AuthorTopic: The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread  (Read 43141 times)

Offline azozeo

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Re: The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread
« Reply #105 on: February 09, 2016, 01:35:47 PM »
https://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2016/02/08/peruvian-volcano-may-be-awakening-from-dormancy-after-540-years-increased-activity/

I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Mt. St. Helens shakes, whole west coast moves
« Reply #106 on: February 09, 2016, 01:38:48 PM »
http://dutchsinse.com/2082016-mount-saint-helens-struck-by-seismic-unrest-whole-west-coast-moves-from-ca-to-wa/




I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread
« Reply #107 on: February 10, 2016, 07:58:08 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/XkzEZJB8Olk&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/XkzEZJB8Olk&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread
« Reply #108 on: February 10, 2016, 08:08:05 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/0-F5bdQeqIo&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/0-F5bdQeqIo&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread
« Reply #109 on: March 21, 2016, 05:18:39 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/AbiI3cXfnu4&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/AbiI3cXfnu4&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Volcano in Alaska sends ash spewing 20,000 feet high
« Reply #110 on: March 28, 2016, 06:05:04 AM »
Pretty far from here.  Hopefully it's not a precursor to Mt. Redoubt going Ballistic.  :o

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/28/us/pavlof-volcano-eruption-alaska/index.html

Volcano in Alaska sends ash spewing 20,000 feet high


By Joshua Berlinger, CNN

Updated 8:04 AM ET, Mon March 28, 2016 | Video Source: CNN

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Story highlights

    The Pavlof Volcano is located on Alaska's remote Aleutian Island archipelago
    It last erupted in 2014

(CNN)A volcanic eruption in Alaska sent ash 20,000 feet up in the air and prompted flight warnings, according to authorities.
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The Pavlof Volcano, located on the Aleutian Islands, began "erupting abruptly" Sunday afternoon, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

Fast facts: Volcanoes
A volcano alert warning remained in effect early Monday morning, and the aviation warning color code remains red, its highest level.
Ash was reportedly moving north after the eruption, according to the volcano observatory.
Seismic activity was also reported after the quake.
The volcano last erupted in November 2014.
A few planes appeared to be flying nearby early Monday morning Eastern Time, according to
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Offline RE

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Re: Volcano in Alaska sends ash spewing 20,000 feet high
« Reply #111 on: March 28, 2016, 10:10:01 PM »
Maybe Mt. Redoubt will blow tonight too!  :o

It's been nice knowing you guys!  :'(  Take care of the Diner for me.

See you on the Other Side!

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/the-latest-alaska-airlines-cancels-more-flights/2016/03/28/6a9862ba-f544-11e5-958d-d038dac6e718_story.html

National
The Latest: Alaska Airlines cancels more flights


In this Sunday, March 27, 2016, photo, Pavlof Volcano, one of Alaska’s most active volcanoes, erupts, sending a plume of volcanic ash into the air. The Alaska Volcano Observatory says activity continued Monday. Pavlof Volcano is 625 miles southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula, the finger of land that sticks out from mainland Alaska toward the Aleutian Islands. (Colt Snapp via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT (Associated Press)
By Associated Press March 28 at 8:23 PM

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The Latest on the eruption of Alaska’s Pavlof Volcano (all times local):

4 p.m.

Alaska Airlines says it has cancelled more flights because of a massive cloud of volcanic ash from Alaska’s Pavlof Volcano that spewed into the air.

The Seattle-based airliner said Monday afternoon it has canceled 41 flights involving six Alaska cities until the airline can evaluate weather reports after daylight Tuesday. The cancellations include all flights to and from Fairbanks.

The airline says the canceled flights affected 3,300 passengers.

Flights to Barrow, Bethel, Kotzebue, Nome and Deadhorse also are cancelled.

The airline says it will resume its 54 regularly scheduled flights on Tuesday if conditions improve.

Pavlof Volcano, one of Alaska’s most active, is 625 miles southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula.

The volcano erupted Sunday afternoon, and by Monday morning an ash cloud had stretched northeast more than 400 miles into interior Alaska.

___

3 p.m.

The National Weather Service has issued a weather bulletin warning Alaska residents who live in the region of the Pavlof Volcano that ash may fall on their communities if the wind direction shifts as expected.

The bullet was in effect through early Monday night for Cold Bay, Sand Point and Nelson Lagoon.

The communities are north and east of Pavlof Volcano, which erupted Sunday and continued sending ash into the air Monday.

The weather service says the communities could see an accumulation of less than one-tenth of an inch of ash.

Volcanic ash is angular and sharp and can injure skin, eyes and breathing passages. The ash also can damage electronic devices and vehicle engines.

___

12 p.m.

Alaska Airlines says it has cancelled 20 flights because of volcanic ash put in the air by Alaska’s Pavlof Volcano.

Spokeswoman Bobbie Egan says the canceled flights affected about 1,300 customers heading to rural Alaska communities including Bethel, Kotzebue, Nome, Barrow and Deadhorse.

No flights to Anchorage or Fairbanks have been canceled so far, but Egan says the company is closely monitoring the Fairbanks route.
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Pavlof Volcano, one of Alaska’s most active, is 625 miles southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula.

It erupted Sunday afternoon, and by Monday morning an ash cloud had stretched northeast more than 400 miles into interior Alaska.

Ash can cause jet engines to shut down.

More flights could be affected.

Egan says Alaska Airlines simply doesn’t fly when ash is present and will continue to monitor the trajectory of the ash cloud.

___

11:30 a.m.

An ash cloud from an Alaska volcano rose to 37,000 feet and stretched Monday more than 400 miles into interior Alaska.

Pavlof Volcano, one of Alaska’s most active volcanoes, erupted Sunday afternoon.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory says activity continued Monday.

Pavlof Volcano is 625 miles southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula, the finger of land that sticks out from mainland Alaska toward the Aleutian Islands.

Lighting was detected over the volcano, and pressure-sensor data indicated sustained ash emissions.

Satellite date indicates the size of the ash cloud and its northeast flow.

Geologist Chris Waythomas of the U.S. Geological Survey says Pavlof can erupt for hours to days or erupt intermittently for longer periods of time.

The Federal Aviation Administration has issued a notice to pilots on the ash threat.

___

7:20 p.m.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports that a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula erupted Sunday afternoon and sent ash 20,000 feet into the air.

The agency says the Pavlof Volcano, which is 625 miles southwest of Anchorage, erupted at 4:18 p.m. local time. The agency says the eruption also led to tremors on the ground.

The USGS has raised the volcano alert level to “Warning.”

The agency says the volcano, which is about 4.4 miles in diameter, has had 40 known eruptions and “is one of the most consistently active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc.”

The USGS says that during a previous eruption in 2013, ash plumes rose 27,000 feet. Other eruptions have generated ash plumes as high as 49,000 feet.

The community closest to the volcano is Cold Bay, which is about 37 miles southwest of it.

___

This story has been corrected to indicate Pavlof Volcano is on the Alaska Peninsula, not in the Aleutian Islands.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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Offline RE

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Popocatpetl Erupts!
« Reply #112 on: April 20, 2016, 01:51:03 PM »
POP goes another weasel!

RE

http://www.cnn.com/videos/world/2016/04/19/mexico-volcano-erupts-popocatpetl.cnn
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Offline RE

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Mt. St. Helens is BACK!
« Reply #113 on: May 06, 2016, 10:15:38 PM »
Here we go again...

RE

https://earthsky.org/earth/earthquake-swarms-at-mount-st-helens-2016

Earthquake swarms at Mount St. Helens

Earthquake rates have been steadily increasing since March at the Pacific Northwest volcano Mount St. Helens. The cause is probably new magma, rising upward.


Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption as viewed from the air. Read more about this photo from www.oregonlive.com

The U.S. Geological Survey reported on May 5, 2016, on the large number of small earthquakes occurring beneath Mount St. Helens, the most seismically active volcano in the Washington and Oregon Cascades, in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. This volcano is known for having erupted violently on May 18, 1980. It erupted again – less violently – in 2004-2008. Since March 14 of this year, scientists have been observing small-magnitude earthquakes at the volcano, but scientists do not believe another eruption is imminent. USGS said:

    Over the last 8 weeks, there have been over 130 earthquakes formally located by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and many more earthquakes too small to be located. The earthquakes have low magnitudes of 0.5 or less; the largest a magnitude 1.3. Earthquake rates have been steadily increasing since March, reaching nearly 40 located earthquakes per week. These earthquakes are too small to be felt at the surface.

USGS said these earthquakes – which are taking place below the volcano, at a depth between 1.2 to 4 miles (2 and 7 km) – are a normal part of what a volcano does when it’s not erupting:

    The magma chamber is likely imparting its own stresses on the crust around and above it, as the system slowly recharges.

    The stress drives fluids through cracks, producing the small quakes. The current pattern of seismicity is similar to swarms seen at Mount St. Helens in 2013 and 2014; recharge swarms in the 1990s had much higher earthquake rates and energy release.

Erik Klemetti of Wired’s great earthquake blog explained it this way:

    … new magma is rising up underneath St. Helens as it slumbers. As the magma intrudes, it imparts pressure on the rock around it and it heats up water/releases gases that can add to that pressure. This generates small earthquakes as the rocks shift in response to that stress.

USGS added:

    No anomalous gases, increases in ground inflation or shallow seismicity have been detected with this swarm, and there are no signs of an imminent eruption.

    As was observed at Mount St. Helens between 1987-2004, recharge can continue for many years beneath a volcano without an eruption.

Sometimes keeping a seismic station running during winter is difficult. USGS technicians Kelly Swinford and Amberlee Darold are shown here getting a St. Helens station back online on March 30, 2016.SETH MORAN / USGS

It’s not always easy to keep the seismic network in the Cascades up and running. USGS technicians Kelly Swinford and Amberlee Darold are shown here digging a Mount St. Helens seismic station out of the snow on March 30, 2016. Photo via Seth Moran/ USGS.
Mount St. Helens photographed seven years before the 1980 eruption. Image Credit: U.S. Forest Service.

Mount St. Helens photographed seven years before the 1980 eruption. Image via U.S. Forest Service.
Mount St. Helens photographed two years after the 1980 eruption. Image Credit: Lyn Topinka, U.S. Geological Survey.

Mount St. Helens photographed two years after the 1980 eruption. Image via Lyn Topinka, U.S. Geological Survey.

The small earthquakes in 2016 at Mount St. Helens aren’t nearly as dramatic as the observations prior to the volcano’s 1980 eruption. That year, magma – or molten material – pushed its way up from a reservoir deep inside the volcano, creating a bulge on the volcano’s north side as the magma drew closer to the volcano’s mouth. In 1980, scientists felt strongly that Mount St. Helens would soon erupt, although they weren’t entirely prepared for the violence of the eruption, which, according to Wikipedia:

    …killed 57 people, nearly 7,000 big game animals (deer, elk, and bear), and an estimated 12 million fish from a hatchery … [and] destroyed or extensively damaged over 200 homes, 185 miles (298 km) of highway and 15 miles (24 km) of railways.

Mount St. Helens is 96 miles (155 km) south of Seattle, Washington, and 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Portland, Oregon.

The video below features scientists talking about their experiences during the 1980 eruption.

For more information, see the Activity Updates for Volcanoes in CVO Area of Responsibility and Earthquake Monitoring at Mount St. Helens.
View larger. Nair Sankar reports that this is a blend of 15 exposures from Falling Rocks at the Caldera - Mt. St. Helens Monument and the Perseids, shot after 3 am in the morning. Thank you Nair!

View larger. | Meteors over Mount St. Helens. Nair Sankar created this image from a blend of 15 exposures during the 2015 Perseid meteor shower.

Bottom line: The U.S. Geological Survey reported on May 5, 2016, on the large number of small earthquakes occurring beneath Mount St. Helens, the most seismically active volcano in the Washington and Oregon Cascades. Earthquake rates have been steadily increasing since March. The cause is probably new magma, rising upward.
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Offline RE

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7 dead after volcano erupts in western Indonesia
« Reply #114 on: May 22, 2016, 04:23:52 AM »
We're definitely doing some percolating this week!

RE

http://www.timesunion.com/news/world/article/Volcano-erupts-in-western-Indonesia-killing-6-7936832.php

7 dead after volcano erupts in western Indonesia

Binsar Bakkara, Associated Press Updated 5:47 am, Sunday, May 22, 2016


    A villager carries his belonging during an evacuation following the eruption of Mount Sinabung in Gamber village, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Sunday, May 22, 2016. The volcano in western Indonesian unleashed hot clouds of ash on Saturday, killing several villagers, oficials said. Photo: Binsar Bakkara, AP / Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribu

Photo: Binsar Bakkara, AP
Image 1 of 14
A villager carries his belonging during an evacuation following the eruption of Mount Sinabung in Gamber village, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Sunday, May 22, 2016. The volcano in western Indonesian unleashed hot ... more

GAMBER, Indonesia (AP) — The death toll in the eruption of a volcano in western Indonesia rose to seven on Sunday, with two other people in critical condition, as an official warned of more eruptions.

Mount Sinabung in North Sumatra province blasted volcanic ash as high as 3 kilometers (2 miles) into the sky on Saturday, said National Disaster Management Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho. He said ash tumbled down the slopes as far as 4.5 kilometers (3 miles) westward into a river.
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All the victims of the eruption were working on their farms in the village of Gamber, about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) away from the slope, or within the danger area.

Photos taken on Sunday showed evidence of pyroclastic flows — a fast-moving cloud of hot volcanic gases, rocks and ash — in the village. Dead and injured animals were lying on the ground, around them scorched homes and smoky vegetation. Soldiers were setting up roadblocks and people were carrying their belongings and leading farm animals to safety.

Nata Nail, an official at the local Disaster Management Agency, said a man died Sunday at a hospital, leaving two other victims in critical condition.

Rescuers including soldiers, police, and personnel from disaster combating agencies, as well as volunteers and villagers, halted search operations around the area after they found there were no more victims or villagers inside the danger zone, Nail said.

Earlier on Sunday, security personnel blocked some villagers who wanted to enter the village to take their abandoned belongings.

Nugroho warned of more potential eruptions, with volcanic activity still high at the mountain.

Mount Sinabung had been dormant for four centuries before reviving in 2010, killing two people. An eruption in 2014 killed 16 people.

Sinabung is among more than 120 active volcanoes in Indonesia, which is prone to seismic upheaval due to its location on the Pacific "Ring of Fire," an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin.
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Re: The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread
« Reply #115 on: June 06, 2016, 04:54:49 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/V7dm8aFjqOs&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/V7dm8aFjqOs&fs=1</a>
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A Supervolcano Stirs in Italy
« Reply #116 on: December 22, 2016, 01:09:38 AM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2016/12/21/a-supervolcano-caused-the-largest-eruption-in-european-history-now-its-stirring-again/?utm_term=.e4a73e2b0b38

A supervolcano caused the largest eruption in European history. Now it’s stirring again.
By Sarah Kaplan December 21 at 1:38 PM
Living in a volcano: Film looks at dangers of Italy's Campi Flegrei volcano


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In this educational film, researchers explain the dangers residents face living near the area of the Campi Flegrei volcano, near the Italian city of Naples. (YouTube/UPStrat-MAFA)

The Italian name for the caldera — Campi Flegrei, or “burning fields”— is apt. The 7.5-mile-wide cauldron is the collapsed top of an ancient volcano, formed when the magma within finally blew. Though half of it is obscured beneath the crystal blue waters of the Mediterranean, the other half is studded with cinder cones and calderas from smaller eruptions. And the whole area seethes with hydrothermal activity: Sulfuric acid spews from active fumaroles; geysers spout water and steam and the ground froths with boiling mud; and earthquake swarms shudder through the region, 125 miles south of Rome.

And things seem to be heating up. Writing in the journal Nature on Tuesday, scientists report that the caldera is nearing a critical point at which decreased pressure on rising magma triggers a runaway release of gas and fluid, potentially leading to an eruption.

Forecasting volcanic eruptions is a famously dicey endeavor, and right now, it's impossible to say if and when Campi Flegrei might erupt, according to lead author Giovanni Chiodini, a volcanologist at the National Institute of Geophysics in Rome. But now more than ever, the caldera demands attention: An eruption would be devastating to the 500,000 people living in and around it.

The site's last major eruption happened over the course of a week in 1538, when it expelled enough new material to create the cinder cone mountain Monte Nuovo.

But the caldera itself is some 39,000 years old, formed by an eruption larger than anything else in the past 200,000 years of European history. A 2010 study in the journal Current Anthropology suggested that this prehistoric outburst — which spewed almost a trillion gallons of molten rock and released just as much sulfur into the atmosphere — set off a “volcanic winter” that led to the demise of the Neanderthals, who died out shortly afterward.

[A massive underwater volcanic eruption is captured in real time]

Today, the Campi Flegrei caldera is increasingly restless. For half a century, scientists have measured “bradyseism” events — slow movements of the ground — that are indicative of molten rock slowly filling the mountain's magma chamber. Significant uplift in the past decade prompted Italian authorities to raise the supervolcano's alert level from green (quiet) to yellow (scientific attention) in 2012.

“These areas can give rise to the only eruptions that can have global catastrophic effects comparable to major meteorite impacts,” Giuseppe De Natale, head of a drilling project to monitor the caldera, told Reuters after that change was made in 2012.

Now, Chiodini and his colleagues have identified the volcano's “critical degassing pressure” — a vital data point in understanding the likelihood of an eruption. As molten rock from the Earth's interior rises through the crust, it is subject to less pressure, and this decline in pressure causes volatile gases dissolved within it to be released. At the critical degassing pressure point, this process accelerates tenfold. Huge amounts of steam are injected into the surrounding rock.

If the magma loses too much water, it may harden and cease its upward motion, stopping the eruption in its tracks.

Alternatively, the injections of steam could destabilize the rock, accelerate the deformation process, and ultimately cause the volcano to blow.

Chiodini said scientists have seen an increase in ground deformation and low-level seismic activity around the caldera in recent years. This pattern compares with activity seen around similar volcanoes before their eruptions.

[Dwarf planet Ceres may hold a towering ice volcano]

This doesn't mean residents of Naples should be heading for cover.

“In general, unfortunately, volcanology is not a precise science,” Chiodini wrote in an email. “We have many uncertainties and long-term previsions are at the moment not possible! For example, the process that we describe could evolve in both directions: toward pre-eruptive conditions or to the finish of the volcanic unrest.”

What's more, volcanoes operate on time scales far beyond the scope of most scientific records. Campi Flegrei has had a major eruption only twice in the past 40,000 years, and both happened long before the invention of the first writing systems, let alone seismometers. There are written accounts of the 1538 eruption, but there are limits to the scientific insight those descriptions they provide.

What they lack in data, however, they make up for in vividness. Take this recollection, written by Italian philosopher Simone Porzio:

“The large tract of land which lay between the foot of the mountain . . . and the sea . . . was seen to rise and take the form of the newly produced mountain. And on the same day, at the second hour of the night, this mount of earth opened like a mouth, with a great roaring, vomiting much fire and pumice and stones.”

Read more:

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A researcher discovered how cave men cleaned their teeth. It will make you want to brush yours.

NASA's far-flung space robots keep findings signs of water

A massive underwater volcanic eruption is captured in real time
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Re: The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread
« Reply #117 on: January 03, 2017, 02:01:09 PM »
http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/02/massive-volcano-is-rumblingright-under-one-italys-biggest-cities-report.html



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/G5u97tVZFFo&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/G5u97tVZFFo&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread
« Reply #118 on: January 04, 2017, 03:02:51 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ln93-NTvgVU&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Ln93-NTvgVU&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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The Toba Memorial Volcano Thread-Krakatau Comes To Life
« Reply #119 on: February 19, 2017, 01:07:07 PM »
https://www.volcanodiscovery.com/krakatau/news/61715/Krakatau-volcano-Sunda-Strait-Indonesia-strong-thermal-signal-could-suggest-new-eruptive-activity.html

I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

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