AuthorTopic: Standoff at Standing Rock  (Read 66682 times)

Offline azozeo

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Palestinians join Standing Rock Sioux to protest Dakota Access Pipeline
« Reply #30 on: October 27, 2016, 02:55:43 PM »
Palestinians join Standing Rock Sioux to protest Dakota Access Pipeline

Nadya Raja Tannous

    “Perhaps only in North Dakota, where oil tycoons wine and dine elected officials, and where the governor, Jack Dalrymple, serves as an adviser to the Trump campaign, would state and county governments act as the armed enforcement for corporate interests. In recent weeks, the state has militarized my reservation, with road blocks and license-plate checks, low-flying aircraft and racial profiling of Indians. The local sheriff and the pipeline company have both called our protest “unlawful,”and Gov. Dalrymple has declared a state of emergency.

    It’s a familiar story in Indian Country. This is the third time that the Sioux Nation’s lands and resources have been taken without regard for tribal interests. The Sioux peoples signed treaties in 1851 and 1868. The government broke them before the ink was dry.

    When the Army Corps of Engineers dammed the Missouri River in 1958, it took our riverfront forests, fruit orchards and most fertile farmland to create Lake Oahe. Now the Corps is taking our clean water and sacred places by approving this river crossing.”

    – Dave Archambault II, Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, opinion piece in the NY Times

The Bakken formation in the northern United States and southern Canada is listed by US energy companies as one of the most promising options for national oil extraction, only surpassed in size by the oil fields in Alaska. The fields in North Dakota have beenincreasingly targeted for Bakken shale oil resources over the past years and they are quite familiar with public controversy: many of us remember the proposal of the infamousKeystone XL pipeline from 2008-2015, which was held in starkly low public opinion andstruck down twice by the Obama administration. The proposed Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) is not so different from its failed counterpart. It is mapped out for the same length of 1,172 milesas the Keystone XL and is targeting the same Bakken shale reserves for carry across the upper Midwest. The proposed $3.8 billion dollar DAPL would transport 570,000 barrels of crude oil per day across four states and cross the Missouri River itself. Parent company, Energy Transfer Partners is selling the pipeline as an economic booster, job creator, and sure investment for the future of the American people. Yet, who exactly are they referring to and who did they consult?

In the hills outside of Bismarck, North Dakota is the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, sitting along the banks of the Cannonball River, a tributary to the Missouri River. The pipeline construction sites can now be seen from the reservation, but many people here saw the pipeline coming before it even arrived. Just as Energy Transfer Partners and TransCanada failed to consult Native Tribes who live along the planned pipeline route and whose sacred lands, ancestral lands, and main water sources will be compromised by construction, there has not been a single tribal consultation around the proposed DAPL.

On April 1st , Sacred Stone Spirit Camp was erected on the bank of the Cannonball as a residence for water protectors, many whom came from within and off the reservation to stand against pipeline construction, call for water preservation, and call for recognition of the Federal treaties held with the Great Sioux Nation. What started out as a few hundred people quickly increased into the thousands, stemming the creation of the Oceti Sakowin and Red Warrior Camps on the other side of the Cannonball.

Protectors, support, and solidarity with Standing Rock are arriving from all edges of the world, many of them representing Indigenous Nations. My own caravan set out from California the 2nd week of September, preceding the Palestinian Youth Movement-USA Caravan that arrived soon after. As a contingent of Indigenous peoples in diaspora and recent settlers on Turtle Island, we attest that those standing at Standing Rock are standing for our present and future as well. We must in turn stand for each other against the present, future, and historical supremacies of erasure, the active legacy of settler-colonialism, and the viciousness of greed.

The pipeline company seems to remain unconcerned by the risk of polluting the reservation’s main water source, the highly probable degradation of land and sacred sights, and their trespass against a series of federal laws, and they are becoming increasingly reactionary to the flow of protectors in and out of the protector camps and surrounding areas. Just a few weeks ago, on September 28th, alarming images and video were released of armed police and military-style vehicles cornering protectors holding a prayer ceremony at a North Dakota construction site. The video portrayed the intensity on the ground and just how vulnerable the protector camps are without the gaze of the public eye:

    “They are moving in”
    “They won’t let us leave. They have locked us in on both sides”
    “They’ve got their weapons drawn”
    “They’ve got snipers on top of the hill”
    “They’re blocking me on Facebook”
    “They are arresting everyone now. Everyone is running”
    “Share this far and wide”

    – Transcript of LiveStream video via Unicorn Riot

The militarized forces blocked the only exit from the site to the public road before arresting 21 protectors. Other attendees posted photos of a crop dusting plane releasing a gas or chemical over the crowd. There has been little clarity thereafter of the makeup of the compound or the purpose of the spray.

The participation and planning of direct actions against DAPL construction, however, are continuing, with over 100 cars caravanning out to 5 construction sites the week of October 3rd and successfully halting construction for the day. Local authorities, private security hires, and the National Guard are seemingly disturbed by the presence of protectors as well, and are going out of their way to restrict access in and out of the protector camp area and intimidate newcomers. Indeed my own caravan coming from California was discouraged from approaching the reservation on the main road running from Bismarck, ND due to the checkpoints erected by North Dakota authorities. Our longwinded encounter with the highway patrol on our way to North Dakota — who insisted on not only checking all of our IDs followed by standing on the side of the highway outside of the car for an hour but also “passed our information down the line to the authorities higher-up” including suspicions of illegal activity — seemed to be motivated to dissuade an influx of supporters into the area. Stories of license plate checks, racial profiling of Native and ethnic drivers and/or car passengers, as well as arrests at roadblocks, circulated through the camps. Democracy Now, The New York Times, Huffington Post, and many independent news sources also reported these same tactics.

Why did I go in the first place? Because somewhere in the awkward power dynamic of being a US citizen, a non-native inhabitant of Turtle Island, and a Palestinian in the Diaspora, I saw the struggle for livelihood and culture, the struggle against settler-colonialism, the struggle to protect the sacred and maintain your own legitimacy, and the ever ominous force of erasure and historical amnesia. What I later saw at Standing Rock both embodied this and became bigger than it; as a Mohawk Elder said to me, “Without water, we [humans] are infertile dust”.

At a council fire in Oceti Sakowin during my stay, 280 Indigenous Nations were thanked for their support and representation at the camps. Movement leaders at Sacred Stone Spirit Camp have repeatedly stated that the gatherings of different Indigenous Nations near Cannonball, ND is the largest in the past 150 years on the North American continent.

The council fire sits at the mouth of the main entrance of Oceti Sakowin Camp, outlined by rows of flags representing many of the Indigenous Nations who have come to stand with Standing Rock. At the end of one of the rows is the Palestinian flag. Seeing it filled me equally with joy and sadness because it confirmed two things that I had pondered throughout the long drive from California to North Dakota: the first thought is that the power of collective resistance against greed and settler-colonialism is a mighty force. That thought was embodied by my joy to see a representation of will by the presently unseen Palestinian siblings who had come to take a stand against destructive powers. The second thought was embodied by sadness for, if the struggle for protection of water, culture, land, heritage, and livelihood is truly mirrored in Standing Rock and Palestine, then the struggle ahead is both vast and uncompromising.

I spoke with many inspiring protectors from the Maori in New Zealand, indigenous representatives from Ecuador, Canadian representatives from the Blackfoot Nation who were longtime activists in the “Idle No More” mobilizations, and Dakota/Lakota/Nakota from Standing Rock and the neighboring reservations among so many others.

From a variety of perspectives and personal stories, the same foundational message was repeated back to me: this stand isn’t just about standing for Native rights, it is about protecting the water, protecting our earth and securing the livelihood of our next generations. Water is life for all of us.

Myself and fellow members of the Palestinian Youth Movement–United States Branch had reflected on the latter thought when we authored our statement of solidarity “with the Standing Rock Sioux, the Great Sioux Nation and our other native sisters, brothers and siblings in the fight against the DAPL”, circulated on September 7th. Segments read:

    “We condemn all forms of state violence against our First Nation siblings and denote that the undermining of their sovereignty and livelihood is a part of the continuing dialectic of settler-colonialism transnationally.

    Since the arrival of settlers on Turtle Island, First Nations have resisted genocide and displacement. From seizure of land to reservations, from boarding schools to massacres, the state has done everything in its power to erase and eradicate First Nation peoples. Yet, they are still with us today and they continue to resist. Protecting their land, people, and future generations from the DAPL is a testament to their strength and resilience.

    ….
As Native communities face an ongoing genocide and continue to resist the imperialist settler-colonial regime of the United States, Palestinians are too experiencing a genocide and ethnocide within our homelands from the settler-colonial state of Israel.”

The comparisons are uncanny. I had spent most of the hours on the road to North Dakota contemplating the connections between the obstacles and oppressions facing those in Standing Rock and the obstacles and oppressions facing we Palestinians under occupation and apartheid. However, upon arriving at Standing Rock, I no longer just thought about the similarities, I felt them in my bones.

When protectors at Standing Rock asked me about what Palestinians experience in our own fight against settler-colonialism, oppression, and greed, I answered sometimes through the language of statistics. Yet, more often, I told them narratives of genocide, exile, delegimitzation, broken promises, and resounding resilience.

Sitting around a fire, burning sage and cedar wood, Darlene Meguinis of the Blackfoot Nation in Canada reflected on the beginnings of the Idle No More movement, in which she is still an active organizer. She told me: “Everything must start with prayer and ceremony, especially organizing.” She reminded me that the founders ofIdle No More, elders Nina Waste, Jessica Gordon, Sheelah Mcleen, and Sylvia McAdams, had rooted the movement in ceremony. The result of doing so, Meguinis maintained, was to center the focus of the collective actions for change.

Native youth in the #NoDAPL Youth Council at Standing Rock reiterated similar ideas about DAPL actions. Two youth leaders recounted to me, “we are striving for the results that we want to see but are being directed by our ancestors. We are here, acting now, for our children.”

Intention and prayer surrounded much of the daily camp life and easily dispersed the tensions outside, even as the DAPL Company and National Guard helicopters flew low over the camps each morning, afternoon and night (something that pointedly reminded me of life in Palestine).

Some mornings along the bend of the Cannonball River, which delineates Oceti Sakowin/Red Warrior Camp from Sacred Stone Spirit Camp, Native artists reflected the beauty around them in paintings and art installations. One of the organizers was Albuquerque artist Monty Singer, whose picture is shown below.

The time set out to create art and music, to gather around fires and drum circles, toparticipate in prayer and ceremony with each other uplifted the vibrant energy of the camps and the people within them. We cheered, prayed and supported the direct actions as best we could every day; donations from across the U.S. and internationally flooded into the main entrance in the afternoons and community kitchens and donation booths ran 24/7 to maintain the swelling of protector numbers. Hundreds of people ebbed and flowed into the camps every single day.

The sheer power required to uphold the movement is sobering: in light of the failed injunction by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe against the US Army Corps of Engineers at the lower court level, a Federal Appeals court officially halted construction of the pipeline, underlining the same temporary hold parameters as the decree proposed on September 9th by the Department of Justice (DOJ). That hold applies solely within 20 miles on either side of Lake Oahe near the Missouri River.

Other locations on the planned pipeline route are still open for construction and, though direct actions at sites of DAPL construction have not wavered, they are increasingly receiving less and less media attention with increasingly severe charges being applied to protectors. For example, the 5 protectors who strapped themselves to bulldozers at an active DAPL construction site 100 miles down Hwy 94 from the reservation during my stay at Oceti Sakowin Camp were slapped with felony charges for “criminal trespassing”, the same charges outlined against Amy Goodman in her arrest warrant as a result of her coverage of the DAPL in early September (although her charges at the time constituted a misdemeanor and were thankfully dropped October 17th after a court hearing). Some of those arrested were even extradited back to their home states to face their charges from North Dakota in addition to preexisting protest charges in other states.

My last night in Standing Rock, I spoke with a woman by the name of “Terry”, a resident of Bismarck, ND. I asked her why I had met so few non-natives from the local area at Standing Rock. Her response was direct and had very little to do with the sheriff’s implemented checkpoints and roadblocks: “It is because of the media propaganda. For example, during the dog attacks, Bismarck news covered a worker’s injury at the site and the hospitalization of a guard. No one gave popular air time or writing space to cover the effects of the dog attacks on protectors.” She mentioned that an article in the conservative paper, Town Hall, soon after the attacks read: “So dogs were unleashed on these protestors. Good”. She and a few others from Bismarck came to the camps because they saw past the media pressure. “We understand that the fight for clean water and recognition of Native sovereignty affects everyone in the surrounding area”, she told me, which would become increasingly apparent if oil leakage wells up in the Bakken region.

In Geneva, on September 20th, Dave Archambault II, Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, urged the UN Human Rights Council to stand with the tribe in opposing the DAPL project and advocate for the recognition of their sovereign rights, including the protection of water and sacred places. Protectors are remaining vigilant on and off site, many walking to pay respects to the graves of the Dakota/Lakota/Nakota ancestors that have been disturbed by construction.

Martina Looking Horse, a longtime writer from Cheyenne River Reservation, has been camping at Standing Rock for over a month. She told me that she and her family plan to stay until the pipeline is defeated but stressed that the conditions at camp are not easy to live under. The torrential rainstorms, the swings of hot and cold, and the impending North Dakota winter discourage many from staying longer than a few weeks. Yet, Looking Horse affirmed her belief that she and many others will carry on, with or without the support of mainstream media. The hope, she reaffirmed, is that the national and international people of conscience will continue to support in all the ways that they can, hold the US government accountable to their promises, and not forget that the protectors are still there taking a stand.

The day that I left, the PYM-United States Branch’s official caravan came into Oceti Sakowin, bringing supplies, people power, and small gifts for the tribal council as visitors to the land. They also read our statement at the tribal council fire and met many people, as I had, who stated how glad they were to see Palestinians supporting the front lines against movement suppression. The solidarity with Palestine for all of us who participated in caravans from PYM was overwhelming. What was supposed to be a few-day trip was extended into a week.

Inspired by the stories, the people, the call to our moral responsibility to protect each other and the water that keeps us alive, we hope to return back to Standing Rock and bring supplies for winter.

Friends of Sabeel North America also sent forward a statement of solidarity, in part remarking:

    “we know that settler colonialism depends on the exploitation of land and natural resources to the detriment of indigenous communities…Today, we see you, the Sioux nation and members of the other 280 Native American tribes who have joined you to protect the water of the Missouri River and stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, taking a stand for all life, the embodiment of resilience. As the Israeli occupation continues, Palestinian land is stolen, ancient olive trees are uprooted, and blood is shed, your struggle inspires our work and we redouble our efforts to witness and nonviolently resist. We stand in full support of indigenous sovereignty and self-determination.”

The light of hope in Standing Rock is not fizzling out. Upon returning to the Bay Area, I came across many art builds and donation efforts, and have been seeing many more events publicized by friends and family in New York State, Virginia, North Carolina, Florida and Arizona.

Thanks to Caleb Duarte and the wonderful youth from Fremont High School in Oakland (recently arrived unaccompanied youth from Chimeltenango, Guatemala) who made this solidarity banner:

I remember thinking as I left Standing Rock to return to California: peoples suppressed by power and greed have strength when they rise together. There is a poignant uniting force through something as important as the world that sustains us.

The river was quiet when I left, with lots of green and tall grass on its banks. The river flats lay muddy and fertile, the slow current reflecting the sky day and night, the water turning pink and orange by sunset.

A water protector strapped to heavy machinery down the Hwy 94 shouted out, before being removed to jail,

    “This pipeline is a pipeline to the past. We need to be building sustainable infrastructure for the future, not destructive unsustainable industries that hurt land, that hurt water, that hurt people. Everything is wrong about this pipeline… We’re here standing in solidarity with millions of people from around the world that are against this pipeline.” (via Unicorn Riot)

The collective call for justice is ringing loud and clear. Mni Wiconi –Water is life.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2016, 02:59:23 PM by azozeo »
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Dakota Access Pipeline: Police remove protesters; scores arrested
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2016, 03:32:47 AM »
Not looking like they will stop the pipeline from going through.  :(  My guess would be sabotage once it is completed.

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/27/us/dakota-access-pipeline-protests/

Dakota Access Pipeline: Police remove protesters; scores arrested

By Marlena Baldacci, Emanuella Grinberg and Holly Yan, CNN

Updated 9:52 PM ET, Thu October 27, 2016
Police remove pipeline protesters

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Dakota Access pipeline protesters defy law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The months-long dispute over the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline reached a crisis point when the protesters set up camp on land owned by pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners. The disputed area is just to the north of a more permanent and larger encampment on federally-owned land where hundreds of protesters have camped for months.
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Police remove pipeline protesters
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Dakota Access pipeline protesters defy law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The months-long dispute over the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline reached a crisis point when the protesters set up camp on land owned by pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners. The disputed area is just to the north of a more permanent and larger encampment on federally-owned land where hundreds of protesters have camped for months.
Police remove pipeline protesters
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Shell protesters dangle on bridge for 36 hours
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Story highlights

    Opponents arrested protesting construction of 1,172-mile pipeline
    Authorities call in help from seven other states to help remove protesters

(CNN)Police in riot gear faced off with protesters on horseback as the monthslong protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline came to a head Thursday.
At least 117 protesters were arrested after law enforcement Humvees and helicopters began to flood the area to break up a protester encampment near the pipeline's path.
Calling themselves "water protectors," supporters of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe set up tents and teepees on the land, about an hour south of Bismarck, which they said belongs to the tribe under a 19-century treaty.
But authorities said they are trespassing on pipeline property. Officials brought in reinforcements from seven states to remove protesters and dismantle roadblocks made of hay bales and wood.
As the standoff continued, police deployed bean bag rounds and pepper spray gas and unleashed a high-pitched siren to disperse the crowd.
Protesters and law enforcement faced off on Thursday.
Protesters and law enforcement faced off on Thursday.
In response, protesters lit debris on fire near a bridge and threw Molotov cocktails at law enforcement, North Dakota Department of Emergency Services spokeswoman Cecily Fong said.
At least two people were arrested for allegedly firing gunshots; one on Highway 1806 near officers and another near a bridge north of the protester's main camp.
"Most of these people are peaceful, prayerful people," Fong said. "But we know that there is a faction that is willing to do anything to stop this pipeline. That's why our people went down there prepared."
By Thursday evening, law enforcement had cleared the area and pushed protesters about a mile down Highway 1806, to the site of a previous encampment. Law enforcement lingered in vehicles from different agencies as trucks towed burned cars.
The long-brewing standoff stems from construction of the 1,172-mile pipeline, which protesters said will threaten the environment and destroy Native American burial sites, prayer sites and culturally significant artifacts. Opponents also cite environmental concerns, including possible contamination due to breaches and eventual greenhouse gas emissions.
Aggressive tactics
Both sides have accused the other of increasingly aggressive tactics, from police strip-searches and violence, to protesters destroying construction equipment.
The conflict has become a celebrity cause, drawing the support of actors Shailene Woodley, who was arrested in an October 10 protest, and Mark Ruffalo, who provided infrastructure for the camp, including solar panels.
Ruffalo told CNN's Jack Tapper that he did not witness violence when he visited there, but he heard stories from people who claimed they were thrown in jail naked.
Ruffalo warns N.D. governor could have 'blood on his hands'
mark ruffalo north dakota pipeline protest intv lead_00002412

Ruffalo warns N.D. governor could have 'blood on his hands' 06:47
Protesters are trained in peaceful resistance, he said. No one is allowed in the protest area without training.
"The mantra of the place is 'it's not the police, it's the pipeline that we're protesting or protecting ourselves against.' They spend basically the entire day doing prayers, chanting. I've never been around so peaceful a stand."
What is the Dakota Access Pipeline?
It's a $3.7 billion project that would cross four states and change the landscape of the US crude oil supply.
The 1,172-mile pipeline, currently under construction, would stretch from the oil-rich Bakken Formation -- a vast underground deposit where Montana and North Dakota meet Canada -- southeast into South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois. An estimated 7.4 billion barrels of undiscovered oil is believed to be in its US portion, according to the US Geological Survey.
After the pipeline is completed, it would shuttle 470,000 barrels of crude oil a day, developer Energy Access Partners said. That's enough to make 374.3 million gallons of gasoline per day. From Illinois, the oil could go to markets and refineries across the Midwest, East Coast and Gulf Coast.
Depending on who you ask, the results could be an economic boon that makes the country more self-sufficient or an environmental disaster that destroys sacred Native American sites.
Supporters say it would significantly decrease American reliance on foreign oil and free up railways to transport crops and other commodities.
The Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters say pipeline construction will destroy burial sites, prayer sites and culturally significant artifacts. The tribe sued the US Army Corps of Engineers after it approved the project.
Read the complaint
But an advocacy group says the tribe's claims are misleading, saying the pipeline "does not cross into the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's reservation."
The Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now also said 100% of the affected landowners in North Dakota, where part of the tribe lives, voluntarily signed easements to allow for construction.
Oil pipeline in North Dakota in limbo
North Dakota oil pipeline 5

Oil pipeline in North Dakota in limbo 01:24
What's the environmental impact?
The developer says the pipeline would provide a safer, more environmentally friendly way of moving crude oil compared to other modes of transportation, such as rail or trucks. Pipeline supporters cite the 2013 disaster in Quebec, Canada, where a train carrying crude oil derailed and destroyed downtown Lac-Megnatic.
But Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II said he doesn't support moving more crude oil from North Dakota. He told CNN affiliate KFYR that Americans should look for alternative and renewable sources of energy.
More than 271,000 online petitioners agree.
"The Dakota Access pipeline would fuel climate change, cause untold damage to the environment, and significantly disturb sacred lands and the way of life for Native Americans in the upper Midwest," a petition on CredoAction.com states.
America's aging pipelines
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America's aging pipelines 03:08
Opponents also say they're worried what would happen if the pipeline, which would go under the Missouri River, ruptured and contaminated the water supply.
But the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now backed the developer's claim that pipelines are a safe way of moving crude oil.
"Already, 8 pipelines cross the Missouri River carrying hundreds of thousands of barrels of energy products every day," the group said in a statement.
What's the economic impact?
Energy Transfer Partners estimates the pipeline would bring an estimated $156 million in sales and income taxes to state and local governments. It'll also add 8,000 to 12,000 construction jobs, the developer said. The company said it has tried to steer the pipeline away from residential areas and reach voluntary deals with property owners "at a fair price."
The US Energy Information Administration shows the network of existing crude oil pipelines across the country.
The US Energy Information Administration shows the network of existing crude oil pipelines across the country.
But Archambault said he thinks the Native Americans are getting short-changed once again.
"We're not opposed to energy independence. We're not opposed to economic development," he told CNN.
"What we're opposed to is paying for all the benefits that this country receives."

CNN's Madison Park and Alberto Moya contributed to this report.
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2016, 01:27:18 PM »
Psychopaths GET what psychopaths want  :emthdown:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #33 on: October 28, 2016, 02:12:47 PM »
BREAKING: No-Fly Zone Declared as Militarized Police Prep for Assault on ‘Front-Line Camp’ at Standing Rock.


BY IWB · PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27, 2016

by Pamela Williams

There is breaking news that a no-fly zone has been declared over the Dakota Access Pipeline area at Standing Rock, North Dakota. Protestors and Native American activists have set up a new camp called “Front-Line Camp” where they are making their last stand against the party Energy Transfer Partners, who are working on the Pipeline. The Sioux Tribe has declared eminent domain over the water rights and sacred land rights in the same area as the Pipeline is being built. They are asking for prayers as they make a great stand against the destruction of their sacred land.

 

    Pipeline opponents attempting to protect their water supply from the Dakota Access oil pipeline (DAPL), as well as prevent the continued destruction of burial grounds and cultural sites, are anticipating a confrontation with policetoday. This news come after “water protectors” refused law enforcement requests to vacate reoccupied land in the pipeline’s path, owned by Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners.

http://thesccop.com/breaking-no-fly-zone-declared-as-militarized-police-prep-for-assault-on-front-line-camp-at-standing-rock/

 



    While Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Harold Frazier sat down with President Barack Obama at a private roundtable in Los Angeles on Tuesday, October 25, Morton County, N.D. Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier was calling in police reinforcements from six states to enforce Energy Transfer Partners’ demands that “trespassers” be removed from the path of the pipeline.

    Authorities implied they may forcibly remove the water protectors from the new camp, which is on land recently purchased by Dakota Access LLC, the subsidiary that is building the pipeline.

    “We have the resources. We could go down there at any time,” Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney said, according to the Associated Press. “We’re trying not to.”

    “We are here to enforce the law as needed,” Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said. “It’s private property.”

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/10/26/police-presence-grows-civil-rights-leaders-join-water-protectors-166226
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline K-Dog

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #34 on: October 28, 2016, 02:20:10 PM »
8 to 12 thousand construction jobs for a single pipeline?  That propaganda just pisses me off.  8 to 12 hundred might be more like it and that estimate may have blue sky in it.

Why we need a pipeline for such a small amount of oil seems nuts.  Oil trains are rolling through Seattle just fine.  I was stopped for one while it went by this week.  It was about a mile long.

It would not be long before a pipeline runs empty so why build it in the first place?  Is this a new way to fleece investors prior to taxpayer dollars coming to bail out the big ones?  I suspect so.  Eventually taxpayers are going through pay for oil extraction when it can't be made profitable anyway so demanding a buissness case for the pipeline is totally appropriate.

And those Native Americans; getting so upset about a little pipe in the ground!   The way they are acting is like they think they own this place.  Where did they get such an attitude?
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #35 on: October 28, 2016, 02:55:41 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/x3xpfvU2Su8&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/x3xpfvU2Su8&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #36 on: October 28, 2016, 02:59:26 PM »
Meet the journalist facing 45 years in jail for filming the tar sands pipeline protest in North Dakota

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Are North Dakota authorities waging a war against the public’s right to know about the ongoing Standing Rock pipeline protests? We are joined by documentary filmmaker Deia Schlosberg, who was charged earlier this month with three felonies for filming an act of civil disobedience in which climate activists manually turned off the safety valves to stop the flow of tar sands oil through pipelines spanning the U.S. and Canada.

The actions took place in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and Washington state. Schlosberg is an award-winning filmmaker and was the producer of Josh Fox’s recent documentary, “How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things Climate Can’t Change.” She was filming the action at a valve station owned by TransCanada in Walhalla, North Dakota. She was arrested along with the activists, and her footage was confiscated. Then she was charged with a Class A felony and two Class C felonies—which combined carry a 45-year maximum sentence.


TRANSCRIPT

AMY GOODMAN: But we’re joined right now in Los Angeles by Democracy Now! video stream by Deia Schlosberg, the award-winning documentary filmmaker, producer, who was arrested on October 11th in a different area of North Dakota, while reporting on a climate change protest in Walhalla, North Dakota, charged with three felonies, facing 45 years in prison, if convicted. Also with us, Josh Fox. His article in The Nation, “The Arrest of Journalists and Filmmakers Covering the Dakota Pipeline is a Threat to Democracy—and the Planet.” His previous documentaries include Gasland, which first exposed the harms of the fracking industry, nominated for an Academy Award, also made Gasland 2, which aired on HBO.

We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Deia, describe what happened to you.

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: Well, on October 11th, I was working as a climate reporter, as I’ve done for years and years and years, as Josh and I were doing, and the rest of the How to Let Go of the World team, when we made the film. And I was documenting people taking a stand, people on the frontlines of the fight to lessen the impacts of climate change. So, there were—there were five activists across four states that had planned to turn the emergency shutoff valves on the five pipelines that bring all Canadian oil sands into the U.S. And I was documenting this occurrence at the North Dakota site, outside of Walhalla, as you said. I was—I was filming the action. I was on public land. I was on a public road and at no point trespassed, at no point, you know, broke in or destroyed any property. I had nothing to do with the planning of the event. I was there to document it. I think it’s essential for journalists to—journalists and filmmakers to go where the mainstream media is not. And there’s a major hole in the coverage of climate change and people that are already dealing with the consequences of climate change and people that are fighting climate change. So, I take that responsibility very seriously.

AMY GOODMAN: So when did the police come?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: The police came after—well, the activist that was doing the action, Michael, had called the company ahead of time to say that he was—he was going to shut off the valve, so they could—to give them ample time to take any emergency precautions. And then he turned the valve. And meanwhile, the company notified the local police. So, after the valve was closed, they came in probably about 15 minutes. I had my camera set up on a tripod on the public road. And they told me I was arrested for being an accessory to a crime, at which point I was brought to the local jail. I figured it would—things would just have to clear up once they realized what was—

AMY GOODMAN: So, they charged you with three felonies?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: —that I was just, you know, exercising my First Amendment—

AMY GOODMAN: What were the felonies?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: Conspiracy—they were all conspiracy charges: conspiracy to theft of public—theft of property, conspiracy to theft of service and conspiracy of interfering with a public—a critical public infrastructure.

AMY GOODMAN: And you face 45 years in jail? What is your comment on this?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: What is my what? Sorry, the connection is—

AMY GOODMAN: What do say about this?

DEIA SCHLOSBERG: It’s absolutely outrageous. Yeah, I mean, this is what I—this is what I do for my living. This is what I’ve done for years and years. There’s absolutely no grounds for these charges.

Read more at: DemocracyNow.org

Learn more:  http://www.naturalnews.com/055793_First_Amendment_Dakota_Pipeline_criminal_journalism.html#ixzz4OOFJk4mS

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #37 on: October 28, 2016, 03:42:56 PM »

It would not be long before a pipeline runs empty so why build it in the first place?  Is this a new way to fleece investors prior to taxpayer dollars coming to bail out the big ones?  I suspect so.  Eventually taxpayers are going through pay for oil extraction when it can't be made profitable anyway so demanding a buissness case for the pipeline is totally appropriate.


The deal and the bond issues for this pipeline were all likely made a few years ago when there were a bazillion rigs pumping oil in the Bakken.  If they don't finish the pipeline and get at least some revenue out of it, all that money is flushed down the toilet, and all the investment has to be written down.  Whoever made the loans takes a huge hit.  Right now they can still pretend it will make money at some future date if they finish it.

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Tensions Escalate As Police Clear Protesters Near Dakota Access Pipeline
« Reply #38 on: October 28, 2016, 05:07:23 PM »
http://www.npr.org/2016/10/28/499756362/tensions-escalate-as-police-clear-protesters-near-dakota-access-pipeline


Tensions Escalate As Police Clear Protesters Near Dakota Access Pipeline
4:11


October 28, 20164:30 PM ET
Heard on All Things Considered

Amy Sisk

From
Prairie Public Broadcasting

Law enforcement dressed in riot gear arrest protesters who are demonstrating against construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D. Police and National Guard moved in on an encampment of tents and teepees on Thursday.
Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

In North Dakota, tension over the 1,200-mile Dakota Access oil pipeline is escalating. Police and National Guard troops arrested more than 140 protesters near a construction site Thursday.

The Standing Rock Sioux have sued to stop the pipeline from crossing under the Missouri River next to their reservation, claiming the project would destroy sacred sites and threaten the water supply.

What started months ago as a dispute between a tribe and the federal government has escalated into clashes between protesters and police.
In Fight Over N.D. Pipeline, Tribe Leader Calls For Peace And Prayers
Around the Nation
In Fight Over N.D. Pipeline, Tribe Leader Calls For Peace And Prayers

Hundreds of law enforcement in riot gear formed a line Thursday across the prairie and moved in on an encampment of tents and teepees. The protest camp was set up over the weekend along the pipeline route on land owned by the Dakota Access pipeline company. Officers were backed up by dozens of police cars, armored vehicles and aircraft.

Surveillance helicopters circled above a makeshift roadblock of beat-up cars, tires and wooden pallets. Protesters lit it on fire, trying to keep police out.

But police pushed protesters back, trying to get them to move farther down the highway.

"We won't have it anymore. This is our stand. We'll stand. And we'll stop this pipeline," said Robert Eder, a resident of Cannon Ball, N.D., the first town downstream from the pipeline's proposed river crossing. He was joined by hundreds of Native Americans from tribes across the country and by activists camped nearby since August.

Dakota Access oil pipeline protesters burn debris as officers close in to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction on Thursday.
James MacPherson/AP

The project is slated to carry crude oil from North Dakota's Bakken oil fields to Illinois. Pipeline supporters and state officials have given assurances it's safer than transporting crude by the trains that carry it across the very same river every day.
Oregon Occupation Unites Native American Tribes To Save Their Land
Around the Nation
Oregon Occupation Unites Native American Tribes To Save Their Land

Protesters knew when they moved to private land owned by pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners last weekend that it would provoke a confrontation. And that came Thursday, with law enforcement barking orders over a speaker. Highway Patrol Lt. Tom Iverson says he was hoping not arrest anyone.

"If we could have come out here today and not made any arrests that would have been great," Iverson said. "But they forced us into arresting them."

Demonstrators remain adamant that the pipeline not cross under the water. And they unite in prayers, as well as with chants of "Black Snake Killaz." That's how some describe their purpose here: to kill the pipeline they have dubbed the black snake.

Protesters surround the Rev. Jesse Jackson on Highway 1806 on Thursday.
Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

Jeff Chavis of South Carolina's Pee Dee Tribe says they won't back down until they stop the pipeline.

"They get their pipes. They get their machines. They get their people and they leave," Chavis said. "There's no negotiation."

On Thursday, the Republican governors of Iowa and the Dakotas urged the Army Corps of Engineers to issue the easement for construction to continue. This river crossing has been on hold since the federal government decided to review the permit. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has argued in court that the Corps failed to adequately consult it.

If construction is approved, the tribe says it will do everything it can to block it.

Amy Sisk reports for Prairie Public Broadcasting and for Inside Energy, a public media collaboration focused on America's energy issues.
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Bundys acquitted as authorities go after Standing Rock.
« Reply #39 on: October 29, 2016, 06:38:46 AM »
Glaring example of  selective application of "law enforcement".

RE

http://grist.org/briefly/bundys-acquitted-as-authorities-go-after-standing-rock/

Briefly
Stuff that matters

oy



Reuters/Jim Urquhart

Bundys acquitted as authorities go after Standing Rock.



A jury handed down the not-guilty verdict on Thursday in Portland, Oregon. Ammon and Ryan Bundy, along with five co-defendants, were tried on conspiracy and weapons charges following a 41-day occupation of Malheur Wildlife Refuge in rural Burns, Oregon, last winter.

It’s a verdict some Burns locals found shocking, but anti-government activists applauded the decision. The defendants’ takeover of the wildlife refuge came after the Bundy family’s dispute over federal grazing fees in Nevada and long-standing battles over who should control public land.

“We’re so grateful to the jurors who weren’t swayed by the nonsense that was going on,” defendant Shawna Cox told reporters outside the courthouse. “God said we weren’t guilty.” The Bundys remain jailed due to pending charges in Nevada.

Meanwhile in North Dakota, police arrested at least 141 people and used mace and rubber bullets against hundreds of others in an attempt to break up a Dakota Access pipeline blockade.

In Portland, Jarvis Kennedy, a Burns Paiute Tribe council member, watched Bundy supporters celebrate. “What if I did that with my Native brothers and sisters, and we went and occupied something, do you think we’d be let running around free, going in and out of it?” Kennedy told NPR. “No, we’d be locked down.”
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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #40 on: October 29, 2016, 12:49:29 PM »
That same tired shibboleth was immediately repeated by every special group in the world of Political Correctness.

The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

The BLM people, the Native Americans, the LGBT's, illegal aliens, legal aliens, Muslim refugees, all singing the same song. No big surprise there. Not to me.

The surprise is the acquittal. I don't think they got off just because they're white.It's more complicated than that, by far. Not much surprises me anymore, but that did.

Not sure what it means, but Marty Armstrong was ranting about it today. It happened on one of his "turning point" dates. Worth a look.

https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/future-forecasts/ecm/did-something-happen-of-the-ecm-turning-point/



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Ammon Bundy’s lawyer tackled, Tasered by U.S. Marshals
« Reply #41 on: October 29, 2016, 01:48:02 PM »
Glaring example of  selective application of "law enforcement".

RE

http://grist.org/briefly/bundys-acquitted-as-authorities-go-after-standing-rock/

Briefly
Stuff that matters

oy



Reuters/Jim Urquhart

Bundys acquitted as authorities go after Standing Rock.



A jury handed down the not-guilty verdict on Thursday in Portland, Oregon. Ammon and Ryan Bundy, along with five co-defendants, were tried on conspiracy and weapons charges following a 41-day occupation of Malheur Wildlife Refuge in rural Burns, Oregon, last winter.

It’s a verdict some Burns locals found shocking, but anti-government activists applauded the decision. The defendants’ takeover of the wildlife refuge came after the Bundy family’s dispute over federal grazing fees in Nevada and long-standing battles over who should control public land.

“We’re so grateful to the jurors who weren’t swayed by the nonsense that was going on,” defendant Shawna Cox told reporters outside the courthouse. “God said we weren’t guilty.” The Bundys remain jailed due to pending charges in Nevada.

Meanwhile in North Dakota, police arrested at least 141 people and used mace and rubber bullets against hundreds of others in an attempt to break up a Dakota Access pipeline blockade.

In Portland, Jarvis Kennedy, a Burns Paiute Tribe council member, watched Bundy supporters celebrate. “What if I did that with my Native brothers and sisters, and we went and occupied something, do you think we’d be let running around free, going in and out of it?” Kennedy told NPR. “No, we’d be locked down.”



Ammon Bundy’s lawyer tackled, Tasered by U.S. Marshals in a surreal ending to the Oregon standoff trial

By Maxine Bernstein

Moments after the Oregon standoff defendants’ acquittals were announced in court Thursday, Ammon Bundy’s lawyer Marcus Mumford stood before the judge, and argued that his client should be released from custody immediately and allowed to walk out of the courtroom a free man.

Ammon Bundy, who chose to wear blue jails scrubs throughout the trial, was dressed in a gray suit Thursday.

U.S. District Judge Anna J. Brown told him that there was a U.S. Marshal’s hold on him from a pending federal indictment in Nevada.

“No, he’s released on these charges. He’s acquitted. Nevada doesn’t have jurisdiction,” Mumford yelled, standing before the judge. “If there’s a detainer, show me.”

“Mr. Mumford, you really need to never yell at me now or never again,” the judge responded.

Brown told Mumford that she’s releasing Bundy on all federal holds in the Oregon case, but he’ll have to take up any questions about the federal holds from the Nevada case with the U.S. Marshals Service.

“If they want him, they know where to find him,” Mumford told the judge. “I don’t see any paper proving their authority to hold him.”

Suddenly, a group of about six to seven U.S. Marshals, who had been either standing or seated around the perimeter of the courtroom, slowly moved in and surrounded Mumford at his defense table. The judge directed them to move back but moments later, the marshals grabbed onto him.

“What are you doing?” Mumford yelled, as he struggled and was taken down to the floor.

As deputy marshals yelled, “Stop resisting,” the judge demanded, “Everybody out of the courtroom now!”

Mumford was taken into custody by the Federal Protective Services.

He was cited for failure to comply with a federal lawful order and disturbance and released with a Jan. 6 date to return to federal court, said Eric Wahlstrom, supervising deputy of the U.S. Marshals Service.

According to Wahlstrom, Mumford was shocked with a stun gun in what’s called a dry-stun mode, meaning no probes were fired into his body but a Taser was placed up against his body.

Wahlstrom, who was not in the courtroom, said the actions were taken because Mumford was resisting and preventing marshals from taking Ammon Bundy out of the courtroom and back into custody.

Wahlstrom said the stun gun was used because deputy U.S. marshals “attempted to handcuff him and he continued to resist.”

But observers who were close to the arrest decried the use of force against a lawyer in court.

“What happened at the end is symbolic of the improper use of force by the federal government,” Mumford’s co-counsel J. Morgan Philpot said. Philpot explained that Mumford was attempting to point out that since the judge previously had said in court that she had no authority over detention orders made by the court in Nevada, she couldn’t now maintain the right to order his client held.

“I grew up on a dairy farm, so am I used to some rough treatment, sure?” Mumford told reporters, after his release. But he said the actions of the U.S. marshals were uncalled for.

“All I was asking for was papers. Just show me you have the authority to take Mr. Bundy into custody,” Mumford said.

Defense lawyer Per C. Olson, who represented co-defendant David Fry, called the physical confrontation “a complete overreaction. Utterly disgusting.”

Olson said Mumford was getting animated, but he did nothing physical. He didn’t charge the bench, or block marshals from his client. “He raised his arm as if to say, what the hell…And they grabbed him, Tased him and took him down. It was just shocking. It was completely inappropriate,”Olson said.

Defense lawyer Matthew Schindler, standby counsel for defendant Kenneth Medenbach, said he was disappointed by Mumford’s challenge to his client’s return to custody, considering he faces more serious federal charges in Nevada.

Schindler said Mumford was exhausted, having “put out everything he had,” during the past six weeks of the case.

“Unfortunately he let his passion and desire and belief in his client overcome his good judgement,” Schindler said.

Margaret “Margie” Paris, a University of Oregon law professor and former dean, said she couldn’t believe what occurred when she learned of the confrontation.

“It just blows my mind,” Paris said. “To have a lawyer who’s making an argument in court physically restrained and taken down is extraordinary. He’s entitled to make these arguments. If he was repeating himself over and over, the more typical response is to hold him in contempt. But to physically accost him is just shocking.”

Oregonian Staff Writer Jeff Manning contributed to this story.

— Maxine Bernstein
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #42 on: October 29, 2016, 02:33:45 PM »
The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

You're missing the point.  The Bundys didn't get special treatment because they're white.  If they WEREN'T White, they would have been convicted though.  No bunch of blacks or hispanics or Native Americans could have pulled that stunt and not had the book thrown at them.

The reason they got off is because they are Righties.  Righties get acquitted, Lefties go to jail. The Righty controlled MSM supports it.  Righty pigmen like the Koch brothers pay for it. That's how it goes in the Fascist States of Amerika.  Everybody Knows. 

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #43 on: October 29, 2016, 02:50:39 PM »
The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

You're missing the point.  The Bundys didn't get special treatment because they're white.  If they WEREN'T White, they would have been convicted though.  No bunch of blacks or hispanics or Native Americans could have pulled that stunt and not had the book thrown at them.

The reason they got off is because they are Righties.  Righties get acquitted, Lefties go to jail. The Righty controlled MSM supports it.  Righty pigmen like the Koch brothers pay for it. That's how it goes in the Fascist States of Amerika.  Everybody Knows. 

RE

I have heard it all. Rightie controlled MSM.   :WTF: :spamsign:

Wake up and get with the program.

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #44 on: October 29, 2016, 03:15:44 PM »
The Bundys got special treatment because they're white.

You're missing the point.  The Bundys didn't get special treatment because they're white.  If they WEREN'T White, they would have been convicted though.  No bunch of blacks or hispanics or Native Americans could have pulled that stunt and not had the book thrown at them.

The reason they got off is because they are Righties.  Righties get acquitted, Lefties go to jail. The Righty controlled MSM supports it.  Righty pigmen like the Koch brothers pay for it. That's how it goes in the Fascist States of Amerika.  Everybody Knows. 

RE

I have heard it all. Rightie controlled MSM.   :WTF: :spamsign:

Wake up and get with the program.

Rupert Murdoch is a lefty?  Time-Warner is lefty?  ATT is lefty?

Wake up and smell the coffee.

RE
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