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Messages - RE

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1


So Diners can plan on what dishes they will bring to the FEAST, here is what the Cooking Zone kitchen is whipping up for Conspicuous Consumption on Friday, June 21st:


Doomstead Diner Menu Prix Fixe
Summer Solstice 2019




Price: FREE!  :icon_sunny:



Starter: Cream of Wild Mushroom & Garlic Soup infused with Tarragon & Rosemary


A delicious blend of flavors and textures
from an Original RE Recipe





Side Dish: Asparagus & Mushroom Alfredo Casserole


A marriage made in heaven between al dente Asparagus spears and butter sauteed Crimini mushrooms in a fresh Alfredo sauce topped with seasoned bread crumbs
from an Original RE recipe





Main Course: Mediterranean Grilled Alaska Coho Salmon with Kalamatta Olives, Tomatoes, Artichoke Hearts, Hearts of Palm and Feta Cheese


Grilled to moist perfection with crispy skin on Bugout Cooking Apparatus
from an Original RE recipe





Beverage: Cheap White Wine
Purchased originally by RE from the ON SALE rack at 3 Bears Liquor Store
(you are :hi: to bring a more expensive bottle of wine to share.  Red is OK too, even though it's a fish dish.)





*Note: Photos above are Googled facsimiles.  You have to wait until Friday for the actual photos and videos, which are better.  :icon_sunny:



Remember, you don't have to actually cook up a dish, you can just pick a favorite and Google up a representative Food Porn pic to share at the dinner table as we discuss the ongoing Collapse of Industrial Civilization!


Eat well in Collapse!


RE


2
The Diner Pantry / Meat🥩-o-saurus: Field Dressing Bambi
« on: Today at 05:51:21 AM »
It's Meat 🥩 Monday here on the Diner, so we are getting some Venison ready for Dinner!  :icon_sunny:

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EdFtwFN5G4A" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EdFtwFN5G4A</a>

3
Seasteading / ⛵ The Old Sea Dog Tours the Homeland
« on: Today at 05:35:21 AM »
Rough flight back to Jolly Old England for OS!

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/qY0PXnCxPyQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/qY0PXnCxPyQ</a>

4
At least they didn't have Mickey Ds and GMO Doritos.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ofiwRzoYrdw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ofiwRzoYrdw</a>

5
I have to disagree with that.  It is confusing Cause & Effect.

$MONEY$  🤑 is the Root of all our problems.  Propaganda is simply a tool the Elite use to keep the money in their own hands.

RE

6
I still think Houseboats are the best solution for the individual, but this one is pretty good on a city planning level.


RE

https://www.nola.com/environment/2019/06/for-some-mississippi-river-cities-there-are-only-2-choices-adapt-or-move-the-rivers-revenge.html

For some Mississippi River cities, there are only 2 choices — adapt or move: The River’s Revenge
Updated Jun 15, 2019; Posted Jun 15, 2019


The Mississippi River encircles Davenport, Iowa's minor league baseball stadium during flooding in early July 2014. Designed to partially flood, the stadium remained open for a three-game Independence Day series. (Photo by Tristan Baurick, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)

Tristan Baurick, NOLA.com | The

The Mississippi River encircles Davenport, Iowa's minor league baseball stadium during flooding in early July 2014. Designed to partially flood, the stadium remained open for a three-game Independence Day series. (Photo by Tristan Baurick, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
394 shares

By Tristan Baurick, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

DAVENPORT, Iowa — In early July 2014, the Mississippi flooded downtown Davenport, turning its minor league baseball stadium into an island. It happened at a particularly bad time: just before a three-game Independence Day weekend series against upriver rivals from Wisconsin.

But the game played on.

With floodwaters lapping at its base, the stadium welcomed more than 6,000 fans to watch the hometown River Bandits take on the Timber Rattlers of Appleton, Wisc. The post-game fireworks display was bigger than ever, and the stadium’s Ferris wheel offered birds-eye views of the flooding.

“This (stadium) — it literally becomes the middle of the Mississippi River,” Davenport Mayor Frank Klipsch said.

That’s by design. Davenport, population 103,000, is the only major city along the Upper Mississippi without a floodwall. Part of its downtown functions as an urban floodplain.

During flooding, elevated sidewalks link up with removable steel bridges and ramps to the stadium. Parking is tight when much of it is under water, so the River Bandits enlist a shuttle to bring fans from lots on higher ground.

Since the 1980s, Davenport has put limits on development along the river. As buildings have adapted to flooding, like the stadium, or been torn down or relocated, the city’s riverfront has gone green. A nine-mile stretch is dominated by nearly 560 acres of parks and trails, much of which can hold or absorb flood water.
The riverfront of Davenport, Iowa, is designed to flood during the Mississippi River's periods of high water. (Photo courtesy of City of Davenport)

City of Davenport

The riverfront of Davenport, Iowa, is designed to flood during the Mississippi River's periods of high water. (Photo courtesy of City of Davenport)

On the city’s south edge is the 513-acre Nahant Marsh, one of the Mississippi’s largest urban wetlands. The site of a gun club for nearly 30 years, the marsh underwent an extensive clean up that removed 243 tons of lead shot and heaps of trash. Now the marsh hosts a variety of birds and other wildlife and an education center that draws thousands of visitors each year.

Most importantly for Davenport, the marsh acts as a giant sponge. Each of Nahant’s acres can soak up 1.5 million gallons of floodwater. The marsh can hold millions more as standing water.

“The river used to have wet places like this all along it,” said Brian Ritter, the marsh’s executive director. “We’ve broken our connectivity with them or filled them in, and it’s probably why flooding is getting worse. But we have the remarkable ability here to capture billions and billions of gallons of floodwater every time the Mississippi floods.”

Davenport plans to add more floodable plazas, a water-absorbing sculpture park, and sandy stretches of riverbank.
The size and number of large floods have increased along with human efforts to control the Mississippi River. A scenario that excludes engineering and that ties flooding to climate changes shows a much lower flood rate. (Sean McKeown-Young, Advance Local Graphics. Source: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

The size and number of large floods have increased along with human efforts to control the Mississippi River. A scenario that excludes engineering and that ties flooding to climate changes shows a much lower flood rate. (Sean McKeown-Young, Advance Local Graphics. Source: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Clear views of the river and easy access to it have spurred downtown development, outdoor recreation and tourism, Davenport leaders say.

“Most people say they come here because of the river,” said Mary Ellen Chamberlin, a Davenport resident who led a fight in the late 1960s against a planned flood wall. “They can see it and they can literally put their feet in the Big Muddy.”

Davenport’s open arms approach to the river is a point of local pride. But the city does suffer damage during large floods. After flooding in 2001, the city needed more than $3 million to pay for cleanup. FEMA, which covered 90 percent of the tab, was critical of Davenport for refusing to build a floodwall. Davenport’s share of the costs — about $310,000 — wasn’t much more than the nearly $300,000 the city estimated it would have to spend each year maintaining a levee.

Also worth pointing out, Davenport’s leaders say, is that cities with flood protection also suffered significant damage during the same flood.

“It’s gotten to the point where (the river) comes up and we just rinse off,” Chamberlin said.
Davenport's unwalled riverfront is dominated by parks that absorb Mississippi River floodwater. (Photo courtesy of Visit Quad Cities)

Visit Quad Cities

Davenport's unwalled riverfront is dominated by parks that absorb Mississippi River floodwater. (Photo courtesy of Visit Quad Cities)

Following Davenport’s lead isn’t easy. Many river cities, including Hannibal, Mo., have grown up alongside floodwalls and levees. Removing such protections would require an expensive and disruptive revamp of buildings, streets and other infrastructure.

Ways of living with flooding are gaining traction along the river. Illinois has drawn praise for what flood risk experts call “managed retreat” from the river. The state has aggressive buyout and relocation programs, and has enacted some of the nation’s toughest floodplain development restrictions.

“We got serious after the 1993 flood,” said Paul Osman, floodplains program manager for the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. “Now we’re number one in the nation in the fewest (flood insurance) claims on new buildings. We’re simply not building in floodplains.”

The state has bought out about 6,000 at-risk buildings since 1993 and moved entire towns out of harm’s way.

The town of Valmeyer, Ill., is “the poster child” for large-scale relocations, said Nicholas Pinter, a geologist with the University of California, Davis.
Floodable parks and plazas dominate the riverfront of Davenport, Iowa. City leaders embrace flooding rather than fight it with walls and levees. (Photo courtesy of Visit Quad Cities)

Visit Quad Cities

Floodable parks and plazas dominate the riverfront of Davenport, Iowa. City leaders embrace flooding rather than fight it with walls and levees. (Photo courtesy of Visit Quad Cities)

“It was catastrophically flooded in 1993,” he said. “Now it’s been almost entirely rebuilt and its population moved on to the bluff tops, about 300 feet higher in elevation.”

Valmeyer had about 1,000 people before the move. “Today, it’s almost doubled in size and is growing like crazy,” Osman said.

Illinois is spending $5 million buying out 150 structures in what Osman calls “one of the stupidest locations to build a community” — the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers, where the land is low, sandy and ever-flooding.

Grafton, another small Illinois community, has eschewed levees in favor of buyouts and a slow, piecemeal retreat to higher ground. Much of old Grafton now looks like Davenport’s riverfront, with green spaces and trails. New Grafton, relocated to a nearby bluff, is high and dry.

“They’ve had six floods since the buyouts,” Osman said. “But they’ve all been non-events in Grafton.”

The choices appear stark: adapt or move. The alternative is to continue building higher levees and stronger flood walls. Klipsch, Davenport’s mayor, says that course is reckless for his community and those downriver. A better option is letting the river run its course.

“We didn’t put up a flood wall and push our problems down to places like Louisiana,” he said. “The river does come outside of its banks. We know that. We embrace that.”

This series was made possible in part by a fellowship from the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources.

7
https://www.truthdig.com/articles/the-coming-show-trial-of-julian-assange/

Jun 17, 2019
The Coming Show Trial of Julian Assange
by Chris Hedges


Mr. Fish / Truthdig

LONDON—On Friday morning I was in a small courtroom at Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London. Julian Assange, held in Belmarsh Prison and dressed in a pale-blue prison shirt, appeared on a video screen directly in front of me. Assange, his gray hair and beard neatly trimmed, slipped on heavy, dark-frame glasses at the start of the proceedings. He listened intently as Ben Brandon, the prosecutor, seated at a narrow wooden table, listed the crimes he allegedly had committed and called for his extradition to the United States to face charges that could result in a sentence of 175 years. The charges include the release of unredacted classified material that posed a “grave” threat to “human intelligence sources” and “the largest compromises of confidential information in the history of the United States.” After the prosecutor’s presentation, Assange’s attorney, Mark Summers, seated at the same table, called the charges “an outrageous and full-frontal assault on journalistic rights.”

Most of us who have followed the long persecution of Assange expected this moment, but it was nevertheless deeply unsettling, the opening of the final act in a Greek tragedy where the hero, cursed by fortuna, or fate, confronts the dark forces from which there is no escape.

For more information on the Assange case, see Chris Hedges interview U.N. special rapporteur on torture Nils Melzer and read the transcript. Also, see Hedges interview WikiLeaks Editor in Chief Kristinn Hrafnsson.

The publication of classified documents is not a crime in the United States, but if Assange is extradited and convicted it will become one. Assange is not an American citizen. WikiLeaks, which he founded and publishes, is not a U.S.-based publication. The message the U.S. government is sending is clear: No matter who or where you are, if you expose the inner workings of empire you will be hunted down, kidnapped and brought to the United States to be tried as a spy. The extradition and trial of Assange will mean the end of public investigations by the press into the crimes of the ruling elites. It will cement into place a frightening corporate tyranny. Publications such as The New York Times and The Guardian, which devoted pages to the WikiLeaks revelations and later amplified and legitimized Washington’s carefully orchestrated character assassination of Assange, are no less panicked. This is the gravest assault on press freedom in my lifetime.

The WikiLeaks publisher was trapped for nearly seven years in the Ecuadorian Embassy, where he had been granted political asylum. He feared being sent to Sweden to face sexual offense allegations, which he has denied, and then extradited to the United States. Two months ago, although diplomatic missions are considered sovereign territory, he was physically dragged out of the embassy by British police when the new government of Ecuador revoked his asylum and the Ecuadorian citizenship that had been granted to him. (Assange retains his Australian citizenship.) He was transported to court within three hours of his arrest, given 15 minutes to prepare a defense and summarily handed a 50-week sentence for a dubious bail violation. He was sent to Belmarsh, a notorious high-security prison in southeast London.

On Thursday, the day before Assange appeared in court, British Home Secretary Sajid Javid advanced the process for his removal to the United States by signing an extradition request. It is a clear signal to the courts where the British government stands.

We know what will be done to Assange. It has been done to thousands of those we kidnapped and then detained in black sites around the world. Sadistic and scientific techniques of torture will be used in an attempt to make him a zombie. Assange, in declining health, was transferred two weeks ago to the hospital wing of the prison. Because he was medically unable to participate when the hearing was initially to be held, May 30, the proceeding was reset. Friday’s hearing, in which he appeared frail and spoke hesitantly, although lucidly, set the timetable for his extradition trial, scheduled to take place at the end of February. All totalitarian states seek to break their political prisoners to render them compliant. This process will define Assange’s existence over the next few months.

Assange’s psychological and physical state, which includes a dramatic loss of weight that was apparent Friday, came as Nils Melzer, the United Nations’ special rapporteur on torture, spoke out after he, with two physicians, went to Belmarsh Prison to assess Assange. Melzer said Assange had undergone prolonged psychological torture. He went on to criticize what he called the “judicial persecution” of Assange by Britain, the United States, Ecuador and Sweden. He warned that Assange would face a politicized show trial in the United States if he were extradited to face 17 charges under the Espionage Act, each carrying a potential sentence of 10 years, for his role in publishing classified military and diplomatic cables, documents and videos that exposed U.S. war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan. An additional charge that he conspired to hack into a government computer carries a maximum sentence of five years.

At last week’s hearing, Assange spoke only briefly.

He does not have access to a computer, and his attorneys have complained that the heavy restrictions imposed upon him make it nearly impossible for him to prepare his case.

“I know there has been an indictment brought against me,” Assange said through the video conference system. “My lawyers have not yet given me the paperwork.”

He raised objections to the prosecutor’s charge that he and WikiLeaks attempted to hack into a U.S. government computer, insisting “WikiLeaks is nothing but a publisher.” The United States has charged him with offering to hack into a government computer to help Chelsea Manning—who passed the files and documents to WikiLeaks—conceal her identity. The government concedes, however, that no such hack ever took place.

“The prosecution attorney told the BBC yesterday I was wanted in the U.S. for computer hacking,” he said. “This is unquestionably false. Even the U.S. admits there was no hack. No passwords were broken. There is no evidence that I, WikiLeaks or Chelsea Manning engaged in hacking. I have 175 years of my life at stake. This is a signal that the prosecution will misrepresent the charges to mislead the press.”

The judge, Emma Arbuthnot, cut him off, saying “this is not the time to go into this.”

Commenting in 2018 when Assange’s lawyers requested that the warrant for his arrest be dropped, Arbuthnot said, “I accept that Mr. Assange had expressed fears of being returned to the United States from a very early stage in the Swedish extradition proceedings but, absent any evidence from Mr. Assange on oath, I do not find that Mr. Assange’s fears were reasonable,”

This statement by the judge captures the Alice-in-Wonderland quality of the judicial persecution of Assange. She dismisses as unreasonable Assange’s fears that if he voluntarily left the Ecuadorian Embassy he would be arrested by British police and extradited to the United States because he did not appear in court to express them. And yet, she is now presiding over his extradition trial.

This circular logic is not the only disturbing aspect of Judge Arbuthnot’s overseeing of the Assange case. She is married to James Arbuthnot, who sits in the House of Lords, is a British Conservative Party politician, was the minister of state at the Ministry of Defense and for nine years was the chairman of the Defense Select Committee in the House of Commons, a committee that oversees the operation of the Ministry of Defense and the armed forces. Arbuthnot, who was reprimanded while a member of Parliament for diverting public funds to maintain his two homes, is a director at SC Strategy, established by John Scarlett, the former head of the British foreign intelligence service MI6. The politician also is on the advisory board of Thales UK, a huge arms manufacturer whose corrupt business practices, which included massive bribes to heads of state in exchange for arms contracts, were exposed when some of its internal documents were published by WikiLeaks.

The judge “has a strong conflict of interest,” Melzer said from Vienna when I interviewed him by video link for my television show, “On Contact.” “Her husband had been exposed by WikiLeaks.”

Assange’s lawyers have asked the judge to recuse herself. She has refused.

“I was able to visit Mr. Assange in Belmarsh Prison,” Melzer said in the interview. “I was accompanied by two medical experts—a forensic expert and a psychiatrist. Both of them were specialized in identifying, examining and documenting psychological and physical torture. What we found was Mr. Assange showed all the symptoms that are typical for a person who has been exposed to prolonged psychological torture. What we’re talking about is severe traumatization. Chronic anxiety. Intense, constant stress, and an inability to relax or focus, to think in a structured, straight line. Someone who is in a constant, hyper-stimulated stage and can no longer relax.”

“Psychological torture can have various consequences,” Melzer continued. “It is difficult to predict exactly how the situation will evolve. What you see now, during my visit, was already alarming. What we have seen since then, his state of health has dramatically deteriorated as predicted by the psychiatrist who accompanied my visit. What can happen during the prolongation is it can have irreversible damage, even on the physical level. First on the psychological and emotional level. But then also on the physical level it can lead to a nervous breakdown and to cardiovascular damage that is no longer reversible.”

Melzer, who is an attorney, closely examined the 2010 Swedish allegations against Assange. He said he found a series of disturbing judicial anomalies and indications that the sexual assault charges were being manipulated by Swedish authorities to extradite the publisher to the United States. When legal proceedings were initiated against Assange, for example, they were immediately made public. Assange learned about the allegations in the press.

“He was in Sweden at the time,” Melzer said. “He immediately went to a police station himself and said, ‘Could I please make my statement and participate in this?’ Sweden law prohibits the publication of the name of the complainant and the suspected offender in a sexual offense case. His statement was taken. Two or three days later, the prosecutor closed the case, saying, ‘There was no evidence of any crime being committed at all.’ ”

But a few days later the case was reopened by a different prosecutor.

“Mr. Assange voluntarily stayed on in Sweden for three weeks, saying, ‘I’m at the disposal of the prosecution for any questions you have to ask,’ ” Melzer said.

Assange had a commitment in Britain and, Melzer noted, received permission from the prosecutor to leave Sweden. Once he arrived in the United Kingdom, however, Sweden issued an arrest warrant, claiming he was trying to avoid questioning.

“They asked him to come back to Sweden for questioning,” Melzer said. “Then Mr. Assange became a little bit suspicious. ‘I thought we had dealt with this. What is the issue?’ He was afraid that he was being called back so Sweden could surrender him to the U.S.”

Sweden has on several occasions surrendered foreign nationals to the CIA without due process, including handing over two Egyptian nationals, Mohammed al-Zari and Ahmed Agiza, to CIA operatives on Dec. 18, 2001, for transfer from Stockholm to Cairo. The men were seeking asylum in Sweden. Once returned to Egypt they were imprisoned and tortured. Sending asylum seekers to countries that are known to engage in torture is a violation of international law.

When Assange’s lawyers asked for a guarantee that he would not be extradited to the United States, Swedish authorities refused. Assange’s lawyers said he would be willing to undergo questioning by video link from Britain, a proposal Sweden rejected despite having used this procedure in past criminal cases. Assange proposed to be questioned by Swedish officials in Britain. This offer, too, was rejected. The Swedish authorities insisted he return to Sweden.

“That is why Mr. Assange looked for refuge in the Ecuadorian Embassy once the extradition proceedings to Sweden didn’t go in his favor at the Supreme Court in the U.K.,” Melzer said.

“What is called a rape allegation [in the Swedish case] is not what would be called a rape in English or Swedish or any other language in the world,” Melzer said. “I know what I’m talking about because I speak Swedish. What the rape allegation refers to is an offense that doesn’t involve any violence. He has been alleged of intentionally ripping a condom during consensual intercourse with a woman. She said it was intentional. He said it was an accident. Predictably, this is something no one will ever be able to prove. The piece of evidence submitted to the prosecution, the condom, was examined and did not have any DNA on it from him, or from the complainant, or anyone else.”

“There is no evidence that he committed a sexual offense … ,” Melzer said. “This whole narrative is extremely important. It dominated his presence in the Ecuadorian Embassy for seven years.”

A leaked email exchange between Swedish judicial authorities, who sought to drop the case four years before they formally abandoned proceedings in 2017, and Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service, handling the Assange case, included a message to the Swedes warning them not to “get cold feet!!!”

Assange’s 50-week sentence is for violating his bail conditions by refusing to surrender to the British authorities and accept extradition to Sweden. After he requested and took political asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy, the British government refused him safe passage to the airport, trapping him in the Ecuadorian compound. The Swedish judiciary, which conveniently reopened its case against Assange the moment he was taken from the embassy, has since dropped its extradition request, clearing the way for his extradition to the United States.

In 2017 Lenin Moreno was elected president of Ecuador. He sought to mend relations with the United States and agreed, apparently in exchange for debt relief, to unilaterally revoke Assange’s asylum status and the Ecuadorian citizenship he had been granted under the previous administration. Ecuador was given a $4.2 billion debt relief package by the International Monetary Fund three weeks before Moreno authorized British police to enter the embassy in London.

Judge Michael Snow called a disheveled Assange “a narcissist who cannot get beyond his own self-interest” when he appeared in court three hours after being dragged out of the embassy April 11. The only words Assange spoke during that hearing were “I plead not guilty.” The 50-week sentence he received for bail violation is only two weeks short of the maximum provided by law.

“This shows the disproportionate sentencing and bias against him,” Melzer said. “Normally a bail violation would end in a fine and perhaps in a very grave case a short  prison sentence [much less than 50 weeks].”

Melzer said he is convinced Assange cannot “get a fair trial in the United States” after nearly a decade of “unrestrained public mobbing, intimidation, calls for his assassination and instigation to violence against him.”

“He has been exposed to public ridicule, including by serving officials and former officials of government, by prominent personalities,” Melzer said.

“A fair trial requires legality—that he’s actually being charged for something that is punishable,” Melzer said. “Seventeen out of the 18 charges are under the Espionage Act. All of them relate to activities that any investigative journalist would conduct and would be protected under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The 18th charge, the so-called hacking charge, doesn’t relate to him. The U.S. doesn’t claim he actually hacked a computer to receive information. He obtained all of the information he published [from] someone who had full clearance. He received this information. He may have perhaps encouraged the source, as any journalist would do, to give him the information and then published it. The hacking charge relates to him unsuccessfully attempting to help the source break a password that would have allowed her to cover her tracks. But he didn’t succeed.”

“I don’t see any possibility that Mr. Assange would be acquitted in the U.S. or that he would receive a very light sentence of six weeks in prison,” Melzer said. “That is utterly unrealistic, especially under the so-called espionage court, in the Eastern District of Virginia, where he has been charged. There has been no defendant that has been acquitted there of national security charges.”

“A fair trial requires equality before the law,” Melzer said. “When a government prosecutes a whistleblower, let alone a journalist, for having exposed serious crimes by government agents—we’re talking about war crimes—and then these war crimes are not being prosecuted [this is not equality before the law].”

“There is no longer the rule of law,” Melzer said. “There is no longer equality before the law. There are no longer transparent court proceedings when you have a secret grand jury and a secret session debating classified evidence. These are proceedings skewed against the defendant. I don’t think Julian Assange would get a fair trial.”

“Britain, Sweden and Ecuador have violated the convention against torture,” Melzer said. “They should release Mr. Assange. They may question him in response to the sexual offenses. Frankly, I don’t think there is much behind that. If there is, I think he has suffered more than his share already through that ill treatment. He should be released. He should be compensated and rehabilitated by those states.”

8
The Boys in Black Pajamas are bringing out some big numbers.  2M Homo Saps reported on the street.  However, Beijing is unlikely to back down here.  This will be ongoing until they roll in the tanks.  Street action alone can't change things.  It takes a full blown REVOLUTION.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ag7pyYZP1eI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ag7pyYZP1eI</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/cipJApobJko" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/cipJApobJko</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/fcJ2xI7hYcY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/fcJ2xI7hYcY</a>

9
Nuke Puke / ☢️ A nuclear waste dump for eternity
« on: Today at 12:19:44 AM »
Bury it and Forget it. The Ron Popeil solution to Nuke Puke.  ::)

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/NzqJtHZXsiM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/NzqJtHZXsiM</a>

10
D-Bank scrambling for survival.  But tell me, WTF is going to buy any of the DOGSHIT 💩they are loading into the "Bad Bank"?  ???   :icon_scratch:

RE

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-deutsche-bank-restructuring-usa/deutsche-bank-to-set-up-50-billion-euro-bad-bank-ft-idUSKCN1TH0S7

June 16, 2019 / 12:15 PM / Updated 7 hours ago
Deutsche Bank to set up 50 billion euro bad bank: FT


(Reuters) - Deutsche Bank is planning to overhaul its trading operations by creating a “bad bank” to hold tens of billions of euros of assets and shrinking or shutting its U.S. equity and trading businesses, the Financial Times reported on Sunday.

The bad bank would house or sell assets valued at up to 50 billion euros ($56.06 billion)- after adjusting for risk - and comprise mainly long-dated derivatives, the FT reported, citing four people briefed on the plan.

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With the creation of the bad bank, Chief Executive Officer Christian Sewing is shifting the German lender away from investment banking and focusing on transaction banking and private wealth management, the newspaper said.

As part of the restructuring, the lender’s equity and rates trading units outside continental Europe will be shrunk or closed entirely, the report said.

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The bank is planning cuts at its U.S. equities business, including prime brokerage and equity derivatives, to win over shareholders unhappy about its performance, four sources familiar with the matter told Reuters in May.

“As we said at the AGM on May 23, Deutsche Bank is working on measures to accelerate its transformation so as to improve its sustainable profitability. We will update all stakeholders if and when required,” Deutsche Bank said in an emailed statement on Sunday in response to the FT report.

Sewing could announces announce the changes along with Deutsche Bank’s half-year results in late July, the FT reported.

Reporting by Ishita Chigilli Palli and Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru; Editing by Sonya Hepinstall and Peter Cooney

11
The Bulb gets Dimmer.

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/16/world/power-outage-argentina-uruguay-paraguay/index.html

'Massive failure' leaves Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay with no power, utility says

By Eliott C. McLaughlin, CNN

Updated 6:37 PM ET, Sun June 16, 2019


A general view taken on March 26, 2015 in Nairobi shows the Kenyan parliament, as President Uhuru Kenyatta addresses two Houses the Senate and the National Assembly.
Kenyan MP accused of assaulting female colleague
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a media availability at the State Department, Thursday, June 13, 2019, in Washington.
Pompeo blames Iran for attack on tankers
Gulf of Oman attack video aftermath fire vpx_00001212.jpg
Video shows fiery aftermath of suspected attack on tanker
Sara Netanyahu, wife of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (unseen), is seen before she and her husband receive the Chadian President for a dinner at the PM&#39;s residence in Jerusalem on November 25, 2018. - Chadian leader Idriss Deby Itno on November 25 became the first president of his country to visit Israel and pledged a new era of relations when meeting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu decades after ties were severed. (Photo by Heidi Levine / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEIDI LEVINE/AFP/Getty Images)
Sara Netanyahu pleads guilty to illegal food orders
Tropical Cyclone Vayu strengthens as it approaches India
Millions in India facing Tropical Cyclone Vayu's wrath
A protester throws a tear gas canister fired by police during a rally against a controversial extradition law proposal outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. - Violent clashes broke out in Hong Kong on June 12 as police tried to stop protesters storming the city&#39;s parliament, while tens of thousands of people blocked key arteries in a show of strength against government plans to allow extraditions to China. (Photo by DALE DE LA REY / AFP)
Several injured as Hong Kong protesters clash with police
Trump waves paper at press, says it's deal with Mexico
Russia police drop charges against reporter after backlash
'Massive failure' leaves several countries without power
African migrants denounce conditions at Mexico border
She stared down a group of riot police to protest bill
Amanda Knox: I am not a monster
Hong Kong suspends controversial extradition bill
This photo taken on June 9, 2019 shows a man wading through floodwater in Rongan in China&#39;s southern Guangxi region after heavy rainstorm hit the area. (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
China floods kill more than 60 people
Landslide sweeps through traffic, kills 1
A general view taken on March 26, 2015 in Nairobi shows the Kenyan parliament, as President Uhuru Kenyatta addresses two Houses the Senate and the National Assembly.
Kenyan MP accused of assaulting female colleague
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a media availability at the State Department, Thursday, June 13, 2019, in Washington.
Pompeo blames Iran for attack on tankers
Gulf of Oman attack video aftermath fire vpx_00001212.jpg
Video shows fiery aftermath of suspected attack on tanker
Sara Netanyahu, wife of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (unseen), is seen before she and her husband receive the Chadian President for a dinner at the PM&#39;s residence in Jerusalem on November 25, 2018. - Chadian leader Idriss Deby Itno on November 25 became the first president of his country to visit Israel and pledged a new era of relations when meeting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu decades after ties were severed. (Photo by Heidi Levine / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEIDI LEVINE/AFP/Getty Images)
Sara Netanyahu pleads guilty to illegal food orders
Tropical Cyclone Vayu strengthens as it approaches India
Millions in India facing Tropical Cyclone Vayu's wrath
A protester throws a tear gas canister fired by police during a rally against a controversial extradition law proposal outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. - Violent clashes broke out in Hong Kong on June 12 as police tried to stop protesters storming the city&#39;s parliament, while tens of thousands of people blocked key arteries in a show of strength against government plans to allow extraditions to China. (Photo by DALE DE LA REY / AFP)
Several injured as Hong Kong protesters clash with police
Trump waves paper at press, says it's deal with Mexico
Russia police drop charges against reporter after backlash
'Massive failure' leaves several countries without power
African migrants denounce conditions at Mexico border
She stared down a group of riot police to protest bill
Amanda Knox: I am not a monster
Hong Kong suspends controversial extradition bill
This photo taken on June 9, 2019 shows a man wading through floodwater in Rongan in China&#39;s southern Guangxi region after heavy rainstorm hit the area. (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
China floods kill more than 60 people
Landslide sweeps through traffic, kills 1
A general view taken on March 26, 2015 in Nairobi shows the Kenyan parliament, as President Uhuru Kenyatta addresses two Houses the Senate and the National Assembly.
Kenyan MP accused of assaulting female colleague

(CNN)A "massive failure" in an electrical interconnection system left Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay completely without power, and for many customers, restoring electricity would take all day, a utility distributor said Sunday.
Parts of Chile and southern Brazil experienced outages as well, said Edesur, the Buenos Aires-based company. Chile's system was running normally again Sunday afternoon, CNN Chile reported.
The company later posted an updated statement removing Uruguay and Paraguay from the list of countries that were entirely without electricity, but it isn't clear how many residents in those two countries have had their power restored. Power was only partially restored in Uruguay, the country's energy authority said.
Power had been restored to more than half of the country by Sunday evening, Gustavo Lopetegui, Argentina's energy secretary, said in a press conference.

Lopetegui said that experts are trying to determine the cause of the unprecedented blackout. As of now, no explanation for the widespread power failure has been identified.
The blackout left rail stations, like this one in the Buenos Aires barrio of Constitución, in the dark.
The blackout left rail stations, like this one in the Buenos Aires barrio of Constitución, in the dark.
In a statement on its website, Edesur said a "collapse" in Argentina's government-operated interconnection system occurred around 7 a.m. (6 a.m. ET).
The outage "is the first generalized blackout that Argentina has had in its history," Edesur spokesman Alejandra Martínez told CNN affiliate TN.
Edesur is prioritizing any customer who depends on electricity for health reasons, it said, but because the power outage is so serious, anyone experiencing problems should go to a medical center.
A tweet posted just before 10 a.m. (9 a.m. ET) said the company had begun generating electricity in Buenos Aires and the surrounding area. It said restoring power in greater Buenos Aires would take several hours.
Lucas Rodriguez tweeted a video of the Argentine capital in darkness before dawn, saying he'd never seen anything like it.
"The funny part is that we don't have electricity, but we have internet in our phones," he told CNN.
Edesur had restored service to more than 2 million customers, roughly 80% of its clients, by 3 p.m., the company said.
Power was also restored to parts of western Uruguay that border Argentina, and to some regions in the south, including Montevideo, said National Administration of Power Plants and Electrical Transmissions, the country's energy authority.
The cause of the failure is under investigation, said Edesur, which has launched an "emergency operational plan" to deal with the situation.
Utility distributor Edenor, which controls 20% of the Argentine market, about 3 million customers, said a transmission system at Yacyretá Dam -- on the Paraná River near Ayolas, Paraguay -- failed "without human intervention," forcing an automatic shutdown.
People walk past a police station left in the dark after Sunday&#39;s blackout.
People walk past a police station left in the dark after Sunday's blackout.
Edesur added that the failure began in a transport connection between the dam and the Salto Grande power stations on Argentina's coast. The shutdown was a protective measure, it said.
Roughly 95% of Edenor's customers had had their power restored by 3 p.m., the company said.
The Argentine Interconnection System, which experienced the failure, handles the bulk of Argentina's electricity. It is one of two such systems in the country, the other being in the Patagonia region.

The utility won't be able to fully restore power to the region until the interconnection system is running normally again, which could take all day, it said.
The three countries experiencing total blackouts are home to a collective 55 million people.

CNN's Amanda Jackson and Tatiana Arias and CNN en Espanol's Esteban Campanella and Daniel Silva Fernandez contributed to this report.

12
As usual, it's all about the money.

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/06/16/donald-trump-reelection-machine-2020-1365846

Trump campaign makes a radical break from 2016

The president’s 2020 campaign is flipping the script from its ham-fisted approach the first time Trump sought elected office.

By GABBY ORR

06/16/2019 07:02 AM EDT


President Donald Trump speaks during a recent rally in Pennsylvania. Trump's reelection campaign comes armed with resources it could only dream of in 2016. | Drew Angerer/Getty Images


President Donald Trump is sitting on a war chest topping $40 million, has boots on the ground spread across nine regions crucial to his 2020 map and owns a sprawling network of volunteers who’ve been rigorously trained for the months ahead.

When he takes the stage Tuesday in Orlando, Fla., to announce his bid for reelection, Trump will be joined by 20,000 guests whose personal information — names, zip codes, phone numbers — was meticulously recorded when they requested tickets to the rally. First-time attendees will receive relentless emails and texts in the coming weeks, reminding them they can help “Keep America Great” by contributing $5, $10 or $15. Some maxed-out donors who gave generously to his 2016 campaign will trek to Florida to witness what they delivered — and decide whether to give big again.

It’s a straightforward strategy to get the president four more years in the White House: be the political juggernaut Trump lacked in 2016.

While 23 Democratic presidential candidates scramble for attention, Trump’s 2020 campaign is quietly flipping the script from its ham-fisted approach the first time he sought elected office. His team has spent two and a half years building a robust, modern and professional operation to optimize as many variables as possible and amassing an unprecedented pile of cash to keep it all afloat.

It’s worked so far. The Trump campaign and Republican National Committee had a combined $82 million in the bank as of April — the result of a joint fundraising operation — and staffers have yet to devolve into the bitter infighting that strained the president’s first campaign and stained his earliest days in the White House.
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“In 2016, the people on the campaign like to say that they were building the airplane while it was in flight. This time, he will have a campaign that is befitting of an incumbent president of the United States,” said Tim Murtaugh, communications director for the new-and-improved Trump campaign.

Indeed, one official involved in Trump’s first presidential campaign likened the experience to a slow-motion plane crash: “We were strapped in on a sloppily assembled machine that was gradually spiraling out of control.”
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Even with a better-financed and well-ordered campaign, Trump has found the developing 2020 landscape to be tough. State investigators are still probing his past business ventures and financial history. Court rulings have delivered devastating setbacks for his agenda. And House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has encouraged congressional Democrats to do everything short of impeachment to hold his administration accountable.

On top of all that, the outburst-prone president has struggled to boost his approval rating above 42 percent — where it hovers — and could encounter difficulty billing himself as an outsider while occupying the center of the swamp.

“He’s an incumbent. It’s hard to run the same way in 2020 as he did in 2016,” a person close to the Trump campaign said.

The challenges are not lost on the president’s campaign staff. This time, Trump will launch his 2020 campaign with organizational and financial advantages his previous crew could have only dreamed of — soothing allies who worry the current political environment is less conducive to victory.
Elizabeth Warren

2020 elections
Trump campaign zeroes in on a new threat: Elizabeth Warren

By ALEX ISENSTADT

From a 14th-floor suite originally designed to house the offices of a capital markets firm, Trump’s modest campaign team of about 50 employees has spent the past several months laying the groundwork for a 2020 race that diverges from 2016 without sacrificing his insurgent populist message. Extensive assistance from the Republican National Committee — driven by a massive staff, existing presence in all 50 states and a staunch Trump ally at its helm — has helped, bringing institutional knowledge and resources that were notably absent in 2016.

Officials at the RNC’s Capitol Hill headquarters are in constant contact with counterparts who work out of the Trump campaign’s Arlington, Va., office, and staffers from each side often travel to the same events to show simultaneous support for the party and for Trump. For example, Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale and RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel both attended a dinner this week hosted by the local Republican Party in Macomb County, Mich., often called the “home of the Reagan Democrats” and a must-win for Trump in 2020.

“If you look at where the campaign was in 2016 and where it is today, it’s a completely different organization. It has a united Republican Party behind it that also has one of the best fundraising operations we’ve ever seen,” a Michigan Republican Party official said, adding the Trump campaign plans to deploy significant staff to Michigan beginning in early July.

A campaign official said Parscale plans to have “a fully functioning ground game by the end of summer,” as well as several coalition groups that will specifically target female, Latino and African American voters.

Many of those campaign staffers, along with members of the GOP’s state party affiliates, have gone through a program known as GROW, or Growing Republican Organizations to Win. The custom workshop-type classes were created by the Trump campaign and the RNC to train field staff in fundraising, communications, data and digital efforts that will be unique to their states in 2020. One state party official who recently completed the training said they were asked to draft mock news releases and budgets as part of the programming.

Campaign officials readily admit that Trump determines the message on any given day, making it difficult to create a fixed communications strategy that volunteers and staff can follow. Earlier this year, for instance, Trump son-in-law and White House adviser Jared Kushner instructed campaign staff to avoid targeting specific 2020 Democratic candidates only to watch the president lob repeated insults at former Vice President Joe Biden weeks later. Trump has also insulted Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind.

“The key for the Trump campaign is to successfully build its operation around the most unconventional candidate in history,” said Jason Miller, a former campaign adviser who remains close to the president. “Parscale has a good enough relationship with Trump to know that you always follow his lead and your job as the campaign is to build upon and amplify his message, not force feed him some message that you cooked up.”
Donald Trump descends an escalator at Trump Tower

The Friday Cover
The Escalator Ride That Changed America

By MICHAEL KRUSE

Parscale has declined to foist soundbites on Trump, opting instead to let the president weaponize Twitter at his own discretion. But the campaign has begun crafting candidate-specific messages that it hopes Trump will test out and eventually deploy regularly, depending on who becomes the Democratic nominee. Officials have largely focused on Biden, Sanders and Warren, believing Trump’s opponent be one of those three.

“If it’s Sanders or Warren, they immediately become advocates for radical change that’s a step too far for most voters, and Trump becomes the centrist. But against Joe Biden, the race is much more of a change vs. status quo dynamic,” Miller said.

Campaign allies who are aware of internal polling said they also want Trump to tout his accomplishments constantly. He will only outperform his Democratic opponent if he’s “getting the right amount of credit for the progress he’s making on immigration, the economy and national security,” one outside adviser said. Several 2020 Democrats have argued that the economy is booming because of policies put in place by former President Barack Obama, although Trump’s economic approval rating reached a new high in a CNN poll last month.

Trump’s campaign has been briefing him almost weekly on polling, according to two aides familiar with the conversations, one of whom said the president is more obsessed with polls than anything else, despite repeatedly questioning their reliability after 2016.

The campaign’s first internal reelection poll found Biden trouncing Trump by 7 percentage points in Florida when it surveyed Sunshine State voters in March, ABC reported Friday. The state is key to Trump’s campaign strategy: Without it, a single loss in the Rust Belt could trigger the end of his presidency.

Campaign officials said that isn’t going to happen. They said fundraising has been too successful and that their massive data-gathering operation is unmatched by any Democratic presidential hopeful.

But as Trump prepares to launch his reelection bid 17 months before voters hit the polls in November 2020, perhaps his most distinct advantage is time.

“It’s important to remember that we are not on the same timetable as the Democrats,” Murtaugh said. “We are already in the general election.”

13
Seasteading / ⛵ Leaving My Love. Adventures of an Old Seadog
« on: June 16, 2019, 05:42:10 PM »
Old Sea Dog finally gets a shower.

Nice to be able to fly home from your Seastead periodically.  Kiss that one goodbye after SHTF Day.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/qKfe7rx091A" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/qKfe7rx091A</a>

14
Currently out of the MSM newz cycle, but still ongoing and getting worse.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Js84u7TKPKQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Js84u7TKPKQ</a>

15
Geopolitics / 🤡 Support For Impeachment Grows Among Democrats
« on: June 16, 2019, 03:15:33 PM »
The vid isn't about impeachment at all.  It's about Trumpovetsky's "Crisis Creation" method of maintaining his 44% Approval Rating.  Bad titling job from NBC.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/JX-2dRhA7ps" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/JX-2dRhA7ps</a>

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