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Messages - Snowleopard

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46
From the research I've done on the guy that reads the news on this channel, he is a front man
for the Hollywood Calif. movie industry. He's been pegged as a disinformation operative.

http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?51834-Beware-of-Suspicious-Observer-on-Youtube

SuspiciousObservers Sun Disinformation


http://www.geoengineeringwatch.org/who-is-suspicious-observer/

Well duh!

When you cannot respond to the well referenced open data that disagrees with your beliefs or agenda then go ad hom! 

This guy is not a front man for anyone, he is too damned original for that.

Rather that disinformation, I would say he pokes holes in the official disinformation.

For those who do not accept the current scientific paradigm, he provides many interesting pieces to the cosmological puzzle.  Of course that is only useful if you think for yourself.

The downside:

He likes to hear himself talk.  He is a bit pedantic.  He's probably making a bundle from membership fees.

I don't need a daily report on this stuff, once a month would be way better.

And he is following so many things on a regular basis that he is sometimes slow to pick up on new developments in other areas. and I think there is more to this picture this guy hasn't figured out yet.

Full disclosure:  I don't know him personally and I don't subscribe.   

47
Environment / Re: Crazy Weather
« on: April 17, 2014, 10:05:06 PM »
Speaking of weather, where you been Snowleopard, time to drop in and say hello and let us know you are ok. What a winter that was Snow, glad it's over, or am I speaking too soon. :laugh:

Hi GO.

Still lurking here abit. 

I noticed you've been detrolled.  I tried to figure out how you got the troll designation, but gave up.

I've also (mostly) given up trying to educate or warn folks, and decided to spend most of my limited time where it does some good.

Is there more snow coming this year?   No clue, but i'd not be surprised.  Still running the wood stove most mornings here.

Yes.  Latest start to maple sugar season in my lifetime and "Coldest fall-winter in over 100 years",  officially caused by global warming climate change via "polar vortex".  BUT....If you look at the area in North America most impacted by polar vortex shift and compare it to last glacial extent maps, it might suggest something.

IMO the probability of near term global cooling has increased significantly.  As for what's ahead medium term, if you'd like my guesses, (and they are guesses or opinions, despite my long study) here they are:

Snowleopard's climate ~odds assessment for the decades (20-30yrs) ahead:

40%  Return to "little ice age" conditions.

30%  Return to 1885-1915 climate conditions

19%  Return to 1948-1978 climate conditions

9%  Cessation of the current instability with little further temperature change.

1%  Quick return to full glaciation (- 8-12 C)

.5% Return of 1978-98 "global warming" trend.

.1%  Quick return to warm "climactic optimum" (+ 2 C)

The longer and sharper the instability in the weather, the colder it is likely to get.

The above assumes the following are possible but highly unlikely within the time period:  Super or major volcanic eruptions.  Severe asteroid or comet strikes.  Nearby supernovas.  The solar system entering a major dust cloud.

Hundreds of weirder things (Examples: Major change in Earth's orbit or axial tilt.  Physical pole shift.  The atmosphere absorbing heat from the local fluff or the infrared Saggit M stars.) are either too unlikely to consider and/or their odds are unknown to me.

Happy Easter, (or maybe we move Springfest to Beltaine / Mayday?)

48
Economics / Re: WIPING OUT THE WHISTLEBLOWERS
« on: February 12, 2014, 03:03:06 PM »
Possibly this is just a coincidence ....and ther's nothing to see here!  But maybe not. 

Anyone know more?

From Zero Hedge:


Another JPMorgan Banker Dies, 37 Year Old Executive Director Of Program Trading


Ordinarily we would ignore the news of another banker's death - after all these sad events happen all the time - if it wasn't for several contextual aspects of this most recent passage. First, the death in question, as reported by the Stamford Daily Voice is that of Ryan Henry Crane, a Harvard graduate, who is survived by his wife, son and parents at the very young age of 37. Second, Ryan Henry Crane was formerly employed by JPMorgan - a bank which was featured prominently in the news as recently as two weeks ago when another of its London-based employees committed suicide by jumping from the top floor of its Canary Wharf building. Third: Crane was an Executive Director in JPM's Global Program Trading desk, founded in 1999 by an ex-DE Shaw'er, a function of the firm which is instrumental to preserving JPM's impeccable and (so far in 2013) flawless trading record of zero trading losses.

There was little detail surrounding the death:


Ryan Henry Crane of Stamford died Monday, Feb. 3. He was 37.


Crane was born Jan. 8, 1977, and grew up in Long Valley, N.J. He graduated from The Delbarton School in Morristown in 1995. He graduated from Harvard University in 1999, after which he spent the next 14 years at J.P. Morgan in New York. He was an executive director in the Global Equities Group.


Crane is survived by his wife, Lauren (nee Pizzotti); son, Harry; parents Mary Jo and Lex of Long Valley, N.J.; brother, Lex of Denver, Colo.; sister, Allison; brother-in-law, John Archard of Arvada, Colo.; parents-in-law, Steve and Carol Pizzotti of Reading, Mass.; brothers- and sisters-in-law, David and Heather Pizzotti of Upper Arlington, Ohio, Stephen and Kristin Pizzotti and Chris and Felicia Pizzotti of Reading, Mass.; five nephews, three nieces; aunts, uncles; and cousins.


Calling hours are Sunday, Feb. 9 from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Leo P. Gallagher Funeral Home, 31 Arch St., Greenwich. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, Feb. 10 at St. Catherine of Siena Church, Riverside. Interment will be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 at Puritan Lawn Memorial Park in Peabody, Mass.


http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-02-12/another-jpmorgan-banker-dies-37-year-old-executive-director-program-trading


49
Geological & Cosmological Events / Re: The Big Chill
« on: February 12, 2014, 09:48:52 AM »
Last week Iran and Japan broke long term snowfall records.

IRAN

Heavy snow in northern Iran left around 480,000 homes without power and some towns and villages cut off.

An official in Mazandaran province, on the Caspian Sea, said the winter storms were the worst in 50 years, with two metres of snow falling in some areas since the weekend.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-26024415


Japan

As much as 27 cm (10.6 inches) of snow fell on Tokyo by late Saturday, which is the most in 45 years, Japan's Meteorological Agency said. The same day, parts of tsunami-hit coastal region received more than 38 cm of snow. Tokyo averages only 11 cm (4.3 inches) of snow each year.

http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2014/02/10/severe-winter-storm-and-unusually-heavy-snow-hit-parts-of-eastern-japan/

50
Remote rural China had a very strong quake earlier today. 

China rated it @ 7.3M,  USGS initial 6.8M  final 6.9 M, EMSC 6.9 M, all have it at shallow depth.  Casualties are likely to be light due to low population in the epicenter area, despite very strong shaking.

http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2014/02/12/very-strong-and-shallow-earthquake-m7-3-struck-xinjiang-tibet-border-china/

http://earthquake-report.com/2014/02/12/very-strong-earthquake-southern-xinjiang-china-on-february-12-2014/

51
Geopolitics / Re: Understanding the Ammo Shortage
« on: February 07, 2014, 04:03:55 PM »


My Cabelas has none in stock. I check regularly. Not a terrible price.

I have no Cabela's close, so i pay for the little brown truck instead.  Otherwise a ~two hour drive for me. 

They do look like they are trying to keep their prices reasonable.

Overbought 22LR abit in '99, so it'll be awhile 'fore i need any.

52
Geopolitics / Re: Understanding the Ammo Shortage
« on: February 07, 2014, 03:50:50 PM »
Someone is making a killing. I would then switch to 177 air for marksman practice, no powder or bang noise but you still have to hold it still.

Hey. Something we agree on!

I use my .177 to shoot rats near the coops and not scare the chickens.  Better than practice!

53
Geopolitics / Re: Understanding the Ammo Shortage
« on: February 07, 2014, 03:37:53 PM »


Box of 50 CCI Stingers for 19.89 plus shipping from CheaperThanDirt. 5 boxes was $122 shipped to Texas. Yep, kinda high.


May i suggest:  (while it lasts)

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Shooting/Ammunition/Rimfire-Ammunition%7C/pc/104792580/c/104691780/sc/104536080/CCI-Blazer-22-LR-Ammo/1804618.uts?destination=%2Fcatalog%2Fbrowse.cmd%3FN%3D1100192%26WTz_l%3DSBC%253BBRprd705571&WTz_l=SBC%3BBRprd705571%3Bcat104536080

Not quite as good as stingers, and one per customer per day per item, but the price(s) is/are hard to beat.

BTW i'm still shooting .22LR i stashed for Y2K!

54
Intense eruption of Tungurahua volcano causes total darkness in Chacauco, Ecuador

A new and intense episode of eruptive activity started at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, on February 1, 2014. A new paroxysm was observed along with a series of powerful vulcanian explosions. Ash plume surpassed 13 km (40 000 ft); eruption produced heavy tephra fall and pyroclastic flows up to 8 km in length.

This intense activity was accompanied by a significant release of rubble that was earlier perceived in Pillate, Capil and Palictahua. Ash in areas surrounding the volcano caused total darkness in the Chacauco.

Tungurahua started showing signs of increased activity from the early hours of last Thursday with explosions of moderate size and significant ash emissions.

(http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2014/02/02/intense-eruption-of-tungurahua-volcano-causes-total-darkness-in-chacauco-ecuador/

Erupción volcán Tungurahua 01 de Febrero 2014

55
Deadly eruption of Mount Sinabung volcano claims its first victims, Indonesia

Indonesian Mount Sinabung volcano claimed its first victims due to a direct effect of the eruption. At least 14 people were reported killed and 3 others severely burnt by one or two moderately large pyroclastic flows this morning. 3 more people are still reported missing.

As of Saturday evening (local time), the bodies of the 14 fatalities have all been transported from a number of areas in Suka Meriah village, which is located within a 3-kilometer radius of the volcano, while three others had yet to be found, Mt. Sinabung Eruption Media Center head Jhonson Tarigan told The Jakarta Post.

During the past days, enforcement of the exclusion zone had been loosened, and according to some sources, people had even be formally allowed to return to their homes - a fatal decision for some.

Among the fatalities were several school children and students.

Rescue operations were affected by fears of new pyroclastic flows.

According to BNPB spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, there were three eruptions: the first eruption occurred at 10:30 a.m. (local time) and lasted for eight-and-a-half-minutes, generating a 4.5 km long pyroclastic flow, while the second followed immediately after at 10:38 a.m. and lasted just over four minutes, followed by a third one at 11:27 a.m. for 84 seconds.

It is not exactly clear where the pyroclastic flow originated, from explosions at the summit, collapse of the summit lava dome, or from (partial collapse) on the viscous flow that had recently been emplaced. The latter two scenarios are the more likely ones. Webcam images don't show much detail except a dense ash plume engulfing the southern slope. (Volcano Discovery)

This is the first direct impact of the Mt. Sinabung eruptions. Before the Saturday incident, the ongoing eruptions have already claimed the lives of 31 evacuees, as a result of various illnesses such as breathing difficulties, depression, asthma and hypertension.

Sutopo said that 16 villages had to be evacuated following the on-going eruptions. The 16 villages are Suka Meriah, Guru Kinayan, Selandi, Berastepu, Gamber, Kuta Tengah, Bekerah, Simacem, Kutarakyat, Sigarang-garang, Kuta Tonggal, Mardinding, Temberun, Perbaji, Sibintun and Lau Kawar. (The Jakarta Post)


http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2014/02/01/deadly-eruption-of-mount-sinabung-volcano-claims-its-first-victims-indonesia/

56
A strong and widely felt shallow (~17-24km) 6.0 Magnitude quake struck Greece about five and a half hours ago (13.55 UTC).  Since then there have been 25 aftershocks between 3.0 & 5.3M trending more shallow (~10-2km).


Strong and shallow M 6.0 earthquake struck Greece



Strong and shallow earthquake magnitude 6.0 struck Lixourion, Greece on January 26, 2014 at 13:55 UTC. EMSC is reporting depth of 24 km, USGS 18.8km (11.7 miles)

Epicenter was located 4 km NW of Lixoúrion (population 3 758), 10 km NW of Argostólion (population 9 820) and 293 km W of Athens (population 729 137). I felt it reports were received from Albania, Montenegro, Bulgaria and Southern Italy 

Overall, the population in this region resides in structures that are a mix of vulnerable and earthquake resistant construction.

Recent earthquakes in this area have caused secondary hazards such as landslides that might have contributed to losses.

Updates:

First reports are mentioning cracked roads and a chaotic situation on Cephalonia. Most people were frightened by the earthquake and ran to the streets. Fire brigade and police are checking for possible damaged buildings and injuries.

16:01 UTC - Damaged buildings are reported from Lixouri, located only 6 km from the epicenter. Power supply is interrupted in Fiskardo, located in northern Cephalonia. More damage reports coming in from different parts of the Island, so far “only” bricks falling from walls, cracks and other limited damage, but it seems that several buildings are affected. In Lixouri a hospice and some homes were demolished.

Newspapers report that Lixouri is the most affected area. Many houses there suffered damage in diverse extent. The quake also caused rockfalls and minor landslides in parts of the island!

One house in Kounopetra collapsed, luckily without affecting people.

Relatively large ash emission of the volcano Etna on Sicily (Italy) followed shortly after this quake was felt there. A connection of both events is possible. (ER)


http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2014/01/26/strong-and-shallow-m-6-0-earthquake-struck-greece/

http://earthquake-report.com/2014/01/26/strong-earthquake-greece-on-january-26-2014/

The aftershocks from this quake did not stop.  There was a 5.0 yesterday, and just a half hour or so ago we have an "aftershock" initially rated at 6.1M, stronger than the inital shock last Sunday....very interesting.

Some agencies have this @5.8M, nonetheless, shallow and strong shaking in sleeping hours makes it somewhat dangerous.

http://earthquake-report.com/2014/02/03/strong-earthquake-greece-on-february-3-2014/

In addition regular earthquake activity seems to have awoken from slumber.  Nothing dramatic, but an uptick in events between 5 - 6.5 M, back to what was "normal" a few months ago.

57
Environment / Re: Alaska Springtime in January Photo Essay
« on: February 02, 2014, 06:10:12 PM »

So the fall of 2012 was unseasonably warm and the fall of 2013 was unseasonably cold.  An abrupt change i highlighted with my gardening experience.  This year i'll be prepared for the cold (and it might be warm again!).

Bah.  Just go Indoors and do it all Hydroponics, Peter Style.  He had a great crop of Swiss Chard as I recall.


RE

This makes a lot of sense if you have the indoor space, but i'd rather not get into indoor grow lights.   

If Fuku gets worse or gets company, we all might like to have our veggies indoors though.

If we build, it will likely be a greenhouse and maybe part would be devoted to aquaponics/hydroponics.

First we have to decide if we are staying here............ :icon_scratch:

58
Environment / Re: Alaska Springtime in January Photo Essay
« on: February 02, 2014, 05:39:31 PM »
Snowleopard said,
Quote
In 2012, it was possible to extend the season for my chard with nothing for aqwhile and later with just some leaves for mulch. The kale needed nothing, the broccolli was a bonus surprise that it survived the two foot Oct snow and produced into late December. We didn't PLAN this, it happened and we took advantage of it.
In 2013 it got much colder much faster. That was not a total surprise and was predictable as early as September. My partner decided she liked having fresh greens late into winter and ordered the "hasty greenhouses" then when she saw some on closeout. They are basicly tarp tents with a greenhouse type cover and closable screen vents. We put them over most of the chard and kale plants. ie. the garden was NOT planted with the greenhouses in mind, and thus the plants not optimally positioned for best greenhouse placement. We did what we could given the circumstances (short of burning lots of propane or lighting small charcoal fires every few hours, which we decided was not worth it). If it was a commercial operation we would have maybe tried propane heaters.

So yes, as i said, the chard and broccoli died in November. Yes, the broccolli stopped producing little heads in early October but it was still alive and green until November. Was the kale not dead, but just looked like it? Maybe. Can't tell now 'cause when it got below zero in January i let my geese into that greenhouse.

So the fall of 2012 was unseasonably warm and the fall of 2013 was unseasonably cold. An abrupt change i highlighted with my gardening experience. This year i'll be prepared for the cold (and it might be warm again!).


Uh, NO Snowleopard.

Please take ANOTHER LOOK at the New Hampshire growing season chart I listed. Your harvests were WAY BEYOND July and IMPOSSIBLE without frost protection. If you claim you had unprotected Brocolli , Chard and Kale harvests to November and December in 2012, you are not telling the truth.

Planting & Maturity Dates of Vegetables in New Hampshire

Crop                        Average Planting Dates                           Average Maturity Dates
Broccoli (seed)              May 1 – May 15                           July 10 – July 20
Broccoli (transplants)         May 5 – May 15                              June 20 – July
kale                                April 15 – May 15                         June 10 – July 10
Swiss Chard                    April 20 – May 15                         June 20 – July 15

Guess what,  I'm here and you're not.  If you continue to think i would lie about gardening then there is not much point in talking to you..                       

Used to be you had to plant broccolli twice or it would bolt out in the summer.  Now it grows into fall, that is my experience.   The varieties in 2012 were Diccio and Calabrese both organic.   The longer you run it though the smaller the heads get.  IF you have space you get way more return by planting another crop later, and that is what anyone would do commercially.   I'll do that when the next garden goes in.  My micro climate tends to cold so kale and chard  never (yet) die in the summer   If i can get a camera that doesn't encode my gps location i'll even take pictures to post this year.



The people that prepared this chart have been in NEW HAMPSHIRE for a rather LONG time and UNDERSTAND variable conditions QUITE WELL. If, as you claim, the conditions can vary so radically that YOU can have UNPROTECTED crop harvests up to November or December even in a warm season like the 2012 one, I am CERTAIN the AUTHORITIES on planting n New Hampshire WOULD NOT limit maturity dates to July.


https://extension.unh.edu/resources/files/Resource000616_Rep638.pdf


I've been in New Hampshire for a long time also.

IMO you place too much faith in authorities.  What they say is true for market crops, i'm raising for my kitchen mostly, and my soil has mucho organic compost, chicken manure etc.


And NO, you did NOT visit the link I gave you. Why did you say you hit the link? That is a lie and I can prove it IF you live in New Hampshire as you claim.  8)

You have a LOT of explaining to do, Mister.

Let's start with telling us WHERE YOU LIVE. If you DID click on that link, you DO NOT live in New Hampshire. If you DIDN'T click on the link and lied about whether you could see my pictures or whatever, WHY did you lie?

My IP does not reflect my address (unless you're uncle scrooge or a hacker).  AND you missunderstood me AGAIN, i was speaking of this link to your post on NH Farmers:

  http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/forum/index.php/topic,2394.msg43320/topicseen.html#msg43320

That is where i can't see the pictures.

I don't lie, though i do make mistakes and sometimes i'm hard to understand for some.  The reason i don't lie is the Karma of lying makes it hard to discern the truth.
 

That's twice.

59
Environment / Re: Alaska Springtime in January Photo Essay
« on: February 02, 2014, 04:05:13 PM »
Snowleopard,
Your stated recently that your New Hampshire extended growing season of Broccoli, Chard and Kale was excellent in 2012 despite heavy snow but frozen to death in November of 2013 (due to
Quote
"unseasonable" cold
(your words alluding to global cooling). How do you contrast your experience with that of this bit of bragging by New  Hampshire Organic Farmers (a banner season in 2013) AND the fact that their extended season, with hoop houses and cold frames, is now year round?  :icon_scratch:


Unless you farm at the top of Mount Washington (which is rather cold all year round with average winds in the 50 mph range  ;D), it is hard to explain your horrible failures in the extended New Hampshire growing season using frost protection techniques (hoop houses, cold frames, or greenhouses. :icon_scratch:

How do I KNOW you HAD to have had frost protection infrastructure? Because the growing season in New Hampshire for Broccoli, Chard and Kale ENDS LONG BEFORE OCTOBER.

Here's my post on it:  :icon_mrgreen:

Quote
When winter comes, the mini hoop tunnels can be used to grow a wide variety of taller vegetables, such as  kale.  :icon_mrgreen:

New Hampshire Organic Farmers  Brag About 2013 Season! "Now, with extensive high tunnels and a brand new storage facility, the Vegetable Ranch LLC can provide local produce to central New Hampshire virtually all year round." :emthup:  :icon_sunny:


These posts by Snowleopard are what piqued my curiosity about the New Hampshire approach to cold weather and also what their techniques are for crops grown in normal and extended growing seasons. I live in Vermont. people here KNOW how to deal with cold from centuries of experience. I know an organic tomato farmer here that grows tomatoes year round in greenhouses. I do not believe New Hampshire folks should be any different but I did not know for sure so I set about to learn8)

What Snowleopard said about losing his veggies to cold weather:


Reply #4 on: January 02, 2014, 12:37:20 PM »
What part of the country are you in, Snowleopard?  We're still looking for property in Maine and value first-hand experiences from the northern states.

Quote
I've little direct knowledge of Maine, despite living in New Hampshire.  Seldom get very far outside the county of late, and when i did travel it was mostly south and/or west.  That said, and despite a distaste for travel, the bit about moving south is getting more consideration every day. 

It's getting cold here.

Last year we harvested unprotected chard, kale and broccoli into late December despite heavy snowfall. This year the broccoli stopped producing in late October. At that point, we put up small portable plastic greenhouses over the chard and kale, but lost them in mid November anyway.  We've had fewer sunny days, lots of "unseasonable" cold, and were unable to keep the plants warm enough, without burning large amounts of propane and/or lighting multiple small wood or charcoal fires each day.  Could have been done maybe, just wasn't worth it.

http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/forum/index.php/topic,2247.msg40270.html#msg40270

Quote
THE TRUTH ABOUT KALE:
By stefanie
My kale plants are currently covered with melting ice. Is it ok to harvest some leaves now, or will that harm the plant?

By Almanac Staff
Kale is a cold-weather champion and can withstand a hard frost; this even makes the veggie taste sweeter. Kale can even survive an extreme freeze; you may lose some leaves but when the temperature warms up to 0 degrees, the leaves start to regrow.
http://www.almanac.com/plant/kale

Snowleopard said:

Reply #108 on: January 28, 2014, 10:09:14 AM »
Quote
My winter greens, (kale, chard, broccoli) don't care much that (allegedly) the average temperature is rising, because they were all killed by freezing to death (in November) inside of their hasty greenhouses.
http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/forum/index.php/topic,1162.msg42968.html#msg42968

Gee, I thought "the broccoli stopped producing in late October".  :icon_scratch:


ABOUT CHARD:


Quote
Is Swiss chard cold hardy?

Yes, it will tolerate light frosts. It is not as freeze tolerant as collards and kale, but will certainly make through the first early frosts of the season when the temperature is not too low and doesn’t stay below freezing but a few minutes in the wee hours.

So the above means that CHARD can die while KALE does NOT die in hard frosts like New Hampshire had in the fall of 2013.  But I thought that, " they (Chard AND KALE) were all killed by freezing to death (in November) inside of their hasty greenhouses".  :icon_scratch:


That explains how the Chard died. Or DOES IT?  :(

Chard growing in Saskatchewan seems to be somewhat more hardy than that growing in New Hampshire...

Quote
I live in Saskatchewan, which gets occasional cold snaps down to the -50′s C. Last year’s chard got covered with leaves purely by accident, and it’s now coming up again. I don’t know whether it was the covering of leaves or whether the chard can withstand a prairie Winter, but it’s coming up, thick and healthy.
http://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-swiss-chard/


Planting & Maturity Dates of Vegetables in New Hampshire
Crop                        Average Planting Dates                           Average Maturity Dates

Broccoli (seed)                     May 1 – May 15                           July 10 – July 20

Broccoli (transplants)         May 5 – May 15                             June 20 – July 1
Kale                                      April 15 – May 15                   June 10 – July 10
Swiss Chard                         April 20 – May 15                       June 20 – July 15


Quote
When winter comes, the mini hoop tunnels can be used to grow a wide variety of taller vegetables, such as kale and leeks.

Snowleopard actually stated that he had an extended growing season from 2012 so he is supposedly no stranger to dealing with frost protection for his veggies.

Look at the NORMAL growing season in New Hampshire for these veggies and you have proof that that, in order to extend the growing season, you NEED hoop house/green house or cold frame protection THAT would have worked JUST AS WELL IN 2013. :icon_scratch: :icon_scratch: :icon_scratch: :P


Here's the link again with the New Hampshire Organic Farmers Bragging about a an EXCELLENT 2013 growing and extended growing season. :icon_mrgreen:


New Hampshire Organic Farmers  Brag About 2013 Season! "Now, with extensive high tunnels and a brand new storage facility, the Vegetable Ranch LLC can provide local produce to central New Hampshire virtually all year round." :emthup:  :icon_sunny:

AG

I looked at your article, unfortunately my pc will not show the photos.

Do you garden?  If so, you know that each site has many variables, as does each variety of the same crop.

I'm not a pro farmer, just expanding my gardening a bit each year.  It is obvious i have a lot to learn, and i likely will continue to learn if i stay here.  I'll also build properly sited permanent, good quailty greenhouses.

In 2012, it was possible to extend the season for my chard with nothing for aqwhile and later with just some leaves for mulch.  The kale needed nothing, the broccolli was a bonus surprise that it survived the two foot Oct snow and produced into late December.  We didn't PLAN this, it happened and we took advantage of it.

In 2013 it got much colder much faster.  That was not a total surprise and was predictable as early as September.  My partner decided she liked having fresh greens late into winter and ordered the "hasty greenhouses" then when she saw some on closeout.  They are basicly tarp tents with a greenhouse type cover and closable screen vents.  We put them over most of the chard and kale plants.  ie. the garden was NOT planted with the greenhouses in mind, and thus the plants not optimally positioned for best greenhouse placement.  We did what we could given the circumstances (short of burning lots of propane or lighting small charcoal fires every few hours, which we decided was not worth it).  If it was a commercial operation we would have maybe tried propane heaters.

So yes, as i said, the chard and broccoli died in November.  Yes, the broccolli stopped producing little heads in early October but it was still alive and green until November.   Was the kale not dead, but just looked like it?  Maybe. Can't tell now 'cause when it got below zero in January i let my geese into that greenhouse.

So the fall of 2012 was unseasonably warm and the fall of 2013 was unseasonably cold.  An abrupt change i highlighted with my gardening experience.  This year i'll be prepared for the cold (and it might be warm again!).


60
Environment / Re: Alaska Springtime in January Photo Essay
« on: February 02, 2014, 02:45:31 PM »
AG posted a link to one of them awhile back, and someone else did in one of the MKing threads.  I'll take your word you haven't seen one, but you sound like you have.

Every time i think i might be ready to debate this issue, i find more data to explore. 

One reason you can easily accuse me of "casting doubt" is because I actually am in doubt as to what is really happening.

FYI this is where i am now:

"Deniers" as you call them, sometimes point out interesting facts but, i'm not in the "nothing to see here" camp of "deniers", as there IS something significant going on here. 

AND i don't think CO2 is a major player in this going forward.  WHY?

(accepting all scientific data for the purpose of discussion)

Mostly given what is known about CO2 IR absorbtion bands vs measured OLR:   ie. As the earth warms (or not) and CO2 increases from here, the small increase in the amount of heat energy that additional CO2 can trap is outweighed by the vast increase in the amount of energy that escapes to space.

This also suggests there is an upper limit to how warm it can get.

The Medieval Warm Period was maybe warmer overall than today, and certianly was in the arctic.  The Roman Warm Period was even warmer.  No one suggests these periods had high CO2 or high ocean heat. Due to decreasing insolation, one would expect this current warm period to be somewhat cooler that the last one, instead it's too close to call (so far).  The Current Warm Period arrived in cyclical rythym with these previous warm periods, but with increasing ocean heat.   CO2, though truly an accellerant to the warming early on, can not explain this ocean heat difference and the rapid CO2 increase is likely more due to outgassing from warming oceans than output from man.

It comes down to the same question RE asks.  What is heating the oceans and causing increased volcanic and seismic/tectonic activity?  IMO it's also responsible for most of the CO2 increase.

The fact that the Medieval/Rome warm period occurred with low atmospheric CO2 concentrations does not dispel the fact that CO2 is a greenhouse gas nor does it dispel the notion that CO2 contributes to higher global temperatures.

I agree

 All this suggests is there are other significant factors that contribute to climate change which could explain those warm periods. However there have been warm periods with higher CO2 concentrations so it is likely that CO2 does play a part in warming the Earth.

I agree again.  In fact CO2 likely played a siginficant part in the current warming until recently.  Am i missing your point?

The other important point to bear in mind when tackling these issues are feedback loops and since the temperatures seem to be rising quite quickly it is probable that positive feedback loops can be triggered that cause more unpredictable changes in the climate. At the end of the day humans are emitting a lot of gas into the atmosphere so it stands to reason we are having an effect on the atmospheric environment. Nitrogen based fertilizers are causing dead zones in the rivers and the various industrial chemicals thrown into the rivers/sea is also having an adverse effect. So how is it that we are not effecting the atmosphere in a negative manner?

Overall i have no argument that BAU is affecting the enviornment in a negative manner.  There are dozens of ways that is happening.  My only point there is that the CO2 iincrease from the warming oceans is likely adding more CO2 to the atmosphere than BAU.  Are there things going on we haven't figured out?  Likely.  Are there positive feedbacks currently unknown?  Possibly.  OTOH there is a large negative feedback loop i mentioned that is ignored by most models.

Being sceptical of government data and lobby data is useful in many instances (we generally need more scepticism in society) the issue I have with being a sceptic in this instance is that to deny is to take no action. Now you COULD argue that there is no reliable evidence for anthropogenic climate change but you have to consider the consequences of being wrong. What are the implications if climate change is real and we do nothing? Much worse living standards and difficulty growing food? On the other hand what if the scientific data is false but we follow the recommendations of reducing CO2 incorrectly. What are the implications of that scenario? Lower economic growth?

As we find with many things it is rare that we can develop a theory that provides us with 100% certainty of a outcome so everything tends to be a risk assessment. And when making an assessment you have to follow certain actions that maybe wrong just because the possible consequences are very dire if no action is taken. The current paradigm is fatally wrong on many other levels ignoring climate change so it must change anyway so why the resistance?

I'm in favor of many of the actions suggested  "to fight climate change" on a personal, voluntary and local level, (whatever the truth of climate change), for other reasons.  (Individual and community resilience, local sustainability, freedom from central control, avoiding contributing to the corp oligarchy, etc etc)  I'm not in favor of scaring folks into accepting a gov't climate czar to force these changes.

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