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21
Surly Newz / Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Last post by Surly1 on October 17, 2018, 10:36:02 AM »
I post this here because, if this ain't something to make you say, "Dafuq?" I don't know what is.
Interesting that i found this today because I actually did #2 last night.

10 Common Items That Could Cause Your Death

Jun 18, 2018 |Bizzare

hot dog

Everyone is acutely aware of the most common causes of death, but there are several everyday items that you might want to be more weary of. Many of them might even be something you use all the time! Keep reading for 10 common items that could kill you.

10. Jacuzzi

You might be surprised to find out that almost every day in the United States someone is killed or drowns in a hot tub. Many of theses deaths are attributed to drowning due to over indulgence in drugs or alcohol, resulting in falling asleep in the hot tub. However, some are also attributed to homicide.

9. Electric Blanket

Image credit:yourbestdigs

Who doesn’t love a warm, cozy electric blanket on a cold night? Well, you might think twice next time you pull it out this winter. Electric blankets cause nearly 5,000 fires per year, which results in about 20 deaths each year.

8. Escalators

escalator

For many people, this is a common fear. Getting your foot, shoe, or clothing stuck in an escalator is a frightening thought. Sadly, it is a reality for about 30 people each year who are killed by escalators and the approximately 17,000 people that are seriously injured. Maybe next time you go to the mall, you’ll opt to take the stairs.

7. Magnets

Magnets, they seem so innocuous right? Everyone has them on their fridge! Wrong. Magnets pose a serious risk to young children who are prone to putting things in their mouths and swallowing them. If a child swallows more than one magnet, the two (or more) will try to find each other through the path of least resistance. This could be through intestinal walls, which can cause major internal damage. Keep magnets out of reach for small kids until they are out of that phase.

6. Dryer Lint

Dryer lint

This is another fire starter item in your home. Nearly 3,000 house fires occur each year as a result of dryer lint. These fires result in about 5 deaths per year. It is very important to clean the lint trap in your dryer before and after each use to prevent build-up. It is also good practice to scrub the lint trap insert with soap and water on a regular basis to prevent a build-up of detergent or fabric softener.

5. Heavy Furniture

bookshelves

Furniture, such as dressers and bookshelves, pose a major risk to small children. Children often want to climb dresser drawers or shelves to see what is on top. This results in the piece of furniture crushing the child, which can lead to death due to internal injuries. Death by furniture is not quite as common as some of the other hazards on this list, but about 200 people were killed by falling furniture over a 16 year period in the US.

4. Headphones

While headphones themselves can’t kill you, they can cause your death. Many people wear headphones while they are out and about either working out or running errands. In some cases, headphones cause a distraction to the pedestrian and result in being hit by a car. Many of these accidents are fatal and could have been avoided. Be alert and keep your volume down if you are in or near a busy roadway.

3. Icicles

This one does not apply to everyone, as not everyone lives somewhere that gets snow and ice, but icicles can definitely be an unexpected killer. Many people each year are injured or even killed by these frozen ice stakes. Make sure to keep an eye out next winter and watch where you’re walking!

2. Beds

This is probably the most upsetting item on this list. Everyone loves to be in their comfy beds trying to get a good night’s rest. But did you know that over 700 people die each year in the United States from falling out of their beds? In fact, Americans are more likely to die each year from falling out of their bed than being killed by a terrorist. Stay safe, sleepers!

1. Hot Dogs

One of America’s favorite foods is also a potential choking hazard to children. Over 10,000 children ages 14 and under are taken to the hospital each year after choking on hot dogs. Of those children, about 75 die each year. Many people do not realize that due to children’s small airways and inability or forgetting to chew properly, hot dogs can be very unsafe. Make sure to cut hot dogs into small enough pieces for your child depending on their age.

While these are just some of the everyday items that can kill you, there are many more. Most of the time these items are harmless, but deaths do occur. Be a little more cautious next time you ride an escalator, don’t leave electric blankets plugged in unattended or overnight, and clean out your dryer’s lint trap! Hopefully, by understanding the risk of these common items, you will be able to keep yourself and your loved ones a bit safer.

22
Surly Newz / Re: Things That Make Me Say, "Dafuq?"
« Last post by Surly1 on October 17, 2018, 10:32:33 AM »
Grandpa was a carpenter
He built houses stores and banks
Chain smoked Camel cigarettes
And hammered nails in planks
He was level on the level
And shaved even every door
And voted for Eisenhower
'Cause Lincoln won the war


            --------- John Prine

Just an excellent example that sprung to mind, of how public perceptions shape politics.

Now people vote for Democrats 'cause Lincoln won the war. It's completely changed in one lifetime. Funny how it's all about the narrative, and the reality comes in a distant second.


Great lyric.

People also forget that, "because Lincoln won the war," politically aware blacks were generally Republicans right up through the end of WWII. IN fact, Martin Luther King, Sr. had been a lifelong republican until he endorsed JFK.

 LBJ changed the politics, and the narrative changed in kind.  As it is changing every day as we watch in awe, terror and disgust.
23
Economics / Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Last post by Eddie on October 17, 2018, 10:26:17 AM »
Nobody said it was your problem, comrade.

I write this stuff to help anyone who is remotely interested understand the process. I know you are not interested, which is fine by me. I'm not trying to sell you anything.

At 180 views it seems to be arousing more interest than most of my rants. But I'm sure the five or six of us who come here regularly are almost certainly the only ones reading it.....but who knows.

I wasn't interested either until last week, but now I am. Okay if I keep the thread going, or would you like for me to stop?

(I secretly hope your source for candles starts to demand payment in bitcoin, btw.....it could happen. LOL.)

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Economics / Re: How Blockchain Will Ruin Your World
« Last post by RE on October 17, 2018, 10:18:40 AM »
All this to buy a fraction of one bitcoin. Sheesh.

This is your problem, not my problem.

RE
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Economics / Re: How Blockchain Will Ruin Your World
« Last post by Eddie on October 17, 2018, 10:09:47 AM »
It's now showing up as pending on my card account, so maybe I'll get lucky. So I have to wait, and see if it goes into my account, the timing of which seems pretty unknowable.

Shrug and pray technology.

Get this. They wanted me to read this long disclaimer while holding my card so they could see it, and then when I did that, the file size was too big. I had to do it over and read really, really fast to get it under 25MB's. So incredibly silly.

All this to buy a fraction of one bitcoin. Sheesh.
26
Economics / Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Last post by RE on October 17, 2018, 10:04:13 AM »
There is a lot of bullshit to deal with in the world of cryptos. That's what I was getting at.

In the world of penny stocks, some online brokers don't handle certain stocks. i ran into that with some of the Canadian pot stocks. But at the  very worst, it was never a tenth as bad as crypto.

You should be able to have one account, but that doesn't work unless you just want to own bitcoin alone, which wouldn't be the way to go these days.

I have now tried to buy some bitcoin for the fifth time, and I've been waiting for a half hour to see if it went through. My guess is no.

All to the good there.  Go out and buy some more ammo.  Or better yet, CANDLES!🕯️  :icon_sunny:

RE
27
Economics / Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Last post by Eddie on October 17, 2018, 10:00:05 AM »
There is a lot of bullshit to deal with in the world of cryptos. That's what I was getting at.

In the world of penny stocks, some online brokers don't handle certain stocks. i ran into that with some of the Canadian pot stocks. But at the  very worst, it was never a tenth as bad as crypto.

You should be able to have one account, but that doesn't work unless you just want to own bitcoin alone, which wouldn't be the way to go these days.

I have now tried to buy some bitcoin for the fifth time, and I've been waiting for a half hour to see if it went through. My guess is no.
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Economics / Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Last post by RE on October 17, 2018, 08:51:51 AM »
I have to get more wallets and more exchange accounts.


RE
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Economics / Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Last post by Eddie on October 17, 2018, 08:47:03 AM »
So, after assuring my credit union I'm not getting scammed, and after assuring the bitcoin wallet people I'm not being held hostage, I tried again.

Fourth attempt, fourth fail. I did fine until the very last step.....but this time instead of them wanting my ID , they asked me to make a video selfie reading a disclaimer and holding my credit card up so they could eyeball me and it at the same time. No shit.

By the time I figured out how to make a video selfie on my Mac (only a few minutes) the transaction timed out. Dammit! They said I could try again in 3-4 hours.

I'm sure none of this stuff is any big deal to a millenial, but to me it's very unwieldy and stupid. Fraud is the issue, of course. It's rampant in the crypto space.

One other thing I forgot to mention that is important. The fees to buy bitcoin are highway robbery. What ever you intended to spend, it'll cost you an extra 10% for the privilege of buying....no online stock broker could ever get away with fees like that. Fuckin' ridiculous.

30
Doomsteading / Re: The Doom Loop
« Last post by Golden Oxen on October 17, 2018, 08:20:38 AM »
The truth according to K-Dog is that collapse is not going to be a single identifiable event that puts us in the middle of a dystopian novel.  Collapse ultimately becomes the fate of individuals and we all have different fates.  Eventually people will starve to death in America, and for many life will become nasty brutish and short.  But this will not happen to everybody and not all at the same time to those it does.  That it be a minority of people or a majority is irrelevant.  That is only a number.  The point I wish to make is that those who suffer merely 'disappear' but civilization limps on.  National Guardsmen shooting looters will be civilization limping on.  Latifundiumi run by prison labor will also be civilization limping on.  Some have already starved and you did not notice.

Collapse has been going on for years.  After the crash in 2008 I did not get hit by it right away.  I had a contract so my job was secure until the end of my contract and then I did not work for a few years until circumstances changed.  I 'recovered' but I realize not everybody did because I came close to fading away for all time myself.  Collapse is a game of musical chairs and if you are the one left standing up you collapse.

Victims of collapse don't get to play the game anymore.  That fact means the survivors will continue to play, and play, and play.  Survivors don't rewrite the rules of the game.  Only victims could do that so the music will play for a very long time and stop many times.  One man's collapse will not happen at the same time as another's.

Katrina,  the crash of 2008, name your disaster.  Collapse has been with us for a long time and if it continues as it has we will have Archdruids ridiculous 'catabolic collapse' concept where John Greer postulates a slow contraction which will defy all rules of mathematics and human nature.

Collapse in a 'doom' sense would mean serious interruption in the oil supply.  I see oil trains sending oil to export every day.  Oil if need be will be pumped at gunpoint while society adjusts and gets rid of excess flesh.  That flesh may well be ours but after we die the great game will go on without us.

Total collapse would mean we all die.  That is not going to happen.  For more likely will be that some find a way to profit from the demise of others.  Then they write history.

At some time something serious has to happen to cause a big die-off.  That is as sure as two plus two is four.  But knowing when will be impossible to predict.  Too many variables.


Fairly profound, there Dog. I agree, and so many doomers don't get this. Just the old ones, LOL.

Only wish to second Eddie's comment. Certainly appears reasonable and very well thought out and expressed.
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