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11
Geopolitics / Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 06:22:27 AM »
On Fridays, Trump just fires off a couple of nasty tweets and flies out to to the golf resort, anyway.

It should be fairly easy to entertain a Trump Free Friday, most weeks, without missing much.

I'm thinking we see some interesting developments from Mueller over the next several days and weeks. He is going to have to shit or get off the pot. It doesn't matter what the truth happens to be. It's the US public perception that matters and that's getting weirder and less related to reality by the day. Mueller needs to indict some people and make it stick, at this point. Somebody besides Russian soldiers doing Putin's backroom hacking dirty work.
12
Golden Oxen Newz / Re: Gold & Silver News
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 05:54:24 AM »
I had a recent hire quit with a phone call 12 hours before this morning's shift. Been with us 5 months and just quit without notice. She lives at home. Her job skills sucked, she never got her required state certification anyway (we hired her on the condition she would), and she didn't see a problem with leaving us in the lurch on a Monday morning.

My fault I guess. Last week I started finally letting my frustration show a little bit with her inability to come up to speed after months of training. She was still making the same mistakes, costing me time and money. I'm glad she weeded herself out, but I expect her to apply for unemployment. I doubt she has a job to go to, and we'll have to fight to keep our state unemployment premiums down. We have to pay half of 6 months benefit if she gets it.

She called the missus and said she "wasn't comfortable" working in our office.
13
Golden Oxen Newz / Re: Gold & Silver News
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 05:45:53 AM »

                For. GO😋😘
             
               " I'd like to get you
                  On a slow boat to China
                 All to myself alone
                 Get you and keep you
                 In my arms evermore
                 Leave all your lovers
                 Weepin on the far away shore"

    Just You and Me Sweet Stuff!! ;D :o :o :-* :laugh:


                            Jimmie Rodgers - Oh Oh, I'm Falling In Love Again

                                   <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/CjLJBj1BprA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/CjLJBj1BprA</a>
                 

This is so cute.
14
Golden Oxen Newz / Re: Gold & Silver News
« Last post by David B. on Today at 05:27:13 AM »
I'm really enjoying reading about other doomer's financial strategies. GO is way out of my league. Eddie is way more ambitious then me. RE probably where I would be if I had no responsibilities. I won't comment on the rest since I do not understand their situations. One thing I have noticed in my age bracket or a bit younger among my greenies or light doomer friends is the tendency to concentrate on the skills and tools of doom to the detriment of the BAU finances. I tear my hair out as I see a maturing food forest and good prepping skills but large mortgage debt barely being picked at. I have long believed that stage one is a financial squeeze not a collapse. I fear for my friends still loaded with debt on a first house let alone a third. I believe they will be crushed by phase one. In the spirit of openness; My wife and I chose this area due to its low cost of living decent isolation and access to income potential (cottagers). We bought our land outright mostly from my squirrelled away money from my apprenticed years. We built the house shell on left over savings, lines of credit and introductory credit card rates... We moved into the shell as soon as the roof was on and the walls sealed. I took a job with a contractor just long enough to qualify for a mortgage then started out on my own. We finished the house as we could. Crazy busy kidless years ensued. Construction is very hard work but it can be rewarding. At this point barring financial disaster I'm set. I have to keep working but the unstoppable wobbles of life should not sink me. I'll never be rich but I don't live that high on the hog anyways.  I never expected to be the one still standing so the last year has been a little confusing. I've mentioned it before but my wife passed away last year.  This was the first year in 12 I actually worked for someone so I had to sock away a fair bit of money in an RSP to avoid tax. That never happened to me when I was self employed! How does this relate to gold?  This is where I don't know enough. I see gold as a currency for buying things when times are hard. Am I wrong? Concentrated portable wealth. So here is what I don't get; if everything I would need to buy is small like tools or grain or parts do I need gold? Yes its portable but its just too concentrated for us working folk no? I keep some cash and oddly enough have a few pounds of silver due to a coin collecting wife but short of that its all tools, skills, preps, land and equipment for wealth storage. So you gold bugs out there should I have a very modest gold position at my stage of the game?
curious to see any responses.
Cheers,  David

Hi David, Yes to your question and emphatically. Have a some gold.

My brain has gone tilt after reading everyone's comments on the gold thread of the last 24 hours.

So much misconception, false notions, and off the wall ideas that I feel my years of work here have been a total failure.

In your case I am going to be as concise as possible, hit you with a few simple facts and arrive at your own conclusion. You strike me as a person who does not want to be bothered with ridiculous statistics, baseless conjecture and dreamed up situations in a future fantasy world.

In 1970 a group of Banksters told President Nixon that they could no longer print money and play the con game of inflation because the gold price could no longer be contained. General De Gaulle had explained to the French they were going to get dicked, and real good, by the US who would renege on it's promise to give gold for dollars on request. He was correct.

President Nixon appeared on nation and world wide TV, severed the dollar from Gold completely, and reneged on on the US promise to give Gold in exchange for Dollars at 35 dollars per oz.

It is July 23, 2018, close to 50 years since that historic day in Financial history.

There has been no Doomsday. The world has not ended. On the contrary we have witnessed the greatest economic boom in History. Undreamed of technological advances, medical advances, shorter work hours, great amounts of leisure time and travel. You live in the same world as I do David so there is no need to continue explaining the overall prosperity many have enjoyed.

What's the point GO??? What the fuck are you saying to me?

There are two other very significant events that happened throughout that period of great prosperity David, of No great panics. No World Wars. No Doomsday. No total breakdown of law and order. No Grid Collapse. No Hyperinflation. No Plagues. Etc. Etc. Etc. 

Gold in Dollar terms went from 35 to 1900 and resides at 1230.39 as I write and the Dollar has lost well over 90% of it's purchasing power.

Hope I've said enough and answered your question David.


                                       


                                       
thank you for the reply. I do look here: http://www.thepeoplehistory.com/70yearsofpricechange.html
And find most goods have inflated by  10 times  that does paint a good picture for gold but could it not also mean that gold could be trading in the 400 range? Not challenging just asking...
15
Golden Oxen Newz / Re: Gold & Silver News
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 05:26:37 AM »
I think relatively few people ever just start a 401K and never tap into it until retirement. That's the exception, not the rule.

Millenials will vote for socialist type reforms, some of which would no doubt be beneficial, like single payer, for instance. They view it as a responsibility of government to provide a safety net. They expect to pay big taxes, and they are fairly accepting of the authority of the state. Most of them are headed for a low standard of living. They expect that.

Just don't fuck with their data plan or their phone apps.
16
Geopolitics / Re: Sanders' wing of the party terrifies moderate Dems.
« Last post by Eddie on Today at 05:20:12 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/elections/sanders-wing-party-terrifies-moderate-dems-here-s-how-they-n893381

Sanders' wing of the party terrifies moderate Dems. Here's how they plan to stop it.
Party members and fundraisers gathered for an invitation-only event to figure out how to counteract the rising progressive movement.
by Alex Seitz-Wald / Jul.22.2018 / 4:01 AM ET


Ocasio-Cortez joins Sanders to rally for Kansas Democrat, progressive values
Jul.20.201801:19

COLUMBUS, Ohio — If Sen. Bernie Sanders is leading a leftist political revolt, then a summit here of moderate Democrats might be the start of a counterrevolution.

While the energy and momentum is with progressives these days — the victory of rising star Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in New York, buzz about Democratic Socialism and the spread of the "Abolish ICE!" movement are a few recent examples — moderates are warning that ignoring them will lead the party to disaster in the midterm elections and the 2020 presidential contest.

That anxiety has largely been kept to a whisper among the party's moderates and big donors, with some of the major fundraisers pressing operatives on what can be done to stop Sanders, I-Vt., if he runs for the White House again.

But the first-ever "Opportunity 2020" convention, organized here last week by Third Way, a moderate Democratic think tank, gave middle-of-the-road party members a safe space to come together and voice their concerns.

"The only narrative that has been articulated in the Democratic Party over the past two years is the one from the left," former Delaware Gov. Jack Markell told NBC News.

"I think we need a debate within the party," he added. "Frankly, it would have been better to start the conversation earlier."

Pragmatism may be a tougher sell in the Donald Trump era, but with the 2020 presidential race just around the corner, moderate Democrats know they are running out of time to reassert themselves.

The gathering here was just that — an effort to offer an attractive alternative to the rising Sanders-style populist left in the upcoming presidential race. Where progressives see a rare opportunity to capitalize on an energized Democratic base, moderates see a better chance to win over Republicans turned off by Trump.

The fact that a billionaire real estate developer, Winston Fisher, co-cohosted the event and addressed attendees twice underscored that this group is not interested in the class warfare vilifying the "millionaires and billionaires" found in Sanders' stump speech.

"You're not going to make me hate somebody just because they're rich. I want to be rich!" Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, a potential presidential candidate, said Friday to laughs.
Image: Tim Ryan
Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, arrives for a House Democratic Caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington on Nov. 30, 2016.Susan Walsh / AP file

The invitation-only gathering brought together about 250 Democratic insiders from key swing states. Third Way unveiled the results of focus groups and polling that it says shows Americans are more receptive to an economic message built on "opportunity" rather than the left's message about inequality.

"Once again, the time has come to mend, but not end, capitalism for a new era," said Third Way President Jon Cowan.

For the left, Third Way represents the Wall Street-wing of the party and everything wrong with the donor-driven wet blanketism they've been trying exorcise since 2016. Thom Hartmann, a liberal talk radio host and Sanders friend, once called the group's warning about Sanders "probably the most stupid thing I've ever heard," before ticking through all the investment bankers on Third Way's board.

But some elected officials in relatively conservative areas say progressives are clueless about what their agenda would mean for Democrats outside major cities and the coasts.

"We will be a permanent minority party in this country," said Iowa state Sen. Jeff Danielson, a firefighter who represents an area that saw one of the biggest swings from Barack Obama to Trump during the 2016 election.

Single-payer, government-run health care may be a popular party plank in New York City, where Ocascio-Cortez, a Democratic Socialist, recently won a high-profile primary, Danielson said, but added, "it does not work in the rest of America ... and I’m tired of losing."

Moderates said they feel they're being drowned out by louder voices on the left.

Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-Ill., a member of the House Democratic leadership who represents a district Trump won, invoked Richard Nixon's "silent majority."

"If you look throughout the heartland, there's a silent majority who just wants normalcy. Who wants to see that people are going out to Washington to fight for them in a civil way and get something done," she told reporters.

"There's a lot of people that just don't really like protests and don't like yelling and screaming," she added.
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And they worry the angry left will cost Democrats a rare chance to win over those kind of voters, including Republicans who no longer want to be part of Trump's GOP.

"Republicans have chosen the far right, which means that they have ceded a good portion of the middle of the road," said former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, who is considering a presidential run. "The Democrats, in my opinion, would make a big mistake if they decide to run a base election and just say, ‘Our base is bigger than your base.'"
Image: Mitch Landrieu
New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu speaks in Washington on race in America and his decision to take down Confederate monuments in his city on June 16, 2017.Jacquelyn Martin / AP file

With much of the recent policy innovation on the Democratic side happening on the left, the "Opportunity Agenda" unveiled here tries to equip moderates with their own big ideas.

Some of the key initiatives are a massive apprenticeship program to train workers, a privatized employer-funded universal pension that would supplement Social Security and an overhaul of unemployment insurance to include skills training. Other proposals included a "small business bill of rights" and the creation of a "BoomerCorps" — like the volunteer AmericaCorps for seniors.

Meanwhile, they say the progressive agenda is out of date. They dismiss, for instance, a federal jobs guarantee as a rehash of the New Deal.

"Our ideas must be bold, but they must also fit the age we are in," Cowan said. "Big isn't enough. If it's bold and old — it’s simply old."

Matt Bennett, Third Way's senior vice president for public affairs, acknowledges that Sanders "had a big head start."

Many of the party's biggest stars, including Sens. Kamala Harris of California, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and Cory Booker of New Jersey, have already signed on to Sanders-backed policies like single-payer health care. But Bennett said he thinks they'll reconsider when they examine the details. "I think they were a little hasty," he said.

Notably, the proposed moderate agenda does not take issue with the party's broad consensus in favor of abortion rights, LGBT equality, stricter gun control and support for immigrants and a path to citizenship for the undocumented.

In a twist, the agenda is based largely on geography, rather than class or race, which are more popular on the left. It focuses on trying to address the fact that cities are thriving as rural areas fall behind.

Clinton was pilloried earlier this year for bragging that she "won the places that are optimistic, diverse, dynamic, moving forward," but Democratic losses in the rest of America have been politically disastrous for the party.

The difficulty will be selling this approach in the Democratic presidential primary to a base that has seemed to move in the opposite direction.

Rep. Jim Himes, D-Conn., the chair of the New Democrat Coalition, said members of his side are not "naturally arbiters of emotion and anger."

"How we tell our story and put forward our polices in a way that makes people want to mount the barricades is one of the biggest challenges we have," said Himes, a former Goldman Sachs banker who represents Fairfield, Connecticut.

He pointed to calls to "Abolish ICE," for instance, which he characterized as emotionally understandable but politically illogical.

"It hurts us in areas where we need to win," Himes warned of "Abolish ICE" in the midterms. "You have now made life harder for the 60 or 70 Democrats fighting in districts where we need to win if we ever want to be in the majority."

"We're going to figure it out, though," he added, looking down at his tie printed with little blue waves. "We're going to figure it out."
 

They should start by learning the math. They need to attract white people, and they aren't doing anything to make that happen.

They persist in their ongoing strategy, which is to just survive until demographics gives the victory, as the brown Americans become the majority. but it isn't quite so simple. On their present course, I don't see them surviving at all as a major force in American politics.


A damaging distortion

Black Americans are over-represented in media portrayals of poverty
And that underpins some toxic beliefs


Democracy in America
Feb 20th 2018by C.K. | WASHINGTON, DC

NBC reported recently that at a meeting last year with the Congressional Black Caucus a member told President Donald Trump that his planned welfare cuts would hurt her constituents, “not all of whom were black”. Mr Trump is reported to have replied: "Really? Then what are they?” If the president had not realised that most welfare recipients are white, he is not alone. And the media are partly to blame, for black Americans are overwhelmingly over-represented in media portrayals of poverty.

The poverty rate amongst black Americans, at 22%, is higher than the American average of 13%. But black people make up only 9m of the 41m poor Americans. The Kaiser Family Foundation, a non-profit focused on health care, found that in only five states for which it had data and the District of Columbia, were there more black poor people than white. Black Americans are more likely to be recipients of means-tested welfare programmes like Medicaid or Housing Assistance - at 41% participation in one or more programmes in 2012 that is about twice the national average. That suggests black people make up about 26% of all recipients.

Media news suggests that the percentage is very much higher. Travis Dixon at the University of Illinois analysed a random sample of television, print and online news stories over 2015 and 2016 and found that 59% of the poor people discussed or depicted in them were black. White families, by contrast, accounted for only 17% of poor people shown, though they constitute 66% of the poor population. It is possible that, with a new emphasis on the frustrations of poor white Americans, that Mr Trump tapped into in 2016, media portrayals will begin to change; it is too soon to know.

The bias isn’t limited to right-leaning news sources. In the news coverage Mr Dixon looked at, CNN depicted seven poor families—all seven of them were black. And all five of the poor families depicted in Dixon’s sample of New York Times coverage were black.

Unsurprisingly, this tendency, which has a long history, has informed the way Americans think about race and poverty. Martin Gilens, a politics professor at Yale, found that in a survey in 1994, 55% of Americans thought that all poor Americas were black and only 24% thought the reverse.

And this, in turn, has set some Americans against welfare spending. Katherine Krimmel and Kelly Rader, political scientists, have found that individuals who are more likely to benefit from government spending tend to support it. Richer people in poorer states are notably keen to cut domestic spending. But they found that racial resentment has an even greater influence on attitudes to government spending. They measured resentment via two questions about whether blacks should overcome prejudice “without any special favours” and whether “generations of slavery and discrimination have created conditions that make it difficult for blacks to work their way out of the lower class.” The impact of resentment on attitudes towards spending was four times that of income differences and larger than measures of self-interest including being unemployed. If welfare is seen as overwhelmingly benefiting blacks it is little surprise that whites displaying racial resentment might oppose it.

The Sentencing Project, an advocacy group for criminal justice reform, has found a similar pattern regarding violent crime.  Crimes perpetrated by African Americans were disproportionately likely to be covered on television –especially if they involved a white victim.  While only 10% of victims in crime reports were whites who had been victimised by blacks, these crimes made up 42% of cases televised by local news. Popular perceptions of crime reflect the coverage bias: a survey from 2002 found that respondents estimated 40% of people who committed violent crimes were black; surveys showed the proportion to be 29%.  And white Americans who more strongly associated crime with black Americans were more likely to support punitive criminal justice policies including the death sentence and three strikes laws.

A media focus on black poverty may be well-intentioned. It probably has its roots in the pre-Civil Rights era when the plight of poor black Americans was too often neglected. But it has helped underpin a toxic set of beliefs about poverty and race. It would be better, of course, if people did not decide their support for programmes based on the skin colour of beneficiaries. But until that is the case a more accurate understanding of the diversity of welfare recipients would help.

https://www.economist.com/democracy-in-america/2018/02/20/black-americans-are-over-represented-in-media-portrayals-of-poverty



17
Golden Oxen Newz / Re: Gold & Silver News
« Last post by David B. on Today at 05:16:38 AM »

Just watching a headline come across that 29 % of millennial's have tapped into their 401Ks already and the number was going up rapidly.  :-\

This is not going to end well. :'( :'(

                                   
for buying homes or just to get by?
18
Geopolitics / Sanders' wing of the party terrifies moderate Dems.
« Last post by RE on Today at 04:51:37 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/elections/sanders-wing-party-terrifies-moderate-dems-here-s-how-they-n893381

Sanders' wing of the party terrifies moderate Dems. Here's how they plan to stop it.
Party members and fundraisers gathered for an invitation-only event to figure out how to counteract the rising progressive movement.
by Alex Seitz-Wald / Jul.22.2018 / 4:01 AM ET


Ocasio-Cortez joins Sanders to rally for Kansas Democrat, progressive values
Jul.20.201801:19

COLUMBUS, Ohio — If Sen. Bernie Sanders is leading a leftist political revolt, then a summit here of moderate Democrats might be the start of a counterrevolution.

While the energy and momentum is with progressives these days — the victory of rising star Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in New York, buzz about Democratic Socialism and the spread of the "Abolish ICE!" movement are a few recent examples — moderates are warning that ignoring them will lead the party to disaster in the midterm elections and the 2020 presidential contest.

That anxiety has largely been kept to a whisper among the party's moderates and big donors, with some of the major fundraisers pressing operatives on what can be done to stop Sanders, I-Vt., if he runs for the White House again.

But the first-ever "Opportunity 2020" convention, organized here last week by Third Way, a moderate Democratic think tank, gave middle-of-the-road party members a safe space to come together and voice their concerns.

"The only narrative that has been articulated in the Democratic Party over the past two years is the one from the left," former Delaware Gov. Jack Markell told NBC News.

"I think we need a debate within the party," he added. "Frankly, it would have been better to start the conversation earlier."

Pragmatism may be a tougher sell in the Donald Trump era, but with the 2020 presidential race just around the corner, moderate Democrats know they are running out of time to reassert themselves.

The gathering here was just that — an effort to offer an attractive alternative to the rising Sanders-style populist left in the upcoming presidential race. Where progressives see a rare opportunity to capitalize on an energized Democratic base, moderates see a better chance to win over Republicans turned off by Trump.

The fact that a billionaire real estate developer, Winston Fisher, co-cohosted the event and addressed attendees twice underscored that this group is not interested in the class warfare vilifying the "millionaires and billionaires" found in Sanders' stump speech.

"You're not going to make me hate somebody just because they're rich. I want to be rich!" Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, a potential presidential candidate, said Friday to laughs.
Image: Tim Ryan
Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, arrives for a House Democratic Caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington on Nov. 30, 2016.Susan Walsh / AP file

The invitation-only gathering brought together about 250 Democratic insiders from key swing states. Third Way unveiled the results of focus groups and polling that it says shows Americans are more receptive to an economic message built on "opportunity" rather than the left's message about inequality.

"Once again, the time has come to mend, but not end, capitalism for a new era," said Third Way President Jon Cowan.

For the left, Third Way represents the Wall Street-wing of the party and everything wrong with the donor-driven wet blanketism they've been trying exorcise since 2016. Thom Hartmann, a liberal talk radio host and Sanders friend, once called the group's warning about Sanders "probably the most stupid thing I've ever heard," before ticking through all the investment bankers on Third Way's board.

But some elected officials in relatively conservative areas say progressives are clueless about what their agenda would mean for Democrats outside major cities and the coasts.

"We will be a permanent minority party in this country," said Iowa state Sen. Jeff Danielson, a firefighter who represents an area that saw one of the biggest swings from Barack Obama to Trump during the 2016 election.

Single-payer, government-run health care may be a popular party plank in New York City, where Ocascio-Cortez, a Democratic Socialist, recently won a high-profile primary, Danielson said, but added, "it does not work in the rest of America ... and I’m tired of losing."

Moderates said they feel they're being drowned out by louder voices on the left.

Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-Ill., a member of the House Democratic leadership who represents a district Trump won, invoked Richard Nixon's "silent majority."

"If you look throughout the heartland, there's a silent majority who just wants normalcy. Who wants to see that people are going out to Washington to fight for them in a civil way and get something done," she told reporters.

"There's a lot of people that just don't really like protests and don't like yelling and screaming," she added.
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And they worry the angry left will cost Democrats a rare chance to win over those kind of voters, including Republicans who no longer want to be part of Trump's GOP.

"Republicans have chosen the far right, which means that they have ceded a good portion of the middle of the road," said former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, who is considering a presidential run. "The Democrats, in my opinion, would make a big mistake if they decide to run a base election and just say, ‘Our base is bigger than your base.'"
Image: Mitch Landrieu
New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu speaks in Washington on race in America and his decision to take down Confederate monuments in his city on June 16, 2017.Jacquelyn Martin / AP file

With much of the recent policy innovation on the Democratic side happening on the left, the "Opportunity Agenda" unveiled here tries to equip moderates with their own big ideas.

Some of the key initiatives are a massive apprenticeship program to train workers, a privatized employer-funded universal pension that would supplement Social Security and an overhaul of unemployment insurance to include skills training. Other proposals included a "small business bill of rights" and the creation of a "BoomerCorps" — like the volunteer AmericaCorps for seniors.

Meanwhile, they say the progressive agenda is out of date. They dismiss, for instance, a federal jobs guarantee as a rehash of the New Deal.

"Our ideas must be bold, but they must also fit the age we are in," Cowan said. "Big isn't enough. If it's bold and old — it’s simply old."

Matt Bennett, Third Way's senior vice president for public affairs, acknowledges that Sanders "had a big head start."

Many of the party's biggest stars, including Sens. Kamala Harris of California, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and Cory Booker of New Jersey, have already signed on to Sanders-backed policies like single-payer health care. But Bennett said he thinks they'll reconsider when they examine the details. "I think they were a little hasty," he said.

Notably, the proposed moderate agenda does not take issue with the party's broad consensus in favor of abortion rights, LGBT equality, stricter gun control and support for immigrants and a path to citizenship for the undocumented.

In a twist, the agenda is based largely on geography, rather than class or race, which are more popular on the left. It focuses on trying to address the fact that cities are thriving as rural areas fall behind.

Clinton was pilloried earlier this year for bragging that she "won the places that are optimistic, diverse, dynamic, moving forward," but Democratic losses in the rest of America have been politically disastrous for the party.

The difficulty will be selling this approach in the Democratic presidential primary to a base that has seemed to move in the opposite direction.

Rep. Jim Himes, D-Conn., the chair of the New Democrat Coalition, said members of his side are not "naturally arbiters of emotion and anger."

"How we tell our story and put forward our polices in a way that makes people want to mount the barricades is one of the biggest challenges we have," said Himes, a former Goldman Sachs banker who represents Fairfield, Connecticut.

He pointed to calls to "Abolish ICE," for instance, which he characterized as emotionally understandable but politically illogical.

"It hurts us in areas where we need to win," Himes warned of "Abolish ICE" in the midterms. "You have now made life harder for the 60 or 70 Democrats fighting in districts where we need to win if we ever want to be in the majority."

"We're going to figure it out, though," he added, looking down at his tie printed with little blue waves. "We're going to figure it out."
 

19
Golden Oxen Newz / Re: Gold & Silver News
« Last post by Golden Oxen on Today at 04:29:18 AM »

Just watching a headline come across that 29 % of millennial's have tapped into their 401Ks already and the number was going up rapidly.  :-\

This is not going to end well. :'( :'(

                                   
20
Surly Newz / Re: WHEN THE END OF HUMAN CIVILIZATION IS YOUR DAY JOB
« Last post by RE on Today at 04:14:51 AM »
Lets not get "Highly" distracted. I'm not back. Just chiming in. I'm not motivated to write in the slightest at the moment.

Participating on the forum inside the Diner isn't "writing".  It's chewing the fat with your fellow Kollapsniks.  It's the cyber version of the nightly campfire where all the hard working sweaty guys sit around and drink beer, smoke ganja, tell tall tales and get in periodic fistfights to break the monotony.

RE

For some of us but not all. Speaking for myself, no drugs whatsoever and sober and working 98 % of the time when at the forum.
Also not allowed to fight back.

That is a violation of the CoC.

RE
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