AuthorTopic: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer  (Read 1681 times)

Offline RE

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Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« on: May 02, 2017, 12:37:06 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/i9TdoO2OVaA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/i9TdoO2OVaA</a>
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2017, 07:08:44 AM »
Like it, but what needs one hammer blow every 10 seconds?  If you really wanted some powdered charcoal, or grain, you could always get your wife to do it.

"The State is a body of armed men."

Offline RE

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Re: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2017, 09:37:16 AM »
Like it, but what needs one hammer blow every 10 seconds?  If you really wanted some powdered charcoal, or grain, you could always get your wife to do it.

Somehow, I doubt he has a wife living with him.  Unless she is the one shooting the videos?

I also wonder about his location.  It's just got everything.  Clay to fire into tiles for his roof and bowls and jars, the right kind of rocks for knapping into stone tools, a clear running stream for water and nobody around to bother him or question the way he is living.  No building department giving him fines for his shack, or fire department giving him fines for his heating system.  I haven't seem him do any hunting or fishing yet, does he just eat yams from his garden?  Where did he get the yams to start it?  If he does do hunting or fishing, does he have a license?  Has he killed a deer with his Atl-Atl?  Caught any fish with a bone hook? Does he have salt around to preserve his meat?

What about some other clothing besides the shorts made in Pakistan he is always wearing?  Does he have any winter clothing or is it always warm where he is?  How often does it rain and does he just sit inside his cabin all day when it's raining and meditate?  I haven't seen him do any spinning and weaving yet to make cloth, or tanning hides to make clothing out of leather either.

When you think about these issues and also see the quality of the production and editing of the videos, it's clear this is a professional operation and he most likely doesn't really live this way, just does it as his day job.  Somebody is financing this operation, like a Bear Grylls Survival show, just done on YouTube.  He does obviously know his primitive skills though.

As to the utility of his water powered hammer, I can't see too much use for it either.

RE
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 10:10:40 AM by RE »
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2017, 03:38:42 PM »
I don't see any signs (or claims) of him actually living there.  It seems to be more of a demonstration plot for various projects.  You would only need a few acres of forest on a block with a proper house on it and nobody would scour the area looking for huts without planning permission.

The water situation would be very fickle, often too much, making it very muddy underfoot and totally miserable to be outside, and little trickles like that would dry up for weeks at a time. Perhaps there is a reliable river in the bottom of the valley, but it would be a soul-destroying job humping water up that steep country.

I think clothes could be entirely optional all year round - that's the way the aboriginals lived in Australia.  When I was in Townsville, there were newspapers in museums that showed the first ICE vehicles (buses) at the same time as naked black men wandering in to town with their spears only a hundred years ago. 

I practiced going without footwear in the forest years ago in NSW, and after a while you build up heavily calloused feet and a much greater awareness of where you are putting them.  The trouble is you can't take your natural boots off when going to bed.  When I applied for a licence to harvest orchids, the National Parks people came to assess the project and I took them to this old stack of felled trees I had found, all covered in moss, ferns and orchids, in bare feet and they were horrified.  They gave me a licence to collect 2,000 orchids, with tags to match that had to stay with each individual plant at all times right through to retail.

Nowadays I start shivering when the temperature goes below 20C, and wouldn't dream of going out without my lace-up rubber boots.
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Offline RE

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Re: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2017, 04:49:33 PM »
I don't see any signs (or claims) of him actually living there.  It seems to be more of a demonstration plot for various projects.  You would only need a few acres of forest on a block with a proper house on it and nobody would scour the area looking for huts without planning permission.

That's what I meant by it's being financed and he doesn't really live this way. His parents probably have a nice big house and instead of playing the X-Box all day in the basement he goes out into the backyard of their 100 Acre Estate and plays Primitive Living Rewilder. His best friend from HS shoots the video and they edit and upload it to Utoob while smoking a Doobie in the basement and microwaving up dinner from the frozen food aisle at safeway. With millions of views on YT, they are now making plenty of money to afford the Ganja and don't need regular jobs. The implication with the heated hut and the garden though is that this is his actual dwelling.  If he never needs warm clothes, then why did he put a heating system in his hut?

If you are going to go around naked all year, you are limited to only the tropics for your primitive living.  All of North America, all of Europe and most of Asia are out.  That cuts survival zones to a very few places.  Stone Age people however as we know lived in Alaska and Siberia.  If he is doing this as a project to show techniques for primitive living, he really should do the clothing end of it to make it more realistic.

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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2017, 08:29:43 PM »
That's probably true, but a bit harsh.  No one can be expected to do the complete Primitive Living thing, AND video it all for YT, AND do it in some godforsaken spot where you are up to your neck in snow and the sun doesn't shine for 18 hours a day in winter.

His complete video list is at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGnWLXjIDnpBR4xqf3FO-xFFwE-ucq4Fj

String is obviously a high priority in his projects.  I don't think he has shown making that, but I think he sub-titles it as being rattan.  The rattans round here are fearsome vines armed with spikes, and vicious hooked tendrils. 



I have successfully eliminated them from my block by cutting them back at the base, with a second cut 3 months later - they store most of their energy in their internal pith above ground, so the base has no reserves.  Maybe the locals would shake their heads at the stupid white man killing off his rattan, but I hate the stuff.  Dogs hate it too.

Here is Survival Lilly - some plants are better than others. 

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/XG93xPsxeHg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/XG93xPsxeHg</a>

Hemp is supposed to be the best, (and they do say you can smoke it too), but you have to use what's available locally.  Round here the best is supposed to be fig tree branches.


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Offline RE

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Re: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2017, 08:56:21 PM »
That's probably true, but a bit harsh.  No one can be expected to do the complete Primitive Living thing, AND video it all for YT, AND do it in some godforsaken spot where you are up to your neck in snow and the sun doesn't shine for 18 hours a day in winter.

Perhaps not, but unless you go the whole 9 yards you're giving a false impression of the true difficulties with rewilding.

There are some communities of people out there trying to do the full primitive, I read about one in Maine a while back.  Can't seem to locate the article on Google now though when I search "rewilding communities"

https://www.google.com/search?q=rewilding+communities&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

What I would like to see is a documentary made of this guy and a few others like him going out into the wilderness and spending a couple of years building their camp.  Start them out in the spring as it gets warm, with Pakistani shorts and a nice Industrially produced High Carbon Stainless Steel knife, some Heirloom Seeds, and enough Freeze Dried Mountain House food to last a month.

If they could even make it through Summer into Fall of the first year I would be impressed.  To convince me they could make it long term, I would need to see their condition after two full winters.  Not even Alaska winters, just typical winter at say 40 degrees latitutde.

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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2017, 10:10:56 PM »
The Bear Grylls "The Island" series takes a group of ordinary westerners and dumps them on a tropical island to survive for 6 weeks.  The people are totally useless, engage in seriously dangerous and stupid activities to find food, and spend most of their time starving and being angry with each other.  The audience is left with the impression that tropical islands are awful places.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/DB4eSDIdhKM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/DB4eSDIdhKM</a>

Your idea of starting off with a bunch of practical experts is a good one.  Even so, breaking new ground is very hard - much harder than growing up in an ongoing community, and keeping it going for the next generation.
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Offline RE

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Re: Primitive Living: Water Powered Hammer
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2017, 10:58:30 PM »
Your idea of starting off with a bunch of practical experts is a good one.  Even so, breaking new ground is very hard - much harder than growing up in an ongoing community, and keeping it going for the next generation.

Indeed.  To begin with, the New Generation has all the furs and clothing left over from the generation before it.  Also already built shelters, being regularly replaced and refurbished each year.

So, for our new generation of Rewilders, we can give them all the old clothes leftover from the Age of Oil, of which there will be many for quite some time since most of the people who used to wear them are DEAD!  They'll also have access to lots of tools not yet rusted out for quite some time they can scavenge, so they won't immediately need to knap stone tools.  So this gives them an Adaptation Period of a Century or so, perhaps a little more.

In this scenario, I think our friend from Primitive Living probably could do pretty well, he is quite a resourceful fellow overall.

Put him, Eustace Conway and Cody Lunden in charge of a community, give them access to a junkyard to scavenge from, then I am pretty sure they could make it for the 2 year test documentary.

RE
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