Doomstead Diner Menu => Doomsteading => Primitive Living => Topic started by: Palloy2 on January 01, 2018, 05:24:40 PM

Title: Horse cart
Post by: Palloy2 on January 01, 2018, 05:24:40 PM
This shows how to make a cart using wood (steel for wheel rims and axles). Super heavy duty version. 15 minutes

http://www.youtube.com/v/FZ3IsIuU8oE
Title: Re: Horse cart
Post by: Eddie on January 01, 2018, 05:35:57 PM
I happen to have, through a pure accident, a horse drawn hay rake, a horse drawn mowing machine for mowing hay, and a horse drawn corn planter. Except that they would have used mules where I live.

They've sat in the rain for maybe 75-100 years, and I'm pretty sure I could make them all work in a day or two. No mule though.
Title: Re: Horse cart
Post by: RE on January 01, 2018, 05:42:27 PM
I happen to have, through a pure accident, a horse drawn hay rake, a horse drawn mowing machine for mowing hay, and a horse drawn corn planter. Except that they would have used mules where I live.

They've sat in the rain for maybe 75-100 years, and I'm pretty sure I could make them all work in a day or two. No mule though.

Maybe you could get the Mangalitsas to pull the cart.

RE
Title: Re: Horse cart
Post by: Eddie on January 01, 2018, 05:48:16 PM
I could trade for a mule, I'm pretty sure. But because horses are valued more right now, horses are more plentiful and availability would be greater. We don't have a lot of draft horses left, but some breeds, like paints, are big gentle horses and could be put to work.

I remember when I was a kid my Dad bought a horse drawn plow and used it to plow our garden. He did it because he was nostalgic for his youth, when that was the normal way to do things. It was the normal way in my own family until 1939, which is when my grandfather bought his first tractor. Not that long ago in the long term scope of things.
Title: Re: Horse cart
Post by: RE on January 01, 2018, 05:55:53 PM
I could trade for a mule, I'm pretty sure. But because horses are valued more right now, horses are more plentiful and availability would be greater. We don't have a lot of draft horses left, but some breeds, like paints, are big gentle horses and could be put to work.

I remember when I was a kid my Dad bought a horse drawn plow and used it to plow our garden. He did it because he was nostalgic for his youth, when that was the normal way to do things. It was the normal way in my own family until 1939, which is when my grandfather bought his first tractor. Not that long ago in the long term scope of things.

Add horses to the menagerie?

Either you move to the Toothstead or you hire a full time manager for the farm.

RE
Title: Re: Horse cart
Post by: Nearingsfault on January 01, 2018, 06:05:01 PM
After he sold the dairy farm my grandfather kept a ferguson tractor and a horse drawn mower and hay rake. Both were pulled by the tractor. When I was 9ish he would sneak me away to mow the hill between his place and ours. He needed a second body to push on the foot lever and pull the hand lever to lift the blade when something got in the way. You have not seen dangerous machinery until you sit on that iron seat and hear the slickety slickety sound of those triangular teeth go back and forth. Such a simple mechanism but so durable. Those are good memories.