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Messages - Cam

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1
Doomsteading / Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...new posts
« on: April 04, 2021, 07:26:37 PM »
Glad to see C5 is writing again at least for now. My world view has been changing over the last few years but I deeply respect his point of view and miss his input. Not much doomer red meat on the diner these days, myself included , so I get the absence. Having "involuntarily car camped" before I liked this one.
https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.wordpress.com/2021/03/07/living-in-your-car-now-that-the-shit-has-already-hit-the-fan-c5s-encore-performance/

Cheers,  NF

I'm curious how your view has changed. Where were you a few years ago and where are you now?
That would take a long time to go over. Let's say I started my serious doom journey a decade ago mostly through the transition movement. The narrative of the time was a localized, low energy future and financial collapse. As narratives go it's fine but what nobody tells you is nobody and I mean nobody can give you a timeframe or how it all rolls out in your neck of the woods. I live in farmng country now with 40 small scale beef operations within 30 minutes of me. Is food insecurity a real concern for me? Grid down is a real concern but alternative energy has gotten ridiculously cheap now so is it a concern? Imploding finances is a real concern but I carry no dept and have savings is that a concern? It becomes very hard to actually live your life with one foot in your society's grave. Then you add in kids and guess what you better start building a narrative for yourself where they have a future or you will raise kids who don't... that is the gist of it not all of course. So I admire C5's writing as an outlier opinion and a place to glean information without surrendering myself to a collapse narrative that results in personal collapse...

Thanks NF I appreciate the detailed response. I was over at a friend's house tonight and I somehow got thinking on narratives and how essential they are to being human. I think I was thinking about religious beliefs, then conspiracy theories. It occurred to me that we're all telling stories to ourselves and other about what is going on in the world. Some may be much closer to the truth than others, and some may be just downright insane. But they're narratives nonetheless and the type of story you tell yourself has a huge impact on your wellbeing. For example my dad has forever been an optimist. When I was first getting into doom I was explaining some stuff, and there were some parts he simply didn't want to hear about. This frustrated me at first but I get it now...there's a reason he's so darn cheery all the time. He may not be fully aware or even want to be, and that's totally fine. By the looks of it I'm inspiring him and my mom to get into gardening and permaculture just through my sheer enthusiasm for it so that's good to see too. I think it's great to get into something like gardening or whatever not because you don't want to starve when the grocery shelves empty out, but because you really enjoy learning to grow your own food. I think I said in my message to JRM before he left that a lot of what's called getting ready for collapse is actually putting in the work to build a better world. Learning to grow your own food? That'll make the world better. Getting to know your neighbours? Ditto. And alternative energy and all the rest. At least that's how I see it now and I really like seeing the world this way. It gives a much deeper meaning to me when I'm working on some welding project or growing some new vegetable...I'm not just doing those things but putting in the work to make the world better day by day. And that's what keeps me going I think. Anyways thanks again for the detailed response!

2
Doomsteading / Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...new posts
« on: April 04, 2021, 07:33:32 AM »
Glad to see C5 is writing again at least for now. My world view has been changing over the last few years but I deeply respect his point of view and miss his input. Not much doomer red meat on the diner these days, myself included , so I get the absence. Having "involuntarily car camped" before I liked this one.
https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.wordpress.com/2021/03/07/living-in-your-car-now-that-the-shit-has-already-hit-the-fan-c5s-encore-performance/

Cheers,  NF

I'm curious how your view has changed. Where were you a few years ago and where are you now?

3
The Kitchen Sink / Re: What's the new guy up to?
« on: March 25, 2021, 02:54:30 PM »
Thanks NF. Me too I may try it one day but not this time around I don't think.

4
I've found a solution to the blade problem. I'm gonna stick with the mild steel I think, but I'm going to run a bead with a hard facing rod on top to give it a hard edge. It's not a forever solution as with sharpening over time it will wear down to the mild steel eventually, but it should last quite a while. Got the idea off permies from another guy who just made one of these. As for getting the chunk into the shape of a blade, one of my friends suggested a mini forge of bricks, charcoal and a blow dryer. Some vids on Youtube looked neat but I'm much more comfortable with grinding, even if it takes a while. So I am grinding away. The frame is done, except for the feet. You can see them in the photo but they're not welded on just yet. Just need to do that, finish the blade, and mount it. Oh and some paint too. Then we should have a nice little splitter!

5
As work on the new house continues we started clearing some trees from the path the power line will take. Just to tell you how broke the utility is we were responsible for clearing about 12 big trees and some brush on the municipal right of way no freebies. The lowest quote we got was $3000. My partners dad and I should finish it tomorrow for about 4 gallons of gas... this tractor could run on charcoal but to be honest I used gas today. I'm a big believer in simpler machinery for the coming hard times. 70 years old, pulling about 1.5 tonnes of log... I have the deepest respect for the ax and hand saw crowd, copice woods horse loggers etc, but I do like machinery to get the big stuff done.
Cheers,  NF

I saw the photo and thought, 'huh that's a big tree'. Then I watched the video and thought 'jeez louise that thing is friggen huge!!'. That's a pretty neat tractor, and all the more cooler in that it can run off charcoal. Never even knew about that process til I read your article on it from a few years back.
Two different trees, both huge. The one in the video was a cedar and that is the entire tree. The one in the picture is a hard maple. We had to cut the crown into 3 pieces and drag the trunk seperately; no video there I had to concentrate 32 inches at the stump; a monster for these parts. Luckily my partner's dad is a really good logger. The trunk is probably going to a relative who will saw it up. All the hardwood I'll cut up for firewood and sell some to the neighbour.

I just measured 32" in front of me and yeah that's a big one. Enjoy the nice firewood you'll get out of it.

6
As work on the new house continues we started clearing some trees from the path the power line will take. Just to tell you how broke the utility is we were responsible for clearing about 12 big trees and some brush on the municipal right of way no freebies. The lowest quote we got was $3000. My partners dad and I should finish it tomorrow for about 4 gallons of gas... this tractor could run on charcoal but to be honest I used gas today. I'm a big believer in simpler machinery for the coming hard times. 70 years old, pulling about 1.5 tonnes of log... I have the deepest respect for the ax and hand saw crowd, copice woods horse loggers etc, but I do like machinery to get the big stuff done.
Cheers,  NF

I saw the photo and thought, 'huh that's a big tree'. Then I watched the video and thought 'jeez louise that thing is friggen huge!!'. That's a pretty neat tractor, and all the more cooler in that it can run off charcoal. Never even knew about that process til I read your article on it from a few years back.

7
Doomsteading / Re: You've Been Splitting Kindling with a Hatchet Wrong!
« on: February 22, 2021, 07:12:03 PM »
Man now that is good stuff. I think I might learn that on the guitar  :icon_sunny:

8
Doomsteading / Re: You've Been Splitting Kindling with a Hatchet Wrong!
« on: February 22, 2021, 05:13:27 AM »
Wow now that is some 'country' country, not the pop stuff I'm used to. Thank you for sharing that!

9
Doomsteading / Re: You've Been Splitting Kindling with a Hatchet Wrong!
« on: February 21, 2021, 05:28:36 PM »
Ahh now that is interesting. I will try that next fire. The only thing I think is that you need a sharp hatchet or axe to do that. Which I mean you also want for regular splitting, but that way especially I think. Definitely gonna try that the next fire we have!

Right on! :) Your right about needing a sharp blade. In the California Conservation Corp we used medium grooved metal files, placing the axe/hatchet between our knees and filing down and at an angle  ( about 30 degrees ) and about 3/8 of inch deep. When the blade can cut paper it is probably a little too sharp. , but getting it close to that is safe ( most of the time ). Always wear gloves because your trailing hand will come close to the blade if not careful. I learned the hard way when I was 20 and feisty and sometimes I took short cuts ( no gloves ). Nothing serious like stitches...but all cuts are a hassle. Choosing wood with the straightest grain is real important and wood varies in density making some kinds easier to split. My favorite is Walnut, then Ash, then Oak.

If you have an electric mounted grinder, like we have here, I use the rougher stone first, and finish it with the smoother stone.

Also you do not need a $50 dollar hatchet like the one in the video. I have used the same wood handle hatchet for 20 years, cost about $15. Now, you have to pay about $20.

There is a good website that talks all about the different kinds of tinder to start a fire, and methods to light it.

http://www.practicalsurvivor.com/tinder

I got curious about the price differences so I looked for hatchets at Tractor Supply Co. They range fro $10 to $64



$11.99

Gloves are a good idea that I haven't used with hatchet or axe or maul sharpening yet. I will wear them next time around for sure.

And ah yes the grain would make a big difference, curvy knotty stuff is a lot more difficult to split from the top or the way he showed.

I've heard that wood handles are good because they give you feedback that you don't get from a composite or plastic handle. Just what I've heard, I haven't split wood with a wood handled axe yet so I can't attest to it or not. I'm sure the feedback matters more when you're doing big swings with an axe or maul versus little taps with a hatchet. Either way sounds like the wood ones aren't super expensive so that's good.

10
Doomsteading / Re: You've Been Splitting Kindling with a Hatchet Wrong!
« on: February 21, 2021, 05:10:34 AM »
Ahh now that is interesting. I will try that next fire. The only thing I think is that you need a sharp hatchet or axe to do that. Which I mean you also want for regular splitting, but that way especially I think. Definitely gonna try that the next fire we have!

11
The Kitchen Sink / Re: What's the new guy up to?
« on: February 20, 2021, 07:01:48 PM »
Leaf springs off of a truck might be a good choice cam. They are decent steel usually. Do you have a picture of what it's supposed to look like?

Just gave those a quick google and that just might work. Just gotta see if the scrapyard is still open or not and I can have a look around there. And yes the original model is made of cast iron and is much rounder than mine will be. I put a pic below. I'm also gonna be adding metal feet with holes so it can be bolted to a big round of wood so it's much more stable.

I'm not familiar with these, but a spade that has a broken handle seems like it could fit the bill. Quite hard and sharp, but u probably want a thicker wedge shape. Welds look neat

I wasn't either until I found it on permies. To me it seems like a far easier and safer way to split wood into smaller kindling pieces. Just had a fire tonight and holding the log in your hand while tapping the axe or hatchet on in it is asking for a cut, especially with my luck. I love the idea of resting the log on the blade and tapping it with a hammer or another piece of wood. And yeah the challenging part is finding something that is hard enough to hold an edge but has a shape that can at least be ground down to a blade.

Now that I think of it, the blade may not need to be as hard as an axe or maul head. My reasoning here is that the blade itself is not being swung, so it is much less likely to be hitting rocks or dirt. Maybe the mild steel will still work. This is the first iteration so if it isn't perfect I will survive. Also I put a pic of what I have currently to make the splitting blade. Took one end off already and am going to take the other one soon.

12
So I am making a kindling cracker. So far I have just the top square. The frame is all rebar. Haven't measured but I'm guessing it's 3/4" stuff. Just want to show off my welding. First cleaned up the ends after cutting with a flap disc. Then stuck them together with 1/8" 6011. Very easy rod to start and offers good penetration but the bead doesn't look pretty, at least not when I do it. I capped it off with a 3/32" 7018 rod. In my experience it's a little pickier...harder to start but when you do get it going it makes a beautiful bead. The longest part of this project by far is going to be grinding out the blade. When I searched around the scrapyard weeks or months ago all I could find was a rectangular chunk of mild steel. Oh well I will persevere!

If any of you have ideas to find hardened steel that could be a splitting blade or made into one let me know. Also I put up a pic of my drawing of the cracker. The only thing I won't be doing is putting the blade across like that, the bar I have isn't long enough. It will be attached to bars in between the others, either bolted or welded on I haven't decided yet. Bolted is potentially not as strong, but welded makes it challenging to sharpen the blade inside the cage. Hmmm....

13
Oh I can guarantee I'll enjoy it! And I didn't know you were a frenchie, c'est intéressant mon ami  :exp-grin:

14
Just wanted to update for all you skeptics out there. There is no paywall and as far as I know Michael is still not charging for anything he makes. Maybe eventually, but he comes across to me as someone who actually just wants to help out. Him and his wife remind me of my grandparents, if my grandparents were doomers. Very well off, but instead of travelling around the world they are spreading the word about doom. To each their own I guess.

I still hold out that you guys may be right and he'll eventually charge for stuff, but a year in I see no prices in sight!
good to know. I've been busy building so no time for doom. You reach a point where you know it's coming you've made peace with it, plans for it, and you just have to start running your game plan. It is a good site of much higher quality then most between that and permies you are in good hands.

That's a good place to be NF. I'm in the phase of learning as much as I can about adapting. I'm re-reading C5's writing. Also this summer I'm headed to a permaculture homestead here in Ontario to help out and learn as much as possible. I'm pumped to be immersed in it all. Keep on posting your house progress pics it's cool to see!
sounds awesome cam. Where abouts in ontario? My two cents us wisdom is use it as a learning opportunity but watch out you dont end up spending all your energy building someone else's dream at the expense of your own. I only say that because it is a real risk in the volunteer world. I know from personal experience.

Little bit further south in the Ottawa valley, small little township. The lady running it has been there for 22 years so I think she has done just about all the basic stuff she wanted to achieve. I think she's at the stage now where she wants to pass on her knowledge and experience and I am happy to soak it up. Thank you for the advice. I can see where it applies with regard to younger folks having people help them out on much less established homesteads. 

15
Just wanted to update for all you skeptics out there. There is no paywall and as far as I know Michael is still not charging for anything he makes. Maybe eventually, but he comes across to me as someone who actually just wants to help out. Him and his wife remind me of my grandparents, if my grandparents were doomers. Very well off, but instead of travelling around the world they are spreading the word about doom. To each their own I guess.

I still hold out that you guys may be right and he'll eventually charge for stuff, but a year in I see no prices in sight!
good to know. I've been busy building so no time for doom. You reach a point where you know it's coming you've made peace with it, plans for it, and you just have to start running your game plan. It is a good site of much higher quality then most between that and permies you are in good hands.

That's a good place to be NF. I'm in the phase of learning as much as I can about adapting. I'm re-reading C5's writing. Also this summer I'm headed to a permaculture homestead here in Ontario to help out and learn as much as possible. I'm pumped to be immersed in it all. Keep on posting your house progress pics it's cool to see!

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