years.

Whether or not they realize it, they have just given the bird to the entire Federal government.  They should not expect any further assistance in their efforts, and quite a bit of resistance, from the US government.

I disagree with you JW.  Would you care to elaborate why you feel that way?

I think big corporations run the world.  I think His Trumpness was nominated by big corporations to be POTUS so that they would have a POTUS that would do their bidding.  He being one of them. 

I think they KNOW that His Trumpness will have no problems "restoring the rule of law" in ND.  Hell, Trumpty Dumpty may be planning to start pulling our troops home because he knows he'll need them here at home to do the domestic "policing" that will be required to "restore the rule of law." 

Besides, a good percentage of Trumpites don't know about Standing Rock, and when they find out they won't care.  The same "bomb your ass and take your gas," "drill baby drill" demographics will have no problem napalming the camps at Standing Rock.  Trumpty is already talking about how the internet is out of control and how it needs to be censored.  "Something needs to be done," because the terrorist are recruiting using the net.  Really, what he is saying, is that the problem is the alternative media.  Something needs to be done about alternative media and the citizenry's ability to get the real news by creating actual journalism instead of MSM propaganda. 

I predict Trumpty's first act will be squashing the protestors.  It will be hailed as a victory for law and order.  The citizens will cheer Trumpty on for saving yet more jobs, just like with Carrier.  Thousands of people now think Trump is akin to God because he saved their livelihoods with his noble goodness.  Expect more of the same.  His Trumpness is here to ensure BAU continues to make America Great Again! 

Indeed, we will all get in line.  The military will be home shortly to ensure it. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on December 09, 2016, 08:49:43 AM
I agree with LD. The pendulum is swinging even further away from protecting the rights of people, toward making the extraction of the earth's remaining hard-to-get energy profitable for Big Oil. The government is about to decide to get out of the way completely and let the corporations have carte blanche.

I would also posit that Standing Rock would be over and done already, except that in today's world, it's popular to mythologize, and sympathize with, the plight of Native American peoples. This has been a very active thread, and that ethos is part of the reason for it, imho.

Compare the Standing Rock protests to the situation in Flint, Michigan, where stupid politicians supervised the poisoning of a large municipal water supply.

The city never filled with proud veterans wearing camo, come to support the protests of Flint residents, who were largely black and poor. Native American causes get lots more likes on Facebook.

What about when the citizens of Denton Texas passed a city ordinance to outlaw fracking there? When the Texas state legislature, which is owned by Big Oil, quickly passed a law overriding that ordinance, where were the vets then? Nobody camped out and occupied the Eagle Ford Shale.

Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: Surly1 on December 09, 2016, 09:01:29 AM
I think they KNOW that His Trumpness will have no problems "restoring the rule of law" in ND.  Hell, Trumpty Dumpty may be planning to start pulling our troops home because he knows he'll need them here at home to do the domestic "policing" that will be required to "restore the rule of law." 

Besides, a good percentage of Trumpites don't know about Standing Rock, and when they find out they won't care.  The same "bomb your ass and take your gas," "drill baby drill" demographics will have no problem napalming the camps at Standing Rock.  Trumpty is already talking about how the internet is out of control and how it needs to be censored.  "Something needs to be done," because the terrorist are recruiting using the net.  Really, what he is saying, is that the problem is the alternative media.  Something needs to be done about alternative media and the citizenry's ability to get the real news by creating actual journalism instead of MSM propaganda. 

I predict Trumpty's first act will be squashing the protestors.  It will be hailed as a victory for law and order.  The citizens will cheer Trumpty on for saving yet more jobs, just like with Carrier.  Thousands of people now think Trump is akin to God because he saved their livelihoods with his noble goodness.  Expect more of the same.  His Trumpness is here to ensure BAU continues to make America Great Again! 

Indeed, we will all get in line.  The military will be home shortly to ensure it.

This it begins:
The National Park Service has already filed documents securing large swaths of the national mall and Pennsylvania Avenue, the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial for the inauguration festivities. None of these spots will be open for protesters.

The NPS filed a “massive omnibus blocking permit” for many of Washington DC’s most famous political locations for days and weeks before and after the inauguration on 20 January, said Mara Verheyden-Hilliard, a constitutional rights litigator and the executive director of the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund. This on behalf of the Presidential Inauguration Committee.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/dec/08/womens-march-on-washington-lincoln-memorial (https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/dec/08/womens-march-on-washington-lincoln-memorial)

So if you want to protest the inauguration of #CheetoHitler, the government will not let you assemble anywhere near where it might have an impact or make a difference. Thus rendering the First Amendment as vestigial as the Fourth.

For those who continue to squeal "protesting doesn't do any good," roll that up tight and pound it up your ass along with the copy of "voting doesn't do any good." Voting, like assembly, are about the only things left that do matter. Refer to the many efforts to steal and suppress for proof. Q.E.D.

How long do you really think it will be before Trumplethinskin's Old White Man government to redefine protesters as "domestic terrorists" and bring the full force of GWOT home? And if the soldiers get squeamish, there is always Erik Prince of Blackwater fame, whose sister (Betsy DeVos) is already part of the junta, to do the mopping up.

And for the cherry on top, Eddie's Governor, Greg Abbott, wants a Constitutional Convention. It only takes 34 states to convene a Constitutional Convention, and with Republicans now occupying 33 governor’s mansions, Abbott has plenty of company. We've already seen that winning the popular vote doesn't count; imagine the genies ready to fly out of the bottle of a Constutional Convention with Amendments edited by ALEC, funded by the Koch Brothers, and implemented by the axis of plutocrats and Christian Dominionists ready to seize the controls.

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on December 09, 2016, 09:12:07 AM
I agree with LD. The pendulum is swinging even further away from protecting the rights of people, toward making the extraction of the earth's remaining hard-to-get energy profitable for Big Oil. The government is about to decide to get out of the way completely and let the corporations have carte blanche.

I would also posit that Standing Rock would be over and done already, except that in today's world, it's popular to mythologize, and sympathize with, the plight of Native American peoples. This has been a very active thread, and that ethos is part of the reason for it, imho.

Compare the Standing Rock protests to the situation in Flint, Michigan, where stupid politicians supervised the poisoning of a large municipal water supply.

The city never filled with proud veterans wearing camo, come to support the protests of Flint residents, who were largely black and poor. Native American causes get lots more likes on Facebook.

What about when the citizens of Denton Texas passed a city ordinance to outlaw fracking there? When the Texas state legislature, which is owned by Big Oil, quickly passed a law overriding that ordinance, where were the vets then? Nobody camped out and occupied the Eagle Ford Shale.

I agree Eddie.  I caught that sentiment when I saw a picture of some veterans kneeling before some Native elders in some apology ceremony.  I addressed this slightly in "fossil fuel dissidence."  The Natives have been mistreated since day one, and so have the blacks, and muslims, and LBGTQS...

I also saw a video of one of the Native elders talking about how Standing Rock is a native led protests for the Natives.  He spoke about the history of Native oppression and genocide and hinted at some conflicts happening at Standing Rock because of the way the Native's feel about whites in general.  He basically said it was on the white protesters to deal with the anger directed at them.  It sort of felt like he was throwing the "white help" under the bus.  Thanks for your help but you guys are a bunch of assholes. 

It's a complicated topic.  My point is that we are all humans, and we all share the same biosphere, and this damage is not about any one people.  This is about a human supporting biome and what we are going to do to ensure we continue to have one. 

Anyways, I really believe that His Trumpness is going to use the military at home to ensure the Corporatocracy's agenda is not impinged by the people.  He'll kill two birds with one stone by bringing the military home.  He'll show that he's concerned about America's security at home, and he'll ensure the Corporatocracy gets it's way. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 09, 2016, 10:45:21 AM
Changing planes in NEW YORK CITY to get on back to Seattle.  I will be going over the Dakotas in a couple of hours.  My dissonance will result in a Diner main page feature, I promise.

The persuit of bling, like it or not that is what centers America and if you are not with the program you get flown over.

That is all for now, the plane is about to take off.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 09, 2016, 01:43:36 PM
Anyways, I really believe that His Trumpness is going to use the military at home to ensure the Corporatocracy's agenda is not impinged by the people.  He'll kill two birds with one stone by bringing the military home.  He'll show that he's concerned about America's security at home, and he'll ensure the Corporatocracy gets it's way.

No military is coming home.  No military out there, no oil comes back here.

What he probably will do is call in the National Guard to dismantle the camp and arrest a few hundred people.  This will then further radicalize the movement and then domestic terrorism evolves from that.  Then there will be riots in the cities and he'll call in more National Guard and then he'll run out of National Guard to call in.  Then there will be a massive riot in Washington and the White House and Congress will be burned down.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on December 09, 2016, 03:32:20 PM
Anyways, I really believe that His Trumpness is going to use the military at home to ensure the Corporatocracy's agenda is not impinged by the people.  He'll kill two birds with one stone by bringing the military home.  He'll show that he's concerned about America's security at home, and he'll ensure the Corporatocracy gets it's way.

No military is coming home.  No military out there, no oil comes back here.

What he probably will do is call in the National Guard to dismantle the camp and arrest a few hundred people.  This will then further radicalize the movement and then domestic terrorism evolves from that.  Then there will be riots in the cities and he'll call in more National Guard and then he'll run out of National Guard to call in.  Then there will be a massive riot in Washington and the White House and Congress will be burned down.

RE

Actually, winter hasn't arrived.
Mother Nature traditionally dumps mass quantities of the fluffy white stuff in the Dakota's.
The snow plows will be called in that will be that ....

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 09, 2016, 04:21:56 PM
Anyways, I really believe that His Trumpness is going to use the military at home to ensure the Corporatocracy's agenda is not impinged by the people.  He'll kill two birds with one stone by bringing the military home.  He'll show that he's concerned about America's security at home, and he'll ensure the Corporatocracy gets it's way.

No military is coming home.  No military out there, no oil comes back here.

What he probably will do is call in the National Guard to dismantle the camp and arrest a few hundred people.  This will then further radicalize the movement and then domestic terrorism evolves from that.  Then there will be riots in the cities and he'll call in more National Guard and then he'll run out of National Guard to call in.  Then there will be a massive riot in Washington and the White House and Congress will be burned down.

RE

Actually, winter hasn't arrived.
Mother Nature traditionally dumps mass quantities of the fluffy white stuff in the Dakota's.
The snow plows will be called in that will be that ....

I believe they already had a major blizzard last weekend.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on December 09, 2016, 04:27:15 PM
Anyways, I really believe that His Trumpness is going to use the military at home to ensure the Corporatocracy's agenda is not impinged by the people.  He'll kill two birds with one stone by bringing the military home.  He'll show that he's concerned about America's security at home, and he'll ensure the Corporatocracy gets it's way.

No military is coming home.  No military out there, no oil comes back here.

What he probably will do is call in the National Guard to dismantle the camp and arrest a few hundred people.  This will then further radicalize the movement and then domestic terrorism evolves from that.  Then there will be riots in the cities and he'll call in more National Guard and then he'll run out of National Guard to call in.  Then there will be a massive riot in Washington and the White House and Congress will be burned down.

RE

Actually, winter hasn't arrived.
Mother Nature traditionally dumps mass quantities of the fluffy white stuff in the Dakota's.
The snow plows will be called in that will be that ....

I believe they already had a major blizzard last weekend.

RE

I won't be surprised if Da Goobermint doesn't pull a "It's for your own good, public safety, DHS, nanny state maneuver".
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 09, 2016, 05:12:43 PM
Anyways, I really believe that His Trumpness is going to use the military at home to ensure the Corporatocracy's agenda is not impinged by the people.  He'll kill two birds with one stone by bringing the military home.  He'll show that he's concerned about America's security at home, and he'll ensure the Corporatocracy gets it's way.

No military is coming home.  No military out there, no oil comes back here.

What he probably will do is call in the National Guard to dismantle the camp and arrest a few hundred people.  This will then further radicalize the movement and then domestic terrorism evolves from that.  Then there will be riots in the cities and he'll call in more National Guard and then he'll run out of National Guard to call in.  Then there will be a massive riot in Washington and the White House and Congress will be burned down.

RE

Actually, winter hasn't arrived.
Mother Nature traditionally dumps mass quantities of the fluffy white stuff in the Dakota's.
The snow plows will be called in that will be that ....

I believe they already had a major blizzard last weekend.

RE

I won't be surprised if Da Goobermint doesn't pull a "It's for your own good, public safety, DHS, nanny state maneuver".

They already did that.  That was the rationale behind the Eviction Notice they got to be out by last Monday, but they didn't follow through with forcing them out.  It was a "voluntary" evacuation notice.

If they're not off the land by the time Trumpty-Dumpty is installed, I'm sure he'll roll in the Bulldozers.

RE
Title: Flyover at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 09, 2016, 08:19:52 PM
I did not 'flyover' Cannon Ball on the way back.  It turns out that a non stop flight from New York City to Seattle spends most of it's time over Canada.  Todays plane left the States in the Niagara Falls vicinity and reentered very close to  where Idaho, Montana and Canada all meet.  I went directly over Winnipeg.  A direct flight from Seattle to Minneapolis goes close to Standing Rock.   Unfortunately when I took that flight on Tuesday it had just become dark and cloudy so I could see nothing on the ground around Cannon Ball.  All I can show is this picture  which is of the LCD screen on the seat in front of me.  I was tracking the flight.

(http://chasingthesquirrel.com/pics/CannonBall.png)

There were other people tracking the flight.  Not many as only nurds like me do it.  I watched the other nurds in front of me to see if they showed any interest in Standing Rock.  Interest could have been shown by zooming the screen as I did.  None showed any interest.  Most people are lost in their own world.  When todays flight landed I doubt half the passengers even knew we were over Canada at all. 

I thought A flight from New York would take the same essential path as the Seattle to Minneapolis flight did.  I was wrong. My thinking was too Euclidean.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on December 09, 2016, 08:34:18 PM
You can't get any good pics from 30,000' out the window of a plane anyhow, even if you went smack over the site in clear weather during daylight hours.

I suggest writing a blog about your THOUGHTS as you overflew these folks.  We can spruce that up with Googled up pics on the web already.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on December 10, 2016, 07:36:15 AM

No military is coming home.  No military out there, no oil comes back here.

We have nearly 800 bases in more than 70 countries RE.  I think Trump can close a few of them and bring the troops from there to here.  Although that would hardly be necessary seeing as how we have hundreds of bases here in the States.  I was unable to find that statistic, so it's just a guess that we have somewhere around 100 here in the States.  I see no reason why it would be difficult for His Trumpty to use the military to squash the resistance like a bug.  If he does not do that, I will be shocked.  He may just use the guard.  Hell, he might just contract it out and hire Black Water or Triple Canopy or the like.  Hell, maybe he'll use boarder patrol or DHS.  Either way if he decides to squash it there is no shortage of resources for him to use. 

Quote
What he probably will do is call in the National Guard to dismantle the camp and arrest a few hundred people.  This will then further radicalize the movement and then domestic terrorism evolves from that.  Then there will be riots in the cities and he'll call in more National Guard and then he'll run out of National Guard to call in.  Then there will be a massive riot in Washington and the White House and Congress will be burned down.

RE

Possibly, although I doubt Washington and the White House will burn down.  Although His Dumpty has shown plenty of scorn towards moving into the White House, so maybe he lets it burn so that he won't have to move in. 

Either way, get the popcorn ready, cause come January 20th it's going to get entertaining.  Personally I can't wait to watch the final season of the Merkan Empire.  Should be a great last season. 
Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: jdwheeler42 on December 10, 2016, 07:37:17 AM
I think big corporations run the world.  I think His Trumpness was nominated by big corporations to be POTUS so that they would have a POTUS that would do their bidding.  He being one of them. 

I think they KNOW that His Trumpness will have no problems "restoring the rule of law" in ND.  Hell, Trumpty Dumpty may be planning to start pulling our troops home because he knows he'll need them here at home to do the domestic "policing" that will be required to "restore the rule of law." 

Besides, a good percentage of Trumpites don't know about Standing Rock, and when they find out they won't care.  The same "bomb your ass and take your gas," "drill baby drill" demographics will have no problem napalming the camps at Standing Rock.  Trumpty is already talking about how the internet is out of control and how it needs to be censored.  "Something needs to be done," because the terrorist are recruiting using the net.  Really, what he is saying, is that the problem is the alternative media.  Something needs to be done about alternative media and the citizenry's ability to get the real news by creating actual journalism instead of MSM propaganda. 

I predict Trumpty's first act will be squashing the protestors.  It will be hailed as a victory for law and order.  The citizens will cheer Trumpty on for saving yet more jobs, just like with Carrier.  Thousands of people now think Trump is akin to God because he saved their livelihoods with his noble goodness.  Expect more of the same.  His Trumpness is here to ensure BAU continues to make America Great Again! 

Indeed, we will all get in line.  The military will be home shortly to ensure it.
Trump is just one man, and he didn't even win the popular vote.

This company is challenging the government's authority.  That is not going to sit well with the bureaucrats -- ANY bureaucrats.

Trump may order Standing Rock squashed, but I think he will find out just how limited the powers of the POTUS really are.
Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on December 10, 2016, 07:40:24 AM
I think big corporations run the world.  I think His Trumpness was nominated by big corporations to be POTUS so that they would have a POTUS that would do their bidding.  He being one of them. 

I think they KNOW that His Trumpness will have no problems "restoring the rule of law" in ND.  Hell, Trumpty Dumpty may be planning to start pulling our troops home because he knows he'll need them here at home to do the domestic "policing" that will be required to "restore the rule of law." 

Besides, a good percentage of Trumpites don't know about Standing Rock, and when they find out they won't care.  The same "bomb your ass and take your gas," "drill baby drill" demographics will have no problem napalming the camps at Standing Rock.  Trumpty is already talking about how the internet is out of control and how it needs to be censored.  "Something needs to be done," because the terrorist are recruiting using the net.  Really, what he is saying, is that the problem is the alternative media.  Something needs to be done about alternative media and the citizenry's ability to get the real news by creating actual journalism instead of MSM propaganda. 

I predict Trumpty's first act will be squashing the protestors.  It will be hailed as a victory for law and order.  The citizens will cheer Trumpty on for saving yet more jobs, just like with Carrier.  Thousands of people now think Trump is akin to God because he saved their livelihoods with his noble goodness.  Expect more of the same.  His Trumpness is here to ensure BAU continues to make America Great Again! 

Indeed, we will all get in line.  The military will be home shortly to ensure it.
Trump is just one man, and he didn't even win the popular vote.

This company is challenging the government's authority.  That is not going to sit well with the bureaucrats -- ANY bureaucrats.

Trump may order Standing Rock squashed, but I think he will find out just how limited the powers of the POTUS really are.

He's not using the power of the POTUS.  He's using the power of the Corporatocracy.  That power is limitless and controls everything.  My feeling is that His Trumpty is the harbinger for the outing of the Corporatocracy.  They are coming out of the shadows to rule in the daylight.  That's what the "election" of His Dumpness means to me.  You are correct that POTUS has no power, at least no power not sanctioned by the Corporatocracy. 
Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: jdwheeler42 on December 10, 2016, 10:15:11 AM
He's not using the power of the POTUS.  He's using the power of the Corporatocracy.  That power is limitless and controls everything.  My feeling is that His Trumpty is the harbinger for the outing of the Corporatocracy.  They are coming out of the shadows to rule in the daylight.  That's what the "election" of His Dumpness means to me.  You are correct that POTUS has no power, at least no power not sanctioned by the Corporatocracy.
The corporations in Germany also felt like they could do no wrong when Hitler came to power.  They discovered they were mistaken.

I'm not saying that Trump is Hitler, just that the bureaucracy is a powerful beast that can be extremely dangerous when it goes into self-preservation mode.

I will, however, put in the caveat that this could all be Kabuki theater, that the ACoE decision was merely a political ploy to delay things until Obama was out of office, in which case, sure, it will all get squished as soon as Trump gets into office.  But only if that was the plan to begin with.
Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on December 10, 2016, 11:34:21 AM

The corporations in Germany also felt like they could do no wrong when Hitler came to power.  They discovered they were mistaken.

I'm not saying that Trump is Hitler, just that the bureaucracy is a powerful beast that can be extremely dangerous when it goes into self-preservation mode.

I will, however, put in the caveat that this could all be Kabuki theater, that the ACoE decision was merely a political ploy to delay things until Obama was out of office, in which case, sure, it will all get squished as soon as Trump gets into office.  But only if that was the plan to begin with.

I believe it was the plan to begin with.  No way ETP spent 3.8 billion without knowing that their investment would go through. 

Title: Re: Oil Company Openly States They Will Defy Army Corps Order in Standing Rock
Post by: jdwheeler42 on December 10, 2016, 11:41:33 AM
I believe it was the plan to begin with.  No way ETP spent 3.8 billion without knowing that their investment would go through.
It's possible, but I think you are crediting the corporations with too much intelligence.  There are medical insurance companies who had ZERO contingency plans for Trump being elected, who were depending on the continuation of Obamacare for their existence.

You can't be too sure of the future, that's all I'm saying.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on December 10, 2016, 12:30:53 PM
You can't get any good pics from 30,000' out the window of a plane anyhow, even if you went smack over the site in clear weather during daylight hours.

I suggest writing a blog about your THOUGHTS as you overflew these folks.  We can spruce that up with Googled up pics on the web already.

RE

I can start collecting them right now and put them together in the next few days.

My thoughts then were 'that this thing is far from over'.  The word FLYOVER is most significant.  This is the most flyover spot in the entire country and I'm not talking total planes going over it.  I'm talking about the natives not being given the best land and being ignored.  This thing is part of a long drama and forcing the externalities of civilization on the natives is part of the American way.

General Sheridan, of the U.S. Army's Department of the Missouri, decided in 1868 that a winter campaign offered a good chance to defeat the Indians. If their food shelter and livestock could be destroyed the warriors and their women and children would be at their mercy.

(http://www.legendsofamerica.com/photos-oklahoma/Washita%20Battle-280.jpg)

http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ok-washitabattlefield.html (http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ok-washitabattlefield.html)

And the cultural threads of that incident are still strong.  The court battle is not over and Bismark is watching the protesters leave.

The Latest: Dakota Access protesters beginning to leave

http://bismarcktribune.com/news/state-and-regional/the-latest-dakota-access-protesters-beginning-to-leave/article_2795d2c0-21ee-549e-8eb2-00721a5c8863.html (http://bismarcktribune.com/news/state-and-regional/the-latest-dakota-access-protesters-beginning-to-leave/article_2795d2c0-21ee-549e-8eb2-00721a5c8863.html)
Title: Oil Pipeline Spills 170,000 Gallons Just Miles from Standing Rock
Post by: azozeo on December 16, 2016, 11:51:27 AM
Oil Pipeline Spills 170,000 Gallons Just Miles from Standing Rock
Monitoring equipment failed to detect the breakage, and it is unknown how long the pipeline was leaking before a landowner discovered it.

(COMMONDREAMS) A pipeline just two and half hours’ drive from the Indigenous water protectors’ ongoing stand against the Dakota AccessPipeline has leaked over 170,000 gallons of crude oil into a tributary of the Little Missouri River and into a hillside, it was reported late Monday.

Monitoring equipment failed to detect the leak, and it is unknown how long the spill near Belfield, North Dakota had gone on before a local landowner discovered it on December 5.

At least two cows have been confirmed dead near the site of the spill, reportsthe Pioneer Press.

The Belle Fourche pipeline is operated by the Wyoming-based True Companies, which is the same company behind the 2015 pipeline rupture in Montana that sent over 40,000 gallons of crude into the Yellowstone River. Indeed, at that time it was reported that the operator had a “checkered environmental history,” with 30 recorded pipeline leaks and multiple federal fines on its record.

Bill Seuss, an environmental scientist with the North Dakota Health Department, told the Associated Press that the investigation into the cause of the most recent spill is ongoing, and cleanup efforts may last into the spring.

Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, has repeatedly insisted that the pipeline is “safe,” but water protectors have argued that it is not a question of if it will leak, but when.

“But it will be safe THIS time, right?” wrote Honor the Earth national campaigns director Tara Houska on Facebook, sharing a report of the latest spill.

The U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration notes that there have been over 11,000 reported “significant incidents” — meaning spills, injuries, deaths, and costly accidents—involving pipelines since 1996.

This article (Oil Pipeline Spills 170,000 Gallons Just Miles from Standing Rock) by Nika Knight originally appeared on CommonDreams.org
Title: 220 'Significant' Pipeline Spills Already This Year Exposes Troubling Safety Rec
Post by: JRM on December 16, 2016, 02:34:44 PM
220 'Significant' Pipeline Spills Already This Year Exposes Troubling Safety Record

October 25th (many more have happened in the meanwhile)

http://www.ecowatch.com/pipeline-spills-2061960029.html (http://www.ecowatch.com/pipeline-spills-2061960029.html)

With fossil fuel pipelines (with the longer ones being the most likely candidates), there is no question as to whether it will rupture.  It will rupture.  The question is only "how soon will it rupture"?  And "how much will be be released before the leaking (gushing) is stopped?"
Title: you can't drink oil
Post by: RE on December 28, 2016, 10:30:24 PM
http://grist.org/briefly/another-native-led-pipeline-battle-bubbles-up-in-new-jersey/ (http://grist.org/briefly/another-native-led-pipeline-battle-bubbles-up-in-new-jersey/)


Briefly
Stuff that matters

you can't drink oil
NBC New York
Another Native-led pipeline battle bubbles up in New Jersey.

(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/chiefperry.jpg?w=1455&h=818&crop=1)

The Ramapough Lunaape Nation has spurred the charge against the proposed 178-mile Pilgrim pipeline, which would transport Bakken crude oil from Albany, New York, to New Jersey’s Linden Harbor. The pipeline would cut through forests and a critical drinking water reservoir.

Last week, the town of Mahwah, New Jersey, issued summonses against the Ramapough Lunaape for establishing a campground and protest signs without permits — even though they’re on tribal land.

Unlike the federally recognized Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the Ramapough Lunaape Nation is only recognized by New Jersey and New York. The federal government isn’t bound by the same obligations to non-recognized tribes, meaning this fight is more complicated than the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance.

In 1993, the nation’s bid for federal recognition crumbled — thanks in part to Donald Trump, who campaigned against the Ramapough Lunaape to stamp out potential casino competition in Atlantic City.

This isn’t the nation’s first brush with environmental racism by a long shot. In the mid-20th century, Ford Motor Company dumped thousands of tons of toxic paint sludge on Ramapough ancestral land — the same land Pilgrim could trespass. The area became a Superfund site after years of soaring cases of cancer and birth defects within the community.
Sabrina Imbler 1 day ago

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guilty of hamburglary
Grist
The vegan meat market really beefed up in 2016.

Sure, we’ve had veggie burgers forever, and food critics ate the first lab-grown hamburger way back in 2013, but 2016 was really the breakthrough year for non-animal meat. The 2013 in-vitro burger cost $330,000 (critics pronounced it passable); by 2015, that sky-high price tag had fallen to an estimated $10 a patty — an incredible drop, but the stem cell burger is still not on the market.

But this year, for the first time, you could go to a restaurant and eat something that had never been through a slaughterhouse but tasted enough like meat to fool the unsuspecting. It was the year of the Impossible Burger, which convincingly reproduces meat’s flavor compounds.

We could dramatically lower our environmental footprint if we ate less meat, but knowing this hasn’t gotten people to go vegan. A delicious, affordable meat replacement, however, might be able to do the trick.

The makers of the Impossible Burger say they can make meat more delicious than animals can, and there are several other serious contenders improving their offerings all the time. Someday we’ll look back at 2016 as the year we realized we might be perfectly happy to give up meat.
Nathanael Johnson 9 hours ago

new year, same fight
APTN News
These are the indigenous-led climate movements to watch out for in 2017.

This year, the Standing Rock Sioux reminded everyone that indigenous people stand at the forefront of the fight for a just and sustainable planet. Here is some of the Native activism that will lead next year’s charge against climate disaster.

    In North America, pipelines put up the biggest fight. The Tsleil-Waututh First Nation and Ochapowace First Nation in Canada have vowed a “long battle” against two new pipeline expansions, which will trespass traditional territory and risk oil spills.
    Indigenous groups across Latin America battle land grabs from energy and agricultural developers.
    In the Niger Delta, the indigenous Ogoni and local fishermen lobby for justice in tribal land “devastated” by Shell oil spills. If the latest lawsuit moves forward, the oil giant will go to court and may be saddled with millions of dollars in cleanup.
    Coalitions in Malaysia and Cambodia fight back against deforestation driven by palm oil and agriculture. And the Kyrgyz people in Kyrgyzstan continue to protest the operation of the largest open-pit mine in Central Asia.

At times, these conflicts can turn into bloody wars. 2015 was the deadliest year for environmental activists, and 40 percent of victims were from indigenous groups. The latest numbers suggests the death toll in 2016 may have tripled. Despite the challenges, indigenous activism doesn’t look like it’s slowing down next year.
Title: Standing With Standing Rock
Post by: Guest on January 02, 2017, 12:56:46 AM


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Published on The Doomstead Diner on Jan 1, 2016






Discuss this article at the Environment Table inside the Diner



I can't tell you how old I was.  I could walk and I could talk and I was with my father.  I was a boy and I was fascinated by where we were.  It was Indian Mounds Park in Saint Paul Minnesota and I had learned that the grassy mounds I was looking at were filled with human bones and that they were hundreds of years old.  That is a fascinating thing to a young boy.  There was no fence that I remember and nobody was around but my father forbade me from running to the top of the tallest mound like I wanted to do.  He said that would not be respecting the dead.   

 

Archeology fascinated me as a boy and I was taught that it was done with great reverence.  Now at the other end of life from being a boy I suspect I was not being given the whole story.  I was of a generation born after history had been rewritten.  Indians were noble the past had been sanitized and American Indians had been integrated into American life.  That is the myth I was taught.  The thought of a pipeline going through sacred lands was preposterous to me.  I was a boy raised in the time of an American Camelot and I was being raised in a big city.  I did not realize that the country was also filled by the descendants of Americans who had wiped out our first nations people in cold blooded murder and these these people were proud of their own sanitized family histories.  My fathers father had died as a missionary on an Indian Reservation as a minister for his church.  I never knew him, he had already passed on by the time I saw the Indian mounds.  My sanitized story was different from the decedents of Indian hating white savages but years would go by before I would understand how poorly the first people have been treated in America.

 

If you start to find out what is going on at Standing Rock you have to find out about the Indians and why they are there trying to protect the waters.  From their point of view they are not protesting anything.  They are trying to right a wrong and the truth is that is the truth.  Indian land was Indian land until white people stole it from them.  It started with the Sioux after the Fort Laramie Treaty in 1851 and the fact is that at the time the Sioux had the unfortunate destiny to encounter American westward expansion; First Nation Tribes were no longer considered to be Sovereign and Eastern tribes were being displaced and marched west in an 19th century Bataan Death March.  The buffalo were wiped out as a result of deliberate government policy intended to wipe out the Sioux by taking away their food supply.  

 

There was a string of genocidal massacres.  One notorious one in which peaceful Indians were extirpated was led by a man named John Chivington.

 

"An estimated 70–163 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho – about two-thirds of whom were women, children, and infants – were killed and mutilated by his troops. Chivington and his men took scalps and other body parts as battle trophies, including human fetuses and male and female genitalia."

 

The truth came out sort of and Silas Soule who disobeyed the order to participate in the massacre testified against Chivington in an investigation.  Silas was murdered and Chivington went on to have a town named after him.  Chivington CO.  Chivington's reputation was tarnished by what he and his men had done at Sand Creek but his life was far from ruined and he never had consequences.  Chivington is still there and that seems to be just fine with Colorado.



 



 



 



 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 



 



 Civington road sign



 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 



 



 



 





Evil has followed First Nations relations right to the present day.  Leonard Peltier rots in jail forgotten and I doubt Hopey-Change will pardon him before he leaves office.  The pipeline itself; I finally get to it; turns out to have been rushed through approvals using Bush Administration special legislation that leave no time for environmental impact statements.  The whole project was fast tracked from the beginning and the pipeline was deliberately moved away from Bismark so it would be an Indian and not a white mans problem.  It was moved so as not to threaten the Bismark ND water supply.  Instead it threatens Sioux waters if it goes forward across the river.

 

For the moment the pipeline is stopped and now I need to say why because respecting First Nation wishes has little to do with it.

 

I am going to describe a man I know who has been to Standing Rock and is on his way back to stand with the First Peoples again.  He and people like him have stopped, at least for the moment, pipeline progress.  He is a veteran and it is not going to look good for the Morton County goon squad to mix it up with a group of white veterans who are willing to stand with the Sioux when water hoses start spraying in subzero weather and take it as far as it goes.  That thought has embarrassed the Obama administration which was quite happily ignoring the dogs, pepper spray, rubber bullets and very heavy handed tactics that have been directed at the water protectors for months.



 



 



 



 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 



 



 Capt America in blizzard.



 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 



 



 



 





My friend is in this picture next to the man with the Capt. America shield.  I understand the shield actually belongs to my friend.  This picture has been used in the National Review in an article which totally misrepresents the Standing Rock situation.  I am going to call my Friend Jake for the rest of this article.  It is not his real name but like I said, he has gone back to Standing Rock.  There is no need for me to explain more than that.

 

Jake was 17 when he joined the army and he went to Iraq in the initial invasion but he was happy to have returned before  IUDs changed the Iraq experience into a nightmare.  For Jake it was mostly a light show in the distance.  His memories of Afghanistan are more troublesome because his unit lost several men in Kandahar province there.  His unit had many purple hearts.

 

Last spring Jake began to follow events at Standing Rock and was appalled at the reports of violence being directed at the water protectors.  Jake knows how to deploy violence and how to be effective in doing so.  His ideas on violence are well developed and he feels that when it is used it needs to be used responsibly and for good reason.  His experience as a vet has refined his beliefs.  He told me that when an attack happens you do what you have to do and it is pretty simple.  Take care of your buddies and stay alive and do whatever you have to do to survive.  That kind of violence does not trouble him.  Violence that troubles Jake is the violence of humiliation and power.  He did not like the humiliation shown to locals when he was doing the military policing part of his job in Afghanistan and Iraq.  He witnessed abuse of authority and it galvanized his beliefs.   

 

Jake's experience in the military made him sensitive to abuse of power and his last straw was finding out about water hoses being sprayed on water protectors in freezing weather at the bridge into the camp.  He had just found out that many other fellow veterans were having a similar reaction to his about the violence being directed against the water protectors and that got him on his way to Standing Rock to stand up against the paid for brutality of Morton County with his fellow veterans and the First Nations peoples.

 

Jake found himself in the middle of an experience when he arrived.  A conglomeration of tribes is at Standing Rock and three different native security organizations administer the camp.  They don't always get along and Jake watched them argue over trivia while he was trying to help organize a community center.  Tribes which have historically been enemies have united at Standing Rock but memories of differences remain.  A ceremonial Tee-Pee was erected that has not been erected since the Little Big Horn.  It was kept by the tribe all these years.  Despite all attempts at destroying it the culture, language, and religion of the Sioux remain.  The original reservation has been reduced in size and the Federal Government has tried to pay the Sioux for some of their stolen land.  They refuse to cash the check and want their land back.  The local and state law enforcement personnel who control and have closed the bridge into the water protector camp are camped on federal land north of the water protector camp across the bridge they have closed which is also on federal land.  Apparently they must all be there with Quo-Bama approval.

 

With the conglomeration of tribes and volunteers other people besides vets with a conscience have come to the camp.  One known as Colonel Dave seems to be excessively helpful.  Concerned with women safety he tried to start a rumor that their had been 24 rapes in the camp in the previous three weeks and security was doing nothing about it.  Concerned that people might not be ready for the elements Dave warned as many as he could the day after pipeline work was ordered stopped that a huge blizzard was on the way and people should get out before it arrived.  He convinced a lot of people to leave.  Some with suspicions about Dave went through his things when he was away from his bunk.  They found unusual radio equipment.

 

The tribes are teaching everyone who arrives that Standing Rock is a nonviolent action.  Guests are there to protect the waters by passive nonviolent means.  Law enforcement has been the author of all violence at Standing Rock and that is what attracted the veterans and which will hopefully kill the pipeline project.  Sophia Wilansky was standing by herself not really doing anything when the concussion grenade was thrown at her which almost blew her arm off.  Even if it does not have to be amputated her arm will never be the same.  The injury was severe and the police account of the incident is bogus nonsense.   

 

In the water protector camp people speculate that the pipeline is being built so oil can be exported overseas.  I am sure that if the owners of the pipeline get it built and if they can make money shipping oil to China that is exactly what they will do.  The pipeline project was not started by men of conscience.  It was started by rich men who want to get richer and who really don't give a damn about anything else.  These men planned heavy handed tactics to defeat opposition from the very start.  Hopefully that will be their undoing.


Title: Re: Standing With Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 02, 2017, 01:08:16 AM
This auto posted when I posted to the Diner main page.  I don't know why it says guest because I was logged in when I posted it.
Title: Re: Standing With Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 02, 2017, 01:57:54 AM
This auto posted when I posted to the Diner main page.  I don't know why it says guest because I was logged in when I posted it.

I updated the format of your article to put in a Diner Header.  I also merged this thread with the Standing Rock thread inEnvironment.  Next time, let me do the publication please.

The reason your byline comes up as "Guest" here on the forum is because you joined after the database mapping of the WP Blog onto the SMF forum was done.  If it's not mapped to your membership ID, it defaults to Guest.  Your ID is correct on the Blog however.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 02, 2017, 02:53:54 AM
Cool the link from the main article comes straight here!

Sorry about the publication I thought hitting the publish button would just send it straight to you.  I was surprised when it popped into the Diner.  Next time I'll save it as a draft and message you when it is ready.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 02, 2017, 03:03:19 AM
Cool the link from the main article comes straight here!

Sorry about the publication I thought hitting the publish button would just send it straight to you.  I was surprised when it popped into the Diner.  Next time I'll save it as a draft and message you when it is ready.

Yea, I try to remember to make a direct link between the Blog article and the Forum discussion, although sometimes I forget.

No problem about the publication, I just wish it had come around an hour later for a Jan 2nd date of publication.  We already had 2 articles published on Jan 1st.  I could change the date, but I decided against doing that.

I'll move it up to a Feature position tomorrow.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on January 02, 2017, 06:01:46 AM
I would be surprised if there was not a "Colonel Dave" that infiltrated.  I'm sure he's not the only one. 

Great article KD! 
Title: 3 people arrested in Dakota Access pipeline stadium protest
Post by: RE on January 02, 2017, 06:50:23 AM
Can't WAIT to see how Trumpty-Dumpty handles the DAPL Protests one he is Crowned!

RE

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/national-business/article124136114.html (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/national-business/article124136114.html)

National Business

January 2, 2017 9:13 AM
3 people arrested in Dakota Access pipeline stadium protest
(http://www.mcclatchy-wires.com/wire_photos/ovxdoe/picture124076254/ALTERNATES/FREE_960/APTOPIX_Bears_Vikings_Football_75817.jpg)
1 of 2
Protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline rappel from the catwalk in U.S. Bank Stadium during the first half of an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Chicago Bears, Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017, in Minneapolis. Andy Clayton-King AP Photo
By DAVE CAMPBELL AP Pro Football Writer

MINNEAPOLIS

Three people are in custody Monday after two Dakota Access pipeline protesters rappelled from the roof of the U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis to hang a banner during the Minnesota Vikings' season finale against the Chicago Bears.

The game was not interrupted by the protest Sunday, but eight rows of fans seated below the banner were cleared as a precaution. The Vikings beat the Bears, 38-10.

The banner urged Minneapolis-based U.S. Bank to divest from the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline. Opponents contend the pipeline could affect drinking water and Native American artifacts. Texas-based developer Energy Transfer Partners says the pipeline will be safe.

Minneapolis police spokesman Officer Corey Schmidt said a 32-year-old man and 26-year-old woman were arrested Sunday on misdemeanor burglary and trespass charges for the high-flying stunt. Police later arrested a 27-year-old woman whom they accuse of obstructing the legal process, but have released no details of her role in the incident.

The protesters rappelled into place during the second quarter, and then hung in a seated position about 100 feet above the seats that were evacuated for safety. The pair watched the rest of the game, occasionally shifting positions or waving at spectators. One wore a purple Brett Favre Vikings jersey.

U.S. Bank Stadium operator SMG said in a statement that they apparently climbed over a guard rail to access the ridge truss. Police spoke with them from a catwalk in attempt to get them to stop, and by the fourth quarter about a half-dozen police and firefighters in rappelling gear were on the truss waiting to remove the pair.

The protesters willingly climbed up their ropes when the game ended, as fans booed them from below.

Vikings spokesman Lester Bagley said the team's only concern was for the "safety of our fans and guests."

Protesters say U.S. Bank has extended a large credit line to Energy Transfer Partners. U.S. Bank spokesman Dana Ripley declined comment.

The pipeline would carry oil from western North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois. Protesters camped in North Dakota for months to try to stop completion of the project.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/national-business/article124136114.html#storylink=cpy (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/national-business/article124136114.html#storylink=cpy)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 02, 2017, 07:22:19 AM
I got the Link up for K-Dog's article on numerous Reddit Subs.  :icon_sunny:

It's up on:

Global Collapse (our sub)
Collapse
Standing Rock
No DAPL
In the News

Hoping to see a further BUMP in readership with the next Google Analytics Update.  We're doing GREAT this month, almost doubling circulation according to Google Analytics anyhow.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: JRM on January 02, 2017, 08:40:45 AM
Good article.

By the way, I looked into Chivington, CO.  It's basically a ruins of an old town with "a few newer homes" -- and that's it.  It doesn't even qualify as a town at all, today.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chivington,_Colorado#Today.27s_Chivington
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 02, 2017, 08:47:30 AM
By the way, I looked into Chivington, CO.  It's basically a ruins of an old town with "a few newer homes" -- and that's it.  It doesn't even qualify as a town at all, today.

All current towns are ruins of old towns, or soon will be.  Chivington was just a bit ahead of its time.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: JRM on January 02, 2017, 08:58:18 AM
Have a look at the OTHER rivers and creeks which the Dakota Access Pipeline would cross.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/11/23/us/dakota-access-pipeline-protest-map.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/11/23/us/dakota-access-pipeline-protest-map.html?_r=0)

And this is just one of many ongoing pipeline projects.
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: The Show Must Go On!
Post by: RE on January 02, 2017, 09:08:50 AM

And this is just one of many ongoing pipeline projects.
Of course. HAPPY MOTORING SHOW MUST GO ON!

http://www.youtube.com/v/t99KH0TR-J4

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock: The Show Must Go On!
Post by: JRM on January 02, 2017, 09:21:50 AM

And this is just one of many ongoing pipeline projects.
Of course. HAPPY MOTORING SHOW MUST GO ON!

http://www.youtube.com/v/t99KH0TR-J4

RE


Poor Freddie!  Seems he was really being very transparent in that very sad song.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freddie_Mercury#Personal_life (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freddie_Mercury#Personal_life)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 02, 2017, 09:38:49 AM
Good article.

By the way, I looked into Chivington, CO.  It's basically a ruins of an old town with "a few newer homes" -- and that's it.  It doesn't even qualify as a town at all, today.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chivington,_Colorado#Today.27s_Chivington (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chivington,_Colorado#Today.27s_Chivington)

Yes, it actually died in the Dust Bowl and Depression years more than half a century ago; but the name is still there.  The water in Chivington turned out to be not pure enough for old school railroad steam engines which dashed initial hopes that it would be a water stop for railroads.  Yet the name remains.

I'm sure it this were Germany and the town were called Mengele to commemorate their war criminal, the appropriate German state government would waste no time voting the town out of existence and taking down the signs even were it empty.  That the town is essentially empty means that the name can be easily changed without too much expense or consequence.  I don't care if the town is almost empty; its existence is offensive.  That the name could now be easily changed makes the situation even more offensive from my point of view.  The town is only 9 miles from the site of the Sand Creek Massacre.

https://www.nps.gov/sand/index.htm (https://www.nps.gov/sand/index.htm)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: JRM on January 02, 2017, 09:57:13 AM
Freddie Mercury

Apparently he was often pretty direct about his being a very unhappy person.  Listen carefully here at minute 2:10.   He's singing about what a good time he's having, then says (if I hear him right) "I'm lying!" Curously, it appears the "I'm lying" statement was later overdubbed onto the recording, for it is the only time when it's clear that his mouth was not in sync with his words in the video.

Biographical info on him seems to show him as a gay/queer man -- a man who preferred men -- who also had a fair amount of internalized homophobia.  Apparently, he was neither in the closet fully nor fully out of it.  I suspect this explains much of his chronic unhappiness.  You'd think the name of the band, Queen, would have pretty much settled that matter?
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock: NOT too Old to Rock & Roll!
Post by: RE on January 02, 2017, 10:10:53 AM

Poor Freddie!  Seems he was really being very transparent in that very sad song.

Freddie was the KING!  The only Rocker with talent close to his is Ian Anderson, who fortunately has not yet bought his Ticket to the Great Beyond.

Like Freddie, beside being a great vocalist, Ian can play guitar and piano.  He also is a world class flautist, and I don't think Freddie played any wind instruments.  I still will rank Freddie as higher in my ranking of Musicians over my lifetime though, the body of work is simply astounding.

It's a close race though, and Ian is still running it.  He's not Too Old to Rock & Roll, and he's not yet Too Young to Die.

http://www.youtube.com/v/ZK4V5vg32ho

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: JRM on January 02, 2017, 04:56:37 PM
Disobedience
http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/disobedience/ (http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/disobedience/)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 02, 2017, 06:29:12 PM
A good film and a good link at the end which I added to my environmental link list.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 02, 2017, 06:49:05 PM
Freddie Mercury

Apparently he was often pretty direct about his being a very unhappy person.  Listen carefully here at minute 2:10.   He's singing about what a good time he's having, then says (if I hear him right) "I'm lying!" Curously, it appears the "I'm lying" statement was later overdubbed onto the recording, for it is the only time when it's clear that his mouth was not in sync with his words in the video.

Biographical info on him seems to show him as a gay/queer man -- a man who preferred men -- who also had a fair amount of internalized homophobia.  Apparently, he was neither in the closet fully nor fully out of it.  I suspect this explains much of his chronic unhappiness.  You'd think the name of the band, Queen, would have pretty much settled that matter?

There was never any closeting for Freddie from the time I started listening to Queen back in the early 70s.  He was as Flaming Gay as they come.  Everybody who knew the band Queen knew Freddie was gay.  He never tried to hide it.

Far as whether he was an unhappy person, I don't think so.  He was a very conflicted person though, but not about his sexuality.  He didn't like the society, but he did like himself, quite a bit actually.  If you want to talk narcissism, Freddy probably outdid even the Donald on this one.  Whenever Freddy was around, all the attention had to be on him.  Brian May who is an unbelievably proficient guitarist and who was/is straight took a back seat to Freddie and let him make the show, but Brian wrote most of the melodies while Freddie did the arrangements.  Brian also holds a Ph.D. in Astrophysics BTW.

Here's an interview with Freddie from back in the day.

http://www.youtube.com/v/8wk9hPubD1Q

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 19, 2017, 08:16:56 AM
I just posted this on my own website.  Bad trouble at Standing Rock.

Quote

Monday January 19th: I am sad to report that things are not going well at Standing Rock.

Steel coated rubber bullets were being fired yesterday.

Oceti Sakowin Camp

We Are Moving Oceti Sakowin Camp

The sacred fire of the Seven Councils has been put to sleep.

The sacred fire can be lit in our hearts internally and spirituality forever.

The Horn has been filled with water and love and now the seeds of this water and love are being given to the world... As we are caretakers of this land we are familiar with the oncoming flooding of the land of Mni S’os’e (Missouri River) we ask occupants of the Oc’eti Oyate to evacuate as soon as possible for safety reasons.

~ The Horn

Go to  http://chasingthesquirrel.com/ (http://chasingthesquirrel.com/) for the Oceti Sakowin Camp link.  This thread is polluted by music videos and so is no longer serious.  I don't want to put the link here.  This is a tragic situation.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 19, 2017, 08:23:42 AM
I just posted this on my own website.  Bad trouble at Standing Rock.

Quote

Monday January 19th: I am sad to report that things are not going well at Standing Rock.

Steel coated rubber bullets were being fired yesterday.

Oceti Sakowin Camp

We Are Moving Oceti Sakowin Camp

The sacred fire of the Seven Councils has been put to sleep.

The sacred fire can be lit in our hearts internally and spirituality forever.

The Horn has been filled with water and love and now the seeds of this water and love are being given to the world... As we are caretakers of this land we are familiar with the oncoming flooding of the land of Mni S’os’e (Missouri River) we ask occupants of the Oc’eti Oyate to evacuate as soon as possible for safety reasons.

~ The Horn

Go to  http://chasingthesquirrel.com/ (http://chasingthesquirrel.com/) for the Oceti Sakowin Camp link.  This thread is polluted by music videos and so is no longer serious.  I don't want to put the link here.  This is a tragic situation.


If you had your own Newz Channel you edit out  posts with Music Videos if you think that "pollutes" a thread.

RE
Title: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 21, 2017, 07:58:55 AM
(http://www.healthnutnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/drones-at-dakota-696x435.jpg)

National Guard Deploys Missile Launchers to Dakota Access Pipeline to ‘Observe’ Protestors

The Avenger missile launcher is foremost a weapon of war. What is it doing at the site of a peaceful protest?


David Axe 01.17.17 3:30 PM ET http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2017/01/17/national-guard-deploys-missile-launchers-to-dakota-access-pipeline-to-observe-protestors.html (http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2017/01/17/national-guard-deploys-missile-launchers-to-dakota-access-pipeline-to-observe-protestors.html)


The North Dakota Army National Guard has deployed two surface-to-air missile-launchers near a critical work site for the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, or DAPL.  Protestors spotted one of the Avenger missile systems on Jan. 16 and posted photos and videos on Facebook. “Anti-drone missile system confirmed on top of a hill guarding the DAPL drill pad,” Jon Ziegler, a self-described “citizen journalist,” wrote on Facebook.  North Dakota Guard spokesman William Prokopyk told The Daily Beast that the Avenger’s missile tubes aren’t loaded. “These systems have observation capabilities and are used strictly in the observation role to protect private property and public safety,” Prokopyk said.  “There’s no authority to arm them,” he stressed, adding that the two Avengers have been in Morton County—site of the drill pad—for more than a month without incident.

The drill pad the Avenger is “protecting” belongs to Dakota Access, LLC, the company building the nearly 1,200-mile-long pipeline meant to transport oil from North Dakota’s Bakken oil field to a storage facility in Illinois.  Dakota Access had hoped to extend the pipe underneath Lake Oahe, which lies on federal land in southern North Dakota. A protest movement originating with the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, which lies on Oahe’s western shore, successfully pressured the Obama administration to deny Dakota Access the easement it needed to drill underneath the lake.  But Dakota Access has vowed to complete the $4-billion pipeline, apparently via an alternate route. Work continues on private land. And it’s on this land that the Guard has stationed its missile launcher.

The Morton County Sheriff’s Department commented on the Avenger deployment on Facebook shortly after The Daily Beast began making inquiries. “MYTH: Law enforcement has [an] anti-drone missile system on the top of a hill to guard the DAPL drill pad and shoot down drones,” the department wrote.

Quote
“FACT: The N.D. National Guard does have an Avenger system employed in support of the Dakota Access Pipeline Protest,” the department continued. “These systems are used strictly for observation of ungoverned encampments to help protect private property and maintain public safety.”

Still, the presence of a missile launcher—even an unloaded one—will likely increase tensions between the Standing Rock protestors and authorities. Police in North Dakota have come under scrutiny for using violent, military-style tactics against peaceful, unarmed protestors.
Quote
The Avenger is foremost a weapon of war. It combines a Humvee truck chassis with a rotating turret that can be armed with eight Stinger missiles and a .50-caliber machine gun. The North Dakota Army National Guard’s 1st battalion, 188th Air Defense Regiment—which has companies in Bismark, Fargo and Grand Forks—operates Avengers.

When fully armed, the Avenger can engage airplanes, helicopters—and, yes, drones. On Oct. 23, 2016, the Morton County Sheriff’s Department announced it had shot down a protestor’s drone after it had approached a police helicopter “in a threatening manner.”  The drone’s operator denied endangering any aircraft. Nevertheless, the FAA subsequently established a no-fly-zone over the pipeline work site.

Prokopyk said the Guard sent the Avenger because it possesses night-vision equipment that many North Dakota Guard units lack, and because the Avenger has an enclosed, heated crew compartment. “With wind chill here, it’s been negative 45 degrees,” Prokopyk said. “I’m not kidding.”  Prokopyk declined to say whether the Avenger crew at the drill pad is using the vehicle’s night-vision equipment specifically to detect activists’ drones.

Around 200 “water-protectors” from the main Standing Rock protest camp reportedly cut through a fence and attempted to reach the drill pad on Jan. 16. Police and National Guardsmen stopped the protesters from reaching the pad. But the activists got close enough to spot an Avenger.  “Many water protectors made it further around the bend to the east closer to the drill site and were met with police and reports of mace used,” Ziegler wrote on Facebook. “We climbed up the hill on the west side right up next to the launcher.”  The Morton County Sheriff’s Office said three people were arrested during the Jan. 16 protest.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 21, 2017, 08:22:06 AM
Trump Is In; Now Where Does Standing Rock Stand?

Friday, January 20, 2017 By Melissa Cox

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/39164-trump-is-in-now-where-does-standing-rock-stand (http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/39164-trump-is-in-now-where-does-standing-rock-stand)

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl1.jpg)

Due to the violent repression of the Water Protectors by the police, 3,000 veterans came to Standing Rock to act as human shields for the Water Protectors. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl2.jpg)

A Water Protector lifts up his voice to the world during Morning Prayer. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

Inauguration Day is here. The wait is over. The administration that is threatening to devastate the future of our world has taken power. Trump, a proud climate denier and adamant supporter of the fossil fuel industry, "intends to cut the bureaucratic red tape put in place by the Obama administration that has prevented our country from diversifying our energy portfolio," according to his transition team. So where does that leave Standing Rock and the 10-month-long struggle to stop the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL)?

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl3.jpg)

"The mantra, Mni Wiconi ('water is life') is the cry that thunders out from a tiny encampment in a remote part of the United States and is being heard around the world," says Toni Cervantes a relentless Water Protector and photojournalist for the Oceti Sakowin Camp. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

The struggle in Standing Rock reflects the universal tensions and conflicts between the interests of capitalism and the interests of people and Mother Earth. This is a decisive moment on the world stage, and the outcome will set a precedent of what's to come.

Quote
"The water protectors continue to camp there because they are concerned. Dakota Access is still working at the site, even though that is supposed to be on hold.... And the National Guard has [Avenger] missile systems, that are allegedly unarmed ... pointed at the camp." -- Angela Bibens
(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl4.jpg)

Oceti Sakowin Camp, the main resistance camp, is on a flood plain, so the camp is in the process of relocating before March. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl5.jpg)

"What this means is the fight is not over," says Dallas Goldtooth from the Indigenous Environmental Network. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

On December 4, 2016, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) denied Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) a permit to drill under Lake Oahe on the Missouri River. Despite mainstream media's portrayal of this denial as a full victory, and despite the fact that many of the 3,000 veterans who had come to stand with Standing Rock for the threatened eviction of the Oceti Sakowin Camp on December 5, 2016, returned home the following day feeling assured by the victory, many Water Protectors regard the day as bittersweet.

Dallas Goldtooth, the Keep it in the Ground organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network -- the organization leading the struggle at Standing Rock and working hand in hand with the Sioux Tribe -- affirmed that "the decision by the Obama administration not to grant the final easement was a clear demonstration of effective organizing and mass mobilization and the power of the people and it was not an end-all victory."

The Sioux Tribe and the Water Protectors were asking for a flat-out denial of the permit and a full Environmental Impact Statement, they got neither. Instead, the USACE said that it wouldn't issue a permit at that time and that it would only carry out a limited impact statement. After the permit was denied pending further investigation, ETP -- the company behind the construction of DAPL -- did not leave. In fact, the company's lights still shine brightly on the camp, their equipment is ready to go and according to Kandi Mossett, the Tribal Campus Climate Challenge Coordinator at the Indigenous Environmental Network, the drill pad site is still a "fortress."

Mossett said, "There's an 8-foot trench in front of it, followed by a 15-foot wall that has razor wire that's all the way around it," guarded by a heavy police presence paid for by taxpayers. On top of that, the Standing Rock Backwater Bridge on highway 1806 remains closed. This bridge is the same site where on November 20, 2016, officers with Morton County Sherriff's Department violently assaulted Water Protectors for 10 hours, injuring 300, including Sophia Wilansky who almost lost her arm.

Clashes over the contentious blockage of the bridge continue. On Martin Luther King Day, Water Protectors carried out a direct action at the bridge to manifest their concern that it's still obstructed. According to Angela Bibens, a lawyer with the Water Protector Legal Collective, Water Protectors were once again shot and tear gassed and 15 were arrested. Bibens added that one of the things that she's most concerned about "is the report from an eyewitness medic who saw a police officer on a snowmobile run over a Water Protector; [the officer] struck the individual and then proceeded to run them over." She added that the police took the person away in an ambulance. "We don't have any information about that person," she said. "We don't know where that person was taken, if their family was contacted, what their medical status is, what their legal status is."

The Water Protector Legal Collective has been working with the Medic and Healer Council to try to track the person down and there's been "no cooperation from the local hospitals or the Morton County Sheriff's Department."

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl6.jpg)

Water Protectors at Backwater Bridge engage in a direct action on MLK Day in 2017. (Photo: Copyright Toni Cervantes Photography 2017)

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl7.jpg)

Local authorities during a direct action on MLK Day in 2017. (Photo: Copyright Toni Cervantes Photography 2017)

The last few days at Standing Rock have been marked by both deplorable events, as well as important advancements. The limited Environmental Impact Statement was just officially started on January 17. This opens the public scoping phase, which invites interested parties to express their views around DAPL crossing Lake Oahe and to identify potential issues, concerns and alternatives to the proposed route.

Prior to the Environmental Impact Statement beginning, there was widespread concern from the Water Protectors that if it didn't start before Trump came in, that he'd just be able to reverse what Obama did to stall the final parts of pipeline construction. Due to the Environmental Impact Statement just beginning three days ago, there's not been a lot of time to analyze its impact, but Bibens believes it could afford the tribe and Water Protectors more protection. Bibens said, "I think it's really good news for the tribe. I am cautiously optimistic that Standing Rock will get the right result." Nevertheless, all are aware that the US government has a long history steeped in breaking promises that it has made to Indigenous people.

And that is exactly what Kelcy Warren, the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, is banking on. In an interview with CBS, Warren said once Trump takes office, "It's 100 percent that the easement [permit] gets granted and the pipeline gets built."

In a leaked audio recording, ETP's Chief Operating Officer Matthew Ramsey remarked, "Make no mistake about it, this pipeline is going through. It's going through exactly where we have planned."

Trump himself has openly expressed his support for DAPL construction at Standing Rock -- but claims it's not because of his investments there -- and has vowed to deal with this issue swiftly once in office. According to Mossett, what this Standing Rock fight did was "call out the ties between industry and government and politics."

Quote
"We know that Trump is going to be antagonistic to our goals to protect mother earth. We know that he's going to be antagonistic to the goals of protecting our communities and ensuring clean water and safe communities." -- Dallas Goldtooth
(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl8.jpg)

Water Protectors join their hands together in unity and resistance. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

Communities are hoping for the best but preparing for the worst. Mossett points out that Trump's in-your-face support of the fossil fuel industry allows for an organizing opportunity that may have been missed if Hillary Clinton had been elected. Clinton would likely have pursued less transparent tactics in which she rejected only parts of the industry but trumpeted others. Case in point: her portrayal of natural gas as a cleaner, more environmentally friendly alternative to coal. Opposition to Trump has been a uniting force, bringing together people who have never worked together before, in a way that Mossett believes could fuel a revolution.

According to Thomas Lopez, a member of the International Indigenous Youth Council (IIYC), "In all of these struggles, what we are finding is they're one [and] the same. The Black struggle is the Native struggle is the gay struggle.... Standing Rock has united us."

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl9.jpg)

Veterans march with Water Protectors. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl10.jpg)

"As hard as they tried to annihilate us we're still here. We're still here and we're stronger and smarter than ever before," says Thomas Lopez. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl11.jpg)

Marco Antonio Iones Gatica is from Inca land in Peru. "Standing Rock is a call that I felt,” he said. “It called the whole world. And when something calls the whole world, it's because it's important." (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)

The divestment campaign "could effectively kill the project in its entirety." DAPL cuts through four states. The Water Protectors at Standing Rock are not just concerned about what's happening in their own backyard. "And if this divestment campaign is successful it will protect everybody that's impacted" by DAPL, declared Mossett.

The divestment campaign is effective largely because it forcefully speaks the language of the investors. "When you speak money and you start to affect their finances -- that's when you start to get a response from them," said Lopez.

The power of the divestment campaign resounds beyond Standing Rock and has the potential to stop future pipelines. "We've already seen this site spark other camps," Mossett said. "There's now a camp in Florida against the Sabal Pipeline. There's a camp in Texas against the Trans-Pecos pipeline. There's a camp in Louisiana against the Bayou Bridge Pipeline." It's worth noting that both the Texas and Louisiana pipelines are backed by ETP. Standing Rock Water Protectors have been sharing organizing strategies with the new camps and sending Water Protectors there.
(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl12.jpg)

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl13.jpg)

Quote
"In order for us to achieve really any kind of movement toward social justice, climate justice, we have to push for systems change.... My greater hope going into this administration is that we see a massive mobilization of resistance against the system." -- Dallas Goldtooth
(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl14.jpg)

"If we don’t stand up today and draw the line in the sand here, then America, Canada and the world will continue to increase their reliance on fossil fuels; it will not end until the planet has been desecrated, the waters poisoned and the air fouled." Toni Cervantes (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)
Standing Rock has battled its way into the forefront of people's minds, and now more people than ever are paying attention to pipeline fights. The IIYC, according to Lopez, is working fiercely to show youth that, "it's cool to care about something and stand up for something." He goes on to say, "there's a prophecy that says that the [seventh generation (people currently 29 years old and under)] will actually lead the resistance against the black snake and bring about change amongst the world. And it's happening."

Despite frigid temperatures reaching -45 degrees Fahrenheit right now and heartbreaking distance from their families, over 1,000 Water Protectors remain at Standing Rock. Goldtooth proclaims: "We're ready. What we need to demonstrate as a movement is that we refuse to be regulated to a reactionary position, that we refuse to give ground to this incoming administration based on fear. We are ready to be proactive in our stance. So we see Trump and we're ready for him and we're not afraid."

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl15.jpg)

Oceti Sakowin Camp at sunset. (Photo: Melissa Cox)

(http://www.truth-out.org/images/images_2017_01/2017_0120nodapl16.jpg)

Fires burn at the Oceti Sakowin Camp to warm Water Protectors through the harsh night. (Photo: Human Pictures and Other Worlds)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 21, 2017, 09:04:30 AM
(https://static1.squarespace.com/static/4f34530ecb12e336a9dfe29c/586888d45016e16d593ac159/587cf0176a4963fff6dfc5d6/1484583044447/IMG_9105.PNG?format=1500w)

A protester blocks highway 1806 in Mandan during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, North Dakota, U.S. November 23, 2016.

North Dakota Bill Would Protect Drivers Who ‘Accidentally’ Hit And Kill Protesters

Stephanie Keith / Reuters  (picture and details about Keith Kempenich provided by K-Dog)


Republican lawmakers in North Dakota are taking aim at protesters with a handful of bills that would make another pipeline protest far more dangerous.  The oil-friendly legislature argues that its constituents are frustrated over the protests, which led federal authorities to halt construction of the $3.8-billion Dakota Access Pipeline as thousands of protesters braved cold weather and violence for months.  A bill that state GOP Rep. Keith Kempenich 

(http://www.legis.nd.gov/files/styles/medium/public/person/photo/kkempenich.jpg?itok=gc89NnG2)

http://www.legis.nd.gov/assembly/63-2013/members/house/representative-keith-kempenich (http://www.legis.nd.gov/assembly/63-2013/members/house/representative-keith-kempenich)


introduced would exempt drivers from liability if they accidentally hit a pedestrian, according to the Bismarck Tribune. House Bill 1203 was written up in direct response to groups of protesters blocking roadways, Kempenich told the paper. He claims protesters were seen jumping out in front of vehicles.

“It’s shifting the burden of proof from the motor vehicle driver to the pedestrian,” Kempenich said. “They’re intentionally putting themselves in danger.”

He admits that the law might be used in cases that don’t involve protests. But a few casualties of justice are apparently worth it; his bill would mitigate instances when panicked drivers might have accidentally “punched the accelerator rather than the brakes” as protesters blocked the roads.  Other new bills would be a thorn in the side of protesters and the federal government. One measure would make it a crime for adults to wear masks nearly across the board, while another would allow the state to sue the federal government over millions in extra police costs, according to ABC News.  At this point, it’s unclear whether any of these measures stand a chance, and there’s no committee hearing set for HB1203. It might be crazy to think they’re anything more than posturing, dissenters say.  “Knee-jerk legislation often is poor legislation,” Democratic state Rep. Marvin Nelson told ABC News.  The Dakota Access protests have cost the state more than $22 million and locals are reportedly upset over the rise in crime in the area ― police have arrested nearly 600 people in the region since August.

(The following content is provided by K-Dog.)

(http://www.ndtourism.com/sites/default/master/files/styles/profile_slideshow/public/zzdata-448_640x480.jpg)

An outside view of the North Dakota State capital.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com%2F-nnsCzFJfdUY%2FTv-GIdiT7rI%2FAAAAAAAAIII%2F2gQJONTVVBM%2Fs400%2FNazi%2BSalute.jpg&f=1)

A view inside the North Dakota State capital.

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 21, 2017, 11:55:44 AM
Great Pics.

RE
Title: Standing With Standing Rock: Of Pipelines and Protests
Post by: RE on January 21, 2017, 02:28:51 PM
http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/01/20/standing-with-standing-rock-of-pipelines-and-protests/ (http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/01/20/standing-with-standing-rock-of-pipelines-and-protests/)

January 20, 2017
Standing With Standing Rock: Of Pipelines and Protests

by Ruth Fowler

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For the majority of the 1300 mile journey from Los Angeles to North Dakota, you don’t see much besides devastating, inhuman moonscapes illuminated by startling sunsets or sunrises. If you came – as we did – from a densely populated, warm city suffocated by endless lines of traffic and hopeless dreams, that ride becomes almost ritualistic, meditative – preparing one for the arrival at Standing Rock, North Dakota, as if it were a world unlike any we might have known before it.

I was one of only four civilians on a bus full of veterans, and I was there not as a protestor, but to document the journey of a group of 24 former members of the armed forces, just a small group from an estimated 4.5k who had heeded the call put out by Michael J. Woods and Wesley Clark Jr. to stand alongside them at the front lines of the Dakota Access Pipeline Project (DAPL), a billion dollar enterprise to pump oil across country in a thin pipe constructed on a relatively shallow pipeline which would rip right through Native American tribal land and nearby areas. DAPL had stopped mid-construction, the earth broken, gaping, gasping like a gutted fish, as First People and their supporters across the nation had joined the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in their attempts to halt the pipeline, arguing that it desecrates sacred land as well as posing a massive risk to their water source. Standing Rock was the largest gathering of tribes across the country since the Battle of Little Big Horn.

I’d known many friends who had been to Oceti Sakowin (‘Seven Fires’) the main camp for the water protectors. Oceti Sakowin is the reception area, the location of the sacred fire which also acts as a hub of information and learning and community. Oceti also hosts the media tent, direct action training, and many of the other sub-camps can only be accessed through it. Surprisingly a number of Californians I’d known for years in the activist community had braved the cross country drive and cold weather, and returned a week or so later, curiously contemplative, touched by something they couldn’t quite articulate. Some had even stayed longer, drawn in by community and a shared sense of purpose, no rent, free food and other passionate idealists who couldn’t bear the idea of a career, but could find comfort in justifying their existence by fighting oppression.

What all of them could articulate was a sense of suspicion over the Veteran action. Were the Veterans actually going to be useful, or was their role merely symbolic? Were hundreds – and as numbers grew, thousands – simply showing up merely to drain the resources of an already strained encampment, or were they going to contribute in a ‘meaningful’ way, whatever meaningful meant?

A couple of nights before the action, I sat down in Wes Clarke’s kitchen with his wife, Anna, a stunning woman of Sri Lankan descent who works in marketing for Playboy. I’d known Anna for years – we’d met after I fostered one of the dogs she routinely saves as an animal rights activist – and when I found out her husband was organizing the action, I called her and asked could I join them. Wes had left earlier that day, driving a car load of donations and gear, leaving Anna to hold the fort. As I sipped a quick glass of wine, she fielded phone calls from panicked RTL’s (Regional Transport Leaders) and Skype conference calls and finally nipped out to the garage for a quick cigarette looking exhausted. “This is a complete surprise,” she told me. “Wes and Michael expected maybe a couple hundred at most to go, but we’re maxed out with over 2,000 veterans on the roster and more saying they’re just going to show up. I don’t even know how much money the gofundme has at this point, “ (I checked later that night and it was around $70,000, and is currently over a million). She was interrupted by another phone call, and looked apologetic. “I’m so sorry, I wanted to tell you more about the action, but I really need to speak to these people.” I left to go home and pack – two changes of thermals, four pairs of wool socks, one down sleeping bag, one down jacket, snow overalls, Sorels, hat, gloves, two hoodies, twenty hand warmers and twenty feet warmers).

Veterans, in my British-born mind, are frail, elderly white men immortalized on the BBC wearing startling red paper poppies on Armistice Day. Even though I’d lived in the US long enough to appreciate the difference between my British imagination and American reality, a part of me still expected this instead of the twenty four people who gathered at Union Station to step onto a shabby looking “luxury” charter bus which smelled of pee and old pizza at 4pm one Friday afternoon in early December.

There was Elizabeth, a slim, tall woman who resembled Angelina Jolie, a quiet, reserved character who slipped into the seat behind me, put on her headphones and gazed out the window silently for the first three hours, lost in thought. Christa, a chain smoking, loud mouthed, tough talking combat medic from the Navy with a boyish haircut and a sharp tongue, who’d brought over 300 pounds of supplies along with Riz, an army Vet and Mom of four she’d met on the Veterans for Standing Rock page a couple of weeks previously. Crash was a shaven headed, shambolic tall artist who made enormous, startling art installations for events such as Burning Man. Thibault was a photographer with movie-star good looks, dark floppy hair and deep brown eyes.Anthony was a smiling stoner, Candice, a slim blond with glasses, Sharne, a mother of four from the Airforce. As the duffel bags outside the baggage compartment grew, the group tentatively chose their seats, kissed and hugged families goodbye, texted partners and uploaded videos to twitter, turned off their facebook live. There was an air of going into battle: but this time, as Christa McDermont told me, “for a war we chose”.

As the passengers on the bus stood up, one by one to introduce themselves, I was struck by the difference between the Vets and the civilians. A young woman with short hair stood up and announced, without any irony, that she was there to “gather material for (her) comedy career”. A quick google of her name, Lindsey Hitt, revealed very little about this career, perhaps unsurprising given her taste for material. Another woman in her mid forties with a breathy, excited voice and shining eyes started handing out flyers encouraging people to move their money from a bank to a credit union, urgently engaging everyone in conversation on the bus. The third civilian, an elderly man named Daryl, sat quietly in the back of the bus, emerging only to announce that he was a journalist and everyone had better behave or he’d skewer them in writing. Upon finding out that I was also a journalist, he revealed he was actually unemployed and had never written anything before, but had a remote lead at The Daily Beast who wanted 500 words in two days and could he borrow my laptop to file it? The fourth civilian was our leader, Eme Ikwuakor, a handsome black actor in his thirties who had somehow become involved in the Veterans group and had been entrusted with the role of Regional Transport Leader without any prior experience in activism.

It was not long before the final civilian of the group, our bus driver, a small, grumpy latina woman in her sixties – Judy – began to exhibit signs that the trip was taking a toll on her. As we navigated out of rush hour traffic, she began to proclaim loudly that “My back hurts. I gotta stop. I need to take a break. I can only work ten hours then they gotta find someone to replace me.” After stopping, she re-entered the freeway on the wrong side and started driving back to Los Angeles, before someone corrected her. When she turned around, she narrowly avoided T-boning a car which had right of way, and then started screaming when Eme and a couple of other passengers tried to explain her mistake.

By the time we stopped at Victorville to pick up more veterans, we were about five hours behind schedule.

At Victorville a small, bossy African-American woman stepped on the bus, her straightened hair slicked back close to her scalp. She loudly announced that she was the other RTL, and that her name was Tatiana. As we left California and Nevada, and entered snowy Utah, the temperature in the bus dropped and the pitch of Tatiana’s voice rose. She started reading directions to the female driver, who already seemed in a state of near panic. The missed turns, double backs, breaks for the bad back and hysteria increased. I turned away from the shit show with an increasingly frustrated Eme and loud Tatiana, and walked to the back of the bus to sit down next to Jai Waggoner, the only lifeguard on the bus, who was talking to ‘Captain’ Katie Robinson, a slim, pale young woman of barely thirty with bright blue eyes and a sad, kind face. “You never, ever burn the American Flag,” Jai was saying fiercely as I approached in the middle of a conversation. Christa saw me looking and explained, “Civilians learn about the pledge of allegiance but you don’t learn about the flag.” Jai, thick dreadlocks around a sad and beautiful face, leaned forward urgently. “I saw a flag the other day, just sitting on the side of the road in a puddle. I stopped my car, took it home, and then called up everyone I knew and we had a day of the dead bonfire, and then we burnt it. Only a veteran can burn a dropped flag. The flag is symbolic of all fallen soldiers.” Christa looked at me. “That’s what they don’t teach you civilians. You burn a flag you’re not making a political statement. You’re burning everyone who died serving this country.”

I feel acutely the cloak of my ignorance weighing heavy upon me. This is a deployment, and I don’t know the terminology, the abbreviations, the ease with which everyone assumes their role in a ranked pecking order which has nothing to do with either skill or intelligence. As Tatiana became more irate up front, yelling instructions at the driver Katie explained to me that this is normal: “It happens all the time in the military. Stupid people give orders and you have to follow them. “ And nothing happens to them? She smiles. “Oh no, shit happens. Just watch.” I sat down next to Elizabeth and started to ask her questions. She had alluded to her slimness before, her struggles with ill-health and cancer scares, but talks in depth now: about her depression after being honorably discharged for a TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) her alcoholism, the struggle with finding purpose and meaning in the real world after losing a community and a career that she loved. Like many veterans, thirty year old Elizabeth did not like fighting in wars she did not believe in, nor did she glamorize the horrors she saw as an Iraq veteran, but she credits the army with giving her a purpose greater than herself. Without it, she says, she would not have gotten clean after a tough spell in her teen years where she found herself addicted to Crystal Meth after falling in with the wrong crowd. It was that purpose which convinced Elizabeth to go back into the closet and hide her sexuality in the 673rd Delta Unit.

I heard similar stories from Christa, from Katie, Candice and Tina, all of whom served under ‘Don’t Ask Don’t Tell’, all of whom deliberately concealed their sexual orientation in order to have a career in the military. Katie Robinson’s story was brutal and horrific – she’d decided to leave the military, had handed in her notice, and had only days left to serve as an O3, when she finally felt comfortable enough to slow dance with her fiancé at a military ball. That small act – taking her girlfriend in her arms to sway along to music – prompted a violent outburst from a Colonel which ended in her very public physical and verbal assault. After someone leaked the story to the press, a disciplinary hearing exonerated Katie of indecent and lewd behavior, and the Sergeant Major lost his job. The investigation, however, tore Katie and her wife apart, and the ensuing press resulted in a wave of harassment against Katie which ultimately resulted in her brutal assault by a masked stranger in the stairwell of her Hollywood apartment. Katie survived the assault, but suffered head injuries which meant she had to relearn basic vocabulary and simple actions in her long, painful recovery. She refers to her service under DADT (it was repealed in 2012) as “my small sacrifice”. Christa chimes in. “It just cost us a little bit more than the average person.”

We swapped secrets and shared stories, warily sniffing around one another, trying to gauge intent or purpose, and by the time we had forged friendships and some kind of trust, we emerged from traffic into a velvet dark night, our breath frosting in the air. As midnight passed, the inside of the windows froze solid so that I had to scrape the ice off with a key in order to peer out to the inky blackness surrounding us. We all hauled sleeping bags out from under the bus and secretly felt ashamed that we could barely deal with the inside of a bus driving through Utah, never mind shacked up in a tent during the blizzards of North Dakota. Eventually, some bright spark had enough of the shivering, and asked the bus driver to turn up the heat. “It ain’t working,” she proclaimed, smacking her lips grimly. “It’s broken.” The bright spark took a closer look. “You have the air conditioning on full blast,” I heard a horrified voice announce. Too cold to put my head out, I couldn’t see who it was. “No, it’s not working.” Judy insisted. “It is now,” said a firm voice. A click, a whirr and almost instantaneously, hot air is pumped into the shivering ice box. We slept, finally, for a few hours until we picked up a new driver, a no-nonsense black woman who has zero interest in any of us and simply wants to drive us to Point B and then get the hell out of there.

As the sun rose in Utah, slumped bodies start to stir. We stop for breakfast, stumble out for coffee and McDonalds, watching our breath mist and our boots crunch fresh snow. If we were on schedule, we should have been arriving in the next six hours, but we still have another 24 to go, and the day passes in a haze of cigarette stops and bathroom breaks, until we pick up our final driver, Joe, in Casper, Wyoming at around 9pm on Saturday evening.

Joe, wearing a baseball jacket and a leather cap, is a short, stocky Latino man in his early seventies with a deep rich St Louis voice. Close your eyes, and Joe is actually Morgan Freedman. Joe is also a veteran who seems both bemused, amused and excited by the presence of 24 other veterans. He’s instantaneously everyone’s friend, and as he takes the wheel of the bus, Jai creeps forward and sits next to him calmly reading directions from one of the few phones with working GPS and reception. I fell asleep to the sound of them discussing their vegetable patches and laughing softly together.

Sometime after midnight, we arrived at the Lakota Cultural Center in Eagle Butte, South Dakota. Handwritten welcome signs on neon paper nestle into crisp new snow. We walk into a warm, strip-lit building full of gatorade and cereal bars and lukewarm coffee, grizzled, tired bodies nursing styrofoam cups, sleeping in the corner. A frazzled looking Vet calls us together. He hasn’t slept for several days, he admits, and as he launches into a description of how we should behave (no alcohol, no drugs, respect our hosts, follow their leads, no responding to violence, be on the lookout for occurrences of trauma or PTSD) what we should expect (CS gas? Rubber bullets? Water? Sound cannons? All or none of the above?) he omits to mention his name or his (past) rank, and we’re too tired to notice. We sign in, grab maps, restock on carbs, and then pile back onto the bus for another three hours to Fort Yates, where a high school on the reservation has been designated as the temporary barracks of the 2,000 vets who are actually on the roster. It’s 6am by the time we roll up, and every available space in the school contains sleeping, supine bodies. We’re quietly led to a dark corridor behind the gym, and for the first time in two days, quickly shower in steaming hot water, and then pass out for a couple of hours.

***

I wake up at 8:30, and Captain Katie gives me a lopsided smile as she starts to roll up her sleeping bag. Across from me, Xavier, or Batman as we’ve started to call him, a young twenty-something ex-Marine with an obsession with Marvel heroes, quietly munches on a cereal bar. I get up and find Eme and Tatiana looking frenzied and feverish. “You haven’t slept?” I ask Eme quietly. “No. There’s shit going down. I can’t talk about it but there’s a lot of developments happening. There are problems.”

He charges off and I gaze after him. Since we stepped on the bus rumor after rumor has plagued us. The state of North Dakota has been shut down. The road to Cannonball is snowed in. No one’s selling propane or firewood to anyone headed to Standing Rock. There aren’t enough beds and tents and people are freezing to death. Every hour a new rumor emerges, usually from a fathomless source: a careless facebook comment, someone’s aunt swearing blind that Fox News just said so. I’ve been around the activist community long enough to ignore them and not react: sleep when I have to sleep, save my eyes and ears and energy for the real drama, but Eme, Tatiana and many of the RTL’s have very little experience in activism – or even, in Tatiana’s case, in active duty. Combine that with the very real facts coming out of Standing Rock – the CS gas, the water guns, the sound cannons, the rubber bullets – and people were stretched taught, running on adrenalin, their nerves shrieking, sensitive to the slightest vibrational change, ready to snap. Tatiana soon bustled in, screaming that we needed to all board the bus to see Tulsey Gabbard in Cannonball, and Christa, Katie, Riz, Jai, Sharne and and the rest of the girls huddled together and decided to revolt and hop on another bus which would take us straight to Oceti Sakowin. Hearing our plans, Eme started arguing with Tatiana and Joe, the bus driver who’d slept in a sleeping bag on the floor next to us, joined in. I walked outside to watch a group of Oregonian Vets load up their van with medical supplies they were intending to donate to camp. On the floor, nestled in the snow, a single tampon lay. I took a photo of it, and one of the vets stopped and laughed sadly. “I saw a first responder kill and Afghani by shoving a tampon in an open chest wound. Sucked all the blood out and his lungs collapsed.” A tall, beautiful woman in her late twenties nodded. “Tampons are great for soft tissue – for open chest wounds, not so much.” Ironically, tampons would, twelve hours later, be lifesavers of another kind for us, as firelighters, but for now, we all grabbed our gear, threw it on the bus and headed to camp, taking a six hour detour along the way as Tatiana, panting agitatedly, decided to re-route our tired driver along a pointless expedition to find a press conference which never existed.

The major problems of our trip were a complete lack of communication. After I sat down with Wes Clarke a month after we’d returned, I found that he, like us, was frustrated and trapped by the radio jammers, the wind which turned iPhones and smart phones to dead ice within seconds, the lack of a central unit of command, the sprawling, uncontrolled, random, fortuitous nature of communications. As we finally made our way into Oceti Sakowin 48 hours after we’d left Los Angeles, those of us with Verizon phones suddenly found them lit up with messages and outpourings of congratulations as the news broke that the Army Corps of Engineers had been denied their easement – which meant they could no longer, temporarily at least, continue to build the pipeline.

We drove into Oceti just minutes after hearing this news, vets starting to laugh, cry, call home. There was a sense of understandable frustration – a 22 hour trip had taken 48 hours, had involved numerous pointless bureaucratic sign in stops, very little sleep and no food for nearly 20 hours – but there was also a strange sense of impotency. “We went there not knowing if we were gonna come back.” Wes told me later. “I wrote my will before I went because we just didn’t know what was gonna happen. We’d planned to take a beating, walk up to the front line, four at a time, like Gandhi’s salt march.” And then suddenly bodies which had ached to hold the scars of a battle they believed in were instead relegated to mere symbols. No one, it seems, had been quite prepared for that outcome.

Flags fluttered against an azure sky and drums floated across crystal air and our bus was stuck in a long line of vehicles all trying to navigate the ice and snow into Oceti to celebrate. We stepped off the bus and started to walk in, Tatiana trying to yell out a drill that no one even bothered to acknowledge. We got to the edge of camp and children were sledding down a hill, people in huge jackets and scarves milling around, cameras and booms and mics everywhere. I stuck close to Darryl and Anthony, two of the army vets I’d chatted with intermittently on the bus. There was no sign of either Wes Clark or Michael Wood, the two organizers, but around 200 vets were engaged in a ritual ceremony of forgiveness holding mirrors and marching slowly around the camp – a ritual Wes admitted later he didn’t even know about. We floated around for a half hour or so, and then our bus skidded into camp and came to a stop on sheet ice. Water Protectors gazed in amusement as forty Veterans tried to push and dig and pry it out, but to no avail. We were at Standing Rock, and we weren’t leaving.

Within minutes Eme appeared looking panicked. He’d checked in at the Vet tent, to find complete confusion. There were no tents available, too many people had shown up, they had no idea where we would stay. Crash, the tall gangly artist, spoke urgently with a couple of friends, and they offered us the use of a couple of tents in Rosebud, the camp over the bridge. The sun was setting, all phones had died, we still hadn’t eaten. We grabbed the minimal gear necessary, and started to march, leaving Joe, our driver, on the bus waiting for the tow truck.

Our tent was a summer military tent turned storage unit. It was covered in a thin dust of snow when we walked in, the wood next to the stove frozen solid. Amanda, the paratrooper, found a box of donated tampons in a corner and used them as firelighters while we arranged our sleeping bags closely together and used a propane heater to thaw off. A community kitchen in a yurt was two minutes from the tent, so we took turns to go grab some food: thick, gloopy chicken and biscuits with tinned green beans and frozen strawberries and stale bread rolls and fresh fried bread. It was warm in the yurt, filled with huge bear-like men, dewdrops glistening from noses, white girls with dreads, kids running around, Australians and Kiwis and South Africans and people from god knows where who had come to call this place home. There were no chairs so we stood awkwardly, shaking and exhausted, overwhelmed and elated. I bolted to media hill after dinner to write a quick story for a woman’s magazine, and found myself battling the cold as my Mac and phone kept freezing within seconds unless I piled hand warmers on them. I dragged myself back to our tent after an hour, crept into the sleeping bag, and fell asleep despite the constant drip of melting snow falling into my face and the wood someone had tried to thaw on top of the stove bursting into flames and nearly killing us. I slept better than I had in years. And when I woke up, it was to find freezing, wet, giggling, exhausted Vets surrounding me.

Christa, Riz and I went off to find coffee and food for the girls who couldn’t bring themselves to leave the warmth of the tent. We found ourselves in another community kitchen, being regarded coolly by a young blonde Australian girl who offered us coffee and seemed displeased when we said yes. Rosebud was known as the white person’s camp, and for good reason. While Oceti, Sacred Stone and Red Warrior seemed run predominantly by Native Americans, here their white supporters had settled. I did not see any of the Burning Man tales so beloved of the press, but it was apparent that Standing Rock was not a protest. Standing Rock was a new society, a society where mini communities sprung up to feed, shelter and clothe one another, take on tasks such as chopping wood and keeping the sacred fire going. As the weather had harshened, the nature of that community became ever more simplified: it became, simply about survival. “Fuckin’ love this shit,” breathed Christa as we stood in the cold and she lit another cigarette. “Have no idea what the hell’s going on, it’s disorganized as shit and I wouldn’t be anywhere else on earth.”

We took thick oatmeal back to the other girls in styrofoam cups, and gradually made our way to the main camp for a noon muster, where to our horror, we found that the bus remained – but Joe had gone, taken to hospital for signs of hypothermia after stepping out into the cold to try and direct the tow truck down to camp. Our phones, still jammed and blocked, wouldn’t even turn on, so we couldn’t text or call him and check he was OK. I began to feel sick, perhaps with emotion or cold, or maybe with having consumed little aside from coffee and cereal bars for 36 hours. Eme steered me into a dark, steaming, greasy tent and plied me with bacon, water and gatorade, and I began to thaw out, and take in my surroundings.

Oceti was overrun with Vets. Christa, Sharne and Candice made their way to the Medics to help out while the rest of us went to check on the bus and Joe. The bus was still frozen and unmoving, but Joe had disappeared, probably to a hotel while waiting to retrieve the vehicle and drive us home.

It was just as we started marching to the bridge leading to the pipeline that the blizzard broke.

People said it was the worst blizzard for twenty years, but then others said it was just another shitty North Dakota winters day. We pushed back stinging snow and wind and tears as First people sang and danced and a woman in a long skirt, her dark hair streaming in the wind cried out, “This is what you were made for. This is your destiny. Thank you for listening.” Around a thousand Vets struggled through the wind until we got to the bridge, and then a long line of elders pushed their way through, linked arms and refused to let anyone go any closer to the pipeline. In the distance and the darkening gloom we saw the quick wink and flash of the headlights of the Army Corps vehicles. People said they were still drilling, that the easement denial was just a way to dissuade the Vets and get them sent home. People said, people said. In this year of false news, rumors and gossip and whispers never seemed so vicious, when we were stumbling blind around a camp, not quite sure whether we were welcomed or despised, unable to call home, surviving the cold long enough to get to the next warm fire, the next hot tea, the next smile. As the temperature dropped and the drumming increased and an hour turned into two, people began to break away, dribble apart and make their way, with difficulty, back to camp, the wind slapping our face. I saw a young woman ride past, galloping on a white horse which suddenly slipped, reared and fell, hitting an older veteran to the floor and unseating his rider. I grabbed onto someone and it turned out to be Brendon, a thin, quiet white guy from the bus who seemed fragile and erratic – PTSD, people surmised. Laughing, we struggled back to the bus and warmth. Thibault and Crash greeted us with the news that Joe, the driver, had never made it to a hotel. He’d been found in the snow with hypothermia, and had spent the night in hospital.

Our vets arrived in short, sharp shocks of frozen air, snow and frosted lashes, until we’d all been accounted for. “They’re telling everyone to go home,” Eme announced. “Mission’s over, there’s not enough places to sleep and the storm’s moving in. We need to leave now, or we might be staying for a week. Who wants to go?”

No one moved.

We quickly made plans to return to Rosebud for the night. The men had been given another army issue tent, and they ran the mile back over the bridge to put it up next to ours after the one they were in the night before got snowed in. We waited for the girls to arrive, and headed back to our frozen, snow covered tent, which was now insulated by about four feet of snow surrounding the canvas, plus several inches inside on top of our sleeping bags. The girls crawled into their bags, Captain Katie shivering and gray. Sharne turned to her. “Snuggle up. Get close between us. We don’t want you to die.”

Christa, Amanda and I went back to the kitchen to eat watery soup and bread rolls. Despite the cold and the exhaustion, we were exhilarated. So much of civilian life is about the crushing, soul destroying boredom of existing in capitalism: paying bills, waiting in lines, listening to hold music for several hours to find out why your internet doesn’t work. It’s about the commute and the hustle, the fruitless search for a job that doesn’t obliterate all your hopes and dreams, the sad realization that you may have to make do. That shit is taken care of in the armed forces. You train. You follow orders. And sometimes, you live life on the very razor edge of existence, every breath a precious gift, every minute an answer to a prayer. Then it’s back to life cutting coupons and searching for work in the ‘real’ world. And suddenly there’s Standing Rock, and an opportunity to put this dying body in front of a gun again, and live every second like it really matters. For the first time in my entire life, I began to understand why someone might join the military, and why someone might miss it when they’re out. The type of community that your unit gives you was the type of community at Standing Rock. It’s the type of community that doesn’t exist anymore in an age when no one gives a shit if you can’t pay the rent or the medical bills or buy food. No one cares. At Standing Rock, everyone noticed when Katie became hypothermic, or when Christa, buried for a half hour underneath a trapped two-wheel drive car struggling to free it, suddenly started shaking and became incoherent, her skin cold and clammy. We cared when Lindsey ‘the comedian’, clearly struggling with the extreme conditions and probably nursing some kind of personality disorder, lashed out at the Vets carrying her around and called them “hypocrites” and mocked their tears and their laughter cruelly. I mean, we cared about the Vets she mocked, not her. In fact, I lost my journalistic cool listening to her insult the people I’d come to consider friends, and told her to fuck off myself. But that night of the blizzard sticks with me: the girls laughing in the tent despite being covered in snow, Jai and Candice waiting up patiently all night to knock the flue of the wood stove back into place when the winds tore it out to prevent us from being smoked out, the solid drip-drip-drip as snow melted on our bodies, then drifted back as condensation onto the roof of the tent only to freeze and snow back down on us. I think we all, without fail, felt the happiest we’d felt for a long, long time. We had not been shot at, we had not marched to the front lines, we had not stood face to face with the Army Corps of Engineers. Our enormous presence had completely colonized the entire village of Standing Rock and strained its resources, but our presence had, I believe, exerted the necessary political and social pressure to deny the easement and prevent the kind of scene which the international media would have lapped up – of Vets – many disabled, many suffering from PTSD, many elderly, and many weak – being shot at by their own government in support of the water protestors and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. Not that the easement was a victory – but it was a small step on the road to victory.

We left the next day. With the blizzard increasing, Chairman Archambault, the spokesperson for the Standing Rock tribe, had released a statement thanking the Vets and asking them to leave due to the worsening conditions. Within days Red Warrior Camp would announce their departure, and others would pack up and leave too, leaving only a core group of 200-300 people left from the estimated 8 thousand or so who made up the community when we were there. We left the bus behind, frozen in ice. Joe called me on the way back home to reassure everyone he was fine. We hitched a ride with a friendly couple who drove six of us to the Casino, and then went back to get more until our entire group was reunited in the smoky, crowded lobby crammed with slot machines, smokers and sleeping Vets. It was at the Casino that we saw Wes for the first time since we’d arrived. Looking gaunt and exhausted, his voice croaking, he flitted around, posing reluctantly for selfies and group shots, his spiritual mission over. We had completely missed the apology ceremony where Wes, in his uniform from Custer’s Cavalry, gave his viral speech to the elders. We were digging out cars from snow, hauling out sleeping bags, carrying hypothermic friends and flatlining coffee in subzero temperatures at the time probably. Shortly after we saw Wes, he hitched a ride out of town on his friend, Milan Markovic’s, private jet and casually tweeted about it, unleashing a torrent of rumors for the media bandwagon regarding the funds Veterans Stand had received. Wes, people stated, had run off with the money and was spending it on private jets (he did not pay a penny for the flight home and covered all his own expenses). The rumors and the backlash – not to mention the ridiculous logistics of 4,000 plus veterans clamoring for reimbursements for gas, equipment and travel expenses – convinced Wes to gently bow out of the movement, leaving Michael to hold the reigns. Wes was reticent to talk about his decision, stating simply that he felt his purpose at Standing Rock was more spiritual, whereas Michael, a seasoned activist, saw an opportunity to capitalize on their high profile by using a portion of the money raised to move to LA, rent a house, establish a 501c3/4 and run Veterans Stand as a serious non-profit. He chose LA, he told me, because in the past, “I’ve been asked to do so many interviews and just had to say no. In LA I’ll be close to CNN, NBC, all the major networks.”

Speaking to the two men separately, I was struck by their differences. Wes had spent much of the time speaking to elders and becoming deeply embroiled in the inner politics of the tribes and the camp, whereas Michael had handled the money, the logistics and the Veterans themselves. However it was Wes who had captured the public imagination, perhaps with that image of himself wearing Custer’s cavalry uniform, kneeling before the elders in forgiveness. Both men did an admirable job of handling an enormous logistical nightmare – getting over 4,000 vets in and out of North Dakota in little more than a week without any injuries or deaths, but whereas the limelight shone on their endeavors seemed to repel Wes, Michael, in contrast, basks in it. “I don’t know why everyone’s so fucking obsessed about the money we raised,” said Wes when I asked him. “There’s a 3.2 billion dollar enterprise breaking treaties and violating the law and ruining the lives of Native Americans, and people are hung up about their $200 gas receipt not being reimbursed in less than a week. I mean, I don’t think anyone gets what’s going on down there. It’s about larger treaty issues and the protection of land and water, but everyone wants to talk about the money. It kind of sums up the world now. I swear historians in the future will be scratching their heads saying, “Right at the end they were really worried about gay marriage?” What the fuck? There are much, much larger issues at stake and we’re wasting our time on fake news.” Wes wanted some of the money – particularly money they’d planned to spend on legal defense, anticipating hundreds of arrests – to go back to the tribe. Michael instead plans on using it to develop Veterans Stand as a major force on the political activist scene, with eyes on Flint, Michigan as the next landing stage. At Standing Rock, the two didn’t cross paths much, Wes running around in a bulletproof vest witnessing tents collapse and catch on fire, caught between the squabbles of different tribal factions, his hands tied by his commitment to allowing the elders to call all the shots. Michael arrived three days after Wes, spent only a couple of days at camp with the Vets, before flying back out to Pennsylvania with his wife, Jessica, who accompanied him on the trip.

Standing Rock is empty now. I received a text from my friend, Vincent, a member of the Lakota tribe, saying “Some of my peoples were hemmed up by a camp security detail made up of all white men. One of them had a dog. Don’t go there Ruth. It’s different now.”

Things change, movements evolve. For all the people who committed to protect water at Standing Rock, many more came in with supplies, stayed a few days and left before the inner politics of the place could seep too deeply into the magic. Like most activist organizations, consensus on the way ahead evades the water protectors and the elders alike, as well as their supporters. The value of the veteran action lies in its symbolic power: the image of servants of the government, now serving the very people whom that government has oppressed since this country came into existence. Its value lies in the message this sends to current Vets serving in wars they may or may not believe in, suppressing parts of themselves for something greater than themselves – something that may, or may not, be good. At Standing Rock, the Vets found something good, and their presence was healing for both themselves, and for the Native Americans who lost ancestors and land at the hands of their oppressors. We came away having played a small part in a narrative that was not yet played out, but it was a role which gave everyone strength to fight the coming regime, and a reminder that we got into this mess because we didn’t show up, and the people who did show up – well, they just don’t care.

It’s not enough to care. Where our mouths go, our bodies need to follow.
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Ruth Fowler is a single mom of one small dog and a large twenty month old living in Venice Beach. She is currently raising funds to eliminate her legal debt and direct a short film about custody visitation at gig.me/at/IRMO – please give her lots of money. She promises not to hug you or believe in you in return.

More articles by:Ruth Fowler
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 21, 2017, 07:23:22 PM
Quote
Standing Rock is empty now. I received a text from my friend, Vincent, a member of the Lakota tribe, saying “Some of my peoples were hemmed up by a camp security detail made up of all white men. One of them had a dog. Don’t go there Ruth. It’s different now.”

May I point out she is not invited back.  Jake is back there now and he talked to Seattle two days ago by phone.  The place is not empty, I need to confirm but the message I received is that there were still at least 1000 people there.

Jake said the Blackwater Bridge action Tuesday was no big deal.  He stayed in his tent.  He said he is waiting for when he is really needed.  There are more kinds of Veterans than gay women out for a weekend with her sisters.  Some veterans stayed.

So Ruth Fowler had a bus trip to Standing Rock and found out that it is really cold.  She got there and thought she was in a blizzard.  Then she writes about her Standing Rock travel experience and discovered 'community'.  Perhaps Ruth may learn that the water protectors are really trying to protect the waters and making a stand for the people against the corporatocracy and defending indigenous rights.  In the meantime she can tell all her Venice Beach friends she was there.  Her Venice Beach residents who know where Standing Rock is that is.  I'll guess many of her friends don't know a thing about it.

She might as well be working for the dark side.  If the first people's elders had let her get closer to Backwater Bridge she might have had something to write about.  The elders were obviously wise.  The camp is not empty and veterans are still there.  Somebody tell Wes Clarke.

I did like this part:

Quote
“I don’t know why everyone’s so fucking obsessed about the money we raised,” said Wes when I asked him. “There’s a 3.2 billion dollar enterprise breaking treaties and violating the law and ruining the lives of Native Americans, and people are hung up about their $200 gas receipt not being reimbursed in less than a week. I mean, I don’t think anyone gets what’s going on down there. It’s about larger treaty issues and the protection of land and water, but everyone wants to talk about the money. It kind of sums up the world now. I swear historians in the future will be scratching their heads saying, “Right at the end they were really worried about gay marriage?” What the fuck? There are much, much larger issues at stake and we’re wasting our time on fake news.

Perhaps Ruth did not 'get' that Wes was talking about her.
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The following content comes from here.  http://lastbestnews.com/site/2017/01/at-standing-rock-the-battle-for-backwater-bridge/ (http://lastbestnews.com/site/2017/01/at-standing-rock-the-battle-for-backwater-bridge/)

(http://lastbestnews.com/site/wp-content/uploads/Bullington-1.jpg)

Water protectors gather at the barricade on Backwater Bridge on Highway 1806, a half mile north of the main Standing Rock resistance camp Wednesday night.


January 19, 2017


Oceti Oyate, Cannon Ball, N.D. — A half-mile north of the main encampment at Standing Rock lies a small highway bridge over Cantapeta Creek.

Here on this bridge the police and National Guard have made their line—a stack three high of concrete highway barriers, flanked by liberal amounts of razor wire and backed by floodlights and military vehicles. On Tuesday, the Daily Beast reported that among the vehicles deployed by the North Dakota National Guard were two surface-to-air missile launchers. The National Guard removed the missile launchers the day after the report.

The barrier, which blocks Highway 1806—the main northern route to the camps and to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation–and prevents water protectors from getting near the path of the pipeline, has been the focal point of protest since the road was closed in early November.

It was here, on Nov. 20, in freezing temperatures, that police turned a water hose against water protectors after they tried to open the road by dragging away the old, burned-out Army trucks that blocked the bridge.

After a month-long hiatus on actions and the apparent failure of negotiations to open the road, the battle for the bridge has resumed. Every night for the past three, more than 100 water protectors have gathered at the barricade to pray, sing and hold the space. Last night police repeatedly shot water protectors with rubber bullets, tear gas, pepper balls and pepper spray in attempts to drive them back to camp. In the chaos that followed the police charges, several people were arrested and many were injured.

The Morton County Sheriff’s Department has said that the bridge is closed because of concerns about its structural integrity after water protectors lit fires on its surface. When you read it online, this explanation sounds plausible. But on the ground, when you look at the geography, it is clear that the barricade at the bridge is but part of the police line that guards the pipeline route for over a mile to the east and west.

The timeline does not make sense either: the bridge did not become a point of conflict, a place where people would have built fires, until police closed the highway.

When I got to the bridge last night about 10, water protectors bearing plastic shields were sitting and standing on top of the concrete barricade. Behind them, drummers and singers kept up a constant rhythm of Lakota songs and people danced and prayed. Still others worked at the coils of razor wire on the flanks, snipping and pulling it down into huge thorny piles.

Several volleys of tear gas hit the front line, but most wore gas masks and stood their ground. Some tossed the canisters back across the barricade into the police ranks, and others yelled at them not to do this, that this was a prayerful gathering. Aside from seeing a native kid throw a snowball later, this was the only act of retaliation I saw from the water protectors that night.

Lines of riot police materialized from behind the razor wire on the flanks and charged the bridge from both sides, firing rubber bullets into the crowd. People stampeded backward, screaming in pain, falling over one another, afraid of being trapped on the narrow bridge. People yelled for medics and water.

(http://lastbestnews.com/site/wp-content/uploads/Bullington-2.jpg)

Tear gas mixes with smoke from a sage smudge behind the barricade on Backwater Bridge.

A man bent over gasping for breath, vomiting–hit by tear gas. Pushing through the crowd with one arm, carrying in the other the slumped figure of his unconscious friend, a young native man made for one of the ATV ambulances already busy carrying the wounded back to the medic station in camp.

Again and again the shields tried to form and hold a line, and again and again they were driven back by a hail of rubber bullets and exploding pepper balls. Police on snowmobiles sped alongside the retreating crowd on the bridge and fired at targets behind the shield line–including a man with a spotlight and camera who was filming the incident.

When the police had pushed the water protectors off the bridge and up the road, they began slowly to pull back. They extinguished the warming fires on the road and took with them those they had arrested. The water protectors rallied then, and, to the driving sound of drums and singing, they pushed back toward the police line and drove them back across the barricade.

A few minutes later, it all happened again.

It was 3 a.m. before I got back to my tent, and 4 a.m. before I could go to sleep.

When I arrived back at Standing Rock two nights ago and began unloading the car, I noticed a low droning sound and searched the star-filled sky for sign of some aircraft. There was none. The noise grew louder, roaring right overhead. Then I saw it, a darker shadow swimming across the dark sky: a small plane flying low over camp, lightless except for a faint glow from the cockpit.

The plane circled for hours. This phenomenon–which doesn’t sound that strange until you observe it yourself and realize you’ve never before seen anything like it–has become a nightly terror.

(http://lastbestnews.com/site/wp-content/uploads/Bullington4.jpg)

Tear gas canister found on Backwater Bridge after the first police charge Wednesday night.

This is a frightening and uncertain time at Standing Rock. What is happening here has mostly disappeared from news reports and hence from the sight of most of the country. The main camp, Oceti Oyate (formerly Oceti Sakowin), is in the throes of a major transition. The Standing Rock tribe and the camp leadership have agreed that the camp should move off the floodplain of the Cannonball River and to a new site near the town of Cannon Ball on the reservation.

The evacuation is set to begin tomorrow, Jan. 20–inauguration day for a president who has called climate change a “Chinese hoax,” promised more resource extraction and more pipelines, said he will resolve the standoff at Standing Rock “quickly,” and received large campaign contributions from the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the Dakota Access Pipeline; a president who until recently was invested in the pipeline, who’s pick for Energy secretary sits on the board of Energy Transfer Partners, and who has chosen an ardent critic of the EPA to head that agency, which will oversee the newly required environmental impact statement for the DAPL project.

At Standing Rock, as in much of the rest of the country, people are unsure what is coming next. But at Standing Rock there’s a good chance they’re already standing on the front line.

Joseph Bullington grew up in White Sulphur Springs. He worked as a freelance journalist and editorial intern for mtvigilante.org. He has been camped in the Standing Rock resistance camps for more than a month. He can reached by email at joeb.k2@gmail.com, on twitter @aDeepSpaceAlien, and at his blog DontGoQuietlyBlog.Wordpress.com.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 21, 2017, 07:31:30 PM

May I point out she is not invited back.  Jake is back there now and talked to Seattle two days ago by phone.  The place is not empty, I need to confirm but the message I received is that there were still 1000 people there.

Well, I think we need a new Blog from you and Jake in that case.

1000 people is pretty good for mid-winter in ND, but it also is a large reduction in total numbers from the peak of the protest.

Hopefully when Spring arrives, the less hardy folks will return for Round 2, although His Trumpness will probably use the rest of the winter to squash the remaining 1000.

RE
Title: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 12:16:55 AM
Only 2% of people pass this Quiz from Brainfall.com!  I PASSED with a 74%!  :icon_sunny:

You scored 74%, You are sharp as a stone knife!

(https://bfmbrainfall.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_sharp_as_a_stone_kknife.jpg?w=640)

Quote
Like a sturdy, reliable, sharp stone knife, you have a clean and cutting knowledge of the history of the North American continent's first people. Be proud and spread their stories!   :icon_sunny:

It takes a while to work through it, 62 Questions on First Nations people history.  You do learn some stuff just taking the Quiz.

There are super EZ questions and then some that are quite hard, particularly later into the test.  It is pretty well designed as a test.

NO GOOGLING ALLOWED DURING THE TEST IF YOU TAKE IT!  NO CHEATING!!!

http://brainfall.com/quizzes/only-1-in-50-people-can-pass-this-native-american-quiz-can-you/

RE
Title: Re: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 01:23:05 AM
Only 2% of people pass this Quiz from Brainfall.com!  I PASSED with a 74%!  :icon_sunny:

Paranthetically, this reminds me of my first big Chem Test at Columbia as a Freshman.  I sat down with my Blue Book to do my calculations and write my answers in.  The first question was a Combined Gas Law problem,  (PV=nRT), but of course with a few sneaky tricks to it based on the info in the question.  Designed to separate out those who could just plug in to the formula versus those who could actually figure out what was going on in the experiment being described.

I PANICKED.  I couldn't figure out how to get the right numbers to plug into the equations from the data that was provided.  My hands were shaking, I thought I was an INSTANT FAILURE!

After 10 minutes of Cold Sweats on this problem, I decided to skip the fucking thing and move on through the other questions on the test.  Most of the rest were not so hard, and I more or less breezed through them.  We had 90 minutes for the test, and I was done with all the rest of the questions after around an hour.

I spent the last 30 minutes left going back to see if I could solve the Gas problem.  I still could not see how to resolve it, so I just started writing down equations and plugging in the numbers from the test into them, pretty much willy-nilly.  What I was doing is what I later learned was called "Bullshit Math".  You can bullshit math just like you can bullshit words.  I filled up a good 6 pages with complete garbage calculations, or so I thought.  It turned out in the end I was not all that far off, although I had no fucking clue whatsoever of what I was doing.

I handed in my Blue Book certain I would FAIL this test.

After the test on Thursday and the weekend passes smoking at least an ounce of Ganja, I go in the next Tuesday to class.  Now, I was used to in HS needing to get a 90-100% on a test to be doing really good, and my fucking Blue Book comes back with a fucking 76% on it!  I figure I am FINISHED already in Chemistry as a Freshman.

But THEN, the Professor (Charlie Cantor I think it was) throws up the CURVE on the blackboard for this test.  Median was like a 45.  lol.  My 76 was an A+!  I think it was one of the 2 or 3 raw scores that actually even broke a 60 on that test! lol.  That is out of around 100 Freshman that were in that section of Freshman Chemistry!

After that experience, I never got nervous or flustered on a test again during those years.  I realized that if I could not figure it out, nobody else could either and don't worry, it's graded on a curve anyhow.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on January 22, 2017, 07:07:27 AM
I knew when Trumpty was "elected" that DAPL was going to cross the Missouri. 

Noway they spent 3.8 billion dollars on DAPL without knowing that they would be able to cross as planned. 

Noway Dumpty makes "America Great Again" without cheap fossil fuels.  Anyone who thinks DAPL can be stopped is suffering from delusions. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 07:22:54 AM
Anyone who thinks DAPL can be stopped is suffering from delusions.

Oh, it will be stopped, but not by First Nations protesters.  It will be stopped by economics.  There is no cheap oil to push through that pipeline, only expensive oil.  It's a total White Elephant, a complete waste of money.  The folks who built it will lose their shirts and their underwear too.  Maybe oil flows through it for 3 years.  Maybe.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on January 22, 2017, 09:08:59 AM
Anyone who thinks DAPL can be stopped is suffering from delusions.

Oh, it will be stopped, but not by First Nations protesters.  It will be stopped by economics.  There is no cheap oil to push through that pipeline, only expensive oil.  It's a total White Elephant, a complete waste of money.  The folks who built it will lose their shirts and their underwear too.  Maybe oil flows through it for 3 years.  Maybe.

RE

I agree with you, but it will be built, and fracked fuel will flow through it. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 09:32:44 AM
Anyone who thinks DAPL can be stopped is suffering from delusions.

Oh, it will be stopped, but not by First Nations protesters.  It will be stopped by economics.  There is no cheap oil to push through that pipeline, only expensive oil.  It's a total White Elephant, a complete waste of money.  The folks who built it will lose their shirts and their underwear too.  Maybe oil flows through it for 3 years.  Maybe.

RE

I agree with you, but it will be built, and fracked fuel will flow through it.

I'll agree with that too.  Given it is a brand spanking new pipeline, it probably will not leak into the water supply under the Missouri River during the time period it functions for though.  More to worry about are some older ones.  I read an article about some 63 year old pipelines under the Straights of Mackinac in Michigan that are exposed and probably will burst before this shit show is done. (h/t r/collapse)

Two 63-year-old pipes lie exposed at the bottom of the current-whipped Straits of Mackinac, determined by one expert to be "the worst possible place" for a spill in all the Great Lakes.

http://projects.jsonline.com/news/2017/1/18/dangerous-straits.html (http://projects.jsonline.com/news/2017/1/18/dangerous-straits.html)

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on January 22, 2017, 09:43:05 AM
Anyone who thinks DAPL can be stopped is suffering from delusions.

Oh, it will be stopped, but not by First Nations protesters.  It will be stopped by economics.  There is no cheap oil to push through that pipeline, only expensive oil.  It's a total White Elephant, a complete waste of money.  The folks who built it will lose their shirts and their underwear too.  Maybe oil flows through it for 3 years.  Maybe.

RE

I agree with you, but it will be built, and fracked fuel will flow through it.

I'll agree with that too.  Given it is a brand spanking new pipeline, it probably will not leak into the water supply under the Missouri River during the time period it functions for though.  More to worry about are some older ones.  I read an article about some 63 year old pipelines under the Straights of Mackinac in Michigan that are exposed and probably will burst before this shit show is done. (h/t r/collapse)

Two 63-year-old pipes lie exposed at the bottom of the current-whipped Straits of Mackinac, determined by one expert to be "the worst possible place" for a spill in all the Great Lakes.

http://projects.jsonline.com/news/2017/1/18/dangerous-straits.html (http://projects.jsonline.com/news/2017/1/18/dangerous-straits.html)

RE

Yep, Dumpty is a powerful symbol for the fact that the first wheel is about to come off.  Maybe one lug nut is holding that wheel on, and it's gonna give way and we're going to have catastrophic failure complete with fascist military dictatorship and marshal law. 

I believe that the shit is currently hitting the fan.  It has already hit the fan, and it's starting to get blown all over everybody and everything and nothing is going to stop it. 

Our way of life depends on cheap fossil fuel energy.  That is all gone.  The game is over.  What's left is for American's to realize it. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 22, 2017, 03:12:47 PM
You scored 83%, You are fast as a bow-shot arrow!

Your keen knowledge of Native American history flies as straight as an arrow and is as sharp as its point. The continent's first people deserve to be known and their stories told. It's great that you know them so well!

I really wish I was not better than one in fifty, I'd prefer one in three, but I made the cut.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com%2F_QwcEIL8KRls%2FSaKvCD-HuJI%2FAAAAAAAAADI%2FVY8pepLOCmo%2FS660%2FIndianWolf.jpg&f=1)

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 03:17:03 PM
You scored 83%, You are fast as a bow-shot arrow!

Your keen knowledge of Native American history flies as straight as an arrow and is as sharp as its point. The continent's first people deserve to be known and their stories told. It's great that you know them so well!

I really wish I was not better than one in fifty, I'd prefer one in three, but I made the cut.

I figured you would beat me.

It was overall a good test though.

RE
Title: Re: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: K-Dog on January 22, 2017, 03:29:21 PM
Only 2% of people pass this Quiz from Brainfall.com!  I PASSED with a 74%!  :icon_sunny:

After the test on Thursday and the weekend passes smoking at least an ounce of Ganja, I go in the next Tuesday to class.  Now, I was used to in HS needing to get a 90-100% on a test to be doing really good, and my fucking Blue Book comes back with a fucking 76% on it!  I figure I am FINISHED already in Chemistry as a Freshman.

But THEN, the Professor (Charlie Cantor I think it was) throws up the CURVE on the blackboard for this test.  Median was like a 45.  lol.  My 76 was an A+!  I think it was one of the 2 or 3 raw scores that actually even broke a 60 on that test! lol.  That is out of around 100 Freshman that were in that section of Freshman Chemistry!

After that experience, I never got nervous or flustered on a test again during those years.  I realized that if I could not figure it out, nobody else could either and don't worry, it's graded on a curve anyhow.

RE

I've been there done that.  I've been convinced I have flunked tests and then wound up getting the highest score in the class.  When I took this quiz I figured I just made it at 83 thinking 80 would be the cut-off but 70 could be since you made it and you were just shy of 75.  If it were graded on a curve the median would be below fifty I'll guess.  It would be lower but some people are able to notice the medallion of a British coin around Tecumseh's neck in the portrait for that particular question and things like that.  I should have been able to answer the question identifying the first native American woman doctor by her dress which was upper class white for the time as it would have had to have been.  But alas, I noticed it after my click.     

Overall I'll agree it was good.
Title: Re: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 03:42:26 PM
Only 2% of people pass this Quiz from Brainfall.com!  I PASSED with a 74%!  :icon_sunny:

After the test on Thursday and the weekend passes smoking at least an ounce of Ganja, I go in the next Tuesday to class.  Now, I was used to in HS needing to get a 90-100% on a test to be doing really good, and my fucking Blue Book comes back with a fucking 76% on it!  I figure I am FINISHED already in Chemistry as a Freshman.

But THEN, the Professor (Charlie Cantor I think it was) throws up the CURVE on the blackboard for this test.  Median was like a 45.  lol.  My 76 was an A+!  I think it was one of the 2 or 3 raw scores that actually even broke a 60 on that test! lol.  That is out of around 100 Freshman that were in that section of Freshman Chemistry!

After that experience, I never got nervous or flustered on a test again during those years.  I realized that if I could not figure it out, nobody else could either and don't worry, it's graded on a curve anyhow.

RE

I've been there done that.  I've been convinced I have flunked tests and then wound up getting the highest score in the class.  When I took this quiz I figured I just made it at 83 thinking 80 would be the cut-off but 70 could be since you made it and you were just shy of 75.  If it were graded on a curve the median would be below fifty I'll guess.  It would be lower but some people are able to notice the medallion of a British coin around Tecumseh's neck in the portrait for that particular question and things like that.  I should have been able to answer the question identifying the first native American woman doctor by her dress which was upper class white for the time as it would have had to have been.  But alas, I noticed it after my click.     

Overall I'll agree it was good.

Traditionally, 65 is a Passing Score on a test.  Somebody will have to Fail it before we know what the Pass/Fail mark is.  It could be a 50.

I got screwed on 2 questions where my finger accidentally tapped the touchpad while the cursor was hovering over the wrong answer, and then one where I misread the question.  I knew the right answer and cursed myself for screwing that one up.

RE
Title: Re: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 05:10:19 PM

Traditionally, 65 is a Passing Score on a test.  Somebody will have to Fail it before we know what the Pass/Fail mark is.  It could be a 50.


When I was a skule teacher designing tests, I tried to set up my questions to get this kind of curve:

<65% got you an F
65% got you a D.
70% got you a C
80% got you a B
90% got you an A

I then would add + or - to the letter grade depending on how far above or below a target score was.  For instance, an 84% would get you a B+, while an 88% would get you an A-.

My tests did not always hit the mark I shot for, so I occassionally would adjust the curve on them.  But mostly I was on target.  College testing was was different though.  Median raw scores were often below 50%.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 22, 2017, 05:17:15 PM
I have some thoughts on the DAPL which can help define a Standing Rock win/loose scenario.

The Cheeto will pretend Standing Rock does not exist as long as he can.  Obama successfully used this same strategy and while unlike Obama, the Cheeto will be unable to complete his term(s?) without acknowledging Standing Rock at some point delay helps his agenda if he is as foolish as we fear and loyal to his peer group.  It will behoove the Cheeto (from his point of view) to let rubber bullets fly and ignore Standing Rock as long as he can unless he takes care of it behind closed doors right now with positive proactive action.  If he gets involved after public awareness forces the issue the pipeline will be built and NATIONAL SECURITY will TRUMP any reasonable objections.  The Cheeto must and will play tough guy.  This could make the Cheeto very unpopular and it his unpopularity is enough the Cheeto will have followed a lose/lose strategy instead of the win/lose scenario he hoped for.  But an alternative win/win scenario is possible if the Cheeto has a brain.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwarelane.files.wordpress.com%2F2012%2F04%2Fscarecrow-wizard-of-oz.jpg&f=1)

Winning and loosing will simply be a matter of where DAPL crosses the river and it will be a test to see if the Cheeto has anything more than artificial flavor, texture, and color.  He can be smart enough to avoid having to acknowledge Standing Rock at all but he has to give up a winning scenario to the people for it to happen.  This may require more courage than he has.

Consider the following thought experiment which could actually be carried out if Google Earth provided real time map data.  That Google does not in the Standing Rock vicinity right now makes them complicit in the conspiracy of silence.  But money makes monkeys of men and I'm not writing about that right now.

Fire up Google Earth and set your eye level about four and a half Kilometers up.  Pan along the DAPL route from start to finish with your mouse.  It is going to take you quite a while to get along the entire pipeline length.  Each mouse movement is only going to give you a dozen miles at a swipe.  You move faster than a jet but you are closer to the ground.  Now do the same thing but start and stop at the two places where the pipeline route would have to be changed to put the pipe across the river just north of Bismark ND.  Swipe right through the middle of Bismark if that makes you feel better on this trace.  It worked for me.

It will only take a couple of minutes the second time you traced near Bismark but tracing the entire pipeline length could take close to an hour.  In other words rerouting the pipeline away from Standing Rock is no big deal in the greater scheme of things.  Hopefully the Cheeto will realize this and tell his buddies to take the (to them) small financial hit, suck it up, and accommodate the people.  If he does not then we know that the Cheeto is made of air and is without solid substance.

Having the pipeline moved is a win for the people because it pays attention to the will of the people.  If the pipeline is not moved we know that we are under a totalitarian oligarchy which has no loyalty to the planet, it's people, or our nations future.  In that case we have a government that must be brought down by any means necessary; but we are not there yet.  If Cheeto is smart and says look this is what is going to happen to make everybody happy to his billionaire buddies and Cheeto orders the pipeline moved, he can avoid having to deal with any Standing Rock fallout or any increased Standing Rock awareness.

Having the pipeline moved is a win for then the door is pushed open a crack more open and the voice of the people will matter a little bit more because in the halls of power it's whisper is just a little bit louder with the door pushed.

Here is the Oceti Camp Map at Standing Rock.

(http://chasingthesquirrel.com/pics/ocetiMap.png)

Here is the Oceti Camp area as seen from Google Earth at an altitude of 4.68km.  The tracing altitude of the thought experiment.

(http://chasingthesquirrel.com/pics/ocetiGE.png)

The screen-shot I took to produce this image matches the map with a bit of extra room at the top.  I added the room so you can see where the Backwater Bridge is.  It is the bridge which the 1806 uses to cross the creek at the top of the image.  The lower bridge on 1806 crosses into the reservation proper.  DAPL goons are camped north of Blackwater Bridge which is closed by DAPL goons to guard their drill platform which they will use to cross the river if they can.
Title: Re: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: jdwheeler42 on January 22, 2017, 05:31:02 PM
I've been there done that.  I've been convinced I have flunked tests and then wound up getting the highest score in the class.  When I took this quiz I figured I just made it at 83 thinking 80 would be the cut-off but 70 could be since you made it and you were just shy of 75.  If it were graded on a curve the median would be below fifty I'll guess.  It would be lower but some people are able to notice the medallion of a British coin around Tecumseh's neck in the portrait for that particular question and things like that.  I should have been able to answer the question identifying the first native American woman doctor by her dress which was upper class white for the time as it would have had to have been.  But alas, I noticed it after my click.     

Overall I'll agree it was good.
Okay, I'll fess up, I appear to be the ignoramus of the group, I only got a 70, I got the same message as RE....
Title: Re: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: K-Dog on January 22, 2017, 05:33:23 PM
I've been there done that.  I've been convinced I have flunked tests and then wound up getting the highest score in the class.  When I took this quiz I figured I just made it at 83 thinking 80 would be the cut-off but 70 could be since you made it and you were just shy of 75.  If it were graded on a curve the median would be below fifty I'll guess.  It would be lower but some people are able to notice the medallion of a British coin around Tecumseh's neck in the portrait for that particular question and things like that.  I should have been able to answer the question identifying the first native American woman doctor by her dress which was upper class white for the time as it would have had to have been.  But alas, I noticed it after my click.     

Overall I'll agree it was good.
Okay, I'll fess up, I appear to be the ignoramus of the group, I only got a 70, I got the same message as RE....

An ignoramus who is still beating one in fifty!
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 05:39:22 PM
I seriously doubt that His Trumpness will change the route of the pipeline as projected.  That would be seen as a capitulation, and he does not appear to be a capitulating sort of guy. YOU'RE FIRED!

Besides that, a change in the direction really is irrelevant as far as the Water Protectors are concerned.  It MUST pass under the Missouri River, and if it breaks ANYWHERE the downstream water will be polluted.

In order to truly succeed in Water Protection, the pipeline has to be STOPPED completely.

RE
Title: Re: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 05:42:23 PM
I've been there done that.  I've been convinced I have flunked tests and then wound up getting the highest score in the class.  When I took this quiz I figured I just made it at 83 thinking 80 would be the cut-off but 70 could be since you made it and you were just shy of 75.  If it were graded on a curve the median would be below fifty I'll guess.  It would be lower but some people are able to notice the medallion of a British coin around Tecumseh's neck in the portrait for that particular question and things like that.  I should have been able to answer the question identifying the first native American woman doctor by her dress which was upper class white for the time as it would have had to have been.  But alas, I noticed it after my click.     

Overall I'll agree it was good.
Okay, I'll fess up, I appear to be the ignoramus of the group, I only got a 70, I got the same message as RE....

An ignoramus who is still beating one in fifty!

I am betting the Passing Score on this test is set at 50%.  Fortunately no Diners so far appear to be that ignorant of the history of the First Nations people.

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 22, 2017, 06:42:28 PM
I seriously doubt that His Trumpness will change the route of the pipeline as projected.  That would be seen as a capitulation, and he does not appear to be a capitulating sort of guy. YOU'RE FIRED!

Besides that, a change in the direction really is irrelevant as far as the Water Protectors are concerned.  It MUST pass under the Missouri River, and if it breaks ANYWHERE the downstream water will be polluted.

In order to truly succeed in Water Protection, the pipeline has to be STOPPED completely.

RE

You may be right about his Trumpness and some Water Protectors won't like it but if it goes under at Bismark the pipe will be twice as thick as it is now and there will be a thorough environmental impact study before it does.  Stopping the DAPL altogether is not going to happen though I wish it could.  The point of my Google Earth suggestion was to make the point that while in his supreme orangeness'es mind it might be seen as capitulation the truth is far different.  If Cheeto wants to let everyone know he is the boss following my advice instead of kissing Rick Perry's ass could be better for him in the long run.  Can he understand that, probably not.

If he only does what he his told and only kisses peer group ass then Cheeto can be reduced to giving Medals of Freedom to rich successful people who really don't need them in an upper class-wank like Obama was at the end of his terms.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 06:51:57 PM
Cheeto can be reduced to giving Medals of Freedom to rich successful people who really don't need them in an upper class-wank like Obama was at the end of his terms.

Obama-sama was an upper class wank from Day 1 as POTUS.

I see it as highly unlikely Cheeto will follow your prescription.  However, if the Oil prices crash low enough by springtime, they may suspend the construction indefinitely rather than throwing "good" money after "bad".

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on January 22, 2017, 08:15:57 PM
Typical American multiple choice test. I made a 72.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: jdwheeler42 on January 22, 2017, 08:18:16 PM
I seriously doubt that His Trumpness will change the route of the pipeline as projected.  That would be seen as a capitulation, and he does not appear to be a capitulating sort of guy. YOU'RE FIRED!

Besides that, a change in the direction really is irrelevant as far as the Water Protectors are concerned.  It MUST pass under the Missouri River, and if it breaks ANYWHERE the downstream water will be polluted.

In order to truly succeed in Water Protection, the pipeline has to be STOPPED completely.
Short of economic collapse, I really don't see that happening.

I think this will be a very good litmus test though, for the Trump administration.  The DAPL will be finished, the question is how?  Will it be pushed through ham-handedly?  Will a perfunctory Environmental Impact Statement state that the current plan will turn out hunky-dory?  Or will they find a slight detour that technically makes the problem go away?

I'm not betting on this one.... other than I expect it'll be some variation of one of those outcomes.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 22, 2017, 08:39:02 PM
Typical American multiple choice test. I made a 72.

Diners still PASSING here!  :icon_sunny:

I really would like to know what the FAILURE  score on this test is. ???  :icon_scratch:  Where is that mark of 98% Failure rate set at?

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on January 22, 2017, 09:38:02 PM
I seriously doubt that His Trumpness will change the route of the pipeline as projected.  That would be seen as a capitulation, and he does not appear to be a capitulating sort of guy. YOU'RE FIRED!

Besides that, a change in the direction really is irrelevant as far as the Water Protectors are concerned.  It MUST pass under the Missouri River, and if it breaks ANYWHERE the downstream water will be polluted.

In order to truly succeed in Water Protection, the pipeline has to be STOPPED completely.
Short of economic collapse, I really don't see that happening.

I think this will be a very good litmus test though, for the Trump administration.  The DAPL will be finished, the question is how?  Will it be pushed through ham-handedly?  Will a perfunctory Environmental Impact Statement state that the current plan will turn out hunky-dory?  Or will they find a slight detour that technically makes the problem go away?

I'm not betting on this one.... other than I expect it'll be some variation of one of those outcomes.

Exactly right.  A litmus test it is.  The question is how the DAPL will be finished because the lack of finesse shown thus far among the children of so called civilized people is lacking.
.
.
.
Since you took the quiz JD I'll star my rant here rather than another post.

A bone I have to pick with the quiz regards how the quiz presented The Five Civilized Tribes.  The question was racist.  I agree with this from Wikipaedia.

Quote
The Five "Civilized" Tribes were indigenous peoples of the Americas who lived in the Southeastern United States. Most were descendants of what is now called the Mississippian culture, an agrarian culture that grew crops of corn and beans, with hereditary religious and political elites. The Mississippian Culture flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from 800 to 1500. Before European contact these tribes were generally matrilineal societies. Agriculture was the primary economic pursuit. The bulk of the tribes lived in towns (some covering hundreds of acres and populated with thousands of people). These communities regulated their space with planned streets, subdivided into residential and public areas. Their system of government was hereditary. Chiefdoms were of varying size and complexity, with high levels of military organization

The question presented the tribes as somewhat adopting white man ways.  Not even close to the truth.  They were civilized the way white men considers civilized people to be but they were different and they were in the way.  For being civilized but being in the way they had the displeasure of walking the Trail of Tears.

Regarding the Missouri River, native rights and the government.  One thing that has happened as a result of the Corps of Engineers damming the Missouri River is they put native agricultural lands underwater.  More than a hundred miles up the Missouri from Standing Rock is the Garrison Dam.  Civilized tribes also lived there.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fimg.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fv202%2Fwitesoxfan%2Fgarrisonopen.jpg&f=1)

This is a picture of the Garrison Dam overflow spillway being used for the first time in 2011.  The dam started drowning the valley now below Lake Sakekawea in 1956.  A first nation that had been growing maize for perhaps a thousand years was flooded out.  Here is a better view of the Garrison Dam.  The spillway is on the far right side of the dam.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com%2F-Xqg6WPGWlFo%2FTfBIHCQUkiI%2FAAAAAAAAHvM%2FVPzCFqRL42o%2Fs400%2FGarrison.jpg&f=1)

Lake Sakakawea at 480 square miles is huge.  The Three Affiliated Tribes were displaced.  They had to give up all mineral rights for what is under the lake.  One of the three affiliated tribes, the Mandan had been a prosperous culture of farmers and traders.  They were expert at working Knife River flint and were talented maize growers.  They had lived in villages made of earth lodges for centuries.  94% of the agricultural land of the Three Affiliated Tribes was flooded out.

Standing Rock also lost agricultural land when Lake Oahe was formed by the Oahe Dam in 1959.  55,993 acres were lost.  Not consulting the locals seems to be a very common habit and did not stop with the theft of the Black Hills.  Lake Oahe goes all the way up to Bismark.  The DAPL as planned now does not go under an actual river.  It goes under a lake held back by this dam.

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.com%2F-2akRsA6Jkns%2FTfBHH4UQZUI%2FAAAAAAAAHu8%2FfaJ-m3--E4Q%2Fs400%2FBig--Bend.jpg&f=1)










Title: Re: First Nations History Quiz
Post by: jdwheeler42 on January 23, 2017, 06:47:40 AM
I am betting the Passing Score on this test is set at 50%.  Fortunately no Diners so far appear to be that ignorant of the history of the First Nations people.
Okay, if you want the baseline....

<h2 class="result-text">
You scored 0%, You are blunt as a stone club!</h2>
<img alt="only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_blunt_as_a_stone_club" class="result-image" height="336" scale="0" sizes="(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px" src="https://bfmbrainfall.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_blunt_as_a_stone_club.jpg?w=640" srcset="https://bfmbrainfall.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_blunt_as_a_stone_club.jpg?w=640 640w, https://bfmbrainfall.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_blunt_as_a_stone_club.jpg?w=150 150w, https://bfmbrainfall.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_blunt_as_a_stone_club.jpg?w=300 300w, https://bfmbrainfall.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_blunt_as_a_stone_club.jpg?w=768 768w, https://bfmbrainfall.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_blunt_as_a_stone_club.jpg?w=1024 1024w, https://bfmbrainfall.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/only_1_in_50_people_can_pass_this_native_american_quiz_can_you_blunt_as_a_stone_club.jpg 1200w" width="640" />        <div class="text">
<div class="result-description">
          Like a stone club, your knowledge of native American history is solid, but not fast, sharp, or dangerous. That's okay because the fact that you took this quiz means you have an interest in the original makers of American history! </div>
</div>


Um.... tried copying and pasting into that editor you recommended, RE, still no luck....
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: agelbert on January 23, 2017, 04:33:26 PM
Well folks, TRUMP is DOUBLING down on THE BIG PLAN to crush anybody, including the Standing Rock water protectors, that wants to keep Big Oil from Profit over Planet:  :evil4:

First, Trump picked arch civil rights foe Jeff Sessions as his nominee for attorney general.

Then, it was reported last week that Trump’s budget blueprint slashes funding for the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division.

Now, Trump has tapped anti-civil rights, right-wing lawyer John Gore, to head the Civil Rights Division!

These headlines tell the story:

Trump's Pick to Enforce Civil Rights Is an Expert at Defending GOP Voting Laws (New York Magazine - Jan 21, 2017)
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_IPZX1n_gnIM/TBxKST8wgBI/AAAAAAAAFxM/52D2UaemhQE/s400/Gas-Oil-Petroleum385.jpg)

Donald Trump's Pick to Enforce Civil Rights Is a Civil Rights Disaster (Slate - Jan 20, 2017)


Quote
Petition

US Senators:

John Gore is an unacceptable pick to head the DOJ's Civil Rights Division. Someone with his record of extreme hostility to civil rights and voting rights should not be the one tasked with protecting those rights.

I ask that you do all in your power to OPPOSE Gore's confirmation.

(http://www.createaforum.com/gallery/renewablerevolution/3-300614160245.gif)



Let your Senators know that the nomination of John Gore to enforce our nation’s civil rights laws is UNACCEPTABLE!>> (https://secure.pfaw.org/site/SPageNavigator/action.html?survey_id=11742&autologin=true&utm_medium=email&utm_source=aa&utm_campaign=johngore)
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: RE on January 23, 2017, 04:45:45 PM
Then, it was reported last week that Trump’s budget blueprint slashes funding for the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division.

Civil Rights? We don't need no STINKIN' CIVIL RIGHTS!

http://www.youtube.com/v/VqomZQMZQCQ

RE
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: agelbert on January 23, 2017, 04:55:25 PM
Then, it was reported last week that Trump’s budget blueprint slashes funding for the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division.

Civil Rights? We don't need no STINKIN' CIVIL RIGHTS!

http://www.youtube.com/v/VqomZQMZQCQ

RE

It sure looks that way...  :P


Quote
Wenonah Hauter
Executive Director
 Food & Water Watch
 wenonah(at)fwwatch(dot)org

On inauguration day, the Trump Administration took all references to climate change off of the White House website.1 Now, they're beginning a months-long rollout of budget cuts and roll backs of key regulations designed to protect our air, water and climate from corporate polluters.

The leaked to-do list makes it clear that Trump will follow through on promises to gut the agency.2

•The document identifies opportunities to cut programs, including $513 million from "state and tribal assistance grants  :evil4:  (http://www.pic4ever.com/images/2z6in9g.gif)
," $193 million from ending climate programs and $109 million from "environmental programs and management."

•The administration outlines initiatives they want to stop, including "Clean Air Act greenhouse gas regulations," clean car standards and clean water protections.

•The to-do list also includes a plan to permanently change how the EPA uses science   :evil4:to prevent the agency from returning to "its bad old ways as soon as an establishment administration takes office."
Title: A Journey to Standing Rock
Post by: Guest on January 25, 2017, 04:52:00 AM


youtube-Logo-4gc2reddit-logoOff the keyboard of Eric Lewis



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Published on Peak Surfer on January 1, 2017



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Discuss this article at the Environment Table inside the Diner



"This story was sent to us on the day before Christmas by Eric Lewis. It seemed like the best way to end one year and start another, or to end one era and begin a new one."



 



 


For a couple of months prior to my trip I had been working on my Facebook Page, Frackfree Tennessee, trying to assemble every news story out there about Standing Rock in one place in order to spread the word. I also got involved in organizing shipments to Standing Rock and raising money to fund them. I began to get to know the people working on the issue and to talk to those who had made the Journey.  Some Middle Tennessee Standing Rock supporters had a meeting at my house. “When are you going?” people would ask me. Then it came together in a matter of four days.



Michael, Lynn, and I set out on December 1st for Standing Rock. We rented a four-wheel drive, high-clearance pickup truck because we were told that we would encounter mud and ice. We were glad we did. We managed to raise $5,000 in four days. On board we carried a wood stove, a new chain saw, a cooler full of donated meat, $500 worth of herbal remedies, and lots of food. We made the thousand-mile trek in 24 hours.



According to plan we went straight to the home of a Lakota family that Michael had gotten to know on a previous trip. Frank and Rochelle Bullhead were our gracious hosts for the next four days and even though we did not sleep at the camp, we found ourselves right in the middle things. Frank and Rochelle were central in the various “actions” over the past few months. Frank showed us where he had been shot with rubber bullets and bean bags and described how the police had jabbed him in the kidney, the only one he had left, and arrested him; they put a number on his arm and put him in a dog cage. The Morton County army sprayed them with water in 25-degree weather. Rochelle wore her traditional dress and faced down the national guard on numerous occasions. Both had been sprayed a number of times with mace, pepper spray and tear gas while praying.



We went to the camp shortly after our arrival. My first impression of the camp was one of awe and excitement; it was huge and full of life. Tents and tipis and yurts,  Indian youth on horseback, drums and whoops, people of every description setting up camp, a line of cars and buses that poured in all day long.  Three thousand veterans and a host of new water protectors swelled the population from four thousand to over twelve thousand. The energy in the camp was electric.



The line of flags along the road represented the 350 indigenous tribes who had made the journey from all over the world, from South America to Alaska, from Hawaii to Siberia. This was unprecedented, and many of these tribes had been enemies in the past. What they had in common was the threat of exploitation by energy extraction companies and polluters who have made their billions at the expense of indigenous people. As each tribe arrived they did their dances and were welcomed in prayer ceremonies. The site of so many different colorful flags was awe inspiring.



There were challenges ahead, of course. The infrastructure was not set up for these numbers, and the strain on the organizers was beginning to show. Many newcomers had arrived in small two-wheel drive cars and Michael and I found ourselves pushing cars and trucks that were getting stuck on Facebook Hill. We met one large group of young people from Chicago who were just getting off their bus and were pretty sure they had just landed on the moon. They intended to spend the night in their bus and did not seem very warmly dressed. Being from Chicago myself I thought I had seen winter, but later I saw what a North Dakota winter was like.



Facebook Hill, so-named because it was one of the few places you could get a signal, had a great view of the camp.  One of four camps, Oceti Sakowin was growing by leaps and bounds.  From there you could see that tents were set up amid several frozen ponds in the flood plain of the Cannonball and Missouri Rivers. Come Spring most of the camp would be under water. We met a man there who was charging his cell phone on a stationary bike. And we were told to beware of the helicopter that was omnipresent overhead. No one was really sure if it was the helicopter or the semi-trailer peaking over the hill that was intercepting data and draining cell phone batteries: 21st century cyber warfare.



Frank and Rochelle’s son-in-law, Isaacs, was head of the Oceti Sakowin camp.  The tall, very spiritual 28-year old warrior explained to us the arrangement of tipis at the center of the camp. This was the sacred Lakota Council Fire Circle that had not been seen in a hundred and fifty years. The seven tipis were in the shape of buffalo horns and represented the different branches of the Lakota tribe. Each tipi was occupied by a representative of the different branches. Isaacs, who had been staying in the camp since its inception, represented the Lakotas of the Great Plains. In the center was the fire circle and a campfire that had been burning for eight months and had fire keepers that never left who were very serious about their jobs. The field around the Fire Circle was kept free of tents and we were told not to stand on the east side of the fire where the buffalo horns came together because that is the direction the spirits came from.



That first night we made supper over our camp stove and sat around the Council Fire talking to people and listening to organizers discussing strategy. We heard that earlier that week a gift had been delivered to the Morton County Sheriff’s office, a peace offering of food and supplies. The Sheriff had sent out a plea for local residents to help them because all their money had been spent “protecting” the pipeline. The water protectors wanted to share the bounty of the camp.



Many of the veterans who had arrived seemed ready to tangle with the Morton County Sheriff and the national guard. The elders and camp organizers met and voted to refrain from marching in the morning in order to keep peace. It was rumored that the Sheriff had moved one mile back from the barricaded bridge, evidently wanting to avoid a confrontation. Things were happening fast.



Michael, Lynn, and I decided to go to the Prairie Knights Casino for a cup of tea and to check out that scene. Eight miles south, the casino was filled with people from the camp, easily recognized by their heavy winter gear. Being on the reservation and controlled by the Lakota, the casino proved to be an invaluable resource: a place to get warm, grab a hot meal, and get cell phone reception. All the rooms were full, mostly with gamblers on weekends, but the camps had reserved a few. When the snow storm hit two days later over a thousand campers took refuge in the hallways.



After spending a cozy night on the Bullheads’ floor we returned to camp. The place was buzzing with activity. Cars and buses continued to pour in. The veterans were organizing for some sort of action and the horse-mounted young security force was herding people assembling on the road back to camp. There was to be a prayer meeting of all twelve thousand people at the main fire. As we were heading in that direction we came upon the Bullheads. Frank, with tears in his eyes, said two words: “We won.” The Army Corps had revoked the permit for the pipe line!



What ensued was joyous celebration on a grand scale. Hugs and whoops and big smiles everywhere. The drums were beating, everyone was dancing and singing and praying. Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II gave the announcement and then invited the elders to pray at the Council Fire. One Indian told me that the tribes had not won such a victory since Custer. And it just happened to be Custer’s birthday!



The Council Fire circle was a powerful gathering of chiefs and elders. It was both celebratory and solemn at the same time. Stories were told, reminders given of the importance of the victory over the pipeline company. And of course no one was under the illusion that the fight was over. This was only a chapter in the ongoing struggle to preserve the earth and all its inhabitants.



That evening we once again met with friends in the cafeteria of the casino. A snowstorm was on the horizon and getting around would soon be difficult. That night, sleeping on the Bullhead’s floor, we got our first hint of what was coming as the wind howled and whistled outside. I had never experienced unrelenting 30-50 mile an hour winds and total white-out conditions. I got pinned against the truck trying to fold our large tarp! As Michael said, “Feels like the wind could just cut you in half.”



We tried to make it back to camp or to the casino in our four-wheel drive but gave up after a couple of miles. The Lakota people said that this is what you do in a blizzard: hole up and wait. And so we spent the next 28 hours snowed in, eight Indians and three whites in a small house. It proved to be pretty enjoyable as we shared cooking and cleaning duties and got to know each other. We watched movies, including a family favorite, Avatar. Albert Red Bear, a Lakota religious leader who had dropped by the day before, was full of stories. Reba was delightful and a great cook. Lynn gave “readings” with her Earth Cards. Dawson, the seven-month-old, was so good. There were endless discussions about the day’s events and the future of the camp.



Unfortunately, we were under a deadline to high-tail it home. When the sun peaked out the next afternoon we decided to make a run for it. Albert was headed back to Pine Ridge and would lead us south. The snow was blowing sideways so thick it was like driving through a cloud, but all I had to do was follow our Lakota guide. By the time we got to South Dakota, the snowstorm was behind us.



That night we spent in another native-owned casino in Iowa. There we met a couple of Indians who had just come back from the camp. When we asked how it had been going, instead of a horror story about the snow, they said, “We had fun.” Another lesson…



And so, after another marathon drive, we made it back to Tennessee where it was a balmy 33 degrees. All three of us are still processing what we experienced on the Great Plains. Part of my process is to write this. And to organize meetings where we can share our story of Standing Rock, as we were asked to do by our Lakota friends. We are thinking of returning in the Spring with tools and money and solar panels to help fix up the Bullhead house. If the camps are still there we will be joining the Water Protectors along the banks of the mighty Missouri River. 






 



 



 



Stand With Standing Rock



Two Lakota families from the Standing Rock reservation are coming to Tennessee! They want to share with us their stories from the #NoDAPL struggle and to sing and dance and pray with us! Frank and Rochelle Bullhead were in the front lines at Standing Rock many times. Isaacs Weston was Head of Camp at Oceti Sakowin. He is accompanied by his wife Mimi and baby Dawson. They will be at five locations in ten days, including Chattanooga, Sewanee, Franklin, The Farm and Nashville.



Nashville: January 8th, Friends Meeting House, 530 26th Ave. N., 7:15pm.

Suggested donation: $10+



Please join us and help support the ongoing fight to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline and meet these brave and powerful brothers and sisters who are leading the way in saving our planet!



For more information contact:
 Eric Lewis



 



 



FrackFreeTennessee



 


Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on January 25, 2017, 05:50:04 AM
All the protesters at Standing Rock will be hauled to jail soon. I just hope they don't kill a bunch of them first. Last stands tend to be bloody.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on January 25, 2017, 06:34:25 AM
All the protesters at Standing Rock will be hauled to jail soon. I just hope they don't kill a bunch of them first. Last stands tend to be bloody.

That's what I've been saying.

Where are you getting this "last stand" bit though?  Did I miss something? 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on January 25, 2017, 06:40:33 AM
Just that the timeline is being moved up by the Trumpster. I expect they'll be moved off the land before summer.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on January 25, 2017, 07:02:37 AM
Just that the timeline is being moved up by the Trumpster. I expect they'll be moved off the land before summer.

Yeah, I hadn't seen the news about Dumpster and his executive bills to get the pipelines going before commenting here.  As soon as the weather permits they will bring in the bulldozers and dump trucks and remove those pesky protestors.  Then they will block access to the site with those jack booted military police officers and their weapons of war.

But hey, we should have cheap gas for a couple more years :emthup:

Maybe I can make enough money to build a spaceship and blast off into the infinite universe with my family in hopes of finding an inhabitable planet for my kids to grow healthy on? 

Alas, I know that's not possible.  Maybe by some miracle I can get a couple of domes built?  They'd have to be self contained though.  We'd have to be able to live in them without opening the airlocks to the outside toxicity...ever...like a nuclear winter. 

But I suppose our consolation prize is the cheap gas for a few more years. 
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on January 25, 2017, 07:21:02 AM
Just that the timeline is being moved up by the Trumpster. I expect they'll be moved off the land before summer.

Yeah, I hadn't seen the news about Dumpster and his executive bills to get the pipelines going before commenting here.  As soon as the weather permits they will bring in the bulldozers and dump trucks and remove those pesky protestors.  Then they will block access to the site with those jack booted military police officers and their weapons of war.

But hey, we should have cheap gas for a couple more years :emthup:

Maybe I can make enough money to build a spaceship and blast off into the infinite universe with my family in hopes of finding an inhabitable planet for my kids to grow healthy on? 

Alas, I know that's not possible.  Maybe by some miracle I can get a couple of domes built?  They'd have to be self contained though.  We'd have to be able to live in them without opening the airlocks to the outside toxicity...ever...like a nuclear winter. 

But I suppose our consolation prize is the cheap gas for a few more years.

Well, not necessarily.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-would-the-keystone-pipeline-affect-oil-and-gas-prices/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-would-the-keystone-pipeline-affect-oil-and-gas-prices/)

The pipelines are crucial to allow the Canadian environment to be butt-raped some more, so Warren Buffet and a few others can keep extracting low EROEI tar sands to turn into gasoline to ship overseas.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on January 25, 2017, 07:33:27 AM
Correction: Looks like Warren gave up on tar sands. But the Koch bros are still there, I think.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: luciddreams on January 25, 2017, 07:37:02 AM
Just that the timeline is being moved up by the Trumpster. I expect they'll be moved off the land before summer.

Yeah, I hadn't seen the news about Dumpster and his executive bills to get the pipelines going before commenting here.  As soon as the weather permits they will bring in the bulldozers and dump trucks and remove those pesky protestors.  Then they will block access to the site with those jack booted military police officers and their weapons of war.

But hey, we should have cheap gas for a couple more years :emthup:

Maybe I can make enough money to build a spaceship and blast off into the infinite universe with my family in hopes of finding an inhabitable planet for my kids to grow healthy on? 

Alas, I know that's not possible.  Maybe by some miracle I can get a couple of domes built?  They'd have to be self contained though.  We'd have to be able to live in them without opening the airlocks to the outside toxicity...ever...like a nuclear winter. 

But I suppose our consolation prize is the cheap gas for a few more years.

Well, not necessarily.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-would-the-keystone-pipeline-affect-oil-and-gas-prices/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-would-the-keystone-pipeline-affect-oil-and-gas-prices/)

The pipelines are crucial to allow the Canadian environment to be butt-raped some more, so Warren Buffet and a few others can keep extracting low EROEI tar sands to turn into gasoline to ship overseas.

That article was clear as mud on the issue of gas prices.  "Price at the pump might go up, it might go down, it's hard to predict and we just don't fuckin' know" was my takeaway. 

Besides, in the few years it takes to get those two pipelines in service, we will likely have major economic upheavals resulting in third world Merka spreading its wings and promptly crashing to the ground.   
Title: The Standing Rock Sioux will not back down
Post by: RE on January 26, 2017, 01:37:05 AM
http://grist.org/article/the-standing-rock-sioux-will-not-back-down/ (http://grist.org/article/the-standing-rock-sioux-will-not-back-down/)


#nodapl
The Standing Rock Sioux will not back down
By Sam Levin and Julia Carrie Wong on Jan 25, 2017

(https://grist.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/standing-rock-dakota-access.jpg?w=970&h=545&crop=1)

This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and its supporters are vowing to resist Donald Trump’s executive order to allow construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline with legal action, civil disobedience, and a return to the “water protector” encampments.

“President Trump is legally required to honor our treaty rights and provide a fair and reasonable pipeline process,” said Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chair Dave Archambault II, who called Trump’s action “politically motivated.”

“Creating a second Flint does not make America great again,” he added.

The executive order represents a major — if not wholly unexpected — reversal of fate for the $3.8 billion project, which was slated to cross the Missouri River just upstream of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation. The tribe feared the pipeline would contaminate their drinking water and destroy sacred sites.

On Dec. 5, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers denied a permit for the pipeline to cross the river, handing a major victory to the thousands of Native American and environmental activists who established encampments on the banks of the river to oppose the pipeline.

The denial of the permit — and initiation of an environmental impact statement — were expected to delay the pipeline’s completion by years. Water protectors in Washington, D.C., were already mobilizing on Facebook to protest at the White House on Tuesday evening. “Stopping these projects will require action at home, in the halls of power, and in the path of each pipeline,” the group wrote.

Jan Hasselman, a lawyer representing the tribe, said that Trump had “unlawfully and arbitrarily sidestepped” the findings of the previous administration. “It’s an insult to the Standing Rock and all of its supporters in Indian country, and it’s a continuation of a historic pattern of trampling on Native rights,” he added.

Dallas Goldtooth, an organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network and member of the Mdewakanton Dakota and Dine tribes, said he had expected Trump to support the pipeline, but did not imagine it would happen within days of the administration.

“These are attacks on our ancestral homelands,” he said. “These orders demonstrate that he is more than willing to violate federal law that protects the environment and protects our communities and protects indigenous rights for the benefit of oil and gas.”

Ron His Horse Is Thunder, a member of the Hunkpapa-Lakota Oyate tribe, said he anticipated a protracted court battle to stop the pipeline. But the former Standing Rock Chair said he feared the pipeline corporation, with the support of Trump, could eventually push forward.

“It’ll slow down the executive order, but it’s not going to stop it,” he said. “It takes us back to where we were when the whole protest started.”

The Standing Rock encampments swelled to include tens of thousands of people in early December, but the numbers shrank significantly following the announcement of the permit denial. The tribe asked supporters to go home for the winter following the December decision, and reiterated that call on Jan. 21, with a unanimous vote of the tribal council.

About 300 to 500 water protectors have remained at the camps through the harsh North Dakota winter, leading to multiple recent clashes with law enforcement and ongoing concerns about the harsh tactics employed by a militarized police force.

Linda Black Elk, a member of the Catawba Nation who works with the Standing Rock Medic & Healer Council, said campers had been working hard to clean up and considering whether to leave in accordance with the tribal council’s wishes. But Tuesday’s announcement changes that.

“We can’t back down now. We have to continue to stand to protect the water for future generations,” she said. “I’m not scared for myself, but I admit I am frightened for the future.”

Some activists who left in December may soon return to the camps.

Xhopakelxhit, a member of the Nuu Chah Nulth, Coast Salish, and Cree who was a steady presence at Standing Rock last year, said she would return as soon as possible.

“If you want to stand with Standing Rock, this is the time people should be there,” said Xhopakelxhit, who is a member of the Red Warrior camp, which organized direct actions against the pipeline. “The people still at camp are requesting help, more bodies, people who are willing to actually make a stand with them, because it’s the most dire need.”

Others promised the escalation of solidarity protests around the country.

“We need mass civil disobedience and a showing of solidarity with Standing Rock,” said Kandi Mossett, a member of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara tribes, who lives in North Dakota. “The Trump administration is sparking a revolution that makes us stronger than we ever were before.”

Cheryl Angel, a member of the Sicangu Lakota tribe, who was one of the first to join the Sacred Stone encampment, called for “action every day in the communities where the water protectors are standing right now.”

For Jumping Buffalo, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux whose English name is Troy Fairbanks, Trump’s announcement came on a sad day. The sixth-generation grandson of Sitting Bull was preparing to attend the funeral of his daughter when he spoke with the Guardian.

“You can’t drink oil. It’s so sad,” he said. Still, the tribal elder continued to hold out hope that his prayers would be answered.

“Have we as Native people ever been given a fair shake?” he asked. “Nah. But this time, the whole world is watching.”
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: Eddie on January 26, 2017, 12:16:54 PM
Check out those Sibley tents on the left in the photo. A huge one and a smaller one, both round. Now those are some decent tents. They make them here. I was thinking about getting one way back, before the first Diner convo. They run in the thousands of bucks, though, for the larger ones.

http://soulpad.com/ (http://soulpad.com/)

Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: JRM on January 26, 2017, 01:24:26 PM
Correction: Looks like Warren gave up on tar sands. But the Koch bros are still there, I think.

I've no idea who the investors still are.  Too many things to learn! So little time!

Last I heard, the Athabasca oil sands in Alberta are a HUGE (trump: "YUGE") part of the overall Canadian economy, thus a big part of Canadian (etc.) political foolishness. 

I love the phrase "stranded assets" for that situation.  Fossil fools are stranded fools! Now there's a meme that can acquire legs!
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: JRM on January 26, 2017, 01:30:24 PM
Stranded assholes.
http://priceofoil.org/2013/10/29/seeing-tar-sands-stranded-assets/ (http://priceofoil.org/2013/10/29/seeing-tar-sands-stranded-assets/)
Title: Army Corps ordered to issue final Dakota Access pipeline permit
Post by: RE on January 31, 2017, 08:59:36 PM
Took Trumpty-Dumpty a whole week for this one!

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/01/31/army-corps-ordered-to-issue-final-dakota-access-pipeline-permit-two-lawmakers-say/?utm_term=.3ac5d8e4be72 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/01/31/army-corps-ordered-to-issue-final-dakota-access-pipeline-permit-two-lawmakers-say/?utm_term=.3ac5d8e4be72)

Energy and Environment
Army Corps ordered to issue final Dakota Access pipeline permit, two lawmakers say
By Juliet Eilperin and Steven Mufson January 31 at 11:18 PM

(https://img.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=https://img.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_960w/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2016/11/08/National-Economy/Images/2016-10-30T233544Z_01_CAN105_RTRIDSP_3_USA-PIPELINE.jpg&w=1484)
Construction continues on the Dakota Access Pipeline near the town of Cannon Ball, N.D., in October. (Reuters/Josh Morgan)

The acting secretary of the Army has instructed the Army Corps of Engineers to provide the final permit needed to complete the Dakota Access pipeline, according to two North Dakota GOP lawmakers who support the project.

Sen. John Hoeven and Rep. Kevin Cramer both issued statements Tuesday night saying the acting secretary of the Army, Robert Speer, had ordered the Corps to grant an easement for the pipeline to run under Lake Oahe.

“This will enable the company to complete the project,” Hoeven said, “which can and will be built with the necessary safety features to protect the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and others downstream.”

Neither the White House nor the secretary of the Army could be immediately reached for comment.  Kamil Sztalkoper, deputy director of public affairs for the Army Corps of Engineers, referred comments to the Army secretary’s chief spokesman and said he “can’t confirm or deny whether that’s accurate.” A representative of the pipeline company, Energy Transfer Partners, said the company did not know anything beyond what it saw on Cramer and Hoeven’s websites.

The apparent move came a week after President Trump issued a presidential memorandum instructing the agency to “review and approve in an expedited manner, to the extent permitted by law and as warranted… for approvals to construct and operate” the pipeline.

[With new directives, Trump aims to revive long-stalled pipeline projects]

The Dakota Access pipeline has become a central battle point for environmentalists who are trying to stop pipelines in general as part of a campaign to keep fossil fuels in the ground. And it became a heavily symbolic battle for Native Americans as the Standing Rock Sioux tribe sought to prevent the pipeline company from disturbing sacred burial grounds and archaeological sites.

The 1,170-mile pipeline crosses four states, and would carry crude oil from the rich shale oil basins of western North Dakota to the pipeline networks and refineries in Illinois. The pipeline is virtually complete, with the 1,100-foot stretch crossing underneath Lake Oahe being one of the final pieces.

The Standing Rock Sioux have also argued that the pipeline puts their drinking water in danger. The final stretch of pipeline crosses under Lake Oahe, a reservoir created when Army Corps built dams further south on the Missouri River. The company plans to drill horizontally below the river bottom and it argues that the pipeline will be safer than trains and trucks that carry some of the crude oil currently being produced.

But opponents of the pipeline say it could still leak and contaminate the water.

President Obama, as weeks of protests added to political pressures, instructed the Army Corps to look at different route options for the pipeline. The company building the pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners, had considered laying the pipeline in the Bismarck suburbs, about 25 miles north of the current site. The Standing Rock Sioux officials have accused the company of racism for shunning largely white areas of Bismarck and digging in area close to the Native Americans.

A statement by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, provided by its policy adviser Jodi Gillette Tuesday night, said that while a final easement had not yet been granted, tribal members planned to challenge any such action in court.

“The Army Corps lacks statutory authority to simply stop the [Environmental Impact Statement] and issue the easement. The Corps must review the Presidential Memorandum, notify Congress, and actually grant the easement. We have not received formal notice that the EIS has been suspended or withdrawn.”

“To abandon the EIS would amount to a wholly unexplained and arbitrary change based on the president’s personal views and, potentially, personal investments,” the statement added. “We stand ready to fight this battle against corporate interest superseding government procedure and the health and well-being of millions of Americans.”

Jan Hasselman, a lawyer with the environmental group Earth Justice, said the pipeline obstacles were still not settled. “The easement wasn’t issued,” he said. “We assume it’s coming soon, and are ready to litigate. But we’re still waiting for the shoe to drop.”

But Trump made it clear during the presidential campaign he backed the development of both the Dakota Access pipeline and Keystone XL, a project that spanned the U.S.-Canada border that Obama vetoed after a seven-year federal review process. Trump issued a separate directive inviting the company behind Keystone XL, TransCanada, to reapply for a presidential permit, but that process will take much longer.

Energy and Environment newsletter

The science and policy of environmental issues.

Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now, a coalition of business, agriculture and labor groups, issued a statement praising the move.

“We appreciate that President Trump is keeping his word to move lawful, carefully sited energy projects forward,” the group said. “This is a positive development for the pipeline, construction workers across the country, and those who seek to invest in our nation’s infrastructure.”

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) also issued a statement welcoming the move, saying “we know construction will move forward – though we are waiting on more information in regards to a timeline for when construction can begin.”

Given the likely court challenge, it is unclear when work on the pipeline would restart. The tribal council has asked the few hundred protesters who remain on site to leave, in part because of harsh weather conditions.

Last fall, hundreds of law enforcement officers from different states and counties confronted protesters with water cannon, tear gas and pepper spray. Arrests reached a peak of more than 140 protesters. On Sunday, according to Hoeven, another 20 additional Bureau of Indian Affairs law enforcement officers arrived at Standing Rock to help local authorities.
Title: Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
Post by: K-Dog on February 01, 2017, 08:13:45 AM
Took Trumpty-Dumpty a whole week for this one!

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/01/31/army-corps-ordered-to-issue-final-dakota-access-pipeline-permit-two-lawmakers-say/?utm_term=.3ac5d8e4be72 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/01/31/army-corps-ordered-to-issue-final-dakota-access-pipeline-permit-two-lawmakers-say/?utm_term=.3ac5d8e4be72)




(https://memoriesofthepeople.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/eis1.jpg?w=640)

This comes from https://memoriesofthepeople.wordpress.com/. (https://memoriesofthepeople.wordpress.com/.)


Consider the source.   Two North Dakota GOP lawmakers.  Sen. John Hoeven and Rep. Kevin Cramer.

(https://memoriesofthepeople.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/war-zone-221.jpg?w=335&h=168)

Missile launcher and machine gun unit at Standing Rock, aimed at the Sioux reservation.  North Dakota is about to pass a law allowing drivers to run over,without liability, protesters blocking roads or highways.
.
.
.
.
If it is true the rage of the racist redneck begins.  But it may not be true.  Trump's actions should clarify the situation.

We need to see the memo this man is accused of making.

(https://www.army.mil/e2/images/rv7/leaders/official/sa.jpg)

Mr. Robert M. Speer was designated as the Acting Secretary of the U.S. Army, effective January 20, 2017.

The last several weeks have taught us that the blue rage is every bit as ugly as the red rage and we can't trust the Washington Post as far as we can spit.  Trump if he has the I.Q. which he and others have claimed will make it clear that the EIS has to complete the full legal process and no drilling across the Lake or along the safer route under the river north of Bismark can begin until the process completes.  Spring is the earliest time that building this unnecessary pipeline can resume.

In the meantime calm well reasoned arguments need to be made, emotional appeals will be ignored.  The pipeline company has bullied and flaunted the permit process thus far and they think they can just punch under the lake and start their cash machine flowing.  Protected by their private army, they think nothing will stop them.  The lake route is ridiculous.  A spill on the river north of Bismark could be more easily contained.<