AuthorTopic: BREXIT! The FUN Begins!  (Read 15168 times)

Offline RE

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Legally Binding".  Right.  Can I sell you some Swampland in FL?

Sad Brinkmanship.

RE

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/11/uks-theresa-may-clinches-legally-binding-brexit-backstop-changes-deputy-says.html

UK’s Theresa May clinches legally binding Brexit ‘backstop’ changes, deputy says
Published Mon, Mar 11 2019 • 6:29 PM EDT | Updated Mon, Mar 11 2019 • 8:39 PM EDT
Reuters
   
   
Key Points

    “Today we have secured legal changes,” May said in a late night news conference in Strasbourg beside Juncker, exactly 17 days before the United Kingdom is due to leave the EU.
    May announced three documents — a joint instrument, a joint statement and a unilateral declaration — which she said were aimed at addressing the most contentious part of the divorce deal she agreed in November: the Irish backstop.

RT: Theresa May speaking 190116
Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement following winning a confidence vote, after Parliament rejected her Brexit deal, outside 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, January 16, 2019.
Clodagh Kilcoyne | Reuters

Prime Minister Theresa May won legally binding Brexit assurances from the European Union on Monday in a last ditch attempt to sway rebellious British lawmakers who have threatened to vote down her divorce deal again.

Scrambling to plot an orderly path out of the Brexit maze just days before the United Kingdom is due to leave on March 29, May rushed to Strasbourg to agree additional assurances with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

Brexiteers in May’s party have accused her of surrendering to the EU and it was not clear if the assurances she agreed would be enough to win over the 116 additional lawmakers she needs reverse the crushing defeat her deal suffered on Jan. 15.

“Today we have secured legal changes,” May said in a late night news conference in Strasbourg beside Juncker, exactly 17 days before the United Kingdom is due to leave the EU.

“Now is the time to come together to back this improved Brexit deal and to deliver on the instruction of the British people,” May said.

May announced three documents — a joint instrument, a joint statement and a unilateral declaration — which she said were aimed at addressing the most contentious part of the divorce deal she agreed in November: the Irish backstop.

The backstop is an insurance policy aimed at avoiding controls on the sensitive border between the British province of Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland, though some British lawmakers worry it could trap the United Kingdom in the EU’s orbit indefinitely.

On news of the breakthrough, sterling, which has see-sawed on Brexit headlines, jumped 0.8 percent to $1.3250 in Asian trade and rallied to the strongest against the euro since mid-2017.
Last chance?

After two-and-a-half years of haggling with Britain over Brexit, Juncker cautioned that this was the last chance for Britain.

“There will be no third chance,” he said. “There will be no further interpretations of the interpretations; no further assurances of the re-assurances — if the meaningful vote tomorrow fails.”
watch now
VIDEO03:18
Here’s what UK PM Theresa May needs to do to save her Brexit deal

“It is this deal or Brexit might not happen at all,” he said. He said in a letter to EU summit chair Donald Tusk that if Britain didn’t leave by the May 23-26 elections, it would have to elect its own EU lawmakers.

The United Kingdom’s tortuous crisis over EU membership is approaching its finale with an extraordinary array of outcomes still possible, including a delay, a last-minute deal, a no-deal Brexit, a snap election or even another referendum. The country voted to leave the EU in a 2016 plebiscite.

The British parliament on Jan. 15 voted to reject May’s deal by 230 votes, the biggest defeat for a government in modern British history.
Brexit votes

May has promised lawmakers a vote on her deal on Tuesday. The motion put forward by the government said that the joint instrument “reduces the risk” that the United Kingdom would be trapped in the backstop.

The immediate reaction was cautious from Brexit-supporting lawmakers in her own party and from the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party which props up her minority government.

After Cabinet Office Minister David Lidington, who May’s de facto deputy, updated the British parliament on the talks, Brexit supporting lawmaker Steve Baker told BBC Radio: “It’s not for the first time that David has had to put a very good gloss on something which falls short of what was expected.”

Lidington said that Britain and the EU had agreed an instrument to prevent the EU seeking to “trap” Britain in any backstop, work to replace the backstop by December 2020 and confirming pledges Britain has made for a lock on new EU laws applying to Northern Ireland.

He also said that they had agreed a second document, a joint statement to expedite the negotiation of the future relationship.

The DUP said it would study the documents.

May was instructed by lawmakers to replace the backstop with alternative arrangements. The opposition Labour Party said she had fallen far short of her promises to parliament.

If the backstop comes into force and talks on the future relationship break down with no prospect of an agreement, May said the unilateral declaration would make clear there was nothing to stop London from moving to leave the backstop.
Brexit in peril?

The British government’s top lawyer, Attorney General Geoffrey Cox, is due to set out his legal analysis of the assurances ahead of Tuesday’s vote. Many pro-Brexit lawmakers will wait to see that before deciding how to vote.

If she loses the vote, May has said lawmakers will get a vote on Wednesday on whether to leave without a deal and, if they reject that, then a vote on whether to ask for a limited delay to Brexit.

Senior British government ministers have warned rebellious lawmakers that if May’s deal is voted down then there is a chance that Brexit could be thwarted.

Brexit will pitch the world’s fifth largest economy into the unknown and many fear it will serve to divide the West as it grapples with both the unconventional presidency of Donald Trump and growing assertiveness from Russia and China.

Supporters of Brexit say that while the divorce might bring some short-term instability, in the longer term it will allow the United Kingdom to thrive and also enable deeper EU integration without such a powerful reluctant member.
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Offline RE

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🌍 Theresa May's EU withdrawal deal has been rejected by MPs
« Reply #76 on: March 13, 2019, 02:57:51 AM »
Not a good day to quite drinking for Teresa.

RE

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-47547887

    Brexit

Media caption: Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn address MPs after her Brexit deal is voted down again

Theresa May's EU withdrawal deal has been rejected by MPs by an overwhelming majority for a second time, with just 17 days to go to Brexit.

MPs voted down the prime minister's deal by 149 - a smaller margin than when they rejected it in January.

Mrs May said MPs will now get a vote on whether the UK should leave the EU without a deal and, if that fails, on whether Brexit should be delayed.

She said Tory MPs will get a free vote on a no-deal Brexit.

    LIVE: Reaction as May's deal is voted down
    'People must decide' Brexit - Sturgeon
    Brexit: What could happen next?
    Brexit: A really simple guide

That means they can vote with their conscience rather than following the orders of party managers - an unusual move for a vote on a major policy, with Labour saying it showed she had "given up any pretence of leading the country".

The PM had made a last minute plea to MPs to back her deal after she had secured legal assurances on the Irish backstop from the EU.

But although she managed to convince about 40 Tory MPs to change their mind, it was not nearly enough to overturn the historic 230 vote defeat she suffered in January, throwing her Brexit strategy into fresh disarray.
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In a statement after the defeat, Mrs May said: "I continue to believe that by far the best outcome is the UK leaves the European Union in an orderly fashion with a deal.

"And that the deal we have negotiated is the best and indeed only deal available."

Setting out the next steps, she said MPs will vote on Wednesday on whether the UK should leave the EU without a deal or not.

If they vote against a no-deal Brexit, they will vote the following day on whether Article 50 - the legal mechanism taking the UK out of the EU on 29 March - should be extended.

Mrs May said MPs would have to decide whether they want to delay Brexit, hold another referendum, or whether they "want to leave with a deal but not this deal".

She said that the choices facing the UK were "unenviable", but because of the rejection of her deal, "they are choices that must be faced".

Mrs May also told MPs the government would announce details of how the UK will manage its border with Ireland in the event of a no-deal Brexit on Wednesday.

    'Avoid no-deal Brexit own goal,' say business groups
    Disgraced MP back to vote on Brexit deal
    Brexit deal: What do the documents say?

Mrs May said leaving without a deal remained the UK's default position but Downing Street said she will tell MPs whether she will vote for no-deal when she opens Wednesday's Commons debate on it.

The prime minister did not discuss resigning after her latest defeat because a government led by her had recently won a confidence vote in the Commons, added the PM's spokesman.

She has no plans to return to Brussels to ask for more concessions because, as she told MPs, she still thinks her deal is the best and only one on offer, he added.
Cabinet divided on next move

What isn't clear is how the prime minister actually intends to dig herself out of this dreadful political hole.

Some of her colleagues around the Cabinet table think it shows she has to tack to a closer deal with the EU.

Some of them believe it's time now to go hell-for-leather to leave without an overarching deal but move to make as much preparation as possible, and fast.

Other ministers believe genuinely, still with around two weeks to go, and an EU summit next week, there is still time to try to manoeuvre her deal through - somehow.

Read more from Laura

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the prime minister should now call a general election.

"The government has been defeated again by an enormous majority and it must accept its deal is clearly dead and does not have the support of this House," he told MPs.

He said a no-deal Brexit had to be "taken off the table" - and Labour would continue to push its alternative Brexit proposals. He did not mention the party's commitment to back another referendum.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, chairman of the European Research Group of Brexiteer MPs, said "the problem with the deal was that it didn't deliver on the commitment to leave the EU cleanly and that the backstop would have kept us in the customs union and de facto in the single market".
Media captionChris Mason: "A huge defeat for the tweaked Brexit deal"

The Tory MP, who voted against Mrs May's deal, told BBC News: "The moral authority of 17.4 million people who voted to leave means that very few people are actually standing up and saying they want to reverse Brexit. They're calling for a second referendum, they're calling for delay.

"But actually very few politicians are brave enough to go out and say they want to overturn the referendum result."

Leading Conservative Remainer Dominic Grieve, who backs another referendum, said Mrs May's deal was now "finished".

The Tory MP, who voted against the prime minister's plan, said he was confident the majority of MPs would now vote against a no-deal Brexit - and he hoped they would then vote to ask for an extension to Article 50.
Media captionCorbyn: PM's Brexit plan "is dead"

The EU's chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said in a tweet: "The EU has done everything it can to help get the Withdrawal Agreement over the line. The impasse can only be solved in the UK. Our 'no-deal' preparations are now more important than ever before."

A spokesman for European Council president Donald Tusk echoed that message, saying it was "difficult to see what more we can do".

"With only 17 days left to 29 March, today's vote has significantly increased the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit," added the spokesman.

The EU would consider an extension to Brexit if the UK asked for one, he added, but the 27 other EU member states would expect "a credible justification" for it.
Media captionMPs voted by 391 to 242 against Theresa May's Brexit plan

The PM's deal was defeated by 391 to 242.

Some 75 Conservative MPs voted against it, compared with 118 who voted against it in January.

The Democratic Unionist Party's 10 MPs also voted against the deal, as did the Labour Party, SNP and other opposition parties.

Three Labour MPs - Kevin Barron, Caroline Flint and John Mann - voted for the prime minister's deal.
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Offline RE

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🌍 UK MPs reject a no-deal Brexit
« Reply #77 on: March 14, 2019, 01:24:33 AM »
Haven't played the Brexit Theme Song in a while... ::)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/yYkL5igsG4k" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/yYkL5igsG4k</a>

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/PSO4ndj04KM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/PSO4ndj04KM</a>
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Offline RE

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🌍 What could a no-deal Brexit actually mean for YOU?
« Reply #78 on: March 14, 2019, 01:33:57 AM »
The FEAR CAMPAIGN swings into high gear!

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EpYrclfgX2I" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EpYrclfgX2I</a>
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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🌍 What could a no-deal Brexit actually mean for YOU?
« Reply #79 on: March 14, 2019, 04:09:48 AM »
The FEAR CAMPAIGN swings into high gear!

RE
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EpYrclfgX2I" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EpYrclfgX2I</a>

Here's hoping Robert Mercer and the other funders of the Brexit referendum will enjoy the blood on their hands from the resumption of The Troubles.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: 🌍 What could a no-deal Brexit actually mean for YOU?
« Reply #80 on: March 14, 2019, 04:18:09 AM »
The FEAR CAMPAIGN swings into high gear!

RE
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EpYrclfgX2I" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EpYrclfgX2I</a>

Here's hoping Robert Mercer and the other funders of the Brexit referendum will enjoy the blood on their hands from the resumption of The Troubles.

Nice 2 C U back in the Saddle.  :icon_sunny:

RE
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Re: 🌍 What could a no-deal Brexit actually mean for YOU?
« Reply #81 on: March 14, 2019, 06:52:10 AM »
The FEAR CAMPAIGN swings into high gear!

Here's hoping Robert Mercer and the other funders of the Brexit referendum will enjoy the blood on their hands from the resumption of The Troubles.

Nice 2 C U back in the Saddle.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Thanks. good to be back.
Helped plan and attended a surprise 90th birthday party for my mother. Huge success, especially since she didn't core out at seeing 40+ people in the party room. Got to see cousins I hadn't seen in 40 years, and meet some I'd never known before. And then the following night, I met up with a friend since college and we drank Irish Car Bombs until the wee smalls. THAT left a mark. Too old these days.
Anyhow, discussion seems to be brisk as the Iditarod has come to an end. Guess we won't be seeing you on Sportscenter.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: 🌍 What could a no-deal Brexit actually mean for YOU?
« Reply #82 on: March 14, 2019, 07:38:45 AM »
Guess we won't be seeing you on Sportscenter.

You never know.  One of the Iditarod Broadcasts has gone Triple Digits now also.  112 Views in undr a week! :icon_sunny:

2019 Iditarod - The Top 4 Mushers Contend for the Title

112 views 3 days ago

The race now features 4 Mushers in contention for the Reddington Trophy, with Nic Petit the odds on favorite with an 18 mile lead.
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Offline Surly1

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The Bollocks on This Guy
« Reply #83 on: March 14, 2019, 02:07:30 PM »
Master dealmaker throws shade.

Donald Trump criticizes Theresa May for 'how badly' Brexit talks have gone
The president was critical of Brexit negotiations but says the US will stay out of Britain’s talks over its exit from the EU




Donald Trump has renewed his criticism of Theresa May’s handling of Brexit, claiming that she ignored his advice on how to negotiate and now “it’s tearing a country apart”.

The US president, a self-anointed master deal maker, also insisted that a second referendum on Britain’s departure from the European Union would be “unfair” and said he looks forward to making a bilateral trade agreement.

Trump, who is friendly with the former UK Independence party leader Nigel Farage, has long been a cheerleader for Brexit and alive to its domestic parallels. During his presidential election campaign in 2016,he tweeted: “They will soon be calling me MR. BREXIT!”

Speaking in the Oval Office alongside the Irish prime minister,Leo Varadkar, on Thursday, Trump said: “It’s a very complex thing right now, it’s tearing a country apart, it’s actually tearing a lot of countries apart and it’s a shame it has to be that way but I think we will stay right in our lane.”

Trump said on Thursday: “I’m surprised at how badly it’s all gone from the standpoint of a negotiation. I gave the prime minister my ideas on how to negotiate it and I think you would have been successful.

“She didn’t listen to that and that’s fine – she’s got to do what she’s got to do. I think it could have been negotiated in a different manner, frankly. I hate to see everything being ripped apart now.”

May and Trump’s dialogues are a study in contrasting styles, with May preferring to work through bullet points, and Trump opting for freewheeling and dwelling on his achievements. But their relationship is said to have steadily improved, whereas Trump’s interactions with France’s president, Emmanuel Macron, tend toward soaring highs and jarring lows.

On the prospect of a second Brexit referendum, Trump said: “I don’t think another vote would be possible because it would be very unfair to the people that won. They’d say: ‘What do you mean, you’re going to take another vote?’ So that would be tough.

“I thought it would happen, it did happen, and both sides are very, very cemented in. It’s a tough situation. It’s a shame. There was no reason for that to happen. They could have had the vote and it should have gone smoothly and unfortunately it didn’t.”

UK MPs voted in favour of extendingArticle 50beyond its 29 March deadline on Thursday. Earlier in the day, Trump said he believed Brexit was likely to be delayed. “I think they are probably going to have to do something because right now they are in the midst of a very short period of time – the end of the month – and they are not going to be able to do that.”

If and when the UK leaves the EU, it will negotiate its own trade deals, including with the US, for the first time in decades. Trump said: “We are talking with them about trade and we can do a very big trade deal with the UK.”

Turning to Varadkar, visiting the White House to celebrate St Patrick’s Day, he said: “Leo, I’m sure you agree on that. Would you like to express your feelings on Brexit? Maybe I shouldn’t let you do it, I’ll just get you in trouble.”

The taoiseach replied: “We have a different opinion, Mr President. I regret that Brexit’s happening.”

Varadkar said Brexit should not affect Northern Ireland, and that he would like to see a trade deal cemented between the EU and the US. “I think it will be a few years until the United Kingdom sorts itself out, but in the meantime the European Union is available to talk trade with the US.”

American presidents have been unable to resist dipping into Brexit. In April 2016, Barack Obama visited London andmade an impassioned pleato Britons to remain in the EU, warning that the UK would be at the “back of the queue” in any trade deal with the US.

Trump has often relished taking positions opposite to Obama and his election campaign was apolitical cousinof Brexit with similar anti-immigration and anti-elite themes.

Last year, Trump claimed that he was at his golf course in Scotland “the day before Brexit” and correctly predicted the result of the referendum. In truth, he arrived a day later and welcomed the result, saying: “I said this was going to happen, and I think that it’s a great thing. Basically they took back their country.”

The White House is known to contain some strong Brexit supporters who admire May’s tenacity, although many in the US business community are baffled and bemused. Earlier on Thursday,Trump had tweeted:“My Administration looks forward to negotiating a large scale Trade Deal with the United Kingdom. The potential is unlimited!”

Liam Fox, the British trade minister, responded: “Greater trade between us reinforces a comprehensive alliance that goes far beyond the economic, providing for our national security and bringing prosperity to our people.”

The US trade representative’s office has said it will launch negotiations with Britain after its exit from the EU. Last month, it laid out its objectives for a deal that included reduced tariff and non-tariff barriers for US industrial and agricultural goods.

The UK has not yet published its own negotiating mandate, which will probably take a couple of months and a possible parliamentary date. If Brexit goes ahead on schedule, negotiations could begin around September but it will be difficult to complete them before the end of next year, when a presidential election will sow fresh uncertainty. Among the British priorities would be an agreement to sell more military hardware to the Pentagon

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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🌍 March Brexit almost certainly out of reach
« Reply #84 on: March 16, 2019, 03:38:00 AM »
Welcome to the Hotel Brussels.  ::)

RE

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-47577742

March Brexit almost certainly out of reach
Laura Kuenssberg Political editor @bbclaurak on Twitter


Image copyright Getty Images

More than 80 times Theresa May vowed we would leave the European Union at the end of this month.


As the days, then weeks, then months passed with first delays in reaching a deal, and then MPs rejecting it twice, slowly, but surely, that date became less and less realistic.

But it was disquiet in Parliament that forced her to relinquish it publicly.

Now, it is still technically possible that we could leave at the end of this month - the law has not changed.

But politically it is now almost entirely out of reach.

    MPs vote to seek delay to Brexit
    Brexit delay: What just happened?

The prime minister is accepting she will miss one of the biggest targets she has ever set herself.

Tonight's vote is awkward for another reason, as it again displays the Conservatives' fundamental divisions.

This is more than a quarrel among friends, but a party that is split down the middle on one of the most vital questions this administration has posed, with cabinet ministers, as well as backbench Brexiteers, lining up to disagree with Theresa May.

But it matters that Number 10 escaped an attempt by MPs from different parties to grab hold of this process in a formal way, in tonight's votes.
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Assumptions have often been made about the power of former Remainers whose strength in numbers, even if narrowly, often falls short.

Now two tracks continue - Number 10 will keep working, pushing and grinding on to try again to make the case for their Brexit compromise.

And MPs will carry on hunting - and arguing - for alternatives that could take the place of that compromise if it ultimately fails.
Related Topics

    Theresa May
    Brexit
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Offline RE

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🌍 Another big Brexit week begins. What's expected?
« Reply #85 on: March 19, 2019, 12:31:16 AM »
...and the farce plays on across the pond...

RE

Another big Brexit week begins. What's expected?

And why are the European Parliament elections so important?
by Ylenia Gostoli
5 hours ago


A pro-Brexit leave the European Union supporter takes part in a protest outside the House of Parliament in London [File: Kirsty Wigglesworth/The Associated Press]


London, United Kingdom - Last week's Brexit drama led to MPs opting to delay the European Union divorce at least until the end of June.

However, the decision is not unilateral and any extension of Article 50 of the EU treaty - which allows members to leave the bloc - must be approved unanimously by all 27 remaining states.

The next opportunity for EU leaders to discuss the issue will be at a two-day European Council (EC) meeting starting on Thursday - just a week before the current Brexit deadline of March 29.

But it is not yet clear whether this meeting will prove decisive, or how long the granted extension will be.

After Prime Minister Theresa May's deal with the EU was voted down by parliament for the second time this year, MPs also cast a non-binding vote to rule out a no-deal Brexit.

The option of a disorderly departure at the end of March remains on the table, however, as no deal is the default legal position under Article 50.

Looking further ahead, European Parliament elections are expected to take place between May 23 and 26.
Extending, but what for?

May aims to make a third attempt, on Tuesday, at getting her deal through Parliament.

If it is a case of third time lucky, she will ask for an extension ending before the European elections, which should be granted at that stage.

If it doesn't, or if Tuesday's vote is pulled as some British media have speculated, the scenarios will be more complex. And so will the choices facing the EU.

A number of EU leaders have said they remain open to an extension as long as the United Kingdom can provide a valid justification for it.

"They will want to make sure an extension is a price worth paying, that it's going to make a difference," Georgina Wright, a senior researcher at the Institute for Government in London, told Al Jazeera. "If there's a general election, a second referendum, or a change in the government's own red lines, then there might be more appetite for a longer extension."

May is hoping to avoid this and has been trying to get the Eurosceptic wing of her own Conservative Party and Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) behind her deal, saying a long delay might lead to Brexit being cancelled.

They have so far voted down the deal over concerns for the "backstop" protocol of the withdrawal agreement, which aims to keep an open border in the island of Ireland. Critics, however, argue it could "trap" the UK within EU's trade rules indefinitely.

The opposition Labour Party wants to see a "softer" Brexit, including a permanent, UK-wide customs union and close alignment with the single market.

Over the weekend, it emerged that Labour, which has recently announced its official support for a second referendum, will push an amendment to the so-called "meaningful vote" that would make support for May's deal conditional on putting it to the people.

    The EU has no interest in making it easy to leave the bloc. With the rise of populism in the European Parliament, you do not want to give the impression that the EU is a bad negotiator.

    Sarah Wolff, director of the Centre for European Research

The amendment doesn't specify whether remain or leave without a deal could be other options on the ballot paper.

Eurosceptics believe no deal is better than a bad deal, and Leave campaigners have talked about events in Parliament this week as a "betrayal" of the public's will.

Former UKIP leader and current MEP Nigel Farage urged EU leaders this week to veto the extension.

The European Parliament's lead Brexit spokesman, Guy Verhofstadt, spoke out against a long extension beyond the European elections, arguing it could be "hijacked" by the Brexiters.

"We will talk only about [Brexit], and not about the real problems, and the real reforms we need in the European Union," said Verhofstadt.

If May's third attempt does not pass but there's a significant improvement in the consensus for it, a fourth "meaningful vote" is tipped as a possibility.
An existential problem

The EU has made clear that if the UK wants a longer extension, it will have to take part in the European Parliament elections at the end of May.

The new assembly's first sitting is on July 2, and should the UK still be part of the EU by then, it will be required to have representation.

According to some British media reports, a leaked document to EU ambassadors claimed that legal issues could arise if the UK was still part of the bloc by that date without participating in elections.

The document said the EU would "cease being able to operate in a secure legal context" - meaning it would have to terminate the UK's membership to prevent the functioning of EU institutions from being affected.

While legal opinion remains divided on this issue, "purely from a technical point of view, the EU needs to know now if the UK is going to participate because currently they're drawing up their party lists on the basis of a new European Parliament that doesn't have UK seats in it", Wright explained.

"Secondly, you'd be denying UK and EU citizens living in the UK the right to stand and vote in the elections."

Sarah Wolff, a lecturer and director of the Centre for European Research at Queen Mary, University of London, argued that without further guarantees on a way forward, the EU has little to gain in granting a long extension or watching the UK take part in the European Parliament elections.

"The EU has no interest in making it easy to leave the [bloc]. With the rise of populism in the European Parliament, you do not want to give the impression that the EU is a bad negotiator and that you can actually come back to it.

"[Brexit is] the third crisis we have faced in the past decade," Wolff said, adding that while the eurozone and migration crises caused rifts between the members, there hasn't been much divergence on the issue of Brexit.

"EU leaders have understood that with Brexit, it is important to show coherence and unity. And they are already moving forward."

Robert Ford, a politics professor at the University of Manchester, points out that while the UK participation in the European elections could provide a contingent of additional allies for other eurosceptic forces - who are likely to do well - in the European Parliament, "it won't make a difference to EU institutions or campaigns everywhere else".

"The European Parliament elections aren't about Europe anywhere," Ford said, "people tend to vote according to national agendas and national political context."

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Offline RE

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🌍 Brexit: Bercow chucks a hulking great spanner in the works
« Reply #86 on: March 19, 2019, 12:45:24 AM »
Spanner = Monket Wrench in Brit-Speak.  ::)

Jolly good show, mate!

RE

    Brexit

Brexit: Bercow chucks a hulking great spanner in the works
Laura Kuenssberg Political editor @bbclaurak on Twitter

    3 hours ago

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BREXIT CHAOS: John Bercow blocks Theresa May's third vote, Anna Soubry asks Mister Speaker's advice

"He's breaking the constitution" - quite the accusation, laid at the door of John Bercow's grand speaker's apartments.

It's notable because it's the view of a government minister who is not one of those whose pulse quickens when discussing leaving or trying to stay in the European Union.

There is, of course, precedent in the very well-thumbed copies of Erskine May, the parliamentary rules, for the speaker's decision.

Quoting decisions as far back as 1604, John Bercow was quite clear that governments are not meant to be able to keep asking parliament the same question, in the hope of boring MPs into submission if they keep saying no.

But as another member of the government put it mildly, the speaker has a reputation for being "interventionist", and he has, this afternoon, chucked a hulking great spanner in the works.
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Image caption After the speaker's intervention, Theresa May's way forward is far from clear

The government seems to have been cooling all day on the idea of getting MPs to vote again on Theresa May's Brexit deal this week, for a whole shopping list of reasons.

But before Number 10 had a chance to make that decision, the speaker took it out of their hands.

There will be no "MV3", to use the terrible jargon - there won't be another vote on the prime minister's Brexit deal unless it changes.
'Anger and astonishment'

Strangely, MPs who hate Theresa May's compromise, for different reasons, agree to an extent that it's the right call.

But there is anger and astonishment too, partly because MPs will have to explain another potential delay to the process, when many of them sense the public's desire is to crack on.

But there is festering concern about John Bercow's suspected wish to stop Brexit - always denied.

This time the speaker, whose job it is stand up for parliament, has - with no warning - made a decision that some in government believe veers too close to trying to block the government from what it seeks to do.

The way around it for Theresa May is far from clear.
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Offline RE

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🌍 Europe offers British lawmakers chance to delay Brexit
« Reply #87 on: March 22, 2019, 12:45:11 AM »
Another big surprise.  ::)

RE

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Offline Eddie

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Re: 🌍 Europe offers British lawmakers chance to delay Brexit
« Reply #88 on: March 22, 2019, 05:27:25 AM »
Another big surprise.  ::)

RE

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Theresa May increasingly looks to be completely out of her depth.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

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Re: 🌍 Europe offers British lawmakers chance to delay Brexit
« Reply #89 on: March 22, 2019, 05:30:44 AM »
Theresa May increasingly looks to be completely out of her depth.

Her solution appears to be to keep scheduling votes until she gets the result she wants.  ::)

RE
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